35 Burst results for "Audubon"

"audubon" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 3 months ago

"audubon" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Check out the official Game of Thrones podcast on iHeartRadio. We've got all things Westeros on Xfinity flex. Say dragons are coming into your Xfinity voice remote. What if you were in apparel company facing an avalanche of demand? So you call IBM to automate your IT infrastructure. And now your ecommerce platform can handle spikes in orders. Let's create IT systems that rule if their own sleeves, IBM, let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com. The economy is crazy right now. All time high inflation varies stock market, rising home prices, and interest rates? Make your money go further and work harder with a certified financial planner professional from facet wealth, certified financial planner professionals, and fiduciaries. They're legally bound to do what's in your best interest. Facet has a simple flat fee, no hidden charges. There are no commissions. Try facet wealth dot com TRY FACT wealth dot com. That's what wealth is an SEC registered investment adviser. This is not an offer to buy your security, nor is it investment legal or tax advice. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bob-omb here. Buildings and Windows kill roughly a billion birds in the United States every year. Due in part to the artificial lights that disorient them and cause them to crash. In 1999, the national Audubon society and its partners began the lights out program in Chicago, to alert building owners and managers to this problem and convinced them to turn off unnecessary lights when birds are migrating. As of early 2022, 47 cities had adopted lights out programs, including New York, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C.. There are also statewide and regional programs, including lights out Colorado, lights out Georgia, and lights out heartland. Most of these programs are ramping up from August 15th, through November 15th this year to coincide with birds natural fall migration. Okay, but let's talk about why lights are so dangerous to birds. After feral cats, buildings and windows are the second greatest killer of American birds, especially during the two times a year when many migrate, flying between breeding and wintering habitats. Attracted by the bright artificial lights at night, birds fly into buildings and glass windows and are often killed by the impact. If they aren't killed, their flight patterns are disrupted, causing them to become disoriented and circle in confusion, and interfering with their daytime cycle of resting and refueling. Also, biologists have found that light pollution causes birds to start nesting earlier than normal. The resulting mismatch and timing can cause hungry chicks to hatch before their food supply is available. A lights out works on mitigating these problems by requesting building owners and managers turn lights off during the migration season from midnight to 6 a.m. each morning. Audubon recommends they, quote, turn off exterior decorative lighting, extinguish spot and floodlights, a substitute strobe lighting where possible. Reduce lobby and atrium lighting wherever possible. A turn off interior lighting, especially on upper floors, substitute tasks and area lighting for workers staying late or pull window coverings. Down shield exterior lighting to eliminate all light directed upward and horizontal glare. And install motion sensors and automatic controls wherever possible. Let's take Philadelphia, for example. The city is located along a migration corridor for birds, and each year tens of millions of birds pass through while migrating, making it potentially dangerous if too many lights are left on. Bird safe Philly, a coalition of nonprofits, adjoined together with the city of Philadelphia, and its building industry to create lights up Philly in 2021. It began its first migration season, April 1st of that year, the peak of spring migration. It ran through May 31st, and again, August 15th, through November 15th, when birds traveled south. During that time, 41 commercial 53 residential and 6 municipal participants pledged to turn off their lights to help birds out. It may seem like a small measure, but Chicago, the first lights out city in the nation, has reported saving 10,000 birds every year since it began the program. Even if your city isn't participating in the lights out program, you can still help. A close the blinds or turn off interior lights when you leave a room. If you have control over your outdoor lighting, choose down shielded lighting options. Add timers and or motion sensors if possible. And turn off outdoor spotlights or decorative lighting between midnight and 6 a.m.. The national Audubon society also suggests residents of major cities urged their building owners, managers, and other homeowners to turn off outdoor lighting during the months when birds are migrating. While birds are facing a lot of challenges, along with the buildings, there's climate change, feral cats, and habitat destruction, we can help them out by working to fix the problems that we've created. Today's episode is based on the article, Audubon's lights out program hills the lights to save the birds. On host of works dot com, written by Stephanie Parker. Brain stuff is production by heart radio in partnership with how stuff works dot com and was produced by Tyler clang. For more podcasts, my heart radio, visit the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Dragons are coming to Xfinity flax, a new rain begins with a premiere of the ferocious Game of Thrones prequel House of the dragon. August 21st. Check out the best of the Targaryens with our collection packed with free episodes of Game of Thrones to prepare for the premiere of a house of the dragon. And if that's not enough, dragons for you. Check out the official Game of Thrones podcast on iHeartRadio. We've got all things Westeros on Xfinity flex. Say dragons are coming into your Xfinity voice remote. Hey, it's Bobby bones from the Bobby cast. We are Nashville's most listened to music podcast. In depth interviews with your favorite country artists, plus the biggest songwriter and producers in Nashville, all from the comfort of my own home. So it gets a little more laid back. They're sharing stories behind the biggest songs and country music, and personal stories that you will not hear anywhere else. So if you love country music, I think you will love this podcast. Listen to the Bobby cast on iHeartRadio, Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

IBM Lauren bob Washington, D.C. national Audubon society Chicago SEC Philadelphia Baltimore Audubon Atlanta Boston Georgia Colorado confusion United States New York Stephanie Parker Philly Tyler clang Bobby
"audubon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 7 months ago

"audubon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Towers are multi-million dollar proposition And it was around this time when Ross and his colleagues started thinking There is also one animal that needs warm water to survive The endangered Florida manatee because while manatees may look blubbery they'll actually start to die if they aren't consistently in water above 68° Historically manatees had wintered at inland natural springs but by the mid 20th century a lot of that habitat was being developed And people started to notice manatees congregating near power plants like the ones run by Florida power and light But there still wasn't definitive science about where manatees lived Which is where pat rose over at the Audubon society came in He and his colleagues decided that it was worth accepting the utility companies offer to fund that research as long as Florida Audubon would maintain full control of their findings Over the next few years pat found evidence that manatees did depend on power plants for warmth And pat says those findings helped pass new laws protecting manatee habitat Protections which helped manatees begin to recover their numbers Jay Ross Wilcox at Florida power and light says those studies including aerial photos helped the company in its dealings with regulators When you looked up and all you saw was shoulder to shoulder manses in the discharge canal it didn't take much imagination to say that you turn that water off and those animals won't be there Of course all this means that today manatees are still dependent on one of the main industries driving climate change as pat rose reminded me How many manatees in Florida are dependent on the power industry So about 60% that's huge The dilemma of finding an alternative of restoring the manatees natural habitat But that is a really expensive prospect and as manatee numbers have begun to decline again after collapse in their food supply pat's goal now is to convince the power companies to help create a fund for manatee conservation Alexi.

pat rose Florida Audubon society Florida Audubon Jay Ross Wilcox pat Ross Alexi
"audubon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 7 months ago

"audubon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Towers are multi-million dollar proposition And it was around this time when Ross and his colleagues started thinking There is also one animal that needs warm water to survive The endangered Florida manatee because while manatees may look blubbery they'll actually start to die if they aren't consistently in water above 68° Historically manatees had wintered at inland natural springs but by the mid 20th century a lot of that habitat was being developed And people started to notice manatees congregating near power plants like the ones run by Florida power and light But there still wasn't definitive science about where manatees lived Which is where pat rose over at the Audubon society came in He and his colleagues decided that it was worth accepting the utility companies offer to fund that research as long as Florida Audubon would maintain full control of their findings Over the next few years pat found evidence that manatees did depend on power plants for warmth And pat says those findings helped pass new laws protecting manatee habitat Protections which helped manatees begin to recover their numbers Jay Ross Wilcox at Florida power and light says those studies including aerial photos helped the company in its dealings with regulators When you looked up and all you saw was shoulder to shoulder manses in the discharge canal it didn't take much imagination to say that the eternal water off and those animals won't be there Of course all this means that today manatees are still dependent on one of the main industries driving climate change as pat rose reminded me How many manatees in Florida are dependent on the power industry So about 60% that's huge The dilemma of finding an alternative of restoring the manatees natural habitat But that is a really expensive prospect and as manatee numbers have begun to decline again after a collapse in their food supply pat's goal now is to convince the power companies to help create a fund for manatee conservation.

pat rose Florida Audubon society Florida Audubon Jay Ross Wilcox pat Ross
"audubon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I may Martinez The national reckoning over race in history is now playing out in the world of birds At issue the racist past of the 19th century naturalist and illustrator John James Audubon And PR's Melissa block reports Let's go out in the Maryland Woods surrounded by golden tulip trees and the earthy scent of spice bush Oh my gosh it's just such a beautiful fall day The colors are finally turning I've come here with Lisa Alexander I'm the executive director of the Audubon naturalist society Well for the short term for the short term because the Audubon naturalist society which serves the D.C. region recently voted to drop Audubon's name No question Audubon was a brilliant artist He created gorgeous life sized paintings of hundreds of bird species so vivid and detail they seem to fly off the page but also He was a white supremacist He was an owner of slaves He was a desecrator of skulls of Native American and Mexican people All this has drawn new scrutiny as this country reexamines its history Should we have known earlier I think that's possibly true that we should have known earlier But now that we know we have to act Once you know it you can't un know it And so Alexander says the soon to be other than Audubon naturalist society will take the next year or so to choose a new name The only thing I can probably say for sure is we won't name ourselves after another human being Alexander's organization is independent of the national Audubon society which has hundreds of chapters around the country and hasn't yet decided whether to keep or drop Audubon's name Jamal Nelson the society's chief diversity equity and inclusion officer says the national group will take the next 12 to 18 months to hear from stakeholders on that but he says the conversation has to be broader I don't want us to stand really close to a pixelated painting and focus on one little dot There's so much more work than that Which means says Clemson university ornithologist jeju lanham absolutely changed the name Drop Audubon But don't stop there To leverage John James Audubon into something greater than he ever could have been is to take a bitter history and to make some sweeter future out of it To make identity and inclusion central he says to the mostly white homogenized world of conservation as a black man lanna is constantly aware of how race and his passion for birding collide I can have a really high end pair of binoculars around my neck I can have a high end scope on my shoulder And if I walk through the wrong neighborhoods then bad things can happen to me This spring lanham's peace and Audubon magazine titled what do we do about John James Audubon helped kick this national conversation into high gear Lanham wrote Audubon's racism is the albatross rotting around the necks of those who would hold him in reverence It is past smelling foul and beginning to wreak That piece drew outrage from some who revere Audubon lanham is undeterred Use this moment he says to widen the mission And maybe it's going to serve birds better but it's also going to serve humanity better On the wall of his tiny writing studio in South Carolina lanham has hung an Audubon print It shows a Quartet of songbirds bright yellow breasted chats Two in flight and two tending to their nest which is festooned with wild roses Beauty and bitterness lanham says a reminder that genius can wrap itself around a rotten core Melissa bloch NPR news This is morning edition from NPR news I mean Martinez in Culver City California And I'm Noelle king in Washington D.C. the Cuban government is using police security forces and civilian supporters to crush not dissent but plans for dissent They're blocking people in their homes to keep them from protesting in the streets CNN correspondent Patrick Altman is in Havana this morning Patrick Good morning I want to start by stepping back This past summer there were some of the biggest protests in Cuba in decades Those were very significant What were Cubans protesting They took to the streets by the thousand across this island in a way that we have never seen Cubans do before since the Cuban revolution to demand more political freedoms a better economic conditions less censorship really just expressing their frustration at decades of Communist Party rule here Of course the Cuban government claims that this is all plotted by the United States and as a result of U.S. economic sanctions but the Cubans we spoke to in July who were risking everything to God to the streets simply said that they had gotten completely fed up and had nothing left to lose Okay so that was July Now we're in November and protest organizers clearly wanted a repeat But the Cuban authorities appear to have gotten out in front of them The Cuban government was right at this time First because the organizers tried to get permission which is actually allowed under the Cuban constitution to protest and with the Cuban government did with that advance notice was deployed police and plain clothes state security agents across the island We saw activists prevented from allowed to leave their homes by mobs of angry government supporters There were other people who were arrested other activists And unlike those spontaneous protests in July the Cuban government knew when this protest would take place many of the people who were going to be going out were and that allowed them to essentially stop before it even started these protests At the center of this story is a playwright of all people tell us about him Yeah I interviewed Garcia aguilera at his apartment just a few weeks ago And despite the Cuban government claims that he's been bankrolled by the U.S. and his quote mercenary junior lives in a really rundown part of Havana He's not the typical dissident He's a playwright who's won awards from the government for his work and he's a critic of the U.S. embargo on Cuba but also believes that Cubans have a right to demand changes from their government and this is what he told me So junior is saying there is that the government's actions have shown there's no rule of law The fact they prevented from leaving his house that there's no possibility for citizens to dissent to those empowers what he said to me And so he really says that he's holding up a mirror to the government and it's their actions that make the best case for what he's saying about Cuba's system So this is very interesting This tactic by authorities instead of letting people out in the streets and then cracking down on them as we often see all over the world in protest we're going to barricade them in their houses Is it working and do you think people will continue protesting very quickly It worked certainly over the last several days because in July Cuba's president had to get on TV as authorities were kind of standing around not knowing what to do and he said I'm giving you the order to combat This time the order was already given government supporters blocked junior from leaving his apartment On Sunday I talked to a one self described revolutionary named Eduardo and he said to me that he was keeping bloodshed between government supporters and government critics from taking place That's the kind of tension there is right now in Cuba and that tension is not going anywhere Patrick Ahmed CNN's Havana based correspondent Thank you Patrick Thank you so much With close to $2 billion devoted to renewable power the newly.

Audubon naturalist society Cuban government John James Audubon Melissa block Lisa Alexander Jamal Nelson jeju lanham Martinez lanham Audubon magazine Alexander Audubon lanham Melissa bloch NPR news Culver City California Noelle king Washington D.C. national Audubon society Patrick Altman Audubon
"audubon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The national reckoning over race and history is now playing out in the world of birds At issue the racist past of the 19th century naturalist and illustrator John James Audubon NPR's Melissa block reports Let's go out in the Maryland Woods surrounded by golden tulip trees and the earthy scent of spice bush Oh my gosh it's just such a beautiful fall day The colors are finally turning I've come here with Lisa Alexander I'm the executive director of the Audubon naturalist society Well for the short term for the short term because the Audubon naturalist society which serves the D.C. region recently voted to drop Audubon's name No question Audubon was a brilliant artist He created gorgeous life sized paintings of hundreds of bird species so vivid and detailed They seem to fly off the page but also He was a white supremacist He was an owner of slaves He was a desecrator of skulls of Native American and Mexican people All this has drawn new scrutiny as this country reexamines its history Should we have known earlier I think that's possibly true that we should have known earlier But now that we know we have to act Once you know it you can't un know it And so Alexander says the soon to be other than Audubon naturalist society will take the next year or so to choose a new name The only thing I can probably say for sure is we won't name ourselves after another human being Alexander's organization is independent of the national Audubon society which has hundreds of chapters around the country and hasn't yet decided whether to keep or drop Audubon's name Jamal Nelson the society's chief diversity equity and inclusion officer says the national group will take the next 12 to 18 months to hear from stakeholders on that but he says the conversation has to be broader I don't want us to stand really close to a pixelated painting and focus on one little dot There's so much more work than that Which means says Clemson university ornithologist Jey drew lanham absolutely changed the name Drop Audubon But don't stop there To leverage John James Audubon into something greater than he ever could have been is to take a bitter history and to make some sweeter future out of it To make identity and inclusion central he says to the mostly white homogenized world of conservation as a black man lanham is constantly aware of how race and his passion for birding collide I can have a really high end pair of binoculars around my neck I can have the high end scope on my shoulder And if I walk through the wrong neighborhoods then bad things can happen to me This spring lanham's peace and Audubon magazine titled what do we do about John James Audubon helped kick this national conversation into high gear Lanham wrote Audubon's racism is the albatross rotting around the necks of those who would hold him in reverence It is past smelling foul and beginning to wreak That piece drew outrage from some who revere Audubon lanham is undeterred Use this moment he says to widen the mission And maybe it's going to serve birds better but it's also going to serve humanity better On the wall of his tiny writing studio in South Carolina lanham has hung an Audubon print It shows a Quartet of songbirds bright yellow breasted chats Two in flight and two tending to their nest which is festooned with wild roses Beauty and bitterness lanham says a reminder that genius can wrap itself around a rotten core Melissa bloch and PR news This is morning edition from NPR news I mean Martinez and Culver City California And I'm the well king in Washington D.C. The Cuban government is using police security forces and civilian supporters to crush not dissent but plans for dissent They're blocking people in their homes to keep them from protesting in the streets CNN correspondent Patrick Altman is in Havana this morning Hyatt Good morning I want to start by stepping back This past summer there were some of the biggest protests in Cuba in decades Those were very significant What were Cubans protesting They took to the streets by the thousand across this island in a way that we have never seen Cubans do before since the Cuban revolution to demand more political freedoms better economic conditions less censorship really just expressing their frustration at decades of Communist Party rule here Of course the Cuban government claims that this is all plotted by the United States and as a result of U.S. economic sanctions But the Cubans we spoke to in July who are risking everything to go out to the streets simply said that they had gotten completely fed up and had nothing left to lose Okay so that was July Now we're in November and protest organizers clearly wanted a repeat But the Cuban authorities appear to have gotten out in front of them The Cuban government was ready this time First because the organizers tried to get permission which is actually allowed under the Cuban constitution to protest and with the Cuban government did with that advance notice was deployed police and plain clothes state security agents across the island We saw activists prevented from being allowed to leave their homes by mobs of angry government supporters there were other people who were arrested other activists And unlike those spontaneous protests in July the Cuban government knew when this protest would take place Many of the people who were going to be going out were and that allowed them using this state security apparatus that they've spent decades building to essentially stop before it even started these protests At the center of this story is a playwright of all people tell us about him Yeah I interviewed Garcia aguilera at his apartment just a few weeks ago And despite the Cuban government claims that he's been bankrolled by the U.S. and his quote mercenary junior lives in a really rundown part of Havana He's not the typical dissident He's a playwright who's won awards from the government for his work and he's a critic of the U.S. embargo on Cuba but also believes that Cubans have a right to demand changes from their government and this is what he's told me He and the motel and why I thought about it Is saying there is that the government's actions have shown there's no rule of law The fact they prevented from living is house that there's no possibility for citizens to legally peacefully and orderly show their descent to those empowers what he said to me And so he really says that he's holding up a mirror to the government and it's their actions that make the best case for what he's saying about Cuba's system So this is very interesting This tactic by authorities instead of letting people out in the streets and then cracking down on them as we often see all over the world in protest we're going to barricade them in their houses Is it working And do you think people will continue protesting very quickly It worked certainly over the last several days because in July Cuba's president had to get on TV as authorities were kind of standing around not knowing what to do And he said I'm giving you the order to combat This time the order was already given government supporters blocked junior from leaving his apartment On Sunday I talked to one self described revolutionary Eduardo and he said to me that he was keeping bloodshed between government supporters and government critics from taking place That's the kind of tension there is right now in Cuba and that tension is not going anywhere Patrick Ahmed CNN's Havana based correspondent thank you Patrick.

Audubon naturalist society Cuban government John James Audubon lanham Melissa block Lisa Alexander Jamal Nelson Jey drew lanham Audubon magazine Alexander Audubon lanham Melissa bloch NPR news Culver City California Washington D.C. national Audubon society Patrick Altman Audubon NPR Clemson university
"audubon" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Right, Jennifer carotta, thank you so much for coming on the podcast. It's great to have you here. But first, let's start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Sure, my name is Jennifer Corona. I am the current president of sinusoid Audubon, which is a chapter of the national Audubon society. It is a completely volunteer based organization, so that is not my full-time job, my full time job is in healthcare. So this is just a passion of mine on the side. I'd love to switch make the switch over to a conservation career, but I'm so comfortable in my healthcare career that it just never happened. Yeah, it happens. But this is a great illustration of just how people from all walks of life can get involved in the environment in nature. And you don't have to necessarily go back to school or specialize in something you could be from different walks of life, different careers and still give back in some form or another. But what brought you to want to do this? I mean, you got the human component pretty much down pat by the sounds of it. What brought you things? I think when I was younger, my grandpa was always in the backyard birds. So every Sunday was our trip over there to get donuts and read the Sunday paper because I always wanted to read the comics. Nice. And then it always have that, you know, the backyard feeders. So we were always looking at the birds and identifying them. And he would also take me around. I was born on his birthday. So I was the I don't want to say I was a favorite grandchild, but I really was the favorite group. And so he went always take me places everywhere. And the person wants to go Wayne speed store, so he could buy his birthday. And also I was scooping the bins and getting the bird seed out. And so that was kind of my introduction to loving nature. That's awesome. So really it started and continues to be about birds in a big way about the sounds of it. Yes. I mean, I'm getting more into plants after getting involved in this because I'm just curious by nature. And so listening to the botanist talk about these plants and not really knowing what they're talking about is a humbling experience. So I need to learn more. Hey, this is a great place to start. And the fact that you're eager to learn more is already setting you in a direction of success. But I think it's really cool to have that perspective come to the table because most of the people I talk to are plant people first and foremost, that is what they do that is truly what links them to the natural world. And then everything branches off from there. But for someone who's starting to learn about plants and starting to really understand what is going on outside with the botanical communities, what are these feelings you're starting to have for plants? What are these moments of discovery kind of like for you at this point in your journey? Yeah. Well, you really can't realize just how interconnected everything on the planet is. So birds benefit from the plants and I mean, I've always known that, but I don't think I really made the connection of how special Balboa was until I had the opportunity to walk out there with Jack White. And listening to him talk about the plants that were in this little space in front of him and the amount of biodiversity in that it just is overwhelming, really, when you listen to that and to think that bell bowl could go away. And here's this little tiny, many rainforest, if you will, right in our backyard that we're set up to destroy. Yeah, it just became so emotional for me. It was, I think it was that. I mean, I always knew I wanted to help with this initiative, someone had reached out to me and asked me to help with it. But I think I became even more passionate about it when Jack talked about the planks there. And talked about how special available Prairie was. And I would encourage anyone to go out with somebody who really knows prairies. Because I think that's when you can learn about them and kind of really make that connection. I'll just have a special is. I love that because when I give talks or try to talk to audiences that are outside of horticultural groups, gardening groups, botanical groups, I always say that plants are the reason I'm rooted into whatever area I'm in at that point in time. It doesn't mean I'm only interested in plants, but they're a great jumping off point, but any organism can kind of function of that. And as you mentioned, these interconnectedness, those moments when you realize just how connected everything is really drives that point home. And it makes situations like what we're about to talk to today all the more pertinent and all the more emotional, I guess, too, even if especially if it's something that you can go and see it day to day and where you live, right? Right. But yeah, I mean, there are spaces of plants that don't exist unless another species of plant is there right to support it. And there's insects and birds and all works together. And it really is quite amazing when you think about it and in order for us to continue to be able to see things like that and learn from things like that. We need to be able to perform here for us in the future. Yeah. And I mean, as someone that's involved in human healthcare, you see it first and foremost, just how much humans really do rely on nature whether they realize it or not. What's going on outside of our doorsteps in our windows really does come back to affect us, whether that's indirect or immediate or down the road decades, we're all part of it. Yeah, I think we're actually working on a really interesting program at work with the physicians and it's called park Rx and it really is about prescribing nature to patients. And you forgot this massive.

Jennifer carotta Jennifer Corona sinusoid Audubon Wayne speed store national Audubon society Jack White Balboa Prairie Jack
"audubon" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"I'm in a rough place. I got to be honest. And this episode will tell you why, because what we're going to talk about today hits really close to home. Then that is the impending destruction of a remnant Prairie. Now, if you don't live in a state where there's prairies, this might not be as obvious to you, but remnant prairies are something very special because we've destroyed over 99% of Prairie on this continent. And what remnant prairies represent are essentially the old growth forests of grasslands. Their irreplaceable, the biodiversity they support can not be recreated in our lifetimes. I'm of course talking about bell bowl Prairie. The threat that's being placed upon it is the expansion of an airport to accommodate shipping via Amazon and UPS. And to lose this Prairie would be a travesty. Joining us to talk about this is Jennifer kuroda. She's the president of the sinusitis Audubon society, and she is very passionate about biodiversity conservation, not only for her, but for her children and the future. This is a really important issue and at the end we talk about a bunch of different ways that you can have input on this process to hopefully save this Prairie from destruction. I'm warning you, this is coming up quick. The decisions have to be made before October is over. So I don't want to take time from it any longer without further ado, here's my conversation with Jennifer kuroda. I hope you enjoy. All.

Jennifer kuroda sinusitis Audubon society UPS Amazon
"audubon" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"We will not be requiring vaccinations to be employed in the Cobb county school district Mask will continue to be strongly encouraged but will be optional Moving forward The letter threatened to sue the district if he does not change its rules At the height of fall bird migration in Georgia tens of millions of birds are flying over the state on some nights Well now Atlanta's can get updates on when the biggest flocks are expected As Molly Samuel reports the key to figuring it all out is whether radar Most songbirds migrate at night so we can't necessarily see them But the same tools that are used for weather forecasts can also detect birds and let people know they're coming Some nights depending on the direction of the winds And if it was rain it could be just a few thousand but on some of the big nights which we've had recently it's north of 30 million birds just over the state of Georgia Adam petrol is the director of conservation at Georgia Audubon His group is working with a researcher to release daily bird forecasts He says he hopes people use the information and turn off lights that they don't need to help protect migrating birds that can get confused by outdoor lighting at night and by glass during the day The best estimates we have state that 365 million to 1 billion birds a year die from running in the buildings in the United States Georgia Audubon's bird forecasts are available on their website and on social media tonight about 28,000 birds are expected to fly over Atlanta Tomorrow night more than 55,000 Molly Samuel WAB news And you can find more local news on our website that's W ABE dot org right now in the city 77° under a clear skies Overnight lows will fall to the mid 50s and for your weekend lots of sunshine 78 for tomorrow 80 on Sunday.

Cobb county school district Ma Molly Samuel Georgia Adam petrol Georgia Audubon His group Atlanta Audubon United States
"audubon" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Are you afraid of an animal or someone approaching you. Are you afraid of getting hurt Because in most cases there is an answer to that. Fear know there are Safety devices there. There's gps devices. You can take if you're going on a long hike you know there's pepper spray. Their spare spray. There's there's there's a lot of ways that you can really have to an actual tool to counteract that year. And then i think a lot of it is just in our minds and i found that the more i hiked and the more comfortable i became with my own ability to take care of myself in the woods The less i felt those fears at sounds really empowering so. I'm going to go back to phones in a minute. Eight hundred four two three eight two five five but before i do becky your director of mass audubon west. What does mass audubon tell people about safety how to be safe. Yeah great question so Some of it depends on the time of year. A lot of it depends on Knowing trail conditions weather conditions for instance knowing when The storm may be coming in or some weather might be expected Being prepared if things could get cold or rainy and they can sure you have the right layers Another thing this time of year that we start reminding folks. Is that this sunsets a lot earlier and so to make sure you're giving yourself enough time to really Get to wherever you want to go and get back Before the sun sets. Unless of course you're planning to to hike during Nighttime in which case you have to bring a.

becky audubon
"audubon" Discussed on Talkin' Birds

Talkin' Birds

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on Talkin' Birds

"During the day. You may have seen the boreal owl in the movies. As the pet of danish writer karen blixen portrayed by meryl streep in the great film out of africa. Although it's unlikely that this was the species that was act surely blixen's pep since it doesn't occur on that continent the boreal. All's call has been compared to a non vocal sound of last week's mystery. Burn the wilson's snipe. Here's the snipe. And here's the owl by the way the cornell lab of ornithology suggests that if you live within the breeding range of the boreal owl you might consider putting up a nest box. They're readily accepted by this bird. In cornell's nest watch site offers plans and information on how to build one. The boreal owl goalies who. Maria's today's talk and birds featured feathered friend. Welcome back to our show number. Whatever number it is here it's Number eight hundred forty nine and we're live today from the beautiful nature center and aquarium of rhode island audubon audubon society of rhode island here in bristol rhode island Yeah thank you thank you. We have a beautiful Audience Yeah and we have a beautiful guest here. Well handsome guest. I should say he's right next to me here. He's dr charles clarkson who earned an undergrad degree in environmental sciences at mary. Washington college a master's degree in biology biology from virginia commonwealth university and a doctorate degree in environmental sciences from the university of virginia. He's received numerous awards for his research in the field of ornithology and served on audubon board of directors from two thousand thirteen to twenty twenty one and he joins us now to talk about his new position as audubon rhode island's director of avian research. Good morning charles. In morning right. Thanks so much for having me. You're very welcome over a little bit closer here if you could that we I won't drop the microphone again So charles use served recently as a coordinator for the rhode island breeding bird. Atlas aimed at assessing long-term changes to the states bird populations. I wonder if you could give us a thumbnail sketch of that. What was involved in in. That took place in this state and actually bird. Atlases are applied throughout many states here in the country. The ultimate goal of this of the atlas project is to map the distribution and overall abundance of species that primarily breed in the state and so we subdivided the entirety of rhode island and do one hundred and sixty five ten square miles survey blocks and then. We spent six years gathering data on breeding birds. And what makes rhode island so unique. Is that because of our small spatial extent. We were able to extend our surveys into both the migratory and wintering periods as well so we have a snapshot of not only how birds utilize our state during the breeding season in the habitats. They require and the total numbers of individuals from any of our breeding birds. But we also know how birds utilize our state during the non reading period for overwintering habitat at how they use it as they transit through the state during periods of gration. So that's pretty cool. The entire state over all the seasons like that and So many volunteers involved. How do you get all the volunteers. It was It was no easy task but thankfully nowadays we have social media which are our forebears. Didn't have in the first round atlas over thirty years ago. So the first round atlas was able to recruit sixty nine total volunteers and because of platforms like facebook. We were able to get over two hundred volunteers for the second round. Atlas and the data collection itself was primarily driven by citizen scientists and volunteer collected data without whom we would not be able to create all these beautiful spatially explicit maps and understand how birds utilize our state. And what's your report card for birds. In general in rhode island so we have a large number of breeding species. Here we have one hundred and seventy three total species documented with one hundred and fifty of them. confirmed as breeding in the states. Some of whom some of these species are in decline as you might expect. Species enter are very tightly linked to grassland habitats which seems to be the the theme on a regional scale as well at grassland. Birds are are not doing so well. Where i on mature forests. So here in rhode island. We have a lot of maturation or force back in a more formal forested states. And this has become more attractive. Species like the -ffiliated woodpecker and the red bellied woodpecker. So we've had losses on some One of the spectrum and end gains on the other. I really wanted to ask you about some testimony. You gay re-selling to the rhode island legislature. And we're really very tight on time here. But i wonder if you could give us a quick overview of that and in modified bill going to the senate and was standard correctly. All about neo nicotinoid. These really problematic pesticides right so near nicotinoid or the most widely used pesticide in our country. And we do know that some of these pesticides to include in the dakhla prayed which is the most heavily used has very serious negative implication for avian populations and over in europe. They recognize through studies in the netherlands. That were birds and the application of pesticide. Overlap you see. Long term declines in those bird populations. So we've been working to Get a ban on the use of these chemicals and it looks like that ban is going to transform into a bill in which only certified licensed professionals can use it in an outdoor sense and hopefully beyond that at some point exactly yes. That's that's the goal just quickly And this is Along a big topic really but Your new the new Director of avian research here for audubon rhode island and you'll be addressing how to minimize the impacts of climate change on birds as a big part. Tell us really quickly if you could about that Charles and maybe some other areas of focus. Yeah that's right. So the it's really twofold position. The first step is largely going to be determining which species utilize audubon refugees across all fourteen of the refuge complex And then once we have an idea of both the distribution and abundance of birds using these refugees on a year round basis where then going to determine what we can do as a conservation agency to be more efficient with our our money. Our effort dr charles clarkson has been appointed audubon director of avian research here at the audubon society of rhode island in this new position. He'll lead efforts in developing a research program to protect birds other wildlife and their habitats on audubon protected properties and natural spaces in rhode island On behalf of All the fans of audubon rhode island. Welcome and congratulations. Thank you so very much charles. Clarkson here on earth and up next. It's our mystery bird contest to just one minute. The flutter of tail gunner the flash of a wing bar in mid-flight. You don't always have a lot of time to identify burden. Nature let alone to appreciate its beauty. But with vortex optics. You'll have the power to bring every wild moment closer when you choose vortex you're to have a partner in the field as passionate about nature as you are whether you're spotting old friends in the backyard feeder or a packing for a once in a lifetime trip to a few species to your lifeless.

rhode island audubon rhode island dr charles clarkson blixen aquarium of rhode island audub bristol rhode island audubon board of directors karen blixen gration charles meryl streep Washington college virginia commonwealth universi university of virginia cornell rhode island legislature wilson Maria africa
Who Are the Taliban's Leaders and Its Rank-and-File?

The World: Latest Edition

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Who Are the Taliban's Leaders and Its Rank-and-File?

"The taliban took back control of afghanistan. There's been a lot of waiting wondering and worrying about how they will rule the country but we wanted to go bit more granular and ask who makes up the taliban today. It's not a simple question and we don't expect a simple answer. I'm lead hucker is going to take a stab at it. He's the editor of the afghan. I an independent media outlet and he's based in london. I'm eddie first. Question is about the person who's been named the head of the taliban led afghan government will abdelghani. Dr who is he well. He is from southern upon istana and he essentially cut his teeth in the outgun political battlefield during the soviet invasion and occupation he partook in was called the soviet jihad and obviously after the withdrawal of the soviet forces and the collapse of the puppet communist government we saw a surge in infighting amongst the mujahedeen and in one thousand nine hundred four essentially. What were a group of virginia dean. Commanders leaders and southern onto stone got together and formed a political organization called the taliban and now the taliban means literally students and as a social educational network existed for centuries in the south of the country from which malabo that is from. But this was the first time they became a political organization so malabo brought is essentially for all intents and purposes a co founder of. That's audubon a veteran. I wanna move to the rank and file members of the taliban who are they in terms of background education. Where they're from the rank and file it's difficult to sort of characterize them as a monolith however the way in which we could essentially characterize them as generally rural religiously educated so they are literally can read and they can write and generally very young. So almost you know. In that mid-twenties most of them don't remember the toddler bonds previous government in late nineteen ninety s rather their only real remembered experiences of living off the two thousand guantanamo

Taliban Hucker Afghan Government Abdelghani Istana Malabo Afghanistan Eddie DR London Virginia Guantanamo
"audubon" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Now audubon friends audubon audubon friends at firm beautiful ended up buying them out on people. Think scott's ended up buying them out and went to the furman paladins dot com site. And they said you're in an adblocker they kidding me yet. No ad blockers allowed. Oh waitlisted big. I thought really. Good takedown cord. Doctor had to count them to links to his pleura pluralistic dot net blog today. This is the other one end of the line for uber. I thought this was really good. He says uber is a basil. Be easy ellie term. I wasn't familiar with. He defines it as the magical interview interval when a confidence trickster knows he has the money but the victim does not yet understand he has lost it and he makes it very strong case and quotes A A blog that has been for the last several years talking about this. You know. google uber's naked. Capitalism dot com hubert horan twenty-six analysts is twenty six analyses of uber and their quarterly results and the conclusion who hobart comes up with. Hubert comes up with as well as corey is. This was never designed to make money. You know we all think. Oh yeah uber's gonna make money someday. Maybe when self driving vehicles never. It was of amazon as well. Yeah but there is no. There is no path to profit for uber He said the pretense itself driving cars would eliminate their labor costs. They knew this would never happen. They spelt spent billions on a doomed effort. Then had to bribe another company with a four hundred million dollar investment to take its window-dressing away. They sold it Uber didn't need self driving cars. It needed us to think it would have self driving cars that way. The company saudi owners could raise investment capital from subsequent investors. Also known as suckers as corey all the way up to the ipo cash out and walk away whistling innocently. He says uber's almost add a cash at this point and You know uber loses as we've mentioned many times before a lot of money billions but claims. It's making money he says. How does it do this well. It lies simply uber. Shoes boring old. The generally accepted accounting practices. Stacy knows that is gap gap an advance. Facet fanciful new forms of mathematics. Losing money is good actually stuff yeah every quarter it releases. New lies laid out like a profit and loss statement and every quarter hubert horn shows. It's losing money It's mid twenty twenty. One corey says now and going broke. uber bailed or got kicked out of russia. China india and southeast asia. It so interesting A true counting of the last quarter has uber. Losing thirty eight cents. Every dollar took in three point seven billion of its assets or actually worthless paper from failing overseas right. Hail companies hooper's cash reserves declined four point seven billion dollars in twenty twenty and nine hundred thirty seven million more in the first half of this year. They've got six point seven billion in the bank down from fourteen point six twenty nineteen in other words at.

hubert horan corey audubon ellie Hubert hobart scott hubert horn amazon google uber Stacy southeast asia russia China india hooper
"audubon" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Plant in do roofing learned that. I didn't want to do that. The rest of my. That's the other thing you learn worst anything. Well i'll just hot tar but you can fall this commercial building. Some the biggest project that i did was furman university on ice there there. At the time new basketball arena was being. Resurfaced and i was appalled net with the team who way. Hey you wanna do that restaurant. It's funny that jeff should have focused on that. Because i'm much more interested in the bird seed shop where you and church wasn't wasn't a shop. There was an actual plant. Where yeah they had all of these big silos and everything gets mixed together and then dropped in bags and our stack fifty pound bags of seed. Are they long onto pallets. That was it off the line. Stack it onto a pallet forklifts. Come pick it up. Is it just fifty thousand over in over. I wanted you say. nah man. I was in charge. I was working my way up to sunflower seeds militant thistle. Someday i hope to do suet but right now i'm working on my millet and corn. Those are the big ones you did. Minutes arena now audubon friends audubon audubon friends at firm beautiful ended.

furman university basketball jeff audubon audubon audubon
"audubon" Discussed on Sake On Air

Sake On Air

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on Sake On Air

"Hard woods sounds like a lot of fun. Yeah sounds a lot of fun sake brewing. don't we use it. Sounds like hot as well. It's a lot of fun and there's nothing like going to the after party with with just the regular storytellers. Who were who were involved in that day and just listen the mass because a masters the seniority is very very strict yet. But once you get to like okay. We've all done a show together and you know usually most junior people are the ones that did the most help everyone so the seniors are like dory but seniority. More relaxed Drink and that's when it's just most fun society the kind of you'd roll up your Okay who has the best story now. Like in audubon. Now she like. Oh you know what that master was like when he was young. And there's all kinds of gossip and it's just just the funniest thing in the world. This is why become a rock. I really feel that drinking sake. Sometimes as well you know as a group and then kind of you know absolutely i after a show with i mean i've been separated from that world for a few years because it'd be concentrating so much abroad so i don't get the chance that much anymore but you know when you do is just so fun and then and then there's a level on top of that when you just performing with your family like apprentices under the same master sometimes you'll have itchy mon high which means a show with just cuts it up buna. She's does she or apprentices right and then they're literally like brothers and sisters. Thank you because we all suffered under the same pastor. Nobody translate that said that we will went through the same apprenticeship. So that's just you feel like literally you feel like blood relatives. It's fascinating dynamic unique. Let's listen to a few quick questions. Changed the ten polo bear. What's your favorite rocco story. And why i love.

audubon
"audubon" Discussed on The Birding Life Podcast

The Birding Life Podcast

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on The Birding Life Podcast

"And other services for people who are interested in birds. I grew up playing hard outdoors every day. I think that's where my love and my connection for nature comes from and so it's always been something that has been part of my life. I got a degree in marine. Biology traveled up and down the east coast studying all kinds of things. I love the snow. So i ended up back in vermont and kind of found my way to the audubon society which is a bird conservation organization..

east coast audubon society vermont
"audubon" Discussed on BirdTalk Radio Podcast

BirdTalk Radio Podcast

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on BirdTalk Radio Podcast

"Basement right now. And but i've always had a question for you On these hummingbird now is it. Best feed them the clear or the rat food. That's a great question. That is an excellent question and and you should not use red coloring in your food because red coloring. We don't even know what it does to humans to have that red eye and if you look at a little hummingbird if they were as big as a man. They'd be drinking eighty gallons of solution day in that. It'd be a lot of food coloring to run through somebody system. There was a story. I read about a rehabilitated hummingbird that they had it for a couple of days. And of course they weren't. They were using clear solution and foods in sex and things to feed this little hummingbird. But it's droppings. Were red for the next two days so we knew that had built up in it system. We just don't need it if we want to. Add red coloring and make sure the feeder has read on it but at red ribbons to it. It adds color and motion in. It's going to be much safer for the nectar solution table sugar. Or if you don't have it in a house and you want to buy some hummingbird what we sell in stores. As i mean bird nectar a powder that is sucrose. So it's just table. Sugar little finer so it dissolves well or we also have the nectar defender that make stuff last up to three weeks two to three weeks and but no red dye. Okay now thanks kim. Okay thank you so much. We'll see you. Next time. I mention we mcafee texted me just before we went on the show my wife and she said that she had male bullock's oriole still coming into the feeder. Big old robin came and chased it away. Oh my goodness. That's the fun thing i mean. I keep my oriole feeders out there. I've got oranges and grape jelly in there and the orioles are coming by less frequently. Now but the robins are coming in every day and i'm getting males and females and juvenile and. That's quite a treat. Robbins are not common visitors. Feeders know but they love byrd bass but if you want to see him nice and close up. Just put one of those feeders outside your window and you'll get to have robbins coming in every day. Great three zero three six eight six thousand nine hundred seventy one is the number. We're going to go out to talk with richard thornton. Hello richard right. I'm a pre president of rare consultants. And the reason i'm calling is which i've been trying to get a study of of the use of how Windmills sometimes birds cuisinart anyway. The the orchard owners in the seattle area use a thing called flash tape We keep the birds out of their orchards. And basically it's just like a foil that reflects read on one side and Just a total reflection on the other sure and it. It works very well for them and i have been trying to get a study commission to To test test this to see if it would cut down on on on it might even cut down on bad debts as well because the foiled and they might see on their whatever their kind of radar is tend to be attracted to for bats. Tend to be attracted to foil. Yeah if you throw a tin ball of foil up is a bad is flying by. He will fly towards it. I what would happen. If the birthmarks way with the bats crashing into it like crazy it could it could increase mortality. And that's just an anecdotal guests. Because i know that they go after the the silver tip of my fly rod. What i'm out fly fishing dusk. I know that they will go after little tin foil. Balls if you throw them up in the air. So i'm not sure that would work well for bats and everything would have to be lit up at night because of course you're generating electricity when it spinning anyway but it would have to be lit up because a lot of birds migrate it night and they would still fly into the blades. They wouldn't be able to see any reflection off the foil. As a matter of fact most migration takes place at night and these wind turbines are always set up in migratory pathways. Because that's where the winds i. I commend you richard. Great that you're thinking of ways can reduce that because it doesn't seem like anybody else is. There's a lot of promises there have been promises for ten years and they haven't come up with a good solution. No okay dwelled in interesting about the increase bad mortality. Even don't even have to get into the blades. All they have to do is get close to the wind. Turbine and it creates a barrow trauma. Just the slight drop slight. But very rapid drop in barometric pressure causes the lungs to rupture. So they don't even have to be in the blades. They just got to be near the turban. Yeah i haven't. I've talked to vets. The puck audubon society You know just a bunch of different sites where there's been farm and is creates a cognitive dissonance for these green groups and that's like the audubon society the sierra club and all that because they really want to get rid of carbon fuels and they don't like nuclear energy so what they do is they promote this energy which is wind turbines which is worst for wildlife it may be better for the carbon emissions in the air but it's worse for wildlife and but they can't they can't quite admit that because they put so they've invested so much time and energy and lobbying into getting these things out there and they're just awful. I mean there really are they. They don't have to take them down. If they break down they can just leave him up to rust or whatever they do. They're pretty ugly ugly. Just they just dot the landscape with these monstrosities. So we've got to come up with a better solution. Not yeah not go with the easiest fastest thing that makes us feel good and i don't think they've gotten there yet. Technology who it is it is and it has to be subsidized because it doesn't work very well But anyway but thanks for thinking about that. Richard okay. Well i would i would. I would say the energy solution. We need to be looking at it. Deal thermal geothermal hydrogen technology hydrogen cell technology nuclear now. Here's what most of europe runs on. And they do it very efficiently. Nobody's come up with a thorium reactor yet not that. I know of well that that would help earth too because a lot of the rare tied with all right where we appreciate you calling. And that's very thoughtful. We appreciate it and you have a great day back to the phones. Were gonna talk to frank frank..

byrd bass richard thornton Hello richard mcafee bullock orioles Robbins robbins robin kim puck audubon society audubon society the sierra clu seattle richard Richard okay europe frank frank
Is Biden Delivering on His Climate Promises?

The Ten News

01:28 min | 1 year ago

Is Biden Delivering on His Climate Promises?

"His twenty twenty campaign. President biden promised move fast on environmental protections. Now that he's been in office for a few months. How's he doing on that promise. I want to hear everything well. So far his administration is added eighteen new regulations and overturned twenty policies that environmental groups like the audubon society and the natural resources. Defense council opposed now toll. Cain they've stopped a coppermine from operating in arizona. After local native american tribes argued it could endanger sacred sites and sensitive habitats administration. Also pump the brakes on a decision to slash three million acres of northern spotted owl habitat. At least for now maybe the biggest decision. So far was ending the permit to finish the keystone excel pipeline. Which was supposed to carry crude oil from alberta canada all the way to the southern states in the gulf coast. Why is that a big deal. Well environmentalists were against the pipeline from the beginning over safety concerns and the increased greenhouse gases that the pipeline would release into the atmosphere. It also threatens the water supply and lands of the rosebud sioux tribe and other native peoples. Is there more work to do abso lutely. But everything's gotta start somewhere right

President Biden Audubon Society Defense Council Cain Arizona Gulf Coast Alberta Canada
Interview with Johnny Ball - Forget Me Knot Charity

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

06:55 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Johnny Ball - Forget Me Knot Charity

"So. I read on your website that the alzheimer's society which is pretty much the mirror. Image of the alzheimer's association here in the states found that ninety percent caregivers experienced feelings of stress and anxiety weekly more like daily probably at least sixty percent of them struggle to talk about the impact of caregiving on their lives because of feelings of guilt. It's like. I can't complain about what. I'm going through because my loved. One has a tea or alzheimer's or whatever and so how can caregivers balance their needs and the needs of their loved. Ones in your opinion like know have we. Have you thought that one through as you launch charity. I think the as mansell. How things i i think the fittest into that. It's okay to feel the way you feel. I think a lot of as you just explained guilt and extreme sense of duty and which means the facebook does because the caring for fest often before themselves. That i think is important for the mental health of the unification which ben immediately impacts the wellbeing of the patient. They need to care for themselves as well. A member. the average duty of air to themselves as much as they have achieved care to the person benefitting asta and i think inaccessible and really letting mass inside. You know that that's true. I'm giving yourself giving his a brain give yourself the option to feel how you feel and to Except that you need to care about yourself. As well is the vista But also will be trying to do is using technology to support give keg. It's and a big audubon is gonna be a mental health technology so for example of mental health apps identity being used recently going to help with distribution bags. A lot of k gives also busy. just hanso. faux would they would is essentially a fulltime job. The have undergone find that you and i knew mental health apps imitation Love people appear gives won't have time to the studies. Things is important. We proactive in exclaiming walls amphion to help whether they are specialist tools. Okay games on. Otherwise i'm helping distribute them so that people off themselves as well as often careful. Yeah like. I've experienced a little bit today. You have the best laid plans for you know you got you to the list for the day and then you get up at breakfast time. Something blows up your morning. Pretty much caregiving goes. You know you think okay. Well i'll take my mom to the doctor or we'll go to the park or whatever and then you know they have a different idea or they're having a bad day and i do think that as my generation in you you must be a must be one of the old millennials. Right tracy four identified makes me millennials. Yeah you're in the middle. So i'm gen-x i'll be when this episode comes out. I'll be fifty four. I got a birthday at a week. I think yes a week. And it's like irrelevant is about this time and one of the things that i have found with a podcast which obviously is technology. Is that a lot of caregivers. They're older and they're just clueless. Even run across people that are about my age. There was a gal my the showed up. She needed a support group like now today and so she showed up his back in the old days. When you could meet in person. She showed up to my support group from twenty miles away from my old hometown. And i said oh. I've got the perfect solution for you. My podcast and i'm china's show her and of course. I have an iphone and android phone. So i was having troubles because i'm not familiar with that. And she has. Oh do those things anyway. And i'm like it would really help you because i talked to lake fantastic people and she just blew me off like whatever i. I don't have time to think about a podcast mike. It's the easiest way to get advice and information so i'm hoping as we you know. Move through my generation your generation that it won't be sent a challenge to use technology to support our caregiving needs and is your focus with the charity mostly on mental health apps no not specifically but focuses on technology. I saw the empty We can distribute technology broadly cheaply and it also is ideas. My day job. This is my specialty network can understand how whips we can for. Relatively low costs distributed. Old bills will put k gives in touch with the right technology. That's going to help them. So the impact probably won't be as great as for example to support group but the impact can be brewed. Sir podcast princeton's what you mappin fantastic you all of this information or these impact trees from his love of people. Don't know about the concept you're describing. I think we push push the different types of boulder available essentially build towns. You just saw people. I should have a fax. You know how did you decide. Well tell me about okay. Well we've talked kind. Roundabout it into the forget me not charity. Tell me tell me about what you're doing to raise awareness and hopefully raise money to get all this fantastic stuff happening so. The game plan is actually road from portugal and europe and contents of europe to french guiana. Which is in sacramento. So we're gonna grow across the atlantic ocean. Agony essentially almost three thousand eight hundred miles and be three of us in the boats. We will beat a fist people. Whoever this particular passage we hope to break the record for being the fastest revenue which should be a fifty days so the pippa says two of the raised fist. Nine of capital will not to be phones onto defense Yes that's the game

Alzheimer's Society Alzheimer's Association Alzheimer's Mansell BEN Facebook Tracy Sir Podcast Princeton Mappin China Boulder Europe Guiana Portugal Atlantic Ocean Sacramento
Is The Sperm Race A Fairy Tale?

Short Wave

07:46 min | 1 year ago

Is The Sperm Race A Fairy Tale?

"Tell me a little bit about what you learned way back when about how conception works well. They showed us this video that described conception as a kind of obstacle course where the sperm little tadpole looking things and when they enter the vagina during this hostile environment. And they've done fight their way through all these obstacles and make it to the egg and the sperm. That reaches the egg wins. Kind of how it was told. Yeah that's pretty standard. It's similar to what i was taught to. And i spoke to lisa campbell angle stein. She's a reproductive bioethicist and she pointed out that we use really gendered language to describe this biology. She calls it a fertilization tale. So the sperm is this shining knight. Who's there to save the aig damsel in distress. And the sperm has all the agency the sperm is on a mission the sperm is fighting off other sperm to be the one to conquer the egg. Where's the egg is just sort of passively floating around waiting for the night and doesn't do anything itself. How does exactly what they told us. Yeah and lisa examined tons of textbooks at all levels from middle school to medical school for this kind of bias and she found some pretty wild stuff. For example sperm had this little hat like structure called the acronym textbooks described it as a motorcycle. Mean they could have called. It did horseback riding home at a ski how they could call the any type of helmets motorcycle helmet rights and that conjures up images of masculinity islanders. Tough guy weathers well clearly once again. The patriarchy finds a way but in this case. Isn't the story. exactly what happens. Biologically how it all goes down. Actually not at all. Oh no right. I am ready to go back to school. I want this post talk. Talk ariella let's do it. Only while buckle up today on the show go back to school to revisit the sperm race narrative and look at the ways that the edge and the reproductive tract plan active role in this process. I'm ariella zabidi. And i'm emily kwong. You are listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from npr. Alright classes in session. We're going back to school shortwave. School the best kind of school yes to learn about conception yeah and just to be clear. Today we're talking about this process as it plays out internally but a lot of folks conceived through the reproductive technologies like ibf. Yeah which are very cool. Okay just to recap. When i was taught conception in school it was basically described as a survivor style. Sperm race but ariella. You're telling me that this is a lie. yes yes. There are a few really big problems with this narrative when sperm i arrive in the vagina. They can't really race. I talked to jimmy heison. She's a biology professor at smith college. They don't have enough energy to make it to the side of conception. They don't have enough directional but isn't that what the cute little tales or for like don't the sperm use them to swim yet. Details do give sperm some swimming ability. But that's not a complete picture. The sperm are getting there faster than they could all on their own. And we've seen in rats and other mammals that even dead sperm can reach the lopion tubes so it seems like sperm. Don't rely that much on their own mobility. So are they getting their. The reproductive tract is bringing them along. Oh that is amazing. Okay how is the reproductive tract. Doing that so i talked to kristen hook. She's an evolutionary biologist. And she told me it's doing this tons of ways by changing the thickness of the reproductive tract fluid. Just like if we were swimming in a swimming pool with water versus a swimming pool of honey. You're gonna move differently in these different fluids or with contractions summer to contractions in your stomach after you've had a big meal or whatnot to move your food through your intestines so it's like the sperm are on one of those moving sidewalks y-yeah they're being transported along eventually reaching the philippian tubes. Okay and what happens after that. So the sperm. Start to move their tails more intensely. Which makes those pretty useless movements. We talked about earlier. More powerful research just that fluids in the reproductive tract kind of give the spur more energy. Think of it like taking a bath in coffee one. That's dreamy to the idea that the reproductive tract literally gives the sperm. Their strike is giving me strength right now. That is fantastic. I know emily. The official name for this process is hyper activation. Though that's riveting and there's even more the reproductive tract also has to prepare the sperm for one. It eventually meets the egg right now. The sperm is a little overdressed for the occasion. It's got a layer of stuff on that prevents it from binding the egg and molecules in the reproductive tract helps strip off layer so that the sperm is ready to bind. Ooh la la naked sperm. Okay and emily remember the sperm. Don't have is they have no idea where the heck they're going so the egg provides them with a gps it releases these super attractive chemicals that show the sperm where to go. Oh so it's like leaving breadcrumbs for them to follow. Yeah and you have to realize that philippian tubes aren't this straightforward path. It's really complex and winding there. There are tons of little crevices so without those crumbs. The sperm probably wouldn't know where to go. We were taught to think of it as a racetrack. Right but kristen. We know better now if you wanna go with a racetrack idea at least recognized that it's a dynamic race track so it's not like the german audubon. It's more like You know like more like a rainbow road where you have twists and turns and places to fall off and there are checkpoints that you get ask for your license registration and proof of insurance. I'm sorry proof of insurance. What does that mean honestly. That's not too far off from reality. And this brings me to may be the coolest part of all of this. Remember that hostile environment you described earlier. Yeah but you know. I was brainwashed back then in health class and i and i regret saying that because it sounds like the reproductive tract is actually far more helpful than hostile here. You totally but it is true that there are tons of obstacles along the way that seemed to be counterproductive. Like at one point these big immune cells surround the sperm and literally. Eat them. No that's terrifying. Yeah you don't want to be the sperm in that face off so it makes sense that you and me and teachers everywhere described this as a hostile environment but now starting to realize that these obstacles the actually have a purpose. It works to separate sperm. That are dysfunctional. From those that are functional works to separate debris that enters into the reproductive track with quotas and it separates the wheat from the chaff. Shall we say and then it takes what it needs or wants to the site of

Lisa Campbell Angle Stein Ariella Ariella Zabidi Emily Kwong Swimming Jimmy Heison Kristen Hook AIG Smith College Middle School NPR Lisa Emily Kristen
Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

Democracy Now! Audio

06:37 min | 1 year ago

Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

"The. Fbi and new york. Police departments are facing new calls to finally open their records related to the assassination of malcolm x. Shocked at fifty six years ago at the audubon ballroom and harlem february twenty first nineteen sixty five. This comes after the release of a deathbed confession of a former undercover new york police officer who admitted to being part of a broad new york police and fbi conspiracy targeting malcolm in the confession the former officer. Raymond would who died last year admitted he entrapped to members of malcolm security team and another crime. A plot to blow up the statue of liberty just days before the assassination. On saturday ray woods cousin. Reggie would read the letter at a news conference at the shabazz center in harlem assignment to draw the two men into a felonious federal crime so that they could be arrested by the fbi and kept away from managing malcolm. X's audubon ballroom door security on february twenty first nineteen sixty five in his letter. Raymond would also revealed. He was inside the audubon ballroom. At the time of malcolm's assassination at least one other undercover new york police officer. Gene roberts was also inside after infiltrating the security team of the organization of afro american unity. The group malcolm founded after leaving the nation of islam. Both officers would and roberts were part of the bureau of special services and investigations or bossie. A secret of political intelligence unit of the nypd nicknamed the red squat welcomes assassination. Police arrested three members of the nation of islam. His murder but questions about the guilt of the men have lingered for decades in his letter. Raymond would openly says one of the men. Thomas johnson was innocent and was arrested to quote. Protect my cover and the secrets of the fbi and the nypd unquote ray woods letter. Echoes claims and recent books by manning marable and less pain that some of malcolm's actual assassins were never charged in a moment. We'll be joined by raymond. Woods cousin reggie would released his deathbed confession. But i i want to turn to the words of malcolm x. Himself speaking after his home in queens was firebomb just a week before his assassination february fourteenth. Nine thousand nine hundred sixty five by house was bombed. It was bound by the muslim movement. On the orders of aligned to mohammed. Now they hit come around so they had planned to do it from the front. End the back so that i couldn't get out. They had they. They covered the complete the door then they had come to the back but instead of getting directly in back of the house in this way they stood at a forty five degree angle and talk with the windows so it it glance and onto the ground and the fire hit the window woke up my second oldest baby and then the fire burn on the outside of the house but it had had that one going through that window it would have fallen on a six year old girl a four year old girl and a two year old girl. And i'm gonna tell you if it had done it. Taken my wrangling going to anybody insight. I would not wait. Goes in the senate because this the police know the criminal operation of the black muslim movement because they have thoroughly infiltrated because they have thoroughly infiltrated it. Those are the words of malcolm x. Right before his assassination right after his home was firebombed in february of nineteen sixty five just days later he was shot seconds after he took the stage at the ballroom. We're joined now by reggie. Would the cousin of raymond would author of the new book. The ray which story confessions of a black nypd cop in the assassination of malcolm x. Still with us. Civil rights attorney. Ben crump who attended that news conference with Reggie wooden at the audubon ballroom now. The shabazz center where malcolm x was assassinated fifty six years ago. Reggie thank you so much for joining us. Use read parts of the letter this weekend. Talk about your cousin. Ray would and what you understand happened the conspiracy. He alleges that he was a part of by the fbi. And the new york police department to assassinate malcolm x. Morning thank you for having me ray was was a complicated man I think be based on his past experiences he he lived with a lot of fear and caution on a daily basis which instilled in me over the past ten years but are ray was a person that lived as a lived. He lived as a as a very quiet and reserved person because of what he experienced he witnessed some horrible things firsthand and also realized that he was a part of it after the fact and so therefore ray was told by his handlers. That not to repeat anything that he had seen or heard or he would Join malcolm therefore for forty six years. Ray separated himself from the family and In fear that he will put us in danger out rey lived alone many years and he Finally in his final years when he realized that he was his cancer was a reoccurring. He wanted to reconnect with family. Because he didn't want to die alone. So i volunteered to move them to florida so that my wife and i take care of them and get them back and forth cancer treatments things of that nature and therefore he trusted me enough to reveal this information and asked me not to say anything until he passed away but at the same time knox allow them to take it to his grave.

Malcolm Ray Woods FBI Audubon Ballroom Raymond New York New York Police Department Shabazz Center Gene Roberts Organization Of Afro American Bureau Of Special Services And Bossie Malcolm X Manning Marable Woods Cousin Reggie Reggie Thomas Johnson Harlem
Malcolm X's Family Says Letter Implicates FBI and NYPD in His Death

Democracy Now! Audio

01:16 min | 1 year ago

Malcolm X's Family Says Letter Implicates FBI and NYPD in His Death

"And the family of civil rights icon malcolm xs demanding. Authorities reopened an investigation into his assassination. After new evidence was unveiled a letter by a former police officer raymond would who did not want to the letter to be made public until after his death wrote. He was manipulated by new york police in the fbi who covered up key details of the plot to kill malcolm x. Would said he was tasked with arresting members of malcolm x's security team. This is raymond with cousin. Reggie would reading the letter at a news conference saturday a day before the anniversary of malcolm x's assassination in one thousand nine hundred sixty five. It was my assignment to draw the two men into a felonious. Federal crime so that they could be arrested by the fbi and kept away from managing malcolm. X's audubon ballroom door security on february twenty first one hundred sixty five on february sixteenth. Nineteen sixty five. The statue of liberty plot was carried out and the two men were arrested just days before the assassination of malcolm. That's reggie would reading. The words of his uncle. Raymond

Malcolm Xs Raymond Malcolm X Malcolm FBI Reggie New York
"audubon" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"audubon" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Brian. Andy Reid comes on the station. He's on and knows your co and he comes off as the nicest guy in the world. He's had nothing but problems with his son's, um His son, Garrett, back in 2007 sentenced to 23 months. For crashing into another car wall high on heroin. Garrett eventually passed away five years later from a heroin overdose. And just the other day Thursday night, nine o'clock his son, Britt Reid, who is the outside linebackers coach for the chief's, his pick up truck stuck struck a car. That had run out of gas on the on ramp and Interstate. 4 35, a short distance from the chief's facility struck another car that had parked at the ramp to assist. The crash caused life threatening injuries to a five year old and injured four year old. Terrific. Yeah, and he apparently police officer smelled quote, a moderate odor of alcohol, and Britt Reid admitted to having two or three drinks as well as taking Prescribed Adderall. It's like You feel bad for a lot of people a lot of times, but I mean, Andy Reid, they said, We have no idea we just hear about we seem on the sideline was hear him when he comes on the station, But I saw this today is like Was just gutted for this guy. Um, you know his son's was I've got it for the 45 year old. Yeah, I mean, there's sit in the back seat of a car over to help to assist as you said. So you know, parents are doing What you would hope other people do and help somebody out who's disabled vehicle and it changes their life serving. And at the minimum, its support decision making and it worse. It's you know, we don't know how bad you know it's the police at least smelled out falling. Right. When you're coming off an off ramp for an on ramp. You would think that Something happy going on there, other than you just lost control your vehicle, But it's a horrific story. And it comes on the eve of the Super Bowl. You know, it's bad for the entire Kansas City Chiefs team, an organization if they lose any kind of focus, But my focus is still on a four and five year old. I see that car. Yeah, and it's driving that driving the highways. I don't hold If you've done much of this over the last, I don't know. Six months but all of a sudden during covert when there's been less people on the road. All of us, and everybody thinks it's the Indy 500. You know the speed limit you may as well just say, Audubon Drive what you want, because that's what everybody seems to be doing. And Yeah, there's no safety out there pretty scary. And you said it. First of all on an on ramp it off for him, not the best place to have your car run out of gas. No, but I mean, how fast were you going? I don't want that offer hamper on ramp should be decelerating. Or if you're It's an on ramp. I guess your accelerant, but you know, it's just a horrific story for for family. He's got a history of Of issues a lot of lot of terrible stories. 3123323776 is going out to Morton Grove and Asher Asher, What's going on today? Hey, guys. Thanks for taking my call. My okay? I'm a huge box fan since 87 okay? So this is like my my nervousness officially kicked in at 12 o'clock today and noon. I'm extremely nervous about the game. Just just a situation was with Mahomes. Obviously. Consider the next goat but having Tom Brady on your team, it's e. I'm ecstatic. You know, it's so it's interesting how How humble of quarterbacking can come to a team and not even have any preseason workouts, no preseason games and to gel that quickly to mold that team and to have the same type of mentality to all be as part of one to make it to the Super Bowl. Guys, you know, I mean, I'm sure you know how bad this team was in the eighties and nineties, and I need a sticking with them. And I fell in love with whole colors of orange and red and buckle proves you being a Tampa Bay fan. Now it's like people look at me like You're bucks, ma'am again in the morning, orange and rest when anybody ever did for me can't drive. Do you have a candidate in your backyard? Do you laugh every time the stadium tell you be firing off left and right, But you can't let me in the game. Because they've got to keep it equal right? What they said. If the candidate wins, they're gonna be fine. Those cannons all night, So let me let me ask you this going into last week's game. Where was your confidence and coming out of last week's game? Where is your confidence for it was it was honestly the same way as it is now, because if Aaron Rodgers you know they were saying, and I almost they obviously forgot about it being like, you know, campus horrible when it's like below 32 degrees. Even though they bloat broke that curse, you know, in 2003 when they won the Super Bowl that to go beat Philadelphia, but You know, after that, from Bo of Aaron Jones, when we when we put 28 on the board or down something like it was 21. Something like 27. I'm sorry. It's like 27 Turn him like God, you know, people are like, Hey, congratulations. I'm like, hold on a second. You got on the other end, and I know that family. I mean, I know that penalty flags they're gonna be coming in, So I'm excited. I really am. But I'm also so nervous. I feel like I'm not gonna enjoy the game because I'm gonna be extremely nervous. As your it's tough. Appreciate your call. Good luck to you and I can I can sympathize with him. We were talking about the wild Chris Waddle Super Bowl party. We'll talk more about what they're doing tomorrow on twitch that TV, But last year I'm a 40 Niners guys, So I get the Waddell's house. I got a 40 Niner sweatshirt out of the 40 Niners jacket by 40 Niners hat. And in the third quarter with the Niners are up. People are coming over. Congratulate me. It's like what? Really? I mean, that is the game turned out. You know, I just slid away at the end of the fourth quarter and I'm gonna drive home and listen to it in your foot. In your 40 Niners colored car painted. Yeah, Yeah. Do you know the the flying out the back test The magnetic magnetic sign on the side. You know that I had I had to wash the doors of the magnet, which stick and then I I even tuned in to knbr out on the West Coast to listen to their postgame show about you know what they had to say? Just so I could, you know, Misery with somebody or the stress and throughout the rest. It's always a long ride from Lake Forest E O Downers Grove. Speaking of Downers Grove, we go, we go to my now hometown down his Grover. Bring it. Robert! Robert, what's going on? Guys I wanted Tolo don't know why more people are talking about this guy. And I don't know if we have to trade for Murphy is going to be a free agent. But I'm looking here on pro football reference Tyrod Taylor. Pardon my seatbelt vinyl in the parking lot, though. That's okay. He's.

Britt Reid Brian. Andy Reid Niners Garrett Downers Grove heroin Asher Asher Robert Morton Grove Kansas City Chiefs linebackers coach Aaron Rodgers Tyrod Taylor officer Tom Brady Adderall Tampa Bay Chris Waddle Tolo
Eastern black rail imperiled by habitat loss, sea-level rise

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Eastern black rail imperiled by habitat loss, sea-level rise

"Many birders visit wetlands hoping to see an eastern black rail. a sparrow. sized blackbird with white spots and red is but johnson of audubon. Louisiana says this tiny bird has a big reputation for secrecy. Very few murders actually are lucky enough to have ever seen a black rail and now there are fewer to find over the last two decades. Their populations have plummeted to only about three thousand birds because of habitat loss in inland areas and sea level rise the eastern black rails that live along the coast prefer a narrow band of shoreline where the land transitions from soggy. Too dry too. Many storm surge events during the nesting season and just the general encroachment of sea level rise narrows that banned in such a way where it becomes less and less suitable to the black l. This species was recently listed as threatened under the endangered species. Act johnson says the listing highlights the need to reduce carbon pollution in order to slow sea level rise because the black rail is such a mythical and beloved species. It has a real potential for helping sound this alarm and bringing more attention to those

Audubon Johnson Louisiana
Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

PODSHIP EARTH

09:33 min | 2 years ago

Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

"Berta. Volt from more than one. Hundred and fifty million years ago and then explosively diversified culminating in more than ten thousand species distributed worldwide. Today are human. Relationship to beds is complex to seen as spirit messengers of the gods and at the same time. We took the wild red jungle fowl. From india and selectively bred into domesticated chickens the now farmed in cages feathers have been used for thousands of years and indigenous headpieces and at the same time but has like parrots and parakeets a kept as pets bird poop called guana was used as the first fertilize of modern agriculture. And charles darwin study of galapagos finches was to the formulation of evolution. Buds are all around us. We are closer to bed than any other wild animals birds. I literally and figuratively are canaries in the coal mine. Their wellbeing is our wellbeing threats to buds range from habitat loss including logging climate change industrial farming with pesticides invasive species and even cats. These will had a devastating impact on the bird populations of the us and canada. Which in just the last fifty years have declined by. Three billion birds danton insane. Thirty percent of all birds gone. Three billion pez of wings have vanished ever across our continent from sea to shining sea. Luckily birds have strong allies in their corner. There an estimated sixty million active bird watches in the us alone and with the pandemic shutting down so much of our country. We have flocking to bird watching like never before everything from bird feeders. To binoculars have been in short supply and this year the birding app e bird collected more sightings in a single day the was admitted during the first two and a half years of the apps existence. I must admit coming late to the bird-watching pardee. But thanks to dr meredith williams. That's about to change. I'm lucky enough to work with meredith every day in her role. Running one of the most important and complex agencies in california governor. The department of toxic substance control. Dr williams received two undergraduate degree from yale and a doctorate in physics from north carolina. State university meredith then worked and silicon valley fortune. Five hundred companies in the technology consumer product and chemical sectors meredith left the private sector to follow her passion for wetlands and birds and led the san francisco estuary institute as we'll hear. Meredith journey is about so much more than her resume. Meredith nine meet apt get ready for my maiden watching invention merit so we're about to go hopefully bed watching what. What do we need to bring with us while like what. What's what's in the bird watching backpack almost nothing. Which is great binoculars. Of course are your starting point. So i hope you have some inaugurals. I know you were looking for some recently. You gave me some good advice. But i get any but we all kind of professional but what just like you would have an extra pair. Do thought so. It's in the office but we could stop on the way out of town. Not of that sound. No we should. We should yeah. You just kind of out now. Okay okay so you got the binoculars. How do you if you're starting out. It's surprising how good have gotten very affordable these days so i mean it's still a lot to invest but ask a bird watcher. They might have an extra pair. That's the first place you might wanna try like them. What do you well. first of. All there are lots of different kinds of birdwatchers in terms of some people. Want to count every burden get really long list. And they track every single birthday they see. It's about the numbers of the that very unique bird and they chase vagrant birds that fly in unusually and they're rushing off to see that bird so there those kind of bird watchers I'm a bird watcher. Just watch one bird for a long time. I liked bird behavior. just i'm just fascinated by them. And i think they're beautiful so i could just end up watching one bird for for quite a while you can just take it. In at whatever level you want in terms of the variety birds that you could see and how you would just experience them and enjoy them. So and i think the only way to find that out is to bert. Watch a little and see what grabs you What you do sounds really peaceful. The first thing that sounds the first thing sounds more. Like in england as a whole breed of people go train spotters and i always kind of identified them with bird watchers. Like it's really about. How many things. You've you've been able to capture and less about the bird the thing that you'll doing just sounds like being a peaceful will watching another animal even the people who are energized. That way unless they're doing a big day which would be a day when they map it out to see as many birds as they can. In a single day they're not necessarily rushing around even they are going to have moments of really enjoying a bird and even somebody like me chased around golden gate park looking for a rare warbler. That's very rarely in san francisco. There's an amiability amongst birdwatchers is really camaraderie. People are so nice. There's always somebody better in terms of being a better bird watcher. Meaning they either can identify birds better or you know they just have a lot of experience for the a little bit about. The ecology and people are so happy to share their information. That it's really wonderful. That's one of the things i like about it. And it tends to be every now and then you get into group and there'll be somebody who's a little loud but by and large the the folks are really kind of it's easy to get in a groove with with birdwatchers and settled and gopher along stroll and see some great birds. But what's there everywhere that it's a it's a big i mean like it huge movement and it's growing apparently it's one of the fastest growing outdoor activities. There is it's it is just kind of crazy places where i been going for ten years and cues to be just me and five or six friends maybe and now parking lot and i think the pandemic has made it even more so where a lot of people. That's how they wanna get outdoors or they've they've just kind of discovering it because they know it is one of the only ways to be outdoors so i think it's going to continue to grow which i think is great because then more people are connected to the natural world which obviously makes them care about it more. How did you get into meredith like what. What was your journey into bed watching. I mean i liked birds always in the yard growing up in ohio. You know the robbins and the blue jays. There was a hill in town. And i used to ride my bike up in the hill early in the morning and i would always see birdwatchers and i said when i'm old air quotes. I'm going to bird watch. And i kind of that seed was planted but i didn't really bird-watching until my three say in my thirties. I started volunteering for the san francisco. Bay national wildlife refuges. That you know are on the perimeter of the bay. You know them well getting restored a lot of them Back to title harsh. And i when i volunteered i would be doing everything from pulling out. Invasive plants to building shells but there are always birds around and i just became more and more and more fascinated with the birds invested in binoculars and just started creeping in. You join the audubon society and suddenly you're getting news about different outings and the next thing you know you're you're pretty far in foreign now. I'm foreign. I'm not pretty far and have taken a couple bird vacations. Which i think says that. I'm pretty far in. But what do those entail. The longest trip i took was to go to brazil to the pantanal. Which is a very large wetland like the mecca of bud watching their many mecca. It is a mecca over the course of two weeks. We just went out every morning. We get up before sunrise. Be moving by six o'clock at the latest. Usually more like five thirty and we went to a place that's called the parrot crater a giant sinkhole. And it's all a lot of parents live down in the sinkhole. And so you look down. A new parrots lying around in a simple it was tremendous and we ended up seen two hundred different species of birds there along with some giant giant eaters river otter is and it was quite a trip but the birds were spectacular.

Guana Meredith Dr Meredith Williams Department Of Toxic Substance Dr Williams San Francisco Estuary Institut Meredith Journey Berta Danton Charles Darwin Pardee United States India State University North Carolina Canada Bert Golden Gate Park
"audubon" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"audubon" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"I didn't know much about that. Much about climate justice or climate change. I wasn't warehouse. Everybody else and i love the bird. Some lovely little it was. It was nice calendar center. they're funded we wouldn't we all was black and brown folks in the warehouse. Achenese calendar man midnight. Eight in the morning packing knows counters so But when i was getting at the end of the process. I was like they would like they had a couple of damage calendars. And i said. Ma'am gonna take dabbing guy damage counters and take them to the damage calendars and so years lit. Audubon brought me back keynote events so i had to let them know as says a little black guy in a warehouse. Tacking countless planting thirds that total. I said i got. I got a confession to make your catalysts..

of damage calendars Audubon Eight
Interview With Matthew McConaughey

Good Life Project

05:46 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Matthew McConaughey

"Hanging out there. I'm a lifelong new yorker Hanging out in crested butte colorado. Right now and On monday night there was barely any moon in this guy. Nine thousand feet so there's no clouds and there's a meteor shower and it was on the news so i went outside so midnight. I'm standing out in the middle of nowhere. Like ink black skies that stores are just dripping into the ground and they're shooting stars kenley going across and i've got you in my right ear half reaching half telling stories and just thinking to myself. This is an interesting moment. My go-to places always been nature. It's where i stone and it seems like for you. There's somethin' can magical about the combination of nature in solitude. Also yeah. I like that term issues. It's where i touch stone. You said i like that. I'll steal that but a footnote you Yeah for me on just on always can measure. I'm sam in la. I'm in new york. And i'm working. I'm hammered thanks On the day to day gallaudet responsibilities. I'm good at doing that. But all of a sudden when i find is go i'll get ahead of time meaning arab six o'clock yet it's four. Twenty two off cheeks will slow down. So if i go click off check out to have my time in nature or be outside. Get back with the rhythm. That's my vertically stacked responsibilities income comeback guys it was fuel embassy to about three fifteen and i look at the mark o'clock. Don't wear a watch the phone as three seven t there we go okay like a minute or two behind actually my favorite spot just a hair like that like that like a great drummer Like the like. The drummer was on that That that was a these things drivers just on the back side of of the to not not on the front side of the wave just on the back side of the way and then i find that things. All that vertically stacked responsibilities that i'm feeling like accomplishes accomplished knock this down. And i you know start to run on reserve that lays down and becomes lateral in front of me and i can see it all sudden instead of the proverbial weight on the shoulders of that large stack. There's no late on the show because now it's loud in front of me. I can see wanted time. Gotta hop from lily badly. Get just as much or more with a lot less stress after and that's what nature gives me that clock. I think for me yes. No i love that man that really resonates also been thinking. Interestingly we're in this moment in time where the rate of not just speed but acceleration of everything boom boom boom boom boom. It feels like the way that most people are trying to quote keep up with that keep their head above water. Hold on for dear. Life is to accommodate by trying to develop the skill of moving faster right. And it's interesting because for me. What i've been really thinking about lately and kinda see is similar to what you just described is will maybe the better way to handle. This is actually light to cultivate the practices that allow you to slow down time and discern what really matters rather than trying to take it all in and keep up with everything you will the bandwidth we definitely. We would definitely some universally agreed on governor or sifter or or a drain to sift out a lot of needless frequencies or the did the non-constructive frequencies to make room for clear channel for the stuff that matters. That's dog onshore in may be that by process of elimination by process would make room for the things that that that really do matter. That are successful that you can you know have make a living with as well but also Feed us may make room for that those bandwidths to to be de bruyne lighter and have more of an auto bahn you know in their transference To and from us and when they get us even more of an audubon from art nugget to our heart you know that's another audubon frequency. I mean there's just a much sifted through. I think matters what doesn't end what's that governor for society enforces individuals. His oh this actually matched. And i sometimes think that society has gotten to point now where they actually see most of news frequencies that they all that sorta like. I'm taking it too seriously. Maybe like come on man. You don't need to believe that now. They're kind kinda feel excited behind the rag on lincoln to we know it's all soft porn. We gotta get it. We know it's all tmz. I mean this whole even even gleaning big about that with politics. It's up and go. Is everyone kind of get. Get the g. And is that a good thing that things that we had reverence for courtrooms that were never. We were never allowed in political leadership positions. That were by over there in that place on top of that hill that now we like. Oh that we've been in. There would be

Kenley Colorado SAM LA New York Lincoln
Ready to Secure Your Financial Future?

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

04:36 min | 2 years ago

Ready to Secure Your Financial Future?

"This article from Rosemary as I said, a VIP Audubon New York the tide love it is most Americans didn't tamper with their retirement savings even in the pandemic according to a study. Now, this is from Yahoo money. And this is encouraging. I think now this is coming from I see I. This is an Investment Company Institute and they are they represent regulated funds like mutual funds and ETF's electronic transfer funds, things of that nature but according to ICI only two percent, a 401k or other defined contribution plan participants stop contributing to their retirement in the first half of twenty twenty. Now as we all know it was around February marks arch really when the pandemic began to hit and things begin to shut down and shelter in place orders and things were placed around the country in different areas But here's the thing only two percent at that time. If we glanced back to the great recession, which happened in oh seven through nine, the there were four point nine, almost five percent of participants stop contributing to their retirement. Now the reality is this anybody that is saving for retirement is a long term thinker and planner, which means we know that regardless of what's going on in the world, the stock market is like that rollercoaster. You remember me talking about this retire inspired and I've talked about it. A lot of times on the show things are going to go up they're going to go down they're gonNA get Topsy Turvy. The bottom line is as because I invest long term I, don't really get too. Caught up in the short term situation, I keep my view on the thing out in front, and so it's important that that we have this mindset. Now, there were people that were impacted by the pandemic laid off furloughed or hours cut back In that case, a Lotta people did have to pause right because that's what you had to do. You had to go into conserve mode that's where you're onto things and looking at things a little bit different but look at this. Only. Fifteen of four one K. activity obviously was down in the second quarter but only fifteen point, six percent of the participants reported an outstanding loan that meant there were lower and fewer 401k loans which obviously make me happy. These loans are dangerous because if you lose or leave the job and have a one loan, that loan can be due and payable within sixty to ninety days. Well, let's think about this. You lose leave a job. What are you not have money? So the last thing you need is a loan coming due in the midst of trying to find another job. So 401k loans just complicates situations it makes life more stressful. Don't do it you know so the bottom line is this. I I liked this the the study. This these are promising numbers, Rosemary but the reality is as this we've got to make sure that we keep our guard up. We stay very focused and intentional, and if again you've gotta go into conservative mode, it's okay to pause but I wanna hit on something else if you end up having an emergency in the midst of this and you use your emergency fund. I want, did you hear me? You have to pause investing? You have to Paul Saving for college you've got to go back to baby step number three and begin to build up that fully-funded emergency fund. Now hold on because some of you are going. Okay. You went from basic math that like geometry Hogan, what do you? What do you? What are you talking about the Stub? The baby steps the foundational thing. Of all that we teach, which means baby step one, two, thousand dollars, you WanNa, get that thousand dollars in place. So you stop using debt. So if life were to happen a car repair home repair or whatever you, you've got money, you can reach for instead of credit card. Once you get that in place now you're going to attack debt with baby step number two, you're gonNA attack the debt smallest to. largest that's called the debt snowball approach and we're not worried about math. We're GONNA, WE'RE GONNA make payment minimum payments on all the other debts but I'm gonNA throw all extra money up the smallest and once I pay that off move down to the next debt. So smallest to biggest once you have that done now you're going to do what's called the fully-funded emergency fund of three to six months of expenses. Same intensity as you had attack in debt, but you're going to build up this emergency fund. Okay. Once you do that now you're going to begin to do multiple things at the

Rosemary Vip Audubon New York Investment Company Institute ICI Yahoo ETF Paul Saving
'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:29 min | 2 years ago

'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

"A recent NPR PBS Newshour poll showed that the top issue for Democratic voters. This election is climate change for Republicans it barely registers, but there is a divide within the GOP on the issue. Other surveys show that younger Republicans are more concerned than their elders by nearly two to one margin. NPR's Jeff Brady reports Benji backers started the American conservation coalition in two thousand seventeen while still in college he says his love of nature comes in part from his family there audubon members, Nature Conservancy members, but they were conservative and. I grew up not thinking that the environment should be political at all yet these days, environmental politics and dominate his life from now until election day backer is driving an electric car across the country talking about his groups climate agenda and posting videos along the way we are in the San National Park about to kick off the electric election road trip. Promoting his groups American climate contract. That's his conservative market focused response to the green new deal. Backer is critical of fellow conservatives who ignore climate change he's praised Swedish. Climate activist gratitude. And says, he wants to work with liberal climate activists to pass legislation. So how will he vote in November? If president trump wants to get my vote, he's going to have to prioritize climate change in the way that he has not done over the past four years. Backer says he's undecided so far he was disappointed climate change wasn't even discussed at the Republican National Convention. The trump campaign says in a statement to NPR that the president has proven, you can have energy independence and a clean healthy environment but the statement doesn't even mention climate change. Young Republicans are light years ahead of their elder counterparts on this issue here O'Brien HEADS YOUNG CONSERVATIVES FOR CARBON DIVIDENDS WHICH SUPPORTS A carbon tax to reduce greenhouse gas emissions grew up in Alaska and says, young people are motivated by mounting evidence that the climate is changing. They're seeing the impacts firsthand whether it's myself in Alaska with Algal blooms that are turning the ocean weird colors or with flooding in the Gulf coast hurricanes that are unprecedented at this point this is the climate generation and people are witnessing these things that we had been told growing up far off in real time that urgency is prompting young conservatives to join others in their generation and pushing for more action on climate change according to Bob English is a former Republican congressman from South Carolina I. Think it's a with their progressive friends. Plan on living on the earth longer than say their parents or grandparents English now directs the Conservative Climate Group Republic E. N. he says among young conservatives addressing climate change is becoming a moral issue more than a political one and that makes him optimistic. The country will eventually take more action. The demographics are definitely going to deliver a win for climate change. I am absolutely certain that we are going to win on climate policy the questions whether we win soon, enough to avoid the worst consequences scientists say the timeline is short. English says the country is more likely to succeed if both sides of the aisle are focused on climate change jeopardy NPR

Backer NPR GOP President Trump Bob English Nature Conservancy Jeff Brady Alaska Republican National Convention San National Park American Conservation Coalitio O'brien South Carolina
Global warming threatens Atlantic puffin recovery in Maine

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

Global warming threatens Atlantic puffin recovery in Maine

"Europeans first arrived in. North. America. And landed puffins were common on islands and the Gulf of Maine. But hunters killed many of the birds for food or for feathers to adorn ladies hats by the eighteen hundreds. The population in Maine had plummeted. Puffins were almost completely lost. That's Don Lions of the Audubon Seabird Institute. He says it about fifty years ago. Conservationist started bringing puffing chicks from Canada and hand raising them on the main islands. When those birds reached adulthood, they came back to the islands where they were raised and begin nesting themselves. Now, the puffins colony in Maine has recovered to more than a thousand nesting pairs, but global warming threatens to undo some of that progress. The Gulf of Maine has actually now one of the most rapidly warming water bodies on the planet. That's driving many fish to cooler waters. So the puffiness are forced to fly farther or dive deeper to catch enough food. The most intense warm years during the last decade have made it very difficult for Puffins, stories, chicks, because of the additional work involved in finding food for them. So reducing global warming can help means beloved toughens survive.

Maine Don Lions Audubon Seabird Institute Canada America
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Science Talk

04:16 min | 2 years ago

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Pawtuxet River Naturalist Society Twenty Twen Fred Tuchman African American River Black Folks Audubon Maryland Swami United States Chemo Price Consultant
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Science Talk

04:16 min | 2 years ago

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Pawtuxet River Naturalist Society Twenty Twen Fred Tuchman African American River Black Folks Audubon Maryland Swami United States Chemo Price Consultant
Dallas: Traveling Replica Of Vietnam Veterans Memorial Arrives In Garland

The Savage Nation

00:24 sec | 3 years ago

Dallas: Traveling Replica Of Vietnam Veterans Memorial Arrives In Garland

"A replica of the Vietnam veterans memorial wall is making its way into garland today will be on display later this week working people to welcome it to garland to North Texas and you know just give it a big North Texas welcome garland city spokesman Saul Garza says the wall will be assembled in Audubon park tomorrow then it'll be on display twenty four seven right through

North Texas Saul Garza Audubon Park Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall
Kate Middleton Reveals She and Prince William Have Discussed the Holocaust with Prince George

Unorthodox

02:56 min | 3 years ago

Kate Middleton Reveals She and Prince William Have Discussed the Holocaust with Prince George

"We learned from people magazine that Princess Kate and Prince William have been talking about the Holocaust with the little future King George. I'm going to quote from People magazine. Kate Middleton revealed that she and Prince William of told their children about the Holocaust revealed this at the Holocaust Memorial Day service in London on Monday. The royal mom thirty gate was talking to Holocaust survivor. Malla Trish at the reception commemorating the seventy fifth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz Birkenau and after the deeply moving ceremony. She said we are talking to the children children about it earlier today but we have to be you know for a six year old. The interpretation the royal added suggesting that she had to choose her words carefully to explain the mass murder of six a million Jews by the Nazis to Prince George the oldest of their three children. Okay end quote so first of all appreciate the snark from people. Magazine's hang that Princess. This is kate had to choose her words lightly when discussing mass murderer with a six year old so I was talking to last night just before we finished watching Zoe's extraordinary playlist. which is the best show? I've ever I really. It's unanswered. That was made for me. It was like dumb. Sitcom meets great playlist made for me. We're about to fire up the last ten minutes of it. I said to sit as like can. Can you believe they're talking about the. It's so nice that trying to be culturally sensitive telling their little six year old Church of England future king boy about the Holocaust but frankly someone should tell them like maybe a professional g like me to tell. You don't have to tell a six year old. I mean our kids learn about it when they're nine ten eleven but like six like Little Anna. We have a six year old. She doesn't Know Jack Squat about going full Israel in Israel. He started like at three area but they'd sit says to me she's like Oh you think Anna doesn't know about the Holocaust. Have you noticed the book that she's been reading and re reading and re reading and it was like you mean white bird by that the guy that lady who wrote wonder polite Palaccio and since it yeah and I said Yeah it's about a bird right and since it only know it's all about the Holocaust cost which is why today we pulled up in front of neighborhood. Music School and Anna hopped out and put her hand up in the air and said Hail Hitler I said wait a second. You mean to tell me that today might just blonde like looking zero Audubon street new haven. Where like all taste the coffee shop? The music school across from the high school like every family in our social sir. Everyone is like coming and going and picking up and dropping off and Anna hops out little blonde. Green Eyed Anna ops out. It gives and says Hail Hitler. Hails Hitler is a great remix of Ohio. And I said well I guess we should have had the princess. Kate conversation with Kate. Okay but what are we save a six year old again. 'cause we seem to be very totally dropped the ball that she has no idea that Hitler is not good. I have to say like for them for the royals. It's really easy Zeke's all they have to do is go. Talk to Uncle Harry. Who likes to dress up just opposite lowering talk to Jonathan Sachs? who had to like? Give Harry talking to after that. So maybe they could just call up there like like Jewish applicants for chief rabbi of England's preach to an ever shrinking community of Jews from time to time to holocaust education with ignorant

Princess Kate Anna Hail Hitler People Magazine Little Anna Prince William Malla Trish ZOE Uncle Harry King George Prince George Jonathan Sachs London Murder Israel Zeke Church Of England England Palaccio Ohio
Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

10:10 min | 3 years ago

Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

"Let's talk about Mississippi's Gulf coast. I I like to welcome the show Charles. McColl from McCall Travel Dot Com and Charles's come to talk to us about coastal Mississippi Charles. Welcome mm to the show. Hi Chris how are you today. I'm doing well and we're talking about the state of Mississippi. What is your connection with coastal Mississippi? As a travel writer. I have visited the coastal Mississippi a few times over the past two years and after going there three or four times. I decided that I loved that area and other parts of the US Gulf coast. So much that I developed a new brand called. US Golf coast which covers everything from key. West South Padre but we are talking only about coastal Mississippi debut today so as a travel writer I covered it several times. Excellent and why should someone go to coastal Mississippi. We'll we'll talk about many things but it is is unique. The unique destination the United States. It has the longest continuous beach in the United States. Which I think a lot of people don't know I love road road trips? I travel all over the world. Love driving and there's this sense of soul fulfillment I drive on the Mississippi Gulf coast. I where it's just different than anywhere else. You can drive for an hour and not see anything except for the sand in the water is unobstructed by condos and indulge and restaurants. And what have you so this this great peace and calm and different than anywhere else. Excellent and what kind of itinerary tenorio you're going to recommend for us. It's not a singular destination. There are many communities there. So I'm GonNa recommend some things to do in each of the communities go along the coastal Mississippi. It's all still call the Mississippi Gulf coast. So I'M GONNA use both terms interchangeably. I don't want you to drive fifty miles in one day for lunch and then go drive fifty miles back so I will concentrate on the various communities and say all right first day. You're going to be here second day. You're going to be here and so on and we can do a three four five seven ten very well. Let's get into it where you're GONNA start it. Let's start in Pascagoula. So Mississippi is between Alabama and Louisiana China so coastal Mississippi represents the entire Mississippi Gulf coast so over on the east side closest Alabama Alabama. If you're driving from mobile the first thing you're gonna hit is Pascagoula. The city is probably most famous. because it's where Jimmy Buffett was born. Okay I did not I know that. Yeah so that's going to set the expectations for what the coastal Mississippi areas. All about thank Jimmy Buffett was born there so we're already at our five o'clock somewhere attitude. Pascagoula is also a navy base. So there's a lot of military and also industry the street going on there but it's it's a seafaring community. It's laid-back relative to some of the other cities. We'll talk about. Well what are we going GonNa do in Pascagoula one of the things that happened in past the goal of that as I guess lesser known as that one of the biggest UFO abduction stories in in US history happened there. So back in the seventies the couple of people claim that they were abducted by UFO. And so they were never disproven even so. That's one of the most famous things that happened in Pascagoula. Okay but other than being abducted by aliens. What am I going to do in Pascagoula for won a narrow down here to the the oldest house in Mississippi isn't Pascagoula okay? It's called the lapointe Krebs House and museum now so I went. There are a couple of months ago and I was fascinated by Howell. They showed the construction of how house was done in the bleed was the seventeen. Twenty s house was built the How they use the for the the hair from animals as insulation in the house and things like that kind of interesting Seventeen fifty seven. Is there anything specific renovated the Krebs House. We're going to go to the Krebs House. You could probably spend a couple of hours there. It's a nice waterfront setting and you can get some history of the. The natives that lived in the area and then European settlers came in and saw a whole history of Mississippi but the main point there there's to see the the house and the oldest house in the Mississippi Delta region I think between Minnesota and the Gulf of Mexico. It's the oldest house that's still in the American frontier. I'm thinking New Orleans would be older than that but I mean the city might be but I'm not sure if there's a structure that's older than point good point. The city is older but I don't know if there are any of original houses. Okay Fair enough. But another thing that I really loved in Pascagoula. The Motto Bon Center. I believe the official is the best. Gula River Audubon Bond Center captain McCoy Relation on McColl. And there's a captain McCoy and he runs nature trips out of the Pascagoula River River Audubon Center and what I loved about. It is that I learn things. Obviously like you learn on most trips but the Pascagoula River is the longest. And I'm not going to get the the terminology right. It's the longest une damned river in the continental united in a at states. Yeah so I was fascinated by that and I was like well. What about this wherever they were like now? It was dammed at some point. So the Pascagoula River I believe is four four hundred and eighty miles. That is natural the way it's always been so it hasn't been dammed. It hasn't been obstructed by any kind of construction directions so you can see wildlife and nature the way that it was several hundred years ago. Something didn't expect expect to find in coastal Mississippi or anywhere else and you say wildlife. I'm picturing talking marshes birds alligators that sort of thing. Am I in the right right ballpark. You're right and one thing that that's dominant in this area or the Mississippi sandhill cranes which are relatively large bird. I'm sure there are in other parts that states but there is a sandhill crane refuge that none in Pascagoula but on the other side so I tend cuts through through the area so from mobile bill to New Orleans. You would drive high tech Postal Mississippi. I'm talking about everything. South of I ten okay. North of town the Pascagoula River would go up there. And that's where the sandhill crane. Refuges the birds. No birds don't recognize boundaries. They fly all over the place. So you can see that. I was on the riverboat tour. Okay the AUDUBON center is like most centers they want to promote the natural wildlife and the scenery. And that's so forth and it's a really hidden gem. I think that most people don't recognize will in because it has the name Audubon on it. I'm assuming calmly talking about birdlife predominantly. So yes okay. I don't know if everybody knows. I mean Audubon as a as a charity I think is well known but Google Audubon. You'll find what is James Audubon. Is that the a original one who did all the original drawings of birds in the early. US That's really neat. Watercolors this fascinating realistic catches does right. So I mentioned captain McCoy so you could take his crews out of the audubon center also wrench around Kayak and I did did that one time and going at your own pace around the marshes fascinating at least a dozen gainers and as close they would just scatter into the water. So I love love doing that at my own pace to excellent and John James Audubon. I got it almost John James. Okay when I said early. I didn't realize how early he was. He was born in seventeen eighty five and so he was basically drawing birds up until about the Mexican American war. You're in the US. And so as the frontiers were being filled in a he was out there with his sketch pad. MOM IN ESTA goal. There's obviously the Jimmy Buffett stuff to the native son. A I think he this family left when he was three and then he grew up in mobile but he has come back and he recognizes Pascagoula his birthplace so there is a beach and a bridge and his childhood home are all named for Jimmy Buffett. The parrot heads can go and pay pilgrimage to Jimmy Buffett and go visit some of those sites and one of my favorite places the Pascagoula is called bozos grocery. It's a very old school from the nineteen fifties place where you go in you place your order and you wait inside. been there two or three times. The last time I went kayaking at the river Audubon Center. In fact I got a takeout L. Poboy from Bozo's grocery and then took it on the Kayak. But it's this old school place where you go in and you place your order and you order order off the menu. You don't make up stuff and there was some guy in front of me. That was a visitor and he wasn't a local either and so he went on these. ZAC Oh can I make this substitution. Know what's on the bed. Yeah and I was like basically your choices are you. You get what you WANNA shrimp boat boy. You want poboy poboy being sandwich. A sub someplace else or a hoagie or a hero depending on where you're from but a pavilion in this region of the world. Okay and shrimp being the best known. One that I now. They're also known for their Fried Oysters. Poboy so okay. I got a half in half half. It's amazing I had a couple dozen po boys and along the Gulf coast and I it's one of the better ones side totally recommend going to Bozo groceries to get to take out to go kayaking or he.

Mississippi Pascagoula Pascagoula River Mississippi Gulf United States Pascagoula River River Audubon Jimmy Buffett Audubon Center Gula River Audubon Bond Center Gulf Lapointe Krebs House And Museu Audubon James Audubon River Audubon Center Captain Mccoy Mississippi Delta New Orleans Krebs House John James Audubon
Interactive tool shows climate threats to backyard birds

Climate Connections

00:57 sec | 3 years ago

Interactive tool shows climate threats to backyard birds

"You may enjoy gazing out the window window and seeing familiar. Birds like gold trenches robbins are warblers flitting between tree branches but as the climate warms. Many bird species will need to leave some the places. They've long considered home. These areas has become no longer suitable. And they'll have to move to new areas Brooke Bateman as a senior scientist at the National Audubon Society. She says for bird lovers who want to visualize what this means in their own yards. Audubon created an online tool users can enter a zip code and learn more about local climate Emma threats and the risks. They posed birds. It really gives you a local snapshot of what's happening. With climate scenes the two highlights which species will no longer longer find suitable local habitat by the end of the century users can toggle between different levels of future warming so they can see that without climate action. Oh these birds that come. It's my heater or these birds. I see my backyard. They're not going to be there anymore.

National Audubon Society Audubon Brooke Bateman Scientist