17 Burst results for "Audrey Brown"

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:12 min | 11 months ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Summer playlist. I'm coming out as a summer song for all time. I want the world to know I gotta let it show. It's like, right? Tonight at 6 live on WNYC. Coming up on Nissan with me Andrew peach, I'll talk to the priest at the forefront of protests in Sri Lanka, which brought down president Rajapaksa and asked what he wants to happen next. Will assess President Biden's trip to the Middle East in the last few days with the Democratic Party congressman, and the veteran ANC politician and activist Jesse duarte has died in South Africa. Those stories on the way after the latest BBC World news. BBC News. A ferocious heat wave is continuing to cause devastating wildfires and massive evacuations across Western Europe and parts of North Africa. In Portugal, the government says more than 650 people, mostly elderly, have died from heat in the last week. Authorities in southwestern France say the situation is deteriorating in some parts of the region of la gironde. A preliminary report into a mass shooting at an elementary school in Yuval Texas in May has found systemic failures in the law enforcement response. 19 children and two teachers were killed. The report says the responders failed to follow their training for an active shooter. The candidates for the leadership of Britain's governing Conservative Party have clashed over the cost of living in Brexit and the second TV debate. The three women and two men said they would not give Boris Johnson a job in their government. The former finance minister Rishi sunak was again attacked over his refusal to cut taxes. He accused his rivals of being reckless. President Macron was one that anti semitism is still rampant in France, as he marked the 80th anniversary of an outrage committed against the Jewish people during Nazi occupation in the Second World War. Emmanuel Macron said there'd been a number of attacks in Jewish people in France in recent years. The White House's COVID coordinator says coronavirus infections are again spreading fast in the United States. Doctor Ashish jha told ABC News, more than a 124,000 new cases were being reported each day. The Ethiopian runner Tamara tola has won the men's marathon at the world athletics championships. He finished in just over two hours and 5 minutes, beating the previous record by more than a minute. BBC News. The funeral of the political activist Jesse duarte has taken place in South Africa. Jesse duarte died with cancer at the age of 68, she was a stalwart of the African National Congress from its years outlawed under apartheid to being Nelson Mandela's right hand woman once he'd been released from prison. My niece our colleague Audrey Brown knew Jesse duarte, so why was she so important? Jessica was one of the pillars as it were within the ANC structures. As the deputy secretary general she represented a very particular slice into the ANC as a Muslim woman as a woman of mixed heritage, representing a very particularly marginalized community in South Africa that South Africans would call colored, but they mix heritage. So Jesse was a very powerful activist from the 70s and the 80s in that community at a time when the Apache government was at its sharpest and its most vicious. And as the push against the party became stronger, you know, those images that people remember seeing in the 1980s of children being shot and you know the police being challenged. Jesse duarte in that time worked in what we would call the underground structures revitalizing African National Congress structures, preparing the ground in a way for 1990 when all those organizations were unbanned and she then became a personal assistant to Nelson Mandela before he became president. So in that very important time between the end of apartheid and the establishment of a democratic South Africa. Yes, I was going to say in that transition from the ANC being outlawed to the ANC being. She was a key lieutenant for Nelson Mandela tell us more about the work that she did then. Well, then, because the world was so enamored with Nelson Mandela. So it was a lot more about managing his office managing his diary, but also doing the very important work of preparing the state because that's really what was also happening then because there were negotiations going on with the apartheid government that were negotiations going on with business leaders. So there was a public role to it, but one of the people behind the scenes, making all these things possible, was Jessie duarte. It's interesting that in recent years, she's not been such a popular figure because she's criticized for continuing to be utterly loyal to the ANC and its leaders, even when it's been more questionable. Absolutely. And I can understand why she would take that position because she always believed that there was an ANC that was pure. There was an ANC that stood for the ideals that she was prepared to die for and make no mistake it was very dangerous to be a supporter of the NCA and to be part of the structures that were trying to bring about the end of apartheid. So it makes me think that so much went into defeating apartheid and overthrowing the apartheid state, and that so many people were prepared actually to sacrifice their all. And that what came subsequently is something that a lot of people like Jesse would have had to live with a kind of disillusionment and disappointment, but at the same time, a memory that this was an organization that they really did hold very high and were prepared to defend to the death in a way. When is our colleague Audrey Brown on the career of Jesse duarte who's died in South Africa?

Jesse duarte ANC Andrew peach president Rajapaksa President Biden South Africa la gironde Nelson Mandela BBC News Rishi sunak France President Macron Emmanuel Macron COVID Ashish jha Tamara tola WNYC Audrey Brown Yuval Apache government
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:47 min | 11 months ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Up to one gig, learn more at 866-218-0460. Good morning WNYC. I'm Audrey Brown on today's NewsHour, Japan's X prime minister Shinzo Abe dies after being shot. Police have arrested a suspect. The race to be the next British prime minister begins after Boris Johnson's resignation. And the return of the rhino that once roamed Mozambique Savannah, that BBC NewsHour coming up at 9, on 93.9 FM, WNYC. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm a Martinez. And I'm Leila faldon, poet safia of hello, never used to write about her body. She felt safer turning the reader's gaze away. But her new book of poems girls that never die takes a leap by looking at the shame that often accompanies womanhood and piers Giga verma has more. Safiya hello says her new bookmarks a departure. Up until this point, I only really know how to write a sort of neat and tidy and well behaved book of poems. The 31 year old poet has published a collection, a novel in verse and a poetry anthology. She's won awards and seen her work translated in several languages. The idea was, you know, if it wasn't something that I wanted to talk about, then I was not going to write a poem about it. But there was a moment a few years ago when this changed. El helo's first book of poems came out, and she started gaining attention. And I was having a really terrible time on the Internet. Just as a woman. No, I'm just gonna be really saying much. You know, I just was like hanging out on the Internet and would just receive the most disgusting DMs, like day in and day out. It was mostly men sending her these messages, and some even shared a background with el hello. Muslim, Arabic speaking, Sudanese. And so I started writing these poems just from a space of real frustration and anger, kind of mourning all of the years I lost to the belief that if only I was like the correct kind of Muslim woman and polite enough and well behaved enough that nobody would hate me and nobody would want to do me harm. As her latest book girls that never die started coming to life, a hella realized she was writing more freely. This book is for my home girls. It's for my sisters. It's for my siblings. It's for myself. Here's an excerpt from her poem 1000. I am disappeared like all the girls before me. Around me. All the girls to come. Everyone thinks I'm a little girl, and still they hunt me. Still, they show their teeth. I am so tired. I am 1000 years old. 1000 years older, when touched. Amidst her own trauma, el hello interlaces stories of violence rooted in family history, of honor killings and of genital mutilation. Most vividly though, she writes about the dangers of silence. It felt like there was a before and after in my life where there was this long before and it was very silent and there were all these things that I was taught not to ever talk about. And then it felt like the second it occurred to me to start talking about this, it occurred to all of the femmes and the women in the home girls in my circle as well. And so we all started having these conversations at the same time. And with these conversations scheme power, the title of the book sings of the autonomy that el hello imagines for her girls. The threat of death and the fear of death, those are so often used to govern and to control. So if the girls never die, if the girls won't die, maybe they're free from that governance. And from that control, and then what could that look like? What could that look like? Girls that never die is out next week. And your news. Marriage encourages two lives to become one, but sometimes that Bond phrase. There's a singer songwriter whose entire career was once intertwined with her marriage. Now, she's trying to untangle it. NPR's Lindsay toddy has more. Laura vers spent much of the past few years writing songs about the complex wave of emotions that come after a divorce. At the silver mining there's so much loss, but also there's so much of a weight lifting because you believe things will get better on the other side. Flying things have gotten irrevocably broken, so you have to figure out how to move on. That's why people get divorced. And it is so much better on the other side. For Laura vers, reaching the other side of divorce, meant rediscovering who she is as

el hello Audrey Brown NPR news Leila faldon safia Giga verma Safiya hello El helo Shinzo Abe WNYC Boris Johnson Mozambique Martinez Savannah BBC Japan hella genital mutilation Laura vers Lindsay toddy
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:18 min | 11 months ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of senior lawmakers. We'll have more of that coming up next hour. 77 and partly sunny and the New York Central Park this morning mostly sunny and 88 today tomorrow a slim chance of afternoon showers, mostly cloudy and 80. At 7 51, you're listening to morning edition on doubly NYC. WNYC supporters include National Geographic documentary films and neon, presenting fire of love, which tells the love story of French scientist Katya and Maurice Kraft, capturing imagery of their greatest passion, volcanos, now playing in theaters. Good morning, WNYC. I'm Audrey Brown on today's NewsHour. Questions again over British prime minister Boris Johnson's future in office, the 21 South African teenagers who died in a drinking hall were buried today, but questions about how they died remain, and the women's football championship kicks off. That's BBC NewsHour coming up at 9 on 93.9 FM, WNYC. It's morning edition from NPR news ME Martinez. And I'm Leila faulted. The Supreme Court's 1973 decision in roe versus wade transformed the abortion rights landscape overnight. The people who oppose those rights were deeply shaken and newly motivated. In the years since row they began advocating their cause more broadly to bring more people into the movement and gain political power. Today, random and Arab Louis at NPR's history podcast through lying take us back to that time to help us understand how what happened then paved the way for the recent Supreme Court decision that overturned roe. My name's Bernard rosenfeld. I'm a board certified o-b-gyn doctor. I'm an abortion provider. And you're talking to us from Texas. Houston. How long have you lived in Houston? Now 40 years. So 40 years ago would have been and I think it's the early 80s. 1980. In 1980, Ronald Reagan was elected president. We have projected Ronald Reagan the winner. It was a victory for opponents of abortion rights. As a candidate, Reagan had made opposition to abortion rights and important part of his campaign. Even though he supported laws to expand abortion rights while governor of California. So when he won the presidency, it signaled the beginning of a new era for the movement. And for doctor rosenfeld, who had carried out abortions in Michigan, Maryland, and even Reagan's home state, California, before landing in Texas. Something seemed to be changing on the ground. The anti abortion group started picketing the clinics and then even started picking my home. So

New York Central Park WNYC Maurice Kraft Audrey Brown NPR news Katya Boris Johnson Bernard rosenfeld Supreme Court NYC Leila Martinez Ronald Reagan wade BBC Houston football NPR Reagan
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We are warming up this morning 73 and sunny ride down sunny with a high near 80 today cool overnight at 64 and then tomorrow's slim chance of showers mostly cloudy to hive 75 It's 7 51 WNYC is supported by optimum business little by little bringing changes to its services to reconnect with clients like working to secure Internet speeds of up to one gig with built in cybersecurity more at 888-493-8460 Good morning WNYC I'm Audrey Brown on NewsHour civilian evacuations to start from several Donetsk as NATO considers sending more weapons to Ukraine and astronomers say they've discovered the fastest growing black hole in the last 9 billion years that BBC NewsHour coming up at 9 or 93.9 FM WNYC This is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin And I'm a Martinez Ryan Stevenson designs smart speaker voices for an artificial intelligence firm On the job she ended up finding her own voice as a poet an NPR's Jeep of vermin says that led to her poetry collection called human resources Ryan Stevenson wasn't feeling very stimulated at her publishing job in New York Then her husband found work in the Bay Area As we were thinking about our move someone shared with me this article I think it came out in Washington Post It was titled the next Todd job in Silicon Valley is for poets And I basically just emailed every startup that was listed in that article And I ended up talking with a CEO of a very small startup right away At her new job she realized she was thinking about poetry every day We were designing conversational interfaces for speakers like smart speakers And I was thinking a lot about voice and specifically disembodied speakers calling to an unknown user And to me this had a direct correlation to the speaker of a poem and the readers And Stevenson's new book the speaker is often isolated even as she's building technology that's supposed to connect people much of this isolation came from being a woman in a male dominated industry Building voices that were designed to be predominantly female And thinking about that from my point of view and my perspective as usually one of the only women in the room is something that I was navigating She talks about this in her poem the valley Here's an excerpt We want them to look and act human but not too real Get it My boss said touching the dip in a line graph The uncanny valley Isolation and objectification These are the themes that unite Stevenson with a sisterhood of poets only this time the landscape is Silicon Valley NPR news The war in Ukraine has changed the lives of many Ukrainians living abroad From member station W BGO Nate Chen reports on how the Russian invasion brought new urgency to the work of one musician born in Odessa The most accomplished Ukrainian jazz musician of his generation is a former child prodigy Now in his mid 40s my name is I'm a jazz.

Audrey Brown NPR news Rachel Martin Martinez Ryan Stevenson Ryan Stevenson Todd job WNYC Donetsk Ukraine NPR NATO BBC Silicon Valley Bay Area Stevenson New York Washington Nate Chen Odessa
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For New Yorkers and visitors alike and note traffic will be shut down on Fifth Avenue between 82nd and a 105th opening the street for food vendors and street musicians There will also be activities for the kids including the Met's new exhibit called PS art that showcases artwork from artists in grades K through 12 If you want more info you can go to met museum dot org 72 with peaks of sunshine now outside the WNYC windows it's four 20 This is NewsHour live from the BBC in London with me Audrey Brown French voters have been choosing lawmakers for the National Assembly and it seems like there's been a bit of vulture fatigue irritation or boredom because the turnout was the lowest it's been in more than 20 years according to observers polling firms say that president Emmanuel Macron is projected to win the most seats after the first round but it's not clear if he'll get the majority he needs to push through his political agenda He's up against the new alliance of left wing and green parties led by the defeated presidential candidate Jean Luc Final results will be known after a run of vote next Sunday But let's explore things in greater depth with Catherine Nicholson whose European affairs editor for France 24 TV and she's on the line now good evening to you Welcome to NewsHour Good evening So what's the latest that we have Well we're still getting all the results coming in because the last polling stations closed just two hours here in France in the big cities they stay open till 8 p.m. local time So those results will obviously come in a bit later And if I can give you a few headlines as you said in your introduction Manuel Macron projected to win the most seats after the first round but things definitely not clear right now And he's looking his grouping is looking to be more or less neck and neck with this unprecedented left wing and green alliance that came together all of it quickly after the presidential election And in fact some projections that we've had at France 24 have even shown that that left wing and green alliance actually got a bigger share of the popular vote than Emmanuel Macron's grouping did However that doesn't necessarily translate into them getting more seats as the way that things work out here in France So it looks like mechanism is going to have the most seats in parliament but will he get an absolute majority that's really not certain at this point For president Macron and for mister Milan do you think sorry to interrupt you No So for president Macron it's really important for him that he holds on to that absolute majority That's 289 is the magic number of seats for him Because that means that having the president and the National Assembly and the control of the same party he can get his project through much more easily of course For mister Mellon you know this is a really staggering improvement for those left wing parties They have had a huge improvement on last time around in 2017 And their project is not to be able to get that absolute majority but they want to get a big enough grouping in the parliament to be able to put up a big fight against Emmanuel Macron He is a centrist He sells himself as a centrist but in France he's generally seen as being more center right So Jean Luc melon he had wanted to be prime minister Traditionally the prime minister has to be chosen from the biggest party grouping in the parliament It looks pretty certain that that isn't going to be mister millon's group But he will be hoping as I said for a big turnout next Sunday when we have all the second round runoff And so I was bigger group as possible So we'll turn out pick up next week in the next round because and why was it so low Was it irritation boredom or was it just fatigue It's a great question And I mean well we're still waiting for the final turnout figures but it does look like we're on track for a record not just in the last couple of decades but since the rebounding of the French Republic by Charles De Gaulle in fact so in the history of modern France I think that there is definitely a lot of voter fatigue just with politics in general But also the campaign hasn't been very present in France recently the news still very much dominated by what's going on in Ukraine And people do feel that they've heard a lot about politics with the presidential campaign of course I think we can also say though that in general this is pretty common for the French legislative elections The turnout wasn't so much lower than in 2017 And in general similarly to a lot of other countries around France like the UK and Germany it tends to be the older voters who tend to turn out for these elections and so melancholy and his party will be hoping that they'll be able to get that turnout out next week Thank you 'cause they tend to vote more for the left and for the greens Catherine and Nicholson European affairs editor of France 24 TV Now the Palestinian singer and musician nai combines jazz with Arabic and western classical music her songs are influenced by events in the Middle East as well She's just released her debut album and she was performing it here in London with her band tonight and she's been speaking to news hours Martin Bernard She began by telling him about her new album My debut album is called nai the first and it consists of 12 tracks that are very different yet very connected It was very hard for me in.

Emmanuel Macron France president Macron Audrey Brown green alliance Jean Luc Catherine Nicholson National Assembly Manuel Macron mister Milan parliament mister Mellon Jean Luc melon mister millon BBC London French Republic Charles De Gaulle Ukraine Germany
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Crisis I personally am filled with dread every time I have to get a plastic bag because I forgot my bag I do think it's really important To live in the here and now If I was to brush my teeth I'll too much real quick turn the water off Listening to the city's public gardeners discuss climate change makes perfect sense to Carlos Martinez director of New York City parks green thumbs His initiative supports over 550 community gardens citywide He greenlit Cole's audio art installation There is so much knowledge in our own communities There is a very strong argument there that we need to listen more to our elders to our neighbors to everyone especially around climate change These gardens are vital to the communities they serve They shield neighborhoods from heat waves and flooding and community gardeners are among the most connected New Yorkers to the climate changes happening locally Most of them spend nearly every day witnessing and adjusting their crops to global warming Hearing their fears and anxiety while sitting in a garden brings awareness urgency and intimacy to the discussion on climate change for Martinez The gardens also play a critical role in foreign security which has been accessed by climate change And most important gardens Bill strong community ties by bringing people together we're able to create some type of action against climate change Ultimately the artist Rachel Garber Cole wants her project to inspire more heartfelt conversations about climate change One's driven by emotion rather than politics or nihilism Her work is framed as an oral history project but really it's a jumping off point to confront the two realities She says we live in We're living in the old reality of like continuities stability and forward progression And then we're also living in the reality that we're actually living in and that's like the world of chaos instability transition climate change is not all gloom and doom for coal who is expecting her first child at the end of the month In the process of creating the warmest years on record she insists her feelings about the impending apocalypse has turned into something a little more hopeful What does it mean to be a person living in New York City in the next 20 years That's going to change Our whole sense of identity is going to be shaken up as we move even forward into accelerated climate change The audio art installations are accessible 24/7 on the front gates of 13 Brooklyn gardens until December 15th Rosemary miss Derry WNYC news Marketplace morning reporters coming up next and then in ten minutes at 9 o'clock it's the BBC NewsHour 93.9 FM Let's check him in London to see what they're working on London good morning Good morning WNYC I'm Audrey Brown on NewsHour Russia says it's not to blame for global food shortages What is the UN say And the connection between bad dreams and Parkinson's disease that's BBC NewsHour coming up at 9 on 93.9 FM WNYC 73 with a mix of clouds and some sunshine out there slim chance of showers later this morning it will gradually clear up though with a high of 83 today more showers and maybe a thunderstorm overnight in 67 It's doubly NYC.

Carlos Martinez greenlit Cole Rachel Garber Cole New York City Martinez Brooklyn gardens WNYC news Marketplace Audrey Brown BBC London Parkinson's disease WNYC Russia UN NYC
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Next Brian mayor show for June 1st the beginning of LGBTQ Pride Month we'll explore homophobia and transphobia then and now Did it fade a lot since the 80s and 90s but is surging again as a political force today And why do people say phobia instead of just hate Also New York City health commissioner doctor ashman vossen the Brian Leo show at 10 a.m. on WNYC Marketplace morning reporters coming up next and then in ten minutes at 9 o'clock it's the BBC NewsHour 93.9 FM Let's check him in London to see what they're working on London good morning Good morning WNYC I'm Audrey Brown Today on NewsHour the U.S. will give Ukraine long range missiles but not for use on Russian territory and wide scale theft of scrap metal destroys vital infrastructure in Uganda That's BBC NewsHour coming up at 9 on 93.9 FM WNYC 62 with clouds out there this morning we have a slight chance of afternoon showers partly sunny and 72 today and then showers in thunderstorm chances tomorrow and low of 64 Friday whether that's actually tonight and in tomorrow a 50 50 chance of morning and afternoon showers and partly sunny in a high of 81 78 on Friday with more shower chances and more sunshine as well 62 in cloudy at age 51 Can one of the 50 states police social media companies Marketplace morning reporters.

Brian mayor ashman vossen Brian Leo Audrey Brown WNYC BBC London New York City Ukraine Uganda U.S.
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But there are other challenges here in the Donbass a region that once fueled the Soviet Union Many if not most of the aging minds have now shut down But the war has made it impossible to maintain them properly The management are worried that polluted groundwater could start flooding out An ecological threat now hangs over our town says Anatolia If the water floods to the surface it will poison the soil and the rivers It could be catastrophic But that's a longer term threat As the morning shift crowds into the cage there are more immediate concerns Above ground and the dangers still lurking far below That's Andrew Harding in Tourette's in eastern Ukraine You're listening to NewsHour from the BBC I'm Audrey Brown In Australia the newly victorious Labor Party is just short of being able to form a majority government with millions of postal votes still to be counted following Saturday's general election It saw the Liberal Party were conservatives lose power after more than 9 years concerns over climate change emerged as a key issue for voters with the Green Party and climate focused independent candidates poised to win at least 15 seats in Australia's lower house Labor's leader Anthony albanese is due to be sworn in as prime minister on Monday He will then fly to Tokyo for a meeting with the leaders of the U.S. Japan and India the so called quad Obviously.

Andrew Harding Audrey Brown Anatolia Soviet Union Tourette Labor Party Ukraine Australia BBC Liberal Party Green Party Anthony albanese Tokyo Japan U.S. India
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Information at Carnegie Hall dot org This is WNYC I'm Tiffany Hansen making headlines this afternoon police commissioner keyshawn soul says the NYPD has arrested a 17 year old male in connection with the murder of 16 year old Anjali yambo and the wounding of two other young New Yorkers police say the teens were shot next to their high school in the Melrose section of the south Bronx yesterday afternoon They were walking home from school when two men who were arguing on opposite sides of an intersection opened fire On the way next hour NPR's Michelle Martin talks with the state secretary at Romania's Ministry of Defense about Ukraine and what Romania would like to see NATO do in response to the conflict that's on the way at 5 o'clock Back now to the BBC This is NewsHour live from the BBC in London I'm Audrey Brown Campaigning has stopped in France ahead of elections on Sunday but what looked like a done deal for president Macron just two weeks ago is suddenly not such a sure bet after all Marin le pen of the far right is making a late surge in the opinion polls to the point where the idea of her beating Macron in a second round on the 24th of April is no longer inconceivable as our correspondent Hugh schofield reports from the southern town of perpignan stronghold near the Spanish border In the middle of perp in your half a dozen far right supporters are giving me their views on Emmanuel Macron Which means he swings this way and then that He's.

Tiffany Hansen keyshawn soul Anjali yambo New Yorkers police Michelle Martin WNYC Carnegie Hall Romania NYPD Audrey Brown south Bronx president Macron BBC Ministry of Defense NPR Macron Ukraine NATO Hugh schofield Marin
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Audrey Brown Later in the program we'll hear about news that's just breaking of the vote of no confidence in Pakistan which is just taking place and prime minister Khan has been ousted also France prepares to go to the polls and astronauts dock on the first fully private space journey to the International Space Station but who was in charge of the capsule The commander of the mission he is a former NASA astronaut I'm sure that's a comfort to everybody because you know he knows how to fly a spacecraft But the other three passengers are basically entrepreneurs They each had $55 million to pay to see space the earth from up above that's all later The British prime minister Boris Johnson has offered to send Ukraine a 120 armored vehicles and new anti ship missile systems during a meeting with president Vladimir zelensky in the capital Kyiv today Misses Johnson praised what he called president's lenski's resolute leadership and the invincible heroism of the Ukrainian people those are all direct quotes In turn mister zelensky called for other countries to make similar pledges of support I'm grateful to the United Kingdom that continues and intensifies the sanctions and also provides significant support to Ukraine by reinforcing our defense capacities The other democratic Western countries should follow the example of the United Kingdom It's time to impose a complete embargo on Russian energy resources They should increase the amount of weapons being supplied I've been hearing about that visit from our correspondent yogic Ali Maya who is in Kyiv It was a surprise visit There was no information about it until afterwards when their Ukrainian embassy in the UK tweeted out a photo of the two leaders It was significant because one for the symbolism of it which is a show of solidarity for Ukraine from the prime minister of the UK coming soon after the European Commission president Ursula von der leyen came here But it was also significant because there were important announcements of military as well as financial aid to Ukraine So as far as military aid is concerned the UK's promised a 120 armored vehicles and a new anti ship missile systems This is in addition to the announcement that Downing Street already made on Friday of a 100 million pounds worth of high grade military equipment which includes anti aircraft missiles and anti tank missiles And as far as the financial aspect of it is concerned the economic aid the UK has agreed to guarantee an additional $500 million in World Bank lending to Ukraine so that takes the total loan guarantee to $1 billion And it's also agreed to relax tariffs on most things imported from Ukraine So what's the latest on the fighting We've been hearing people being urged to leave a Luhansk because of a threatened Russian offensive there Are people leaving is fighting so continuing in other parts of the country Fighting is continuing in several areas in both the east as well as the south of the country and as you said Ukraine has called on its civilians in the east of the country to flee immediately Yesterday of course we saw that attack the train station in the where there were people who were waiting for a train to try to get to safety They were caught up in a missile attack at that train station more than 50 people were killed including children a lot of those people have been moved to hospitals today and doctors have been working in the city of Crimea to try and save as many lives as possible Russia has denied that it was behind this missile attack we've of course had very condemnation of it from the Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky What do you know about prison exchanges that we've been hearing about in the last few hours Yes just the deputy prime minister of Ukraine has said that a prisoner exchange has been agreed that there are Ukrainian soldiers as well as Ukrainian civilians who will be released as a part of this exchange It is thought to be the third such exchange It's unclear what Russia will get in return Another thing that we've heard in the past 24 hours is of course the opening of more humanitarian about around ten humanitarian corridors to allow civilians in areas where fighting is still going on to escape But of course you know as is the case that we've seen with Mario pole about the difficulties there really are evacuating those citizens that even when these humanitarian corridors are agreed upon that's not always what pans out on the ground Now as yogi was saying their medical staff in the eastern Ukrainian city of chroma turkey have been battling to save the lives of people injured in a missile attack on a railway station on Friday At least 50 people died and dozens of others were wounded Ukraine says at least two missiles were fired in the direction of the railway station where large crowds at crammed onto platforms to flee the war Russia denies it was behind that attack blaming the Ukraine military instead Our defense correspondent Jonathan Beale is in the city and has been meeting survivors and those trying to help them What crimes was hospital ambulances outside of queueing up taking the walking wounded people who were injured in that explosion at the station for treatment essentially most of these patients here are going to have to have shrapnel removed They are not the most critical cases We've been speaking to some of them about what happened I heard a lot of explosions and I fell down When I got up a lot of people were already dead It was only me who stood up from the floor It's a wonder God saved me I have a penetrating chest injury from one side and my legs are wounded like everywhere I got the shrapnel into my groin into my artery I fainted twice lost a lot of blood I was waiting for the evacuation train to go to Levi but now I'm going to the hospital in Denise instead They have moved now pretty much all the patients who are being treated here We're going to go and speak to the surgeon who is dealing with these cases Victor He says it's the worst he's ever dealt with It's only sunk in what had happened when we left the operating theater You have faces of children women elderly people in front of you That was very difficult We've left the hospital and come back to crema tours station It is still closed no trains are moving red tape still around the area that was damaged And over there with a missile landed the casing still there It's being examined by a forensic team at the moment We've come to talk to Alexei whose job is to collect bodies He usually does that from the front line for Ukrainian soldiers but yesterday he had to come to this railway station and gather the bodies of children and women It was right You know when you see how your future is being killed and the future of your nation this is a genocide they are killing just because we're Ukrainian That can clearly be seen when you look at the bodies of women and children It's still not clear what happened here whether one of the missiles was shot down and that's why there is still a casing largely intact but the state railway company says that a number of missiles at least two were fired at the railway station and everyone we've spoken to here believes it was a deliberate strike On civilians trying to leave criminals And that was Jonathan Beale in Now Russia is preparing a new.

Russia UK Audrey Brown Vladimir zelensky Misses Johnson mister zelensky yogic Ali Maya Ukrainian embassy Ursula von der leyen Luhansk lenski Boris Johnson International Space Station volodymyr zelensky Kyiv Mario pole
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The swan galleries app Good morning WNYC I'm Audrey Brown On NewsHour more sanctions on Russia as new evidence of possible war crimes emerges in Ukraine and scientists develop robotic hands with the human touch That's BBC NewsHour coming up at 9 on 93.9 FM WNYC This is morning edition from NPR news Let me Martinez And I'm Leila faldon The Mexican American superhero created by Hector Rodriguez has helped immigrants along the U.S. Mexico border fight Mexican cartels corrupt officials and human traffickers for the better part of a decade But for a special issue of this self published comic book series and peso hero travels to Ukraine It's a callback towards Captain America in Superman during World War II and helping the citizens in Europe A character like Batman or Superman might hide his identity behind a mask and costume but the creator of el peso hero insists he's just a regular guy doing good deeds even if he does have superhuman strength and bulletproof skin Very simplistic clothes you know he has his blue jeans cowboy boots He looks like a you can even say holding a little you know like a farm worker you know like every day die For his latest adventure the superhero travels to the besieged city of mariupol where he lifts a tank to rescue a trapped Ukrainian family deflects Russian bullets finds a missing Red Cross volunteer and deflects a gas attack Rodriguez says it's part of a tradition of comic book characters fighting for just causes and giving a voice to the voiceless In this case it is the norteno Mexican American superhero helping citizens No matter what culture no matter what language they speak it's a very unifying moment that we're all on this together you know that there's always a force of good By day Rodriguez is a bilingual primary school teacher based in Dallas with family on both sides of the border He disagrees with Mexico's refusal to criticize.

Audrey Brown NPR news Leila faldon Hector Rodriguez Ukraine WNYC America Martinez mariupol Russia BBC Mexico Batman Europe Rodriguez Red Cross Dallas
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from London I'm Audrey Brown President Emmanuel Macron of France today held a long conversation with Russia's president Vladimir Putin They spoke about rising tensions in Ukraine it's the second conversation the two leaders have had on the subject and they've also been talking about Russian military maneuvers in Belarus The French presidency says the two men agreed to pursue a diplomatic solution to the crisis over Ukraine The U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken said Washington would keep trying to find a diplomatic solution until the tanks start rolling Speaking in Munich Ukraine's foreign minister Dmitri kuleba needed a bit more than words to stop a war in his country We need actions It's time to act We propose that our partners do the following First diplomacy secondly new deliveries of defensive weapons and everything else that is needed to strengthen our armed forces thirdly the implementation of sanctions So what were the key issues that president Macron was focusing on in his talks with president Putin Dominique moisi is with the institute Montaigne a think tank in Paris A truce if not an end to the infighting that is taking place in donbas in the eastern part of Ukraine and stop to the coming of Russian troops to Belarus So it is really a let's freeze the situation as it is for the moment Let's try to start a process of deescalation which will be initiated by the end of violence in donbas It is in the mind of back of Macron the best weapon to protect peace though it's a very fragile and maybe temporary one Is there a real danger though that they would be a breaking out of hostilities in Ukraine with Russia attacking I think so And I think Putin wants us to believe that it may be about to attack though at the same time is denying it But that spot of its strategy a kind of emotional roller coaster game one day I threaten you and the other day I reassure you So is Emmanuel Macron building a particular kind of rapport with Vladimir Putin that the other leaders who are not talking to him face to face and not talking to him directly might not be Well a lot of people have been talking with Vladimir Putin like the German Chancellor Olaf scholz At the same time president Macron as the feeling that he has a specific card to play in the name of Europe Angela Merkel left power well Great Britain is no longer in the European Union but also there is a feeling that the voice of Boris Johnson tends to be less credible because of his domestic situation than it could have been otherwise So there is an empty space and Macron tries to feel that gap Others will criticize him though for doing that and they have done so before I mean he's gone out on a limb but it is seen as weakening the sense of unity among the U.S. the EU and other allies Is that a fair way of looking at it from the point of view of the other people rather than him Well that is the specificity of president Macron's approach Not only to diplomacy but I would say to nearly everything our mentor at the same time and president Macron can say at the same time that there is a division of labor between him and Washington that Washington speaks tough and he tries to put diplomacy ahead And at the same time there is of course the accusation that what he proposed can be seen as a kind of appeasement and he tries very hard to say that has nothing to do with appeasement We are not in 1938 the president is not Neville Chamberlain Another high level meeting will take place on Monday What should we be expecting to come out of that Probably little I think Putin is very happy to play with our nerves as long as possible And he has returned to be the center of attention like Moscow was at the time of the Cold War when it was the capital of the Soviet Union I suppose this is exactly what Putin is about So probably nothing will occur tomorrow either and Joe Biden has proposed to directly meet with Putin so it's not only Macron who is willing to meet the Russian president It is also the American president And that's Dominique moise a political analyst in Paris The high level diplomatic conversation comes as thousands of mainly women and children are being evacuated from the two Russian back breakaway regions of Ukraine separatist leaders in the Donbass say there's a threat of attack from Kyiv Kyiv says it has no plans of doing so but there have been attacks along the line dividing rebel and government forces In fact two Ukrainian soldiers were killed by shelling on Saturday so how have the evacuations been going Natalia vasilieva is the Moscow correspondent for the UK's telegraph newspaper She's in Russia's rust of region where evacuees are being sent What have they been telling her A lot of people I spoke to were genuinely spooked by a recent uptick in fighting and also by the evacuation orders from separatist authorities because obviously this region has seen hostilities for the past 8 years And even at the height of fighting in 2014 there are so much rumors going around the war frenzy rumors about an upcoming Russian invasion of Ukraine or kind of coming attack of the Ukrainian government on the separatist health areas How are those orders conveyed to people And did they have a choice about whether they stay or not There was a radio statement by the head of the self proclaimed donates people's republic and his counterpart in the neighboring regions of Lorentz I was also told that in many areas especially in small towns and in villages local administration called up for people and pretty much ordering them to leave I have not met anyone who would tell me they were physically forced to leave that they were forced to leave at gunpoint A lot of people are staying behind It's very hard to see how many people have left already I mean the latest figure I've seen is 70,000 people that the rostov region where I am now 70,000 people that they have taken in in the past four to 8 hours Right And the plan is to evacuate around 700,000 people I believe I see that those numbers keep changing I've seen the figure of 700,900 thousand Obviously the entire separatist held area is supposed to be home to 2 million people Again this region has been outside Ukrainian government control There hasn't been any sense So we don't have any exact data how many people live there because people have been living the Donbass region for Ukraine and for Russia and there's no one will really know how many people live there So where are the people who have been evacuated being housed now And is it a kind of long-term evacuation that the authorities have in mind Well it's been very simple at the start Some people were busting from the separatist health parts of it in Ukraine into southern Russia who I was at this border crossing last night where I saw a small makeshift camp with about ten joint tents which could house about 300 people But this was more of a holding point The idea is that people are going to be taken to guesthouses hotel disused senators and summer camps across southern Russia People are arriving There's very little idea of how temporary that is I think no one can answer this question at some point We're also hearing reports that the rest of region with which borders don't boss is basically running out of capacity and the Russian government is now looking at other options that house in people and that taking people by railway to other parts of Russia The telegraph's Moscow correspondent There was more shell fire overnight and both sides continued to accuse each other of breaching the ceasefire with all that going on in the east of Ukraine what's the mood in the capital The BBC's James waterhouse reports from Kyiv What.

Boris Johnson Joe Biden Natalia vasilieva Paris 2014 Belarus Angela Merkel Audrey Brown two leaders Munich Dmitri kuleba two men 70,000 people two Saturday Dominique moisi Monday Neville Chamberlain 1938 700,900 thousand
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:00 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Audrey Brown Preparations for apostle possible Russian invasion of Ukraine are continuing countries are drawing down their embassy staff in Kyiv and advising their citizens to leave the country Today U.S. members of the organization for security and cooperation in Europe's international monitoring mission began withdrawing from the part of eastern Ukraine which is held by Russian backed separatists Germany's vice Chancellor Robert habeck has said Europe could be on the verge of war the country's newly elected president Frank Walter steinmeier has warned Moscow against invading Ukraine And his military recent conflict We're in the midst of the danger of a military conflict a war in Eastern Europe Russia is responsible for this And Russia's troops deployment can not be misunderstood This is a threat to Ukraine but the people there have a right to a life without fear and threats to self determination and sovereignty no country in the world has the right to destroy it and we will respond resolutely to anyone who tries In an interview with Fox News Sunday The Pentagon press secretary John Kirby said they had information from a variety of sources suggesting that Russia was close to having everything ready for an invasion I think you can understand we want to be careful about publicly talking about intelligence and sources and methods and that kind of thing We believe that a major military action could happen any day now And again these assessments are coming from a variety of sources and not exclusively just inside intelligence but also what we're seeing in plain sight Ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky has in the last few hours spoken to President Biden and invited him to come to Kyiv in the coming days Vadim presta is Ukraine's ambassador to the United Kingdom He was the foreign minister until 2020 I asked him if he thought a Russian attack was imminent We've seen intelligence and we're thankful for everybody who is sharing the United States UK NATO some other lies in our partners around the globe but we also have our own intelligence which is confirming that this danger is here Imminent it is at the same time we hope that still the catastrophe can be avoided and although all the cards on the table everybody mentioned their positions Everybody had their conversations with Putin and among themselves I believe there is still a chance to avoid it Are you talking down the threat of it And the hope that diplomacy will ramp up We were not just talking down on the full purpose of keeping people calm The problem is here that money I live in country companies like KLM is formally saying that they are not taken risk of line to Ukraine All this economic activities on the life is just getting stopped We believe that Putin can just have it in mind Without actually crossing the border without shooting in our soldiers he can bring our economy down Now Britain's defense minister Ben Wallace said there's a whiff of Munich in the air which is a reference to an agreement with Hitler that failed to prevent World War II It's a very evocative reference But do you think it's provocative as well I've seen this efforts constant efforts of appeasement before mostly German and France were involved as a party of Normandy former so called trying to resolve the issue in Ukrainian east Now more and more nations understand the understanding that's actually what has been done It's not just helping So this comparison to efforts of a piece the aggressor is unfortunately quite correct That's what we see And we are not downplaying this one That's Vadim prish taiko Ukraine's ambassador to the UK Now Germany's Chancellor Olaf Schultz has been in the job for just over two months hardly as he settled into his role and he has a major diplomatic and military challenge to deal with He'll be going to give and Moscow this week to try and calm things down The U.S. says there are a 130,000 troops massed on the Ukrainian border with Russia with the U.S. warning that an invasion could begin as early as Wednesday does this give the German chancellorship an extra urgency Neil Schmidt speaks for the Social Democratic Party of Germany The sense of urgency has already been there but as a member of the Normandy group Germany has been busily trying to at least come back to a ceasefire in eastern Ukraine and to push for withdrawal of Russian troops from Ukraine and border So I think that schulz's visit comes at the right time Now Britain's defense minister Ben Wallace has said that there's a whiff of Munich in the air from some in the west which is a reference to the infamous 1938 agreement between Neville Chamberlain and Adolf Hitler This would seem to be some sort of criticism of the diplomatic efforts that led by president Macron but also Germany to avert a Russian invasion of Ukraine Is that how you see it No I don't see it that way and we should be very cautious about historic parallelisms And so we have to take the situation as it is and the best way to avoid another war in Ukraine is to count on diplomacy And we should concentrate on that and not dive into historical speculations How much continuity is there with this new German government on policy towards Ukraine given that president Putin has dealt with Angela Merkel for 16 years And it's argued that coming as she did from former communist East Germany She understood him in a way in which perhaps a younger generation of German leaders doesn't Well there's a lot of continuity the German government under shoals continues to pursue it too drag abroad determines and dialog and also continues to count on the Minsk agreement as the only existing framework for finding a political solution to the crisis in eastern Ukraine And schulz is a very seasoned politician although he does not know any Russian I must say he is very familiar with Russia and with international relations in general Has he met president Putin as a managed to establish some kind of rapport even though it's obviously early days for this new government Well he has met Putin before and he has been in contact with Putin and I'm sure that due to the importance of the relationship with Russia He will very quickly build a personal relationship with Putin as well But very much depends on Putin the Russian president needs to know that another military attack on Ukraine would not only harm the relationship Russia has with the western general but would also do a huge damage to the bilateral German Russian relationship What does that mean That would mean that for many years economic and political cooperation between Russia and Germany would be very limited and it would put into doubt the whole array of financial economic relations we will have between Germany and the U on the one side and Russia on the other Would you cancel note stream two Well I would say that not stream two this pipeline is definitely part of the list of possible sanctions But the west so far has agreed not to single out one item of this list of sanctions but there will be very tough sanctions and there will be a very high price to be paid by Russia indeed Russia seems to be impervious to sanctions though That's not true after the annexation of Crimea and the aggression in eastern Ukraine in 2014 the sanctions package at least stop the aggression and this time we built up a huge deterrence even before a possible military invasion so I'm confident that our united front in NATO and in the U and the very clear signals.

Ukraine Audrey Brown Putin organization for security and Kyiv vice Chancellor Robert habeck Frank Walter steinmeier John Kirby Germany volodymyr zelensky President Biden Vadim presta United States German government Europe Moscow Vadim prish president Putin Olaf Schultz Normandy
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're listening to NewsHour from the BBC World Service I'm Audrey Brown We have to go to Cameroon now because the most important event in African football has been taking place in the last couple of hours It's the African Cup of Nations final Two of the world's best players face each other on the pitch in Cameroon Sadio Mané from Senegal and mosala from Egypt They both play for Liverpool at club level We'll be hearing from Dakar and Cairo in just a moment but let's cross to you and for a look at what's been happening on the pitch and off Celestine carone is standing by celestine where are you and what's happening Well I am outside the Olympic Stadium and I can tell you Audrey we've gone to penalties here Senegal had the penalty saved the island the market could have been leading but it was nearly after extra time and it is now on to penalties And the Egyptian goalkeeper has been very good with penalties He got Egypt here to the final because of saving two penalties from Cameroon I can hear fans roaring there So I actually can tell you Celeste because I'm watching it It's one one Penalties So things change quickly in football So who are the cameroonian supporting the terran alliance of the pharaohs Absolutely that Iran alliance I'm telling you Audrey the number of Egyptian fans who were flown in from Cairo to support their team are making a very small sea of red but everywhere else at the colors of Senegal and the Tehran glands And also we have to remember that there are a lot of Senegalese we live in younger about almost a million or so who live in Cameroon and they're all here in great numbers supporting the achievement I can hear another role Right So I can tell you because I have the joys of TV right there It's two one Senegalese just scored It's merely over celestine but it's a tournament that got off to a really shaky start right It was postponed There was a Civil War in Cameroon and there was a pandemic not to mention the tragedy that so many killed in a stampede What's your overall impression of how it's gone I'd like to give that in two parts I think the first part is we can start with the peach My impression on the peaches this has been an absolutely successful absolutely amazing tournament because it has lifted African football it has shown the wild African football league We don't really often see it Looking at debutants like The Gambia the Comoros teams that were out underdogs coming in and taking claim you know that they too can fight with the big dogs in African football So that was absolutely amazing and you've seen some great players also shining through young players And so I think all the pictures was absolutely amazing And then when you look at off the pitch there were moments that stayed in the tournament That's ten to the history of African football Like the stadium disaster here at the Olympic city where 8 people died in a stampede That had never happened before in a couple of nations And so it left a bit of a stain on the tournament Although overall I think if you ask cameroonians they will tell you well we did the best we could But on those two those are my two takeaways Right On the kitchen off the beach Can I just tell you that Egypt has just missed the penalty And the fact that the fans are looking distraught they are looking destroyed Do you think it brought cameroons to cameroonians together or are they as far as apart as they were because of the war in the English speaking parts of the country Yes I covered the tournament actually in limbic You know I wasn't limber spending a lot of time there And the thing that you got is that what football gave them this time was it give them a reprieve to the problems they have been facing daily So what you are hearing from many people is look once this football is over we'll just go back to the same struggles we've been having You know the same issues that have been having with the government here in your own day So I wouldn't really say it has brought them together For a moment yes it gave them something else to think about And something else to celebrate or rather something to celebrate and not the everyday stress of living in an area that has sporadic attacks You know even during the competition on the first day of the games in limb there was an attack in boya It was a gunfight between separatists and security forces And two people died And the government says it had no impact or effect on the competition but it is a reality of what the people they are live with every day and they say that reality has not gone away just because the Cup of Nations came to come around Thank you celestine stay there because if you can tell us what's happening on the pitch because it's now two two penalties We're going to go to Egypt and yazmin el cafe who is there to gauge the mood in Cairo Oh yes I can imagine that It's clash of the Titans Indeed but it's strong feeling that this team was perhaps a little bit lackluster yasmine That's the view on Twitter What are people saying in Egypt Yes people do believe that tonight's game is not as convincing as the last three matches Egypt has played against Morocco the Warren Cameroon But at the same time they are quite understand that the players are much more exhausted than Senegal players who had an easy road to the final They didn't meet or they didn't play against strong teams So they kept their full effort to this final match Unlike the Egyptian players who exerted its strenuous efforts and they did their utmost effort having played more than 120 minutes in each of the last three consecutive matches this is in addition to the penalties And of course this is in addition to also tonight's match with the extra time and the penalty So it's a very tough match Okay I'm going to bring in emmeline singing course because she is in Dakar and Senegal have just pulled ahead again three two emmeline What's it like now in Dakar I imagine everybody is really tense Oh my gosh you could cut the atmosphere with a knife I mean I'm at the monument in what at one of the.

Cameroon football Senegal celestine Egypt Audrey Brown African Cup of Nations Sadio Mané mosala Celestine carone Cairo terran alliance of the pharaoh Audrey Dakar Olympic city Olympic Stadium Celeste Liverpool BBC Comoros
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You live from London I'm Audrey Brown and as you've been hearing in the news the Africa Cup of Nations final has yet to be settled as Egypt and Senegal battle it out in extra time We will be live in Cameroon for a match report and in Dakar and Cairo among the fans later But first the United Nations children's agency has condemned the continuing detention of children in a jail in northeast Syria Guaran prison was attacked by fighters from the Islamic State group last month Hundreds of people died during the ensuing gunfight which lasted for ten days till the U.S. backed Kurdish led militia finally regained control of the prison So how many children are in that jail where any of them killed during the attack and most importantly how did these children come to be in a jail held in conditions described as precarious by UNICEF Both Victor nyland has just visited the prison and he speaks for the agency in Syria When we came to the area it's very much damaged by the fighting that took place And so some of the surrounding buildings have collapsed and it's very chaotic area still We have been invited to come and visit of course the children it's our mandate and the NSF and what we were able to do was to go and see the children in the boys wing What that meant was the second floor of one of the buildings where there were a number of rooms each hosting I would estimate about 60 boys in each of them And we were not allowed to speak to the boys at this point in time We have been given assurances that we're going to be able to be more involved But for the moment it was about witnessing and observing their situation And what were the conditions Well you could see very heavy air in each of the rooms and so clearly these boys have been very much traumatized by the events I could also see some that had patches you know clearly having been wounded But at the same time in this prison now and in these rooms no boys that have been severely injured I don't know It doesn't mean that they don't exist but these were generally an okay health neither happy nor healthy looking in that sense but also not the ones that would have been wounded And there were reports of children dying during the attack on the prison Have you been able to confirm that No we were not able to confirm that We have not received any details What we did discuss with the prison management was that they are still also clarifying between the records that they have from who was in the prison prior to this attack and who are the boys that are there now apparently because also in the fighting some isil members boys including were captured So now there's a bit of a mix between who used to be in the prison but also some new ones And how did the children who were there before get there This was after the fall of isil three years ago These were children who mainly came with their fathers They had joined their fathers in the fight and joined the cause of the Islamic State troops And as they were captured they were together with their fathers but apparently they then had been given their separate wings so they were not staying mostly with their fathers And when we say children how old are we talking about According to our records there were children as young as 12 still there Now what I saw were not very young children doesn't mean that I saw all of them But I would say these would have been from 1415 upwards And where are they from Are they mainly foreign nationals or are they children from Syria and surrounds So the majority of them are from Syria and Iraq And then our estimate about around a hundred are from about 20 different countries And what should happen to those children especially the ones from foreign countries This is really important And we're going to see in this and why we have wanted to get involved It's really to scale up the repatriation of that country nationals If you compare now over the last three years about 1300 children have been repatriated in a three year period With the camps included we're looking at some 10,000 children and their mothers still remaining in northeast Syria And as you can imagine everyday counts they're really vulnerable and exposed to every single day So you're talking about the broadest number of children boys and girls who are the 10,000 right What about the ones that are in Jill You were talking about supporting a new safe place in the northeast of Syria to take care of the most vulnerable children How would that work The idea is that we want to be working in that new facility and make sure that when we children are moved there we actually start working on individual case files And so it's not a static number It's going to be a 150 but quickly we want to make sure that countries are notified You have these three boys or 5 boys and we want to work with you to solve any bottlenecks at the receiving end so that you can accept these voice back Why is it taking so long On the one hand I'm fortunately politics get very much trapped into what is really to be called a child rights crisis and a humanitarian crisis What has happened is that countries get trapped for political reasons for legal reasons and sometimes practical obstacles as well And this is where we at units have want to become an intellectual who can help really solve these complex yet very practical problems The Kurdish authorities in the northeast of Syria have been calling for months and years for foreign nations to repatriate their citizens Why are there calls not heeded Because it seems like they've been left with a problem Indeed many governments of course have been repatriating but unfortunately those numbers are small and also mostly it's been the Western countries that have been repatriating I think one challenge is definitely that many of the countries now that have large numbers because by and large Western countries have been repatriating and they're not big in numbers If you look at the whole number of 10,000 across different facilities and the northeast so for those countries Middle East former Soviet countries you know there are more challenges in the domestic arena And I think that's been part of the problem What about Syrian and Iraqi children Syrian children obviously we will be looking at processes as well for their rehabilitation and reintegration Many of them of course also coming from government areas So this is a conversation that we have only just begun together with the government of Syria as well And then similarly from Iraq really trying to promote there as well that there is a dialog and openness to look at that as opportunity as well because the numbers are quite significant Both Victor and Ireland speaks for UNICEF in Syria President Joe Biden's national security adviser has warned that a Russian invasion of Ukraine could be imminent But Moscow may yet opt for a diplomatic path speaking on the U.S. network NBC's meet the press Jake Sullivan said Russian military action could happen as soon as Monday but he said the allied forces were well prepared for any action We're in the window where something could happen that is a military escalation and invasion of Ukraine could happen at any time We believe that the Russians have put in place the capabilities to mount a significant military operation into Ukraine And we have been working hard to prepare a response President Biden has rallied our allies He's reinforced and reassured our partners on the eastern Flank U.S. national security adviser Jake Sullivan observers have noticed an increase in Russian military readiness after weeks of tension I've been speaking to New York Times journalist Michael about the buildup and the mood in Kyiv The Ukrainian military as well as the United States now says there are about a 130,000 troops on the border stretching kind of in a Crescent from the western border of Belarus all the way down and around the eastern side of Ukraine and then curling up around the southern portion of the country in Crimea Peninsula that's in the Black Sea And there are troops there There are increasingly sophisticated rocket systems artillery systems and now what we're starting to see are air fix swing aircraft fighter jets.

Syria Audrey Brown Syria Guaran Islamic State group Victor nyland UNICEF Dakar Senegal Cameroon Cairo NSF United Nations Egypt United States Africa London Iraq Jake Sullivan Jill Ukraine
"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

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05:19 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from London I'm Audrey Brown and we begin with omikron and the news that at least 13 cases of the new variant of the COVID virus have now been confirmed in the Netherlands They were all on flights coming from South Africa where the variant was first detected South Africa's president said this evening that no new health measures will be introduced there just yet The Netherlands is already experiencing a massive increase in cases more than 20,000 a day now and this morning the authorities announced a partial lockdown that's to last for the next three weeks Anna holligan is in the Netherlands for the BBC She spoke to me from a chilly street in the town of Arnhem where people were in the process of locking down We started talking about the new cases first The fear that this is just the tip of the iceberg skipper airport is a major transport hub So thousands of people who have arrived from southern African countries since the 22nd of November have been asked to come forward to get tested to go into isolation and of course they might not have received those messages because so many people have traveled on elsewhere so it may be too late The virus may be spreading undetected Actually at the airport now they've just set up a special testing street so anyone who flies in from South Africa and surrounding countries is asked to get tested as soon as they land and then go into isolation either at home or in hotel So they're hoping to try to limit the spread But the authorities here fear there are many more cases yet to be detected The Netherlands has already baffling record breaking infection rates So there's more than 22,000 new cases detected today and actually new measures have just come into force so I don't know if you can hear this This is the literal sound of lockdown a door locked up There's an evening lockdown in place now so all bios restaurants cafes non-essential shops have to close between 5 in the evening and 5 a.m. and it's hoped that would be enough to bring those numbers uncontrolled but now of course the new variant is present They don't know to what degree they're still investigating their sequencing is still being conducted on people coming in their test results And if you're speaking to a lot of people here who think the government has simply acted too late in taking these steps to try to protect the hospitals from becoming overwhelmed because there's a shortage of intensive care beds here People are being transferred across the border to Germany for treatment and hundreds of people are dying every week and then on top of that the booster program is only just coming in so over 80s and health workers with direct contact with patients are being asked to come for their booster jobs And I'm surrounded by bars and cafes And you can hear it's totally silent How have the new measures gone down because we've seen unusually for many of us Dutch people revolting against the government and saying that they refuse to wear masks and they don't want to be vaccinated Well the Netherlands actually has a relatively high vaccination rate So about 85% of adults are fully vaccinated now but there is a very strong anti vax movement here which is represented in parliament in fact in terms of the rebellion against the rules what we saw last weekend those riots that was a really small minority I think on a bigger scale it's absolutely certain that a lot of people here in the Netherlands are hugely frustrated with the inconsistent messaging So I was speaking to one scientist earlier who was saying one minute the masks are on the next minute the masks are off People just don't trust the government anymore because one day they say that something doesn't work and then the next day they say well actually you have to do this People can still move around freely on the street but with this new variant present a lot of people here are afraid that there could be a lockdown in place over Christmas Anna holligan in the Netherlands Now if you were listening to news out yesterday you would have heard The New York Times global health reporter Stephanie Nolan telling us about her ordeal in the Netherlands after her flight from South Africa landed She was one of the two she was on one of the two planes carrying 61 people who tested positive for COVID-19 She told us she was stuck in an enclosed space along with these people while they all waited for their results She's now been sent on her way to Canada where she is self isolating So what happened to Stephanie between then and now I tested negative in the Netherlands when I landed but then courtesy of the Dutch authorities I was held for another Oh I guess 19 hours 20 hours in an unventilated space with all those people So I was flying into Canada and everyone who flies into Canada must provide proof of a negative test I didn't love the fact that I had to get on another plane with my unknown status but the Netherlands had made clear that they didn't want us So I really had no choice So I wore my N95 and then went into quarantine as soon as I got here You tested negative before boarding Other people did not What did you find out from people around you I imagine that you had lots of conversations being the journalist that you are I had no idea that every country wasn't requiring a negative test I was in Zambia earlier in the week as.

the Netherlands Anna holligan South Africa Audrey Brown omikron Arnhem BBC London The New York Times global Stephanie Nolan Germany Netherlands Canada government Stephanie Zambia
"audrey brown" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"audrey brown" Discussed on WBUR

"Was our most played program of the week and on Facebook where we posted photos from the activist movements of New York in the early 1980s we also reached a 100,000 of you My South African colleague Audrey Brown presents the series I spoke to listener divis and asked him where he bumped into the show I grew up listening to BBC World Service in Tanzania So I've always listened to me but you're also in the UK And obviously I follow all the African journalists more closely So Audrey and tiny and people like that So I've got to know from her from her Twitter feed that she was doing the story That's fantastic He found it on social media So what most got your attention when you began listening I came to the UK in 1982 I was 19 years old now I remember the hullabaloo with aids and all the posters around London And then you know the moment when Diana help somebody's hand in the hospital which was like wow so it's not infectious I remember all that So I was quite interested in it in the first place Yeah so that Princess Diana moment was such a sort of a breakthrough into the mainstream wasn't it in terms of mainstream news coverage and those things Yeah And you're from Tanzania originally So the oxtail sense of what the response to aids was there at the time or since So if you look at Tanzania Uganda I mean South Africa the last episode that already did with South Africa there was denial there but at least South Africa is advanced enough to have recorded deaths and stuff I mean places like Uganda and Tanzania the probably disrupt everything under the carpet It was like nothing was happening Just like COVID I mean if you remember what Tanzania did with COVID they just swept everything under the carpets It's a really interesting parallel isn't it with the pandemic And one of the characters we hear from early on in the documentary is doctor Anthony Fauci who became a key figure of the pandemic and the response in the U.S. to COVID I was surprised to hear that voice and to hear been involved in the early days of age research We do the same 100% I was like oh my God can you anymore He was amazing You can feel country when you listen to Fauci then and you listen to 20 Fauci now The man the humanity in him just comes shines through He just wants to do the best Yeah it was an uplifting part of it And one thing that they got across well I thought was that the sense of confusion back into the 80s with how even hospital staff for example were afraid to approach patients And that also felt like it had a bit of a parallel with the early days of the pandemic albeit a completely different situation Yes Yeah You know I mean I mean patients being left in a world which was locked up and nobody went to see the patient Nobody left the food at the door and the patient would be too weak to go and get the food and they would just go hungry I mean it was shocking to listen to all this You can understand people's fears I guess But at the same time it was quite profound to hear that wasn't it It really was So looking back on the series then what was the standout maybe interview or the person you heard about that's really stayed with you Anthony Fauci came across really well And then from the last episode selim Abdul Kareem the South African immunologist who again Fauci he was involved with aids and now he's in charge of the COVID response in South Africa So there's similar stories between them too Absolutely Well thank you so.

Tanzania Audrey Brown divis South Africa aids Uganda Fauci UK Audrey Princess Diana Anthony Fauci BBC Diana Facebook New York Twitter London U.S. confusion