35 Burst results for "Audubon"

Who Are the Taliban's Leaders and Its Rank-and-File?

The World: Latest Edition

02:05 min | Last month

Who Are the Taliban's Leaders and Its Rank-and-File?

"The taliban took back control of afghanistan. There's been a lot of waiting wondering and worrying about how they will rule the country but we wanted to go bit more granular and ask who makes up the taliban today. It's not a simple question and we don't expect a simple answer. I'm lead hucker is going to take a stab at it. He's the editor of the afghan. I an independent media outlet and he's based in london. I'm eddie first. Question is about the person who's been named the head of the taliban led afghan government will abdelghani. Dr who is he well. He is from southern upon istana and he essentially cut his teeth in the outgun political battlefield during the soviet invasion and occupation he partook in was called the soviet jihad and obviously after the withdrawal of the soviet forces and the collapse of the puppet communist government we saw a surge in infighting amongst the mujahedeen and in one thousand nine hundred four essentially. What were a group of virginia dean. Commanders leaders and southern onto stone got together and formed a political organization called the taliban and now the taliban means literally students and as a social educational network existed for centuries in the south of the country from which malabo that is from. But this was the first time they became a political organization so malabo brought is essentially for all intents and purposes a co founder of. That's audubon a veteran. I wanna move to the rank and file members of the taliban who are they in terms of background education. Where they're from the rank and file it's difficult to sort of characterize them as a monolith however the way in which we could essentially characterize them as generally rural religiously educated so they are literally can read and they can write and generally very young. So almost you know. In that mid-twenties most of them don't remember the toddler bonds previous government in late nineteen ninety s rather their only real remembered experiences of living off the two thousand guantanamo

Taliban Hucker Afghan Government Abdelghani Istana Malabo Afghanistan Eddie DR London Virginia Guantanamo
Is Biden Delivering on His Climate Promises?

The Ten News

01:28 min | 7 months ago

Is Biden Delivering on His Climate Promises?

"His twenty twenty campaign. President biden promised move fast on environmental protections. Now that he's been in office for a few months. How's he doing on that promise. I want to hear everything well. So far his administration is added eighteen new regulations and overturned twenty policies that environmental groups like the audubon society and the natural resources. Defense council opposed now toll. Cain they've stopped a coppermine from operating in arizona. After local native american tribes argued it could endanger sacred sites and sensitive habitats administration. Also pump the brakes on a decision to slash three million acres of northern spotted owl habitat. At least for now maybe the biggest decision. So far was ending the permit to finish the keystone excel pipeline. Which was supposed to carry crude oil from alberta canada all the way to the southern states in the gulf coast. Why is that a big deal. Well environmentalists were against the pipeline from the beginning over safety concerns and the increased greenhouse gases that the pipeline would release into the atmosphere. It also threatens the water supply and lands of the rosebud sioux tribe and other native peoples. Is there more work to do abso lutely. But everything's gotta start somewhere right

President Biden Audubon Society Defense Council Cain Arizona Gulf Coast Alberta Canada
Interview with Johnny Ball - Forget Me Knot Charity

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

06:55 min | 7 months ago

Interview with Johnny Ball - Forget Me Knot Charity

"So. I read on your website that the alzheimer's society which is pretty much the mirror. Image of the alzheimer's association here in the states found that ninety percent caregivers experienced feelings of stress and anxiety weekly more like daily probably at least sixty percent of them struggle to talk about the impact of caregiving on their lives because of feelings of guilt. It's like. I can't complain about what. I'm going through because my loved. One has a tea or alzheimer's or whatever and so how can caregivers balance their needs and the needs of their loved. Ones in your opinion like know have we. Have you thought that one through as you launch charity. I think the as mansell. How things i i think the fittest into that. It's okay to feel the way you feel. I think a lot of as you just explained guilt and extreme sense of duty and which means the facebook does because the caring for fest often before themselves. That i think is important for the mental health of the unification which ben immediately impacts the wellbeing of the patient. They need to care for themselves as well. A member. the average duty of air to themselves as much as they have achieved care to the person benefitting asta and i think inaccessible and really letting mass inside. You know that that's true. I'm giving yourself giving his a brain give yourself the option to feel how you feel and to Except that you need to care about yourself. As well is the vista But also will be trying to do is using technology to support give keg. It's and a big audubon is gonna be a mental health technology so for example of mental health apps identity being used recently going to help with distribution bags. A lot of k gives also busy. just hanso. faux would they would is essentially a fulltime job. The have undergone find that you and i knew mental health apps imitation Love people appear gives won't have time to the studies. Things is important. We proactive in exclaiming walls amphion to help whether they are specialist tools. Okay games on. Otherwise i'm helping distribute them so that people off themselves as well as often careful. Yeah like. I've experienced a little bit today. You have the best laid plans for you know you got you to the list for the day and then you get up at breakfast time. Something blows up your morning. Pretty much caregiving goes. You know you think okay. Well i'll take my mom to the doctor or we'll go to the park or whatever and then you know they have a different idea or they're having a bad day and i do think that as my generation in you you must be a must be one of the old millennials. Right tracy four identified makes me millennials. Yeah you're in the middle. So i'm gen-x i'll be when this episode comes out. I'll be fifty four. I got a birthday at a week. I think yes a week. And it's like irrelevant is about this time and one of the things that i have found with a podcast which obviously is technology. Is that a lot of caregivers. They're older and they're just clueless. Even run across people that are about my age. There was a gal my the showed up. She needed a support group like now today and so she showed up his back in the old days. When you could meet in person. She showed up to my support group from twenty miles away from my old hometown. And i said oh. I've got the perfect solution for you. My podcast and i'm china's show her and of course. I have an iphone and android phone. So i was having troubles because i'm not familiar with that. And she has. Oh do those things anyway. And i'm like it would really help you because i talked to lake fantastic people and she just blew me off like whatever i. I don't have time to think about a podcast mike. It's the easiest way to get advice and information so i'm hoping as we you know. Move through my generation your generation that it won't be sent a challenge to use technology to support our caregiving needs and is your focus with the charity mostly on mental health apps no not specifically but focuses on technology. I saw the empty We can distribute technology broadly cheaply and it also is ideas. My day job. This is my specialty network can understand how whips we can for. Relatively low costs distributed. Old bills will put k gives in touch with the right technology. That's going to help them. So the impact probably won't be as great as for example to support group but the impact can be brewed. Sir podcast princeton's what you mappin fantastic you all of this information or these impact trees from his love of people. Don't know about the concept you're describing. I think we push push the different types of boulder available essentially build towns. You just saw people. I should have a fax. You know how did you decide. Well tell me about okay. Well we've talked kind. Roundabout it into the forget me not charity. Tell me tell me about what you're doing to raise awareness and hopefully raise money to get all this fantastic stuff happening so. The game plan is actually road from portugal and europe and contents of europe to french guiana. Which is in sacramento. So we're gonna grow across the atlantic ocean. Agony essentially almost three thousand eight hundred miles and be three of us in the boats. We will beat a fist people. Whoever this particular passage we hope to break the record for being the fastest revenue which should be a fifty days so the pippa says two of the raised fist. Nine of capital will not to be phones onto defense Yes that's the game

Alzheimer's Society Alzheimer's Association Alzheimer's Mansell BEN Facebook Tracy Sir Podcast Princeton Mappin China Boulder Europe Guiana Portugal Atlantic Ocean Sacramento
Is The Sperm Race A Fairy Tale?

Short Wave

07:46 min | 8 months ago

Is The Sperm Race A Fairy Tale?

"Tell me a little bit about what you learned way back when about how conception works well. They showed us this video that described conception as a kind of obstacle course where the sperm little tadpole looking things and when they enter the vagina during this hostile environment. And they've done fight their way through all these obstacles and make it to the egg and the sperm. That reaches the egg wins. Kind of how it was told. Yeah that's pretty standard. It's similar to what i was taught to. And i spoke to lisa campbell angle stein. She's a reproductive bioethicist and she pointed out that we use really gendered language to describe this biology. She calls it a fertilization tale. So the sperm is this shining knight. Who's there to save the aig damsel in distress. And the sperm has all the agency the sperm is on a mission the sperm is fighting off other sperm to be the one to conquer the egg. Where's the egg is just sort of passively floating around waiting for the night and doesn't do anything itself. How does exactly what they told us. Yeah and lisa examined tons of textbooks at all levels from middle school to medical school for this kind of bias and she found some pretty wild stuff. For example sperm had this little hat like structure called the acronym textbooks described it as a motorcycle. Mean they could have called. It did horseback riding home at a ski how they could call the any type of helmets motorcycle helmet rights and that conjures up images of masculinity islanders. Tough guy weathers well clearly once again. The patriarchy finds a way but in this case. Isn't the story. exactly what happens. Biologically how it all goes down. Actually not at all. Oh no right. I am ready to go back to school. I want this post talk. Talk ariella let's do it. Only while buckle up today on the show go back to school to revisit the sperm race narrative and look at the ways that the edge and the reproductive tract plan active role in this process. I'm ariella zabidi. And i'm emily kwong. You are listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from npr. Alright classes in session. We're going back to school shortwave. School the best kind of school yes to learn about conception yeah and just to be clear. Today we're talking about this process as it plays out internally but a lot of folks conceived through the reproductive technologies like ibf. Yeah which are very cool. Okay just to recap. When i was taught conception in school it was basically described as a survivor style. Sperm race but ariella. You're telling me that this is a lie. yes yes. There are a few really big problems with this narrative when sperm i arrive in the vagina. They can't really race. I talked to jimmy heison. She's a biology professor at smith college. They don't have enough energy to make it to the side of conception. They don't have enough directional but isn't that what the cute little tales or for like don't the sperm use them to swim yet. Details do give sperm some swimming ability. But that's not a complete picture. The sperm are getting there faster than they could all on their own. And we've seen in rats and other mammals that even dead sperm can reach the lopion tubes so it seems like sperm. Don't rely that much on their own mobility. So are they getting their. The reproductive tract is bringing them along. Oh that is amazing. Okay how is the reproductive tract. Doing that so i talked to kristen hook. She's an evolutionary biologist. And she told me it's doing this tons of ways by changing the thickness of the reproductive tract fluid. Just like if we were swimming in a swimming pool with water versus a swimming pool of honey. You're gonna move differently in these different fluids or with contractions summer to contractions in your stomach after you've had a big meal or whatnot to move your food through your intestines so it's like the sperm are on one of those moving sidewalks y-yeah they're being transported along eventually reaching the philippian tubes. Okay and what happens after that. So the sperm. Start to move their tails more intensely. Which makes those pretty useless movements. We talked about earlier. More powerful research just that fluids in the reproductive tract kind of give the spur more energy. Think of it like taking a bath in coffee one. That's dreamy to the idea that the reproductive tract literally gives the sperm. Their strike is giving me strength right now. That is fantastic. I know emily. The official name for this process is hyper activation. Though that's riveting and there's even more the reproductive tract also has to prepare the sperm for one. It eventually meets the egg right now. The sperm is a little overdressed for the occasion. It's got a layer of stuff on that prevents it from binding the egg and molecules in the reproductive tract helps strip off layer so that the sperm is ready to bind. Ooh la la naked sperm. Okay and emily remember the sperm. Don't have is they have no idea where the heck they're going so the egg provides them with a gps it releases these super attractive chemicals that show the sperm where to go. Oh so it's like leaving breadcrumbs for them to follow. Yeah and you have to realize that philippian tubes aren't this straightforward path. It's really complex and winding there. There are tons of little crevices so without those crumbs. The sperm probably wouldn't know where to go. We were taught to think of it as a racetrack. Right but kristen. We know better now if you wanna go with a racetrack idea at least recognized that it's a dynamic race track so it's not like the german audubon. It's more like You know like more like a rainbow road where you have twists and turns and places to fall off and there are checkpoints that you get ask for your license registration and proof of insurance. I'm sorry proof of insurance. What does that mean honestly. That's not too far off from reality. And this brings me to may be the coolest part of all of this. Remember that hostile environment you described earlier. Yeah but you know. I was brainwashed back then in health class and i and i regret saying that because it sounds like the reproductive tract is actually far more helpful than hostile here. You totally but it is true that there are tons of obstacles along the way that seemed to be counterproductive. Like at one point these big immune cells surround the sperm and literally. Eat them. No that's terrifying. Yeah you don't want to be the sperm in that face off so it makes sense that you and me and teachers everywhere described this as a hostile environment but now starting to realize that these obstacles the actually have a purpose. It works to separate sperm. That are dysfunctional. From those that are functional works to separate debris that enters into the reproductive track with quotas and it separates the wheat from the chaff. Shall we say and then it takes what it needs or wants to the site of

Lisa Campbell Angle Stein Ariella Ariella Zabidi Emily Kwong Swimming Jimmy Heison Kristen Hook AIG Smith College Middle School NPR Lisa Emily Kristen
Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

Democracy Now! Audio

06:37 min | 8 months ago

Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

"The. Fbi and new york. Police departments are facing new calls to finally open their records related to the assassination of malcolm x. Shocked at fifty six years ago at the audubon ballroom and harlem february twenty first nineteen sixty five. This comes after the release of a deathbed confession of a former undercover new york police officer who admitted to being part of a broad new york police and fbi conspiracy targeting malcolm in the confession the former officer. Raymond would who died last year admitted he entrapped to members of malcolm security team and another crime. A plot to blow up the statue of liberty just days before the assassination. On saturday ray woods cousin. Reggie would read the letter at a news conference at the shabazz center in harlem assignment to draw the two men into a felonious federal crime so that they could be arrested by the fbi and kept away from managing malcolm. X's audubon ballroom door security on february twenty first nineteen sixty five in his letter. Raymond would also revealed. He was inside the audubon ballroom. At the time of malcolm's assassination at least one other undercover new york police officer. Gene roberts was also inside after infiltrating the security team of the organization of afro american unity. The group malcolm founded after leaving the nation of islam. Both officers would and roberts were part of the bureau of special services and investigations or bossie. A secret of political intelligence unit of the nypd nicknamed the red squat welcomes assassination. Police arrested three members of the nation of islam. His murder but questions about the guilt of the men have lingered for decades in his letter. Raymond would openly says one of the men. Thomas johnson was innocent and was arrested to quote. Protect my cover and the secrets of the fbi and the nypd unquote ray woods letter. Echoes claims and recent books by manning marable and less pain that some of malcolm's actual assassins were never charged in a moment. We'll be joined by raymond. Woods cousin reggie would released his deathbed confession. But i i want to turn to the words of malcolm x. Himself speaking after his home in queens was firebomb just a week before his assassination february fourteenth. Nine thousand nine hundred sixty five by house was bombed. It was bound by the muslim movement. On the orders of aligned to mohammed. Now they hit come around so they had planned to do it from the front. End the back so that i couldn't get out. They had they. They covered the complete the door then they had come to the back but instead of getting directly in back of the house in this way they stood at a forty five degree angle and talk with the windows so it it glance and onto the ground and the fire hit the window woke up my second oldest baby and then the fire burn on the outside of the house but it had had that one going through that window it would have fallen on a six year old girl a four year old girl and a two year old girl. And i'm gonna tell you if it had done it. Taken my wrangling going to anybody insight. I would not wait. Goes in the senate because this the police know the criminal operation of the black muslim movement because they have thoroughly infiltrated because they have thoroughly infiltrated it. Those are the words of malcolm x. Right before his assassination right after his home was firebombed in february of nineteen sixty five just days later he was shot seconds after he took the stage at the ballroom. We're joined now by reggie. Would the cousin of raymond would author of the new book. The ray which story confessions of a black nypd cop in the assassination of malcolm x. Still with us. Civil rights attorney. Ben crump who attended that news conference with Reggie wooden at the audubon ballroom now. The shabazz center where malcolm x was assassinated fifty six years ago. Reggie thank you so much for joining us. Use read parts of the letter this weekend. Talk about your cousin. Ray would and what you understand happened the conspiracy. He alleges that he was a part of by the fbi. And the new york police department to assassinate malcolm x. Morning thank you for having me ray was was a complicated man I think be based on his past experiences he he lived with a lot of fear and caution on a daily basis which instilled in me over the past ten years but are ray was a person that lived as a lived. He lived as a as a very quiet and reserved person because of what he experienced he witnessed some horrible things firsthand and also realized that he was a part of it after the fact and so therefore ray was told by his handlers. That not to repeat anything that he had seen or heard or he would Join malcolm therefore for forty six years. Ray separated himself from the family and In fear that he will put us in danger out rey lived alone many years and he Finally in his final years when he realized that he was his cancer was a reoccurring. He wanted to reconnect with family. Because he didn't want to die alone. So i volunteered to move them to florida so that my wife and i take care of them and get them back and forth cancer treatments things of that nature and therefore he trusted me enough to reveal this information and asked me not to say anything until he passed away but at the same time knox allow them to take it to his grave.

Malcolm Ray Woods FBI Audubon Ballroom Raymond New York New York Police Department Shabazz Center Gene Roberts Organization Of Afro American Bureau Of Special Services And Bossie Malcolm X Manning Marable Woods Cousin Reggie Reggie Thomas Johnson Harlem
Malcolm X's Family Says Letter Implicates FBI and NYPD in His Death

Democracy Now! Audio

01:16 min | 8 months ago

Malcolm X's Family Says Letter Implicates FBI and NYPD in His Death

"And the family of civil rights icon malcolm xs demanding. Authorities reopened an investigation into his assassination. After new evidence was unveiled a letter by a former police officer raymond would who did not want to the letter to be made public until after his death wrote. He was manipulated by new york police in the fbi who covered up key details of the plot to kill malcolm x. Would said he was tasked with arresting members of malcolm x's security team. This is raymond with cousin. Reggie would reading the letter at a news conference saturday a day before the anniversary of malcolm x's assassination in one thousand nine hundred sixty five. It was my assignment to draw the two men into a felonious. Federal crime so that they could be arrested by the fbi and kept away from managing malcolm. X's audubon ballroom door security on february twenty first one hundred sixty five on february sixteenth. Nineteen sixty five. The statue of liberty plot was carried out and the two men were arrested just days before the assassination of malcolm. That's reggie would reading. The words of his uncle. Raymond

Malcolm Xs Raymond Malcolm X Malcolm FBI Reggie New York
Eastern black rail imperiled by habitat loss, sea-level rise

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 9 months ago

Eastern black rail imperiled by habitat loss, sea-level rise

"Many birders visit wetlands hoping to see an eastern black rail. a sparrow. sized blackbird with white spots and red is but johnson of audubon. Louisiana says this tiny bird has a big reputation for secrecy. Very few murders actually are lucky enough to have ever seen a black rail and now there are fewer to find over the last two decades. Their populations have plummeted to only about three thousand birds because of habitat loss in inland areas and sea level rise the eastern black rails that live along the coast prefer a narrow band of shoreline where the land transitions from soggy. Too dry too. Many storm surge events during the nesting season and just the general encroachment of sea level rise narrows that banned in such a way where it becomes less and less suitable to the black l. This species was recently listed as threatened under the endangered species. Act johnson says the listing highlights the need to reduce carbon pollution in order to slow sea level rise because the black rail is such a mythical and beloved species. It has a real potential for helping sound this alarm and bringing more attention to those

Audubon Johnson Louisiana
Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

PODSHIP EARTH

09:33 min | 9 months ago

Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

"Berta. Volt from more than one. Hundred and fifty million years ago and then explosively diversified culminating in more than ten thousand species distributed worldwide. Today are human. Relationship to beds is complex to seen as spirit messengers of the gods and at the same time. We took the wild red jungle fowl. From india and selectively bred into domesticated chickens the now farmed in cages feathers have been used for thousands of years and indigenous headpieces and at the same time but has like parrots and parakeets a kept as pets bird poop called guana was used as the first fertilize of modern agriculture. And charles darwin study of galapagos finches was to the formulation of evolution. Buds are all around us. We are closer to bed than any other wild animals birds. I literally and figuratively are canaries in the coal mine. Their wellbeing is our wellbeing threats to buds range from habitat loss including logging climate change industrial farming with pesticides invasive species and even cats. These will had a devastating impact on the bird populations of the us and canada. Which in just the last fifty years have declined by. Three billion birds danton insane. Thirty percent of all birds gone. Three billion pez of wings have vanished ever across our continent from sea to shining sea. Luckily birds have strong allies in their corner. There an estimated sixty million active bird watches in the us alone and with the pandemic shutting down so much of our country. We have flocking to bird watching like never before everything from bird feeders. To binoculars have been in short supply and this year the birding app e bird collected more sightings in a single day the was admitted during the first two and a half years of the apps existence. I must admit coming late to the bird-watching pardee. But thanks to dr meredith williams. That's about to change. I'm lucky enough to work with meredith every day in her role. Running one of the most important and complex agencies in california governor. The department of toxic substance control. Dr williams received two undergraduate degree from yale and a doctorate in physics from north carolina. State university meredith then worked and silicon valley fortune. Five hundred companies in the technology consumer product and chemical sectors meredith left the private sector to follow her passion for wetlands and birds and led the san francisco estuary institute as we'll hear. Meredith journey is about so much more than her resume. Meredith nine meet apt get ready for my maiden watching invention merit so we're about to go hopefully bed watching what. What do we need to bring with us while like what. What's what's in the bird watching backpack almost nothing. Which is great binoculars. Of course are your starting point. So i hope you have some inaugurals. I know you were looking for some recently. You gave me some good advice. But i get any but we all kind of professional but what just like you would have an extra pair. Do thought so. It's in the office but we could stop on the way out of town. Not of that sound. No we should. We should yeah. You just kind of out now. Okay okay so you got the binoculars. How do you if you're starting out. It's surprising how good have gotten very affordable these days so i mean it's still a lot to invest but ask a bird watcher. They might have an extra pair. That's the first place you might wanna try like them. What do you well. first of. All there are lots of different kinds of birdwatchers in terms of some people. Want to count every burden get really long list. And they track every single birthday they see. It's about the numbers of the that very unique bird and they chase vagrant birds that fly in unusually and they're rushing off to see that bird so there those kind of bird watchers I'm a bird watcher. Just watch one bird for a long time. I liked bird behavior. just i'm just fascinated by them. And i think they're beautiful so i could just end up watching one bird for for quite a while you can just take it. In at whatever level you want in terms of the variety birds that you could see and how you would just experience them and enjoy them. So and i think the only way to find that out is to bert. Watch a little and see what grabs you What you do sounds really peaceful. The first thing that sounds the first thing sounds more. Like in england as a whole breed of people go train spotters and i always kind of identified them with bird watchers. Like it's really about. How many things. You've you've been able to capture and less about the bird the thing that you'll doing just sounds like being a peaceful will watching another animal even the people who are energized. That way unless they're doing a big day which would be a day when they map it out to see as many birds as they can. In a single day they're not necessarily rushing around even they are going to have moments of really enjoying a bird and even somebody like me chased around golden gate park looking for a rare warbler. That's very rarely in san francisco. There's an amiability amongst birdwatchers is really camaraderie. People are so nice. There's always somebody better in terms of being a better bird watcher. Meaning they either can identify birds better or you know they just have a lot of experience for the a little bit about. The ecology and people are so happy to share their information. That it's really wonderful. That's one of the things i like about it. And it tends to be every now and then you get into group and there'll be somebody who's a little loud but by and large the the folks are really kind of it's easy to get in a groove with with birdwatchers and settled and gopher along stroll and see some great birds. But what's there everywhere that it's a it's a big i mean like it huge movement and it's growing apparently it's one of the fastest growing outdoor activities. There is it's it is just kind of crazy places where i been going for ten years and cues to be just me and five or six friends maybe and now parking lot and i think the pandemic has made it even more so where a lot of people. That's how they wanna get outdoors or they've they've just kind of discovering it because they know it is one of the only ways to be outdoors so i think it's going to continue to grow which i think is great because then more people are connected to the natural world which obviously makes them care about it more. How did you get into meredith like what. What was your journey into bed watching. I mean i liked birds always in the yard growing up in ohio. You know the robbins and the blue jays. There was a hill in town. And i used to ride my bike up in the hill early in the morning and i would always see birdwatchers and i said when i'm old air quotes. I'm going to bird watch. And i kind of that seed was planted but i didn't really bird-watching until my three say in my thirties. I started volunteering for the san francisco. Bay national wildlife refuges. That you know are on the perimeter of the bay. You know them well getting restored a lot of them Back to title harsh. And i when i volunteered i would be doing everything from pulling out. Invasive plants to building shells but there are always birds around and i just became more and more and more fascinated with the birds invested in binoculars and just started creeping in. You join the audubon society and suddenly you're getting news about different outings and the next thing you know you're you're pretty far in foreign now. I'm foreign. I'm not pretty far and have taken a couple bird vacations. Which i think says that. I'm pretty far in. But what do those entail. The longest trip i took was to go to brazil to the pantanal. Which is a very large wetland like the mecca of bud watching their many mecca. It is a mecca over the course of two weeks. We just went out every morning. We get up before sunrise. Be moving by six o'clock at the latest. Usually more like five thirty and we went to a place that's called the parrot crater a giant sinkhole. And it's all a lot of parents live down in the sinkhole. And so you look down. A new parrots lying around in a simple it was tremendous and we ended up seen two hundred different species of birds there along with some giant giant eaters river otter is and it was quite a trip but the birds were spectacular.

Guana Meredith Dr Meredith Williams Department Of Toxic Substance Dr Williams San Francisco Estuary Institut Meredith Journey Berta Danton Charles Darwin Pardee United States India State University North Carolina Canada Bert Golden Gate Park
Interview With Matthew McConaughey

Good Life Project

05:46 min | 11 months ago

Interview With Matthew McConaughey

"Hanging out there. I'm a lifelong new yorker Hanging out in crested butte colorado. Right now and On monday night there was barely any moon in this guy. Nine thousand feet so there's no clouds and there's a meteor shower and it was on the news so i went outside so midnight. I'm standing out in the middle of nowhere. Like ink black skies that stores are just dripping into the ground and they're shooting stars kenley going across and i've got you in my right ear half reaching half telling stories and just thinking to myself. This is an interesting moment. My go-to places always been nature. It's where i stone and it seems like for you. There's somethin' can magical about the combination of nature in solitude. Also yeah. I like that term issues. It's where i touch stone. You said i like that. I'll steal that but a footnote you Yeah for me on just on always can measure. I'm sam in la. I'm in new york. And i'm working. I'm hammered thanks On the day to day gallaudet responsibilities. I'm good at doing that. But all of a sudden when i find is go i'll get ahead of time meaning arab six o'clock yet it's four. Twenty two off cheeks will slow down. So if i go click off check out to have my time in nature or be outside. Get back with the rhythm. That's my vertically stacked responsibilities income comeback guys it was fuel embassy to about three fifteen and i look at the mark o'clock. Don't wear a watch the phone as three seven t there we go okay like a minute or two behind actually my favorite spot just a hair like that like that like a great drummer Like the like. The drummer was on that That that was a these things drivers just on the back side of of the to not not on the front side of the wave just on the back side of the way and then i find that things. All that vertically stacked responsibilities that i'm feeling like accomplishes accomplished knock this down. And i you know start to run on reserve that lays down and becomes lateral in front of me and i can see it all sudden instead of the proverbial weight on the shoulders of that large stack. There's no late on the show because now it's loud in front of me. I can see wanted time. Gotta hop from lily badly. Get just as much or more with a lot less stress after and that's what nature gives me that clock. I think for me yes. No i love that man that really resonates also been thinking. Interestingly we're in this moment in time where the rate of not just speed but acceleration of everything boom boom boom boom boom. It feels like the way that most people are trying to quote keep up with that keep their head above water. Hold on for dear. Life is to accommodate by trying to develop the skill of moving faster right. And it's interesting because for me. What i've been really thinking about lately and kinda see is similar to what you just described is will maybe the better way to handle. This is actually light to cultivate the practices that allow you to slow down time and discern what really matters rather than trying to take it all in and keep up with everything you will the bandwidth we definitely. We would definitely some universally agreed on governor or sifter or or a drain to sift out a lot of needless frequencies or the did the non-constructive frequencies to make room for clear channel for the stuff that matters. That's dog onshore in may be that by process of elimination by process would make room for the things that that that really do matter. That are successful that you can you know have make a living with as well but also Feed us may make room for that those bandwidths to to be de bruyne lighter and have more of an auto bahn you know in their transference To and from us and when they get us even more of an audubon from art nugget to our heart you know that's another audubon frequency. I mean there's just a much sifted through. I think matters what doesn't end what's that governor for society enforces individuals. His oh this actually matched. And i sometimes think that society has gotten to point now where they actually see most of news frequencies that they all that sorta like. I'm taking it too seriously. Maybe like come on man. You don't need to believe that now. They're kind kinda feel excited behind the rag on lincoln to we know it's all soft porn. We gotta get it. We know it's all tmz. I mean this whole even even gleaning big about that with politics. It's up and go. Is everyone kind of get. Get the g. And is that a good thing that things that we had reverence for courtrooms that were never. We were never allowed in political leadership positions. That were by over there in that place on top of that hill that now we like. Oh that we've been in. There would be

Kenley Colorado SAM LA New York Lincoln
Ready to Secure Your Financial Future?

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

04:36 min | 1 year ago

Ready to Secure Your Financial Future?

"This article from Rosemary as I said, a VIP Audubon New York the tide love it is most Americans didn't tamper with their retirement savings even in the pandemic according to a study. Now, this is from Yahoo money. And this is encouraging. I think now this is coming from I see I. This is an Investment Company Institute and they are they represent regulated funds like mutual funds and ETF's electronic transfer funds, things of that nature but according to ICI only two percent, a 401k or other defined contribution plan participants stop contributing to their retirement in the first half of twenty twenty. Now as we all know it was around February marks arch really when the pandemic began to hit and things begin to shut down and shelter in place orders and things were placed around the country in different areas But here's the thing only two percent at that time. If we glanced back to the great recession, which happened in oh seven through nine, the there were four point nine, almost five percent of participants stop contributing to their retirement. Now the reality is this anybody that is saving for retirement is a long term thinker and planner, which means we know that regardless of what's going on in the world, the stock market is like that rollercoaster. You remember me talking about this retire inspired and I've talked about it. A lot of times on the show things are going to go up they're going to go down they're gonNA get Topsy Turvy. The bottom line is as because I invest long term I, don't really get too. Caught up in the short term situation, I keep my view on the thing out in front, and so it's important that that we have this mindset. Now, there were people that were impacted by the pandemic laid off furloughed or hours cut back In that case, a Lotta people did have to pause right because that's what you had to do. You had to go into conserve mode that's where you're onto things and looking at things a little bit different but look at this. Only. Fifteen of four one K. activity obviously was down in the second quarter but only fifteen point, six percent of the participants reported an outstanding loan that meant there were lower and fewer 401k loans which obviously make me happy. These loans are dangerous because if you lose or leave the job and have a one loan, that loan can be due and payable within sixty to ninety days. Well, let's think about this. You lose leave a job. What are you not have money? So the last thing you need is a loan coming due in the midst of trying to find another job. So 401k loans just complicates situations it makes life more stressful. Don't do it you know so the bottom line is this. I I liked this the the study. This these are promising numbers, Rosemary but the reality is as this we've got to make sure that we keep our guard up. We stay very focused and intentional, and if again you've gotta go into conservative mode, it's okay to pause but I wanna hit on something else if you end up having an emergency in the midst of this and you use your emergency fund. I want, did you hear me? You have to pause investing? You have to Paul Saving for college you've got to go back to baby step number three and begin to build up that fully-funded emergency fund. Now hold on because some of you are going. Okay. You went from basic math that like geometry Hogan, what do you? What do you? What are you talking about the Stub? The baby steps the foundational thing. Of all that we teach, which means baby step one, two, thousand dollars, you WanNa, get that thousand dollars in place. So you stop using debt. So if life were to happen a car repair home repair or whatever you, you've got money, you can reach for instead of credit card. Once you get that in place now you're going to attack debt with baby step number two, you're gonNA attack the debt smallest to. largest that's called the debt snowball approach and we're not worried about math. We're GONNA, WE'RE GONNA make payment minimum payments on all the other debts but I'm gonNA throw all extra money up the smallest and once I pay that off move down to the next debt. So smallest to biggest once you have that done now you're going to do what's called the fully-funded emergency fund of three to six months of expenses. Same intensity as you had attack in debt, but you're going to build up this emergency fund. Okay. Once you do that now you're going to begin to do multiple things at the

Rosemary Vip Audubon New York Investment Company Institute ICI Yahoo ETF Paul Saving
'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | 1 year ago

'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

"A recent NPR PBS Newshour poll showed that the top issue for Democratic voters. This election is climate change for Republicans it barely registers, but there is a divide within the GOP on the issue. Other surveys show that younger Republicans are more concerned than their elders by nearly two to one margin. NPR's Jeff Brady reports Benji backers started the American conservation coalition in two thousand seventeen while still in college he says his love of nature comes in part from his family there audubon members, Nature Conservancy members, but they were conservative and. I grew up not thinking that the environment should be political at all yet these days, environmental politics and dominate his life from now until election day backer is driving an electric car across the country talking about his groups climate agenda and posting videos along the way we are in the San National Park about to kick off the electric election road trip. Promoting his groups American climate contract. That's his conservative market focused response to the green new deal. Backer is critical of fellow conservatives who ignore climate change he's praised Swedish. Climate activist gratitude. And says, he wants to work with liberal climate activists to pass legislation. So how will he vote in November? If president trump wants to get my vote, he's going to have to prioritize climate change in the way that he has not done over the past four years. Backer says he's undecided so far he was disappointed climate change wasn't even discussed at the Republican National Convention. The trump campaign says in a statement to NPR that the president has proven, you can have energy independence and a clean healthy environment but the statement doesn't even mention climate change. Young Republicans are light years ahead of their elder counterparts on this issue here O'Brien HEADS YOUNG CONSERVATIVES FOR CARBON DIVIDENDS WHICH SUPPORTS A carbon tax to reduce greenhouse gas emissions grew up in Alaska and says, young people are motivated by mounting evidence that the climate is changing. They're seeing the impacts firsthand whether it's myself in Alaska with Algal blooms that are turning the ocean weird colors or with flooding in the Gulf coast hurricanes that are unprecedented at this point this is the climate generation and people are witnessing these things that we had been told growing up far off in real time that urgency is prompting young conservatives to join others in their generation and pushing for more action on climate change according to Bob English is a former Republican congressman from South Carolina I. Think it's a with their progressive friends. Plan on living on the earth longer than say their parents or grandparents English now directs the Conservative Climate Group Republic E. N. he says among young conservatives addressing climate change is becoming a moral issue more than a political one and that makes him optimistic. The country will eventually take more action. The demographics are definitely going to deliver a win for climate change. I am absolutely certain that we are going to win on climate policy the questions whether we win soon, enough to avoid the worst consequences scientists say the timeline is short. English says the country is more likely to succeed if both sides of the aisle are focused on climate change jeopardy NPR

Backer NPR GOP President Trump Bob English Nature Conservancy Jeff Brady Alaska Republican National Convention San National Park American Conservation Coalitio O'brien South Carolina
Global warming threatens Atlantic puffin recovery in Maine

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Global warming threatens Atlantic puffin recovery in Maine

"Europeans first arrived in. North. America. And landed puffins were common on islands and the Gulf of Maine. But hunters killed many of the birds for food or for feathers to adorn ladies hats by the eighteen hundreds. The population in Maine had plummeted. Puffins were almost completely lost. That's Don Lions of the Audubon Seabird Institute. He says it about fifty years ago. Conservationist started bringing puffing chicks from Canada and hand raising them on the main islands. When those birds reached adulthood, they came back to the islands where they were raised and begin nesting themselves. Now, the puffins colony in Maine has recovered to more than a thousand nesting pairs, but global warming threatens to undo some of that progress. The Gulf of Maine has actually now one of the most rapidly warming water bodies on the planet. That's driving many fish to cooler waters. So the puffiness are forced to fly farther or dive deeper to catch enough food. The most intense warm years during the last decade have made it very difficult for Puffins, stories, chicks, because of the additional work involved in finding food for them. So reducing global warming can help means beloved toughens survive.

Maine Don Lions Audubon Seabird Institute Canada America
"audubon" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"At Audubon with no issues. Oh, and since you've got me here, why not mention this closure this weekend? It's a big one West about 94 close between 2 80 35 w. 10 p.m. Friday. Through right around 4 a.m. On Monday morning. There you go. All right. There you go. Oh, man, You know what super embarrassing Brian Austin Green and, Yeah, there's a lot of stuff, actually what you have, but I'm specifically thinking about Brian, Austin Green and Megan Kelly. Megan is dating machine Gun Kelly and Megan Fox. I'm sorry, Megan Fox. They were married. They have kids. She's posting on Instagram. How hot her new guy is. And then Brian Austin Green goes on and post a picture of the kids and saying, Oh, that forgot exactly. I've gotta look this up because It just feels kind of embarrassing that you're doing this out in front of everyone. They haven't even been together that long. Nor have they been broken up for that. Long. Brian, Austin Green and Megan Fox. It's only been like a month or six weeks or something that they've been apart, right. And then all of a sudden, you know, she's just posting all this stuff. I get it. Look, you're in a new relationship. You want to tell everyone about it? At the same time of thinking. I wonder what? Because they're kids. They're not quite old enough to be on all of this social stuff, but they have to know what's going on. Yeah, I think it's embarrassing import taste and Not using great judgment. People lose their minds when they start getting a new piece of action. Yeah, that's probably what's going on here. Sure, I feel free. Oh, here's what she said. Achingly beautiful boy. My heart is yours. That's what Megan said with her the picture of machine gun Kelly and then Brian Austin Green goes on with their kids and says Achingly beautiful boys. Ah, well, I gotta give it to me. He's got a good sense of humor. I guess, but it's just doesn't she know about the bridge? The bridge. The bridge is like you have the break up of the divorce, and then that very next person is basically just going to be hot sex. You're going to end up with that guy around. You think you love him, But you don't. It's just like you. The door is open to all the possibilities of things that you missed while you were with the other bad person that you weren't supposed to be with But that's not your person. That's your bridge to the next person who could be the person Are you honest with that bridge person? Does the bridge person know that here? She's the bridge? Sometimes Sometimes I tell people to tell him I'm sorry. You're my bridge. So don't fall, not with me because I need to just get this out of my system and then get on to the one who's going to be the one Is there something wrong without no? And some people are like are in all their bridge. Yeah, few bridges, Kenny. Yeah, that was a OK. Yeah, it's all right. All right? Yeah, and everybody's a consenting adults in that situation, so machine gun Kelly's her bridge. Yeah, well, if you ask her right now, she wouldn't say that. Yeah, I don't know that she was the most stable either. She's had a few rows back in those days. Stef, where we didn't have.

Brian Austin Green Megan Fox Gun Kelly Megan Megan Kelly Austin Green Audubon Stef Kenny
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Science Talk

04:16 min | 1 year ago

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Pawtuxet River Naturalist Society Twenty Twen Fred Tuchman African American River Black Folks Audubon Maryland Swami United States Chemo Price Consultant
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Science Talk

04:16 min | 1 year ago

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Pawtuxet River Naturalist Society Twenty Twen Fred Tuchman African American River Black Folks Audubon Maryland Swami United States Chemo Price Consultant
"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Only make one thing the ultimate driving machine Audubon delivers on one thing exceptional customer service white settlement road just north of I. thirty in fort worth okay so the question is where do we go from here in car sales first I need to recognize are still people out there with great concerns about the corona virus and I've said all along just ignore me if this is something that's really driving you nuts and you really want to protect you and your family it also said about three weeks as long as you can keep the American public kicked up to the house and they're going to want to get out and try your dog but this week everybody's back hugging and shaking hands again all the other customers all been come in and put their hands up in the slick there they've had enough and not pay any attention those orders right now the public was actually out in front of the elected officials and for those people who are elected officials they may have actually handled this perfectly they're not in front of the public marching to rejoin an economy there are three rows back going yeah I'm behind you but but that's how Roosevelt got so much done during the Great Depression he said the public don't do anything until the public act absolutely demands it then do it for them if you're doing it saying you're gonna love this it's stupid when they demanded then you do it I thank wow he makes things happen well you know you just kind of smile on out there in East Texas I mean you've already got that social distancing going don't you we did we please we enjoy the time away now out of the big city no doubt uhhuh yeah that that two people per square mile yeah it's like okay so you have to stay at home so I have to stay home and fish that's really bad but you social distance from officially social distance from the fish yes so the question is what happens this summer because my guess is the family travel vacation is gravely curtailed I mean Disney look I think Disney is opening their properties again July eleventh so they're gonna be open what five weeks in front of school restarting assuming school restarts but doesn't leave much left other than other than day trips I don't know the people gonna buy a new car go back all the kids in and go cross country I don't think that many people are going to get on a plane and go to Europe I don't think they can only planes anytime soon but the the the trip should be one thing I mean you know bicycle sales went up looks like recreational merchandise kayaks and things like that people bonds with again not to I have to listeners one that has a bicycle shop in Richardson right one has a number of shops over in fort worth both wrote me and said they sold out of inventory yeah for sure they have well you would have thought a pandemic would have had a different response then you know I haven't had a really good swim bicycle since I was in sixth grade so they don't go on vacation then they're going to save that money where they can do with that money that's my question do they go buy a car with the money this summer or do they say okay let's get together car next year we're going to go and we're going to move ahead with that big family vacation if you're gonna wait and buy a car you probably should be buying the car now because of all the savings of the manufacturer's incentivized everyone to buy right now and the way they're talking they could shorten those up okay when I talked to my friends on the show that have GM dealerships Ford Chrysler we are perilously low on inventories of most popular issue vis.

Audubon
Dallas: Traveling Replica Of Vietnam Veterans Memorial Arrives In Garland

The Savage Nation

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas: Traveling Replica Of Vietnam Veterans Memorial Arrives In Garland

"A replica of the Vietnam veterans memorial wall is making its way into garland today will be on display later this week working people to welcome it to garland to North Texas and you know just give it a big North Texas welcome garland city spokesman Saul Garza says the wall will be assembled in Audubon park tomorrow then it'll be on display twenty four seven right through

North Texas Saul Garza Audubon Park Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall
Kate Middleton Reveals She and Prince William Have Discussed the Holocaust with Prince George

Unorthodox

02:56 min | 1 year ago

Kate Middleton Reveals She and Prince William Have Discussed the Holocaust with Prince George

"We learned from people magazine that Princess Kate and Prince William have been talking about the Holocaust with the little future King George. I'm going to quote from People magazine. Kate Middleton revealed that she and Prince William of told their children about the Holocaust revealed this at the Holocaust Memorial Day service in London on Monday. The royal mom thirty gate was talking to Holocaust survivor. Malla Trish at the reception commemorating the seventy fifth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz Birkenau and after the deeply moving ceremony. She said we are talking to the children children about it earlier today but we have to be you know for a six year old. The interpretation the royal added suggesting that she had to choose her words carefully to explain the mass murder of six a million Jews by the Nazis to Prince George the oldest of their three children. Okay end quote so first of all appreciate the snark from people. Magazine's hang that Princess. This is kate had to choose her words lightly when discussing mass murderer with a six year old so I was talking to last night just before we finished watching Zoe's extraordinary playlist. which is the best show? I've ever I really. It's unanswered. That was made for me. It was like dumb. Sitcom meets great playlist made for me. We're about to fire up the last ten minutes of it. I said to sit as like can. Can you believe they're talking about the. It's so nice that trying to be culturally sensitive telling their little six year old Church of England future king boy about the Holocaust but frankly someone should tell them like maybe a professional g like me to tell. You don't have to tell a six year old. I mean our kids learn about it when they're nine ten eleven but like six like Little Anna. We have a six year old. She doesn't Know Jack Squat about going full Israel in Israel. He started like at three area but they'd sit says to me she's like Oh you think Anna doesn't know about the Holocaust. Have you noticed the book that she's been reading and re reading and re reading and it was like you mean white bird by that the guy that lady who wrote wonder polite Palaccio and since it yeah and I said Yeah it's about a bird right and since it only know it's all about the Holocaust cost which is why today we pulled up in front of neighborhood. Music School and Anna hopped out and put her hand up in the air and said Hail Hitler I said wait a second. You mean to tell me that today might just blonde like looking zero Audubon street new haven. Where like all taste the coffee shop? The music school across from the high school like every family in our social sir. Everyone is like coming and going and picking up and dropping off and Anna hops out little blonde. Green Eyed Anna ops out. It gives and says Hail Hitler. Hails Hitler is a great remix of Ohio. And I said well I guess we should have had the princess. Kate conversation with Kate. Okay but what are we save a six year old again. 'cause we seem to be very totally dropped the ball that she has no idea that Hitler is not good. I have to say like for them for the royals. It's really easy Zeke's all they have to do is go. Talk to Uncle Harry. Who likes to dress up just opposite lowering talk to Jonathan Sachs? who had to like? Give Harry talking to after that. So maybe they could just call up there like like Jewish applicants for chief rabbi of England's preach to an ever shrinking community of Jews from time to time to holocaust education with ignorant

Princess Kate Anna Hail Hitler People Magazine Little Anna Prince William Malla Trish ZOE Uncle Harry King George Prince George Jonathan Sachs London Murder Israel Zeke Church Of England England Palaccio Ohio
Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

10:10 min | 1 year ago

Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

"Let's talk about Mississippi's Gulf coast. I I like to welcome the show Charles. McColl from McCall Travel Dot Com and Charles's come to talk to us about coastal Mississippi Charles. Welcome mm to the show. Hi Chris how are you today. I'm doing well and we're talking about the state of Mississippi. What is your connection with coastal Mississippi? As a travel writer. I have visited the coastal Mississippi a few times over the past two years and after going there three or four times. I decided that I loved that area and other parts of the US Gulf coast. So much that I developed a new brand called. US Golf coast which covers everything from key. West South Padre but we are talking only about coastal Mississippi debut today so as a travel writer I covered it several times. Excellent and why should someone go to coastal Mississippi. We'll we'll talk about many things but it is is unique. The unique destination the United States. It has the longest continuous beach in the United States. Which I think a lot of people don't know I love road road trips? I travel all over the world. Love driving and there's this sense of soul fulfillment I drive on the Mississippi Gulf coast. I where it's just different than anywhere else. You can drive for an hour and not see anything except for the sand in the water is unobstructed by condos and indulge and restaurants. And what have you so this this great peace and calm and different than anywhere else. Excellent and what kind of itinerary tenorio you're going to recommend for us. It's not a singular destination. There are many communities there. So I'm GonNa recommend some things to do in each of the communities go along the coastal Mississippi. It's all still call the Mississippi Gulf coast. So I'M GONNA use both terms interchangeably. I don't want you to drive fifty miles in one day for lunch and then go drive fifty miles back so I will concentrate on the various communities and say all right first day. You're going to be here second day. You're going to be here and so on and we can do a three four five seven ten very well. Let's get into it where you're GONNA start it. Let's start in Pascagoula. So Mississippi is between Alabama and Louisiana China so coastal Mississippi represents the entire Mississippi Gulf coast so over on the east side closest Alabama Alabama. If you're driving from mobile the first thing you're gonna hit is Pascagoula. The city is probably most famous. because it's where Jimmy Buffett was born. Okay I did not I know that. Yeah so that's going to set the expectations for what the coastal Mississippi areas. All about thank Jimmy Buffett was born there so we're already at our five o'clock somewhere attitude. Pascagoula is also a navy base. So there's a lot of military and also industry the street going on there but it's it's a seafaring community. It's laid-back relative to some of the other cities. We'll talk about. Well what are we going GonNa do in Pascagoula one of the things that happened in past the goal of that as I guess lesser known as that one of the biggest UFO abduction stories in in US history happened there. So back in the seventies the couple of people claim that they were abducted by UFO. And so they were never disproven even so. That's one of the most famous things that happened in Pascagoula. Okay but other than being abducted by aliens. What am I going to do in Pascagoula for won a narrow down here to the the oldest house in Mississippi isn't Pascagoula okay? It's called the lapointe Krebs House and museum now so I went. There are a couple of months ago and I was fascinated by Howell. They showed the construction of how house was done in the bleed was the seventeen. Twenty s house was built the How they use the for the the hair from animals as insulation in the house and things like that kind of interesting Seventeen fifty seven. Is there anything specific renovated the Krebs House. We're going to go to the Krebs House. You could probably spend a couple of hours there. It's a nice waterfront setting and you can get some history of the. The natives that lived in the area and then European settlers came in and saw a whole history of Mississippi but the main point there there's to see the the house and the oldest house in the Mississippi Delta region I think between Minnesota and the Gulf of Mexico. It's the oldest house that's still in the American frontier. I'm thinking New Orleans would be older than that but I mean the city might be but I'm not sure if there's a structure that's older than point good point. The city is older but I don't know if there are any of original houses. Okay Fair enough. But another thing that I really loved in Pascagoula. The Motto Bon Center. I believe the official is the best. Gula River Audubon Bond Center captain McCoy Relation on McColl. And there's a captain McCoy and he runs nature trips out of the Pascagoula River River Audubon Center and what I loved about. It is that I learn things. Obviously like you learn on most trips but the Pascagoula River is the longest. And I'm not going to get the the terminology right. It's the longest une damned river in the continental united in a at states. Yeah so I was fascinated by that and I was like well. What about this wherever they were like now? It was dammed at some point. So the Pascagoula River I believe is four four hundred and eighty miles. That is natural the way it's always been so it hasn't been dammed. It hasn't been obstructed by any kind of construction directions so you can see wildlife and nature the way that it was several hundred years ago. Something didn't expect expect to find in coastal Mississippi or anywhere else and you say wildlife. I'm picturing talking marshes birds alligators that sort of thing. Am I in the right right ballpark. You're right and one thing that that's dominant in this area or the Mississippi sandhill cranes which are relatively large bird. I'm sure there are in other parts that states but there is a sandhill crane refuge that none in Pascagoula but on the other side so I tend cuts through through the area so from mobile bill to New Orleans. You would drive high tech Postal Mississippi. I'm talking about everything. South of I ten okay. North of town the Pascagoula River would go up there. And that's where the sandhill crane. Refuges the birds. No birds don't recognize boundaries. They fly all over the place. So you can see that. I was on the riverboat tour. Okay the AUDUBON center is like most centers they want to promote the natural wildlife and the scenery. And that's so forth and it's a really hidden gem. I think that most people don't recognize will in because it has the name Audubon on it. I'm assuming calmly talking about birdlife predominantly. So yes okay. I don't know if everybody knows. I mean Audubon as a as a charity I think is well known but Google Audubon. You'll find what is James Audubon. Is that the a original one who did all the original drawings of birds in the early. US That's really neat. Watercolors this fascinating realistic catches does right. So I mentioned captain McCoy so you could take his crews out of the audubon center also wrench around Kayak and I did did that one time and going at your own pace around the marshes fascinating at least a dozen gainers and as close they would just scatter into the water. So I love love doing that at my own pace to excellent and John James Audubon. I got it almost John James. Okay when I said early. I didn't realize how early he was. He was born in seventeen eighty five and so he was basically drawing birds up until about the Mexican American war. You're in the US. And so as the frontiers were being filled in a he was out there with his sketch pad. MOM IN ESTA goal. There's obviously the Jimmy Buffett stuff to the native son. A I think he this family left when he was three and then he grew up in mobile but he has come back and he recognizes Pascagoula his birthplace so there is a beach and a bridge and his childhood home are all named for Jimmy Buffett. The parrot heads can go and pay pilgrimage to Jimmy Buffett and go visit some of those sites and one of my favorite places the Pascagoula is called bozos grocery. It's a very old school from the nineteen fifties place where you go in you place your order and you wait inside. been there two or three times. The last time I went kayaking at the river Audubon Center. In fact I got a takeout L. Poboy from Bozo's grocery and then took it on the Kayak. But it's this old school place where you go in and you place your order and you order order off the menu. You don't make up stuff and there was some guy in front of me. That was a visitor and he wasn't a local either and so he went on these. ZAC Oh can I make this substitution. Know what's on the bed. Yeah and I was like basically your choices are you. You get what you WANNA shrimp boat boy. You want poboy poboy being sandwich. A sub someplace else or a hoagie or a hero depending on where you're from but a pavilion in this region of the world. Okay and shrimp being the best known. One that I now. They're also known for their Fried Oysters. Poboy so okay. I got a half in half half. It's amazing I had a couple dozen po boys and along the Gulf coast and I it's one of the better ones side totally recommend going to Bozo groceries to get to take out to go kayaking or he.

Mississippi Pascagoula Pascagoula River Mississippi Gulf United States Pascagoula River River Audubon Jimmy Buffett Audubon Center Gula River Audubon Bond Center Gulf Lapointe Krebs House And Museu Audubon James Audubon River Audubon Center Captain Mccoy Mississippi Delta New Orleans Krebs House John James Audubon
Interactive tool shows climate threats to backyard birds

Climate Connections

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Interactive tool shows climate threats to backyard birds

"You may enjoy gazing out the window window and seeing familiar. Birds like gold trenches robbins are warblers flitting between tree branches but as the climate warms. Many bird species will need to leave some the places. They've long considered home. These areas has become no longer suitable. And they'll have to move to new areas Brooke Bateman as a senior scientist at the National Audubon Society. She says for bird lovers who want to visualize what this means in their own yards. Audubon created an online tool users can enter a zip code and learn more about local climate Emma threats and the risks. They posed birds. It really gives you a local snapshot of what's happening. With climate scenes the two highlights which species will no longer longer find suitable local habitat by the end of the century users can toggle between different levels of future warming so they can see that without climate action. Oh these birds that come. It's my heater or these birds. I see my backyard. They're not going to be there anymore.

National Audubon Society Audubon Brooke Bateman Scientist
"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Are fun to drive around town even better on a family trip end Audubon both wagon makes getting your new Volkswagen fun. right now you can check out all our exceptional offers at Audubon B. W. dot com so when it comes to getting the ball talking you really want at a price it's always exceptional picking the right dealership helps in fact it's everything Audubon both wagon white settlement road at university just north of I. thirty in fort worth. back to work we go let's go to defeat in Collegeville ID. Hey buddy how you doing I'm just hanging out what are you doing. well get ready to go uber around town for a little while you gonna be driven around again drive others around. I'm a growth others derailed well okay look I got it. yeah I got a couple of questions for you own a lot of your ads where there's mileage involved like a warranty or something like that it'll be a phrase that I'm probably gonna screwed up but something along the lines of. regional in service date yeah you might talk about matters well it means a lot because like on the auto Bahn BMW service long cars they come with a five year unlimited mileage warranty from the original in service date..

audubon
"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"That had every emergency urgency responder. I bet was there. If there'd been another thing that evening they wouldn't have been able to respond now well. That's my husband was one of those officers so he talked about it when tonight. He knew i was going to be interviewing you. There was one other quick story. <hes> we've got a minute and a half so talk fast him. This has been great. Thank you very much two thousand thousand two hundred sixty stories in the naked cog railway and i can tell a lot of them might teaser. Is that if any cars were cog relatives or people that know any cog stuff they should get in touch with me at. Tim dot lewis at northern vermont dot e._d._u. That's tim dot louis northern vermont. All one word dot e._d._u. I am finding out amazing stories. I have a woman by the name of mattie clarke breaking the glass ceiling in the hotel industry in the eighteen eighty four years and become says when she dies in nineteen thirty her bitch is printed twice in the boston globe. I also have have a cog railway brakeman who almost becomes an officer but because his family has split between pro nazi who who anti-nazi. I got all good stuff. You just discovered that recently right exactly so please. Tim dot lewis at northern vermont dot e._d._u. I can talk it forever. Yes he can. Thank you very much. Tim appreciate it. They will be back next monday. Tomorrow is governor douglas and the following day is steve enjoyed joy..

Tim dot lewis officer vermont mattie clarke governor douglas boston steve eighteen eighty four years
"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Utah beach first-wave <hes> and stayed with the third battalion of the twenty second infantry through to the forest where he was wounded for the first time he wins a the distinguished service cross. He wins a distinguished service <hes> metal british in the u._s. and so for their twenty fifth anniversary and sixty eighty seven arthur takes alan to europe and because he'd won the <hes> british high honor <hes> she could get into the court of saint james which was very cool for her because she is a philadelphia socialite <hes> trained as a nurse that cetera they come back back and of arthur is faced with the problem that he didn't expect the state of new hampshire at that point owns the summit house hotel they had had to neglected to do repairs <hes> a water tower out back of the summit house had blown down. That's why they put chains on stuff. <hes> and the state basically told them that overnight accommodations at the summit house. We're not going to happen that year. That's a problem because all winter long. They've been advertising special to go up at six o'clock. Sunset specials stay overnight see the sunrise come on down package deal yada yada yada <hes> substantial cash flow. They had to send all the deposits back <hes> somewhere early june. Arthur has a heart attack. The cog runs because he's got good lieutenants just like he did in the twenty second infantry in late july..

arthur Utah alan europe new hampshire philadelphia twenty second twenty fifth
"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Mount washington congressman william nineteen seventeen as an engineer was arthur cool and <hes> you said arthur was from newbury. No he's from hereford concord new hampshire right right. Do you know how many years he worked at c. See fred this is this is perfect fred because what i've been doing for the last year is going out and talking about the cog where away looking for the rest of my mountain relatives tips and you sir are one of my mountain relatives because your relative arthur h watkins from concord new hampshire worked at the cog railway and and all of us who were attached to that unique place <hes> we can sit down and start talking as if we were <hes> long lost friends because we we all have that same experience and sort of interesting thing so tell me more about arthur please sony where she wants blossoming main him and knowledge <hes> he was a fireman. I think that's what he told me firemen. Maybe did a little engineer work but anyways. I guess there was a premium price from working up there so i think that was part of the reason why he did it because he got a little extra money. There's always people looking for money that came there right right and he was talking about. There was one thing one thing start what he's talking about. Jacob's ladder exactly the steepest grade on the mountain thirty seven percent yeah yeah right. You're talking about that and then there was some sort of device it an individual man could take no snowboard deadly shingles yeah. He said it was a sled or something. You said what happened was. They started to many guys. Were getting killed. They took it away and they went to let them join anymore four well. That's the official line. That's what i say. It's an interesting thing he's talked about doing. Was he said ah i what up the mountain the first time we saw the moon and this is what i'm trying to remember this from from being relatively young boy. He said that now i kept off house you tip top house is still there and in one thousand nine hundred seventeen there would have been the tip top house and there would have been the brand new summit house that debuted in nineteen fifteen so yes so anyways the tip top house. He said i left the mound. He says he couldn't see what the hell's the chain doing over. The roof was a big chain holding down the tip top house. He couldn't understand that somebody told me. The wind can blow very very hard up there so one time when he was up on the mountain. He said he couldn't believe it. He said there was two freight cars.

arthur hereford concord new hampshire Jacob arthur h watkins engineer arthur cool fred congressman william Mount washington sony official thirty seven percent
"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"It was the world's first mountain climbing railroad <hes> up until that point trains only bring in in the valleys. They couldn't go up more than six percent grade because they were just attraction outfit could you could you explain what the word coggin how how how it all works well. The deal is it <hes> for the regular locomotives up until eighteen sixty six <hes> you had to you. Pull your load just by traction on the outside wheels. That doesn't work once the grade becomes more than six percent because the wheel starts to slip and you can't go <hes> there was a gentleman <hes> by sylvester by the name of silvester marsh who was born in camden new hampshire who who came up with the idea that if you put a con gear in the center of the axle of the engines <hes> wheels and acog gear for people to visualize is if you've ever ridden a bicycle you put your feet on the pedals and when you go around there's that wheel it's <hes> and basically acog gear is that and the cog rail that goes up the mountain is the <hes> chain on your bicycle just laid out and so the engine climbs up the mountain but at the time when he proposed foz this <hes> in eighteen fifty seven ish eighteen fifty eight people thought he was crazy <hes> and <hes> so so he had to demonstrate that it actually worked and so luckily he was a farm boy from new hampshire who done made made good <hes> he was born in eighteen oh three and he left the farm in eighteen twenty three to go to boston and he i started to learn how to sell provisions at a brand new store complex that was just barely built in boston and folks may actually no it because it was the brand new quincy market. I wear which i love which so esther marsh now ten years later <hes> you know young man go goes west <hes> he heads out in eighteen thirty three to a small village on the shores of lake michigan with three hundred people to do his provisioning out there and <hes> again people might actually know this hamlet <hes> because its name was chicago ago and he was actually semester. Marsh was one of the first meatpackers and made a fortune out there. He lost a fortune. He liked to invent stuff stuff. He invented a grain drying machine which helped us have cereal because the green could come back east without getting rotten. He got sued out there and he hired a young lawyer from illinois to defend him. <hes> the young lawyer actually won the case. The young lawyers name was abraham lincoln. I'm great and so he's got. He's <hes> he's he's rich. He's back. He comes to back east and decides he wants to hike up mount mount washington in eighteen fifty seven gets caught in cloud. <hes> nearly loses his life stumble you know he he got trapped around and <hes> where lizzie born had died earlier the young woman from maine and figures. There's got to be an easier way to for folks to get up the mountain uh-huh and that's where he starts to take care of the railway hold that thought tim we've got fred from newbury on the phone fred you there all my grandfather worked on the railroad up there and he was a fireman and he can't he was up there in boston. Ah what was his name arthur arthur watkins watkins. He's going to look it up if he's got enlisted so a._h. Watkins who worked in the mount washington congressman william nineteen seventeen as an engineer was arthur cool and <hes> you said arthur was from newbury. No he's from hereford concord new hampshire right right. Do you know how many years he worked at c. See fred this is.

arthur arthur watkins watkins silvester marsh boston camden new hampshire hereford concord new hampshire mount mount washington esther marsh abraham lincoln fred newbury mount washington illinois lake michigan sylvester quincy market congressman william maine lizzie engineer
"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Would have families <hes> would actually live at the base station <hes> dad would dad's typically weekly worked on the railroad. Moms typically worked in the gift shop and or the restaurant or the cabins or the summit house and the kids is <hes> were basically brought up <hes> by the crew <hes> because the cog railway in the fifties nineteen fifty through sixty-seven which is i call the jitney years <hes> because that was my dad's nickname he started there. He was lyndon teachers college student whose roommate george trask from rochester vermont had been working there and <hes> dad needed a summer job <hes> and so george trask brought norm lewis over to <hes> for an interview with colonel henry teague who <music> own the railway at the time and once the colonel henry <hes> heard that dad it worked on the farm he just said you're hired and so it started <hes> that end <hes> dad was there for eighteen summers and in fact what i took the year off to do was was an outgrowth of what he started back in nineteen sixty two the owner at that time was a colonel arthur thirteen who's no relation to henry which makes it sort of kind of interesting. <hes> and arthur teague wanted dad to write right an operating manual i e how do you run the engines and that operating manual was supposed to be done in nineteen sixty four well in two thousand listen and <hes> fifteen when dad was eighty six i said to him you know you gotta finish this because you're not going to be on the planet much longer and he was kind of reluctant because he was kind of reluctant and he said okay but you're gonna have to include <hes> your first acts acts of journalism that you did when you were thirteen and fourteen at the cog railway and did a weekly newsletter so <hes> he he finished his part of the book before he died on may fourth <hes> twenty seventeen <hes> i by that time i had done a weekly newsletter newsletter for <hes> the cog employees part of it is in order to get readers you put names in the paper i had had about a hundred and fifty names of employees and i wonder whatever happened to these people et cetera and so for the last couple of years i have been reaching out and contacting conquers the people who work there and then i figured out that the cog railway history history has never the ones that had been written have never really focused on the people who actually ran the railroad. I ryan the the beauty of the cog was it was the world's first mountain climbing railroad <hes> up until that point trains only bring in in the valleys. They couldn't go up more than six percent grade because they were just attraction outfit could you could you explain what the word coggin how how how it all works.

colonel henry teague arthur teague george trask norm lewis rochester vermont six percent
"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"He. No one knows what one hundred twenty or has he. You put something schumer got a hold of his real. Quick 'cause west point's affected but otherwise no we we don't know what is there any more we're going on about what the president tweeted the other day about the the picture that he plays the put on on twitter. That probably shouldn't have been out there which one was it was the <hes> from a accident in the rocket site. Oh yeah with view on classified document that sort of quaint who can do it but it's not it's not a good idea to you know the i mean to say the president can do it <hes> he can argue that well you know it's known this happened but he doesn't tell how we got it. Here's here's the problem with tweeting that some people can figure out how you got that photo. They can figure out angles they figure out proximity this modern world so that's why he you shouldn't have have done that. You know <hes> the united states has been. Don't get me wrong. Iran is no picnic walk in the park as a government. I used to live in in iran iran in nineteen seventy eight by the way i left there. Yes uh-huh last year the shah's rule. I was a teacher for what was called. The andhra manager on iran america which was iranian students and i was teacher there and the revolution started. Why was there either leave. Due due to the revolution lucien and then in congress i work with president clinton's administration ambush on iranian issues with other members <hes> but you know this administration has taken in such a hard line on iran and again the government is going to walk in the park but we really take a hard line and i think this is just another extreme where the president's people mean john bolton his early adviser. I think it talked. Probably i'm guessing but talk to president doing this picture to say you can make fun of the iranians own is obsessed with iran and and voting is actually tried some tactics that really is not helpful in our negotiations with iran. I'm surprised surprised because bolton's been around for so long and in key positions obviously interestingly enough when i was there he couldn't get confirmed by the republican senate. Which kind of tells you crazy about some things either. What else do you have on your plate. These days we're looking tonight is and i usually would admit that i would be watching this but i'm not watching some of the of the c._n._n. Climate <hes> with the democratic as i'm going to tune in here and they're don't get me wrong but i thought stretching out seven hours was a lot but of course there's a lot of candidates. <hes> the the democrat national committee would not do a separate debate where the candidates on climate so this is what c._n._n. Has offered but i'm looking forward to the what i'm called the first big big debate debate or you will have sanders and elizabeth warren and <hes> joe biden on the same stage..

Iran president schumer president clinton john bolton twitter west point democrat national committee joe biden united states elizabeth warren republican senate lucien sanders seven hours
"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"He'll be back on monday you want to call in the number is two four four one seven seven seven and while we were on break we had a question right here in the studio and the question from a fisherman was to dave what about the cormorants on lake champlain seen too many of them well. It's an interesting puzzle. The you know <hes> it's as as our bird populations recovering rebound <hes> sometimes they get out of balance and the cormorant sarah bird species that you may have seen the long their long black cenex they're diving birds and they eat fish <hes> and one of the and they're unimportant and and a lovely part of our ecosystem and they can have some significant impacts on habitat they the the waste that they produce actually has the result assault of kind of causing all the vegetation to die so there really are actually one of the threats to comment turns and as their populations have really grown. There's been questions about whether they they may be impacting. Fish populations having other impacts on other bird species so there are actually efforts underway by the fremont department of fish and wildlife the u._s. fish fish wildlife service and others to figure out. How do we keep that population cormorants imbalance. That's great problem that is we have enough trouble with the blue algae and everything else so the list. I read the a little while ago about <hes> bluewater. They're called what you call. Priority birds <hes> <hes> could you talk about what that means. What does it mean to be a priority bird sure the black throated blue warbler leg it. It's it's full full. Name is a fascinating canadian example of this. It is a bird that is in terms of its national or international habitat is threatened. It has some it faces a number of risks that are causing it to be a burr that has declining populations vermont turns out to be one of its its <hes> places that it really loves to be and it's doing very well here so you might look at the black throated blue warbler and think well. It's doing fine for mind but in fact it it means all the more. It's all the more important for us to protect it here. Because it is a bird that's going to thrive in vermont and if we can protect it here we're contributing to the global population of this important species david. We have a call from pete from berry pete. Yes good morning good morning. <hes> i you mention cormorants a moment ago and i'm and just curious when i was a child in vermont <hes>. I don't remember cormorants being around here. <hes> i usually thought of them in warmer waters now. They're coming into vermont or arrived in vermont. Is that a consequence of global warming and if so are there are other birds are coming farther north because of global warming. We're gonna pitch that one right to our guest. I have no clue by thank u. P. that's a great question and i honestly don't know the answer to it but a i do know that there has been a trend in the growth in the number of cormorants there. I'm i'm pretty sure that cormorants have been common throughout vermont in the past but just not the level of the population were seen now and it could be a connected to climate climate change. There are definitely bird species that we're seeing shifts there birds that we didn't ever used to seeing vermont. They're more southern that have begun to shift their range into vermont. There's other species that are at the southern end of their range in vermont who are which are becoming less frequent. You know one of the birds will worried about for instance is the bicknell's thrush so there's no question that we're seeing changes in <hes> in wind snow melt happens when vegetation happens when there's insects <hes> <hes> <hes> blooms and all these things are connected to birds birds have thousands and tens of thousands of years of evolution that have caused them to to arrive on a specific time in a specific location and if because of climate change there are the food that they're expecting to be there isn't they have to keep going they have or they won't come as far so it depends on the species and the nature of their habitat needs but there's no question we're seeing impacts from global the global climate crisis crisis..

vermont lake champlain assault fremont dave pete bicknell u. P.
"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Which we do every year and it's a wonderful chance to be out with one of our conservation biologists and some of our experts on our team and walk walk the land who will show you where the birds live the different kinds of species that migrate to and from vermont. Oh that's great. I think you talked about it. We we eric allante and i decided we were gonna show up but this morning before our show started. Dana was talking to a gentleman from the north branch and he was talking about a bird food fest this fall on saturday. <hes> and use came in and started writing down. I don't know how many you've got their ten activities dealing with with birds this state lumps birds if he does run through that a little bit and just summarize all the stuff that goes on in this state. I'll just pick a few examples. I mean the bird bird fest this saturday at the north branch turned his example and one of our biologists is going to be there to talk but it's that's a great organization who lives in central for modern washington county <hes> to go see but we also were doing a project up in burlington <hes> to to monitor chimney swift's which are species at risk in the state and so we've got. It's at the switchback brewery into if you're interested in going for you already exactly birds bruise <hes> so september twelfth. That's that's an evening of that day and then we have other <hes> kind of events. There's a wonderful <hes> kind of <hes>. I don't know exactly how to describe them but we have a women women who bird you know <hes> group that goes out periodically. That's going to be going out on september. Fifteenth bird watching that you talk about birdwatching and everyone is welcome. It's primarily focused on helping women feel comfortable together out of doors and enjoying how to learn learning how to bert and we have. We have a a group that goes out. That's <hes> does pride hikes. It's kind of folks from the l._g._b._t._q. Plus community who go out there and everyone is welcome to all of all these events but they're they're targeting. Ways are intended to encourage people to feel safe being out of doors. I did <hes> i did a walk around the berlin pon one time and that was very interesting. <hes> just things you don't see you have to be shown a weird look. What did you know what to do and this. I was reading about forest management. Management and there are birds. If it's not managed correctly all of them are impacted but they listed a couple blue warbler scarlet tanger- canadian canada canada warbler said that wrong and would thrust this is quite a diversity of birds. We are really blessed with this amazing rich array of birds in the state eight that live in our forests and our fields and if you wanna get into bird-watching you this is the right state and in fact it is we are. I think if not the single highest percentage in the country in the top three of states in terms of the number of people in the state that liked to go bird watching as long as my blue heron shows up we have a blue heron that shows up on his on his or her <hes> way down south and we have a pond next to us and it comes every year and i always feel life is good. <hes> <hes> youth already talked about some of the programs you've got high schools and with adults and i would think the kids must just love these programs. Oh it's true i was so i feel so so lucky i work at the green mountain audubon center out in huntington which encourage anybody to come visit if they get the chance but the summers this is my first summer at the sound it was delightful i was i'll give an example of how fun it is. I was on the phone with a group of folks <hes> from around the state and country on a conference call. I had my window open and all of a sudden this horrid a preschool came running down the hill howling like coyotes so there's just constant joy and energy around.

eric allante green mountain audubon center vermont washington county Dana bert burlington berlin huntington
"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Natural resources you are protecting really vital habitat for birds. That's great so when you were named <hes> executive director. I'm not going to read this whole quote because it's a long one <hes> but you mentioned that it has never been more important to really do the right thing right now. Could you explain why now is the time to get our iraq together. We are has come out in some of the reports really over. Just the past year <hes> there was a a recent global report talking about the rate of extinction of species a._b._c.'s <hes> we are at a one of those moments where the impacts of human beings on the planet are causing massive levels of extinction of species and we in vermont are one of those. I was alluding to earlier or one of those places where we have the resources if we kind of protect and manage them effectively. I believe we can be a demonstration to the rest of the globe about how you can have a vibrant <hes> prosperous community <hes> that also has these wonderful full natural resources and attributes and rich diversity of species and we certainly have the people that would support that we are small but mighty i think people really are into the environment and saving our habitat and it's a good place to be isn't it it absolutely is true and one of the things that i learned when i was commissioner at ah the department of environmental conservation and has been reinforced for me and this new role has been we have in a in an era where people are really increasingly divided rural versus this urban partisan politics <hes> hunters versus environmentalists or you know think of the thousands of ways in which we divide ourselves farmers versus environmentalists that you know. There's all these ways in vermont the weekend all sit around the table. We're neighbors. You know with each other were related. There's one degree pave separation between us and across the board whether you like to hunt turkey or you like to get out and and hunt or fish or you like bird-watching or you run you know a a kayaking you know business or a hotel or you're you know you're just an employer looking for new employees and you want to track track them. Everyone has a shared interest in protecting these natural resources and so the questions become not about whether to engage in this work together but how do we do it and there's there's plenty of room to disagree and argue which we do in vermont. Yes we do more so lately but we're getting better. I think but anyway <hes> i so you sent me something yesterday and i had all the questions already for the show and and when you sent me that document i put it right smack up frontier because i don't know we have to talk about this and what we can do speaking of being interested in protecting what we have you sent me an article that said green mountain national forest at risk risk due to propose national rule which apparently is may gut the national bedrock environmental law. This doesn't sound good david. There's yes there's real concern about a proposal by the federal government to dramatically reduce the level of environmental review and public input that goes into the decisions at the forest service makes when it proposes to harvest timber right and <hes> it's. I read that the one of the proposals is that the agency they're going to waive requirements that the agency doesn't have to disclose a did i read that right environmental harm and sort of leave out the public. The public input which in vermont is very is huge here. It is people in vermont expect to be involved and frankly it's not and this has nothing to do with being opposed to harvesting timber in fact as autobahn vermont. We're committed to kind of diversity of habitat which requires harvest frankly we could do more harvesting this state.

vermont executive director iraq federal government commissioner david one degree
"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"And our two thousand nineteen Toyota Highlander, mid size, SUV. Both have zero percent financing for sixty months with approved credit through twelve financial zero percent is sixteen dollars and sixty seven cents for every one thousand dollars finance and this offer. Excludes the dealer fee of one hundred and fifty dollars. These offers will in June third two thousand nineteen. Eighteen. And by the way, the all new two thousand nineteen ramp, four compact SUV is an and Freeman has an exceptional availability right now. Freeman Toyota home, the affordable side of the Metroplex Lupe twenty and I just south of the northeast mall. Classic treasure. From Audubon doesn't matter, whether it's the incredible two thousand nineteen beltway Jetta, or are two thousand nineteen Volkswagen. Teak won- compact as she or mid size, two thousand nineteen bowl Bulldogging, atlas and the enthusiast magazines pick the atlas as a top SUV, these vehicles, everything you have come to expect from exceptional German engineering, fun-to-drive around town, even better on a family road trip. And again, Audubon, Volkswagen makes buying bulldog and fun. Today, you can check out all of our exceptional offers at Audubon, VW dot com. When it comes to getting Volkswagen, you really want and a price. That's always exceptional picking the right dealership, helps Audubon, motorcar group both Waggin. Why settlement road university just north of I thirty in Fort Worth. Now, classic tracks with Ed Wallace. Roads, mice.

audubon
"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Expect from exceptional German engineering, fun-to-drive around town, even better on a family road trip. And again, Audubon, Volkswagen makes buying fund today. You can check out Oliver. Exceptional offers Audubon, VW dot com. When it comes to getting Volkswagen, you really want any price, that's always exceptional picking the right dealership, helps Audubon, motorcar group. Both wagon why settlement road university just north of I thirty in Fort Worth. I'm Tony Gilchrist owner southwest Ford in Weatherford, for it's always worth the drive to save the money it's almost summertime. And maybe today today, you want to get your new Ford for those family trips or fuel-efficient Ford just till around town. So right now at southwest Ford, we have our new twenty nineteen Ford f one fifty two will drive STI crew cabs, and you can take ten thousand off the msrp e or get a new twenty nineteen four echo sport. Compact, crossover fully sixteen nine ninety eight and we also have the all new twenty nineteen Ford ranger compact truck inventory, and it's more than great. It's exceptional prizes include all discounts and Ford factory incentives and offers in June. Third twenty nineteen one save real money on your next new Ford. Then Dr west to southwest Ford, four with highway off interstate twenty in Weatherford. Okay,.

audubon
"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Driving machine. Audubon, BMW delivers one thing, exceptional customer service. White settlement road at university. Just north of I thirty in Fort Worth. Now, classic tracks with Ed Wallace. Has goes it wasn't the greatest recording for hit song in rock history. The guitars are too, but in nineteen sixty seven trucks, release their fourth forty five in America. Love is all around their first song, Wild Thing gone to number one, the previous year with a girl like you barely broke the top thirty. I can't control myself didn't even make the top forty but the trucks love is all around the ultimate garage band. Love. Song made it to number seven in the US. Now, the trunks, never charted, another hit after that either here or in England. I'm like, Wild Thing, which was written by actor. Jon Voight brother chip Taylor. Reg, Presley of the trucks, had written loves all around and that song.

Jon Voight Ed Wallace Fort Worth BMW chip Taylor Reg US Presley America England
"audubon" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on AP News

"Climate change, the national Audubon society launched its twenty nineteen climate watch project designed to help scientists understand how birds are impacted by global warming the project focuses on accounting Bluebirds and nut hatchets, scientists are starting there because the ranges of these species cover most of the US and are intimidated to experience climatic changes. The question is how the birds will respond to the changes. In addition to the winter survey. There's also a summer survey that begins in may. A UN report says the world's thirst for fresh water is causing a salty problem. The study by researchers from Canada, the Netherlands and South Korea deceleration plants around the world producing enough Brian waste to swamp an area the size of Florida with a foot of salty water every year research is warranted. Much of the Brian is being dumped untreated into the sea and some is causing home to see life because of toxic chemicals. The researchers called the better Brian management, especially in countries like Saudi Arabia which rely heavily on desalinating. They noted that studies have shown Brian can be used in equity cultures to boost yields of salt, tolerant species of fish and the metals and salts contained in it could be mined honoring Martin Luther King junior. I'm Tim Maguire. But the AP news minute on this Martin Luther King junior day ceremonies honoring him held around the country, including ebony Ebeneezer Baptist church in Atlanta after Delta Airlines provided a grant to the national. Park service to open the church in Columbia, South Carolina. Congressman James Clyburn. Brought up a phrase used by President Trump and his supporters problem is making America's greatness, apply fairly and equitably all of its citizens murder charges pending in Nevada against a man suspected of being in the country illegally. The four victims were found dead in their homes in the Carson city Reno area starting on the tenth of this month through last Wednesday, Wilbur Martinez goes bond, who's twenty was arrested on Saturday in Carson city. A nineteen year old man is in critical condition after being shot outside a clothing store in the suburban Chicago mall..

Brian management Martin Luther King Congressman James Clyburn Carson city Reno national Audubon society Ebeneezer Baptist church UN Carson city US President Trump South Korea Tim Maguire Wilbur Martinez Saudi Arabia Delta Airlines Chicago Canada
"audubon" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on AP News

"The national Audubon society's launched its twenty nine thousand nine climate watch project designed to help scientists understand how birds are impacted by global warming the project focuses on accounting, Bluebirds and nuts hatchets. Scientists are starting there because the ranges of these species cover most of the us and are intimidated to experience climatic changes. The question is. Is how the birds will respond to the changes. In addition to the winter survey. There's also a summer survey that begins in may. Some college students cramming for tests, but yet craving a snack won't have to to the abuse of autocrats. According to the advocacy group Human Rights, Watch AP's at Karen Chavez reports coalitions of states, civic, groups and popular movements are pushing back against those seeking to curtail freedom annual report, the group said that the big news of the pasta isn't the Pacific science of authoritarian trends, but the growing opposition to them the group's director Kenneth Roth says the same populists. He spread hatred and intolerance off feuding a resistance that keeps winning battles. According to the report released in Berlin examples of such perspex can be seen in efforts to resist attacks on democracy in Europe, prevent a bloodbath in Syria, all to stop the Saudi led bombing and blockading of many civilians. I'm Karen Thomas. Researchers say there are a disturbingly low number of western monarch butterflies that migrate along the California. Coast a recent count by the search see society recorded fewer than thirty thousand butterflies and said that's an eighty six percent decline since two thousand seventeen by comparison. The group in nineteen Eighty-one counted more than a million western monarchs wintering in California. The San Francisco Chronicle reported the Cirque see society, wasn't sure what caused the numbers to drop. It said there's no substantial evidence of delayed migration and butterflies are not being reported and other parts of the country 2017 study by Washington state university. Researchers found the species likely will go extinct in the next few decades. If nothing is done to save it special counsel. And BuzzFeed, I'm Tim Maguire AP newsmen a special counsel Robert Mueller's office disputes, BuzzFeed news reports citing a pair of federal law enforcement. Sources President Trump told his then. Private attorney Michael Cohen to lie to congress Muller's office. Doesn't cite any specific errors in the report noting that the descriptions of the story are not accurate AP's Mike Rossier with more in response to the special counsel statement, Trump retweeted a post that said, sadly, so many will never see the metal that it was fake. A spokesman for BuzzFeed says we stand by our reporting the president says he will make a major announcement tomorrow afternoon on the partial government shutdown and the border with Mexico before Trump made public that plan White House economic adviser. Larry cudlow insisted to reporters Trump has been trying to end the standoff, president has tried his mightiest.

President Trump special counsel Kenneth Roth California BuzzFeed national Audubon society Mike Rossier president Karen Thomas us AP advocacy group Human Rights San Francisco Chronicle Karen Chavez Europe Berlin Robert Mueller Michael Cohen Larry cudlow