18 Burst results for "Audio Engineering Society"

"audio engineering society" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

The Podcast Engineering Show

05:44 min | 6 months ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on The Podcast Engineering Show

"Starts July seventh twenty twenty and the one after that starts in September twenty twenty and So today we have the man Dan H- Yooglie he's the marketing manager Focus Right he's an audio engineer and Producer yes. Graduate of the Musicians Institute, he hosts the focus right pro podcast. That's right by the way and focus right if you're if that name rings a bell but might not focus. Right is an audio company that's been around for many years. They make all kinds of great stuff including the very popular focus, right scarlet interfaces like the to I to. Gen, three all that stuff. So and so he hosts the focus right pro podcast, which mostly you talk about music production on that one, right Dan. Yeah. You know that's focused. Right pro is the audio over Ip brand. So it's a lot of a bigger installations touring sound Mostly we talk we talked a lot of thought leaders in that space. So I get to talk to educators and executives and. Engineers, it's. It's a pretty great show to host because. I've. Recently, been able to speak with magazine editors as well. Three Different magazine editors that I just got to sit down with. Some of the Executive Board from the Audio Engineering Society which was really a great a great time. I get to talk to a lot of really great people that's awesome and by the way, the focus right pro podcast is the post production and editing is done by Brian and swinger. PODCASTS engineering school graduate. Graduates. And what a nice guy too let's let's give around applause for Bryan. Bryan Great Job Man Brian's companies called top tier audio go to his website. He makes a bunch of cool videos. He uses Hindenburg journalists pro as well. So if you're a Hindenburg guy, you gotTa Find Brian and And watch his videos on Hindenburg makes a bunch of great videos you really do and I'm embarrassed that I just found that out that. He's the guy behind all those great tutorials because I'm sure we'll get into this in a minute but I I want to love Hindenburg but coming from pro tools I I don't understand Hindenburg for the most part, right? Well, we will talk about that I. I had a similar reaction myself. So we'll talk about that. But you Dan Hugely are also the executive producer of one of the greatest podcast. Of Recent Times. It's The Johnny podcast podcast and I want to tell everyone if you're listening to this and you are not subscribed to the Johnny podcast podcast..

marketing manager Focus Right Hindenburg Brian engineer and Producer Audio Engineering Society Musicians Institute executive producer Dan Bryan Executive Board Different magazine Recent Times
"audio engineering society" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Exactly alike particularly from different manufacturers one model might have a really cool feature that other synthesizers lacked but fall short on a completely different feature a universal protocol could lead a musician chain together multiple instruments or perform additional process sees on sound at the computer level related to this problem is one of competing proprietary approaches to musical interfaces with all the standard each synthesizer manufacturer would be compelled to produce its own interface with other synthesizers and with computers in fact such standards did exist they weren't they weren't really standards their proprietary approaches that were unique to specific manufacturers like Roland for example or Yamaha then you would have a bunch of competing technologies on the market that more likely than not would be impossible to chain together so you'll be locked into one ecosystem you would have to be all in on Roland are all in on motor all in on Yamaha you could mix and match because they wouldn't be able to talk to each other it's sort of like the early days of computing before arpanet came along and you had a set of protocols that would let computers talk to each other same basic problem existed at the early nineteen eighties it was a huge mass for musicians and producers so universal standard would set a level playing field give musicians and producers the greatest number of options when creating music and avoid fragmentation of the market Dave Smith first proposed such a standard in nineteen eighty one at a meeting of the audio engineering society and he called his first approached the universal synthesizer interface Smith recognized that while manufacturers were able to create systems that would allow you to control multiple synthesizers made by that manufacturer there was still no standard that would allow for inter operability and manufacturers were concerned that this issue was costing them customers by creating this frustrating environment two years later he would release the first version of the mini protocols this is nineteen eighty three he didn't develop the protocol all by himself major synthesizer companies like Roland Yamaha and several others were all involved in designing the set of rules and standards it was a pretty remarkable display of competitors working together to create a technology that would benefit the entire industry not just one company within it the designers decide that many would send information as a list of events or messages to instruct a device how to make a certain type of sound now again this was a music file or any other form of music but rather directions the recipient would follow to generate the appropriate sound I'll talk about some of the typical midi messages in the next section but first let's take a quick break to thank our sponsor we need yeah in restaurants to try their new data my burger agency for being a.

Roland Yamaha Dave Smith Roland Yamaha
"audio engineering society" Discussed on 1,000 Podcasters

1,000 Podcasters

09:14 min | 11 months ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on 1,000 Podcasters

"This is a an answer to a question that came to me a day or two ago from another Hindenburg user. And I'M GONNA share with you. What was going on why I think it happens and what I do to fix this so that you can do that kind of thing as well? If you'd like to watch this kind of thing definitely recommend the video if you prefer to listen you can learn that way just find. There's really nothing that you have to actually see 'cause I can explain all of it but if you like to watch that's absolutely fine. I totally understand that. So here's the deal new Hindenburg user. Who was a an established audio editor? She he's worked with a number of other tools and he noticed when he exported his file. It took a lot longer than he expected. I think it was an hour and eighteen minutes to render the file which is pretty long time. I totally understand why why he was frustrated and why he had some questions so I totally totally get that. And I'll explain to you. Why this happens Hindenburg? Just like any other audio software can export a file. That does the mix down sends all that stuff out and it renders. unders that file which is absolutely what you'd expect but the cool thing about Hindenburg is that it can also mix that filed down to a specific loudness so if you think about a podcast. You're listening in the car. You want it to be at a certain loudness level and the Audio Engineering Society has set that target based on what they call. LUFF's I'm not going to get into technicals of that but you can automatically set your file to match a loudness target for broadcast TV broadcast radio. You can set it for podcast and you can set it for for a number of different targets and Hindenburg will automatically matt mix it down and set it to match that loudness target which means applying compression and limiting and doing all kinds of stuff behind the scenes. So that you get exactly what you want when you publish your file. Great thing but the way Hindenburg does that makes total sense. They sort of rendered file in memory. If you will and I don't know all of the technicals behind this so if I'm if I'm not technically correct on this I'm explaining how I see it happen but the reality is it's going to mix mix down. The file wants to understand what the peaks and the valleys are with. The loudness is as the file was saved. So after you've applied all the facts after you've you've done all of your mixing everything in you've done all that stuff it's GonNa mix that down and figure out what the loudness is and what it needs to do to make that file match the loudness target that you've you've told it to do. And then when when it's figured that out is going to mix down the whole file again and apply the additional effects to make it match the target loudness so in this particular case if it took an hour for that file to rent or took an hour and eighteen minutes for that file to render it's reasonable symbol to assume that roughly fifty percent of the time was spent mixing it down the first time and then fifty percent of the time spent mixing it down again to match loudness target to export it and publish it or ply three tags or convert the file all of the things that go into that taking the the raw audio making it down and converting it to an MP three or whatever final format right. You're working in. So that's what's going on is it's basically mixing the file down twice once to understand it and wants to make it match the loudness target and so for longer file that can take a while as an example right now I have opened in front of me a the the upcoming episode of my show the engaging missions show and I've done all the edits and I'm getting ready to mix it down. Here's the work around because I found a way to save at least fifty percent of the time that's involved in this. I'm going to miss this file down to a stereo file or a wave file and I'm going to tell the software not to match a loudness target when it does that so when a mix that down my guess is it's GonNa take probably about ten to fifteen minutes for this filed and makes down. I don't do that offline and we'll come back to it and then when I'm done mixing it down I'm going to bring that file back in and I'm a solo out the new tracks so that I'm only listening to that one gonNA use that to do my final expert to loudness so that's going to be the process. It's actually fairly straightforward. But here's what I'm going to do. The first thing I'm GonNa do is mixed this file down without matching loudness targets and in my case. I'm an export. I need to if you're watching on the screen. I'm going to choose where I want it to go so I'm going to drop but in a folder and the tell it to mix it down as a stereo wave an GONNA turn off my loudest matching so that there's no normalization and I'm GonNa hit save and it's going to render. That file is probably GONNA take think about ten or fifteen minutes. I'm going to pause and then we'll come back after. That's done and see what I do next all right. You're back and as you can see by the display. I did slightly miscalculate how long it would take took nineteen minutes and fifty five seconds to do the mix down to be fair. I did have some video editing going on in the background so I wasn't exactly being nice to my computer but if you think about it nearly twenty minutes for just the mix down a lot of effects applied complex stuff so I get why it took along. But if I'd done this the traditional way were mix it down and then it makes it down again. This would've taken forty minutes. Roughly Two K.. So we're nineteen minutes and and fifty five seconds right now. I'M GONNA go ahead and close his dialog box and find my way back to the beginning of the file S- actually kind of along file and and then I'm GonNa go find the file that I just created the one that I just exported and unfortunately I moved around so let me go find that again. So here's my mic down. Grab that file and just drop it into my production. Make sure that everything looks relatively good so everything looks clean. I've got a break here. That's on purpose to don't worry about that. A minute solo this track so that I only have that track and then I have a master track enabled with some effects on the master track. Go ahead and turn all those effects off. These four effects are actually really processor intensive. So that's why it takes part of why it takes so long so I've got that file I dropped it in. I sold all of it and I turned off the effects on the master. Track all of these other tracks that are enabled are going to be processed again. Because I've sold so that it's only processing this then. I'm going to go to export that file again and this time I'm going to make it an MP three file and I've got a preset for exactly how I want to go and then I just need to choose the destination if you're watching a long. I'm just dropping it into a destination so I've selected the file format that I want that I'm GonNa hit save and you'll see that this render is GonNa take significantly less time than it took me to render the original. It'll probably take about a minute or so what it's doing right now is is analyzing the file just like we talked about when the when the line gets about to the fifty percent. Mark that it's going to start writing the file and I'M GONNA go ahead hadn't positive video here and we'll come back to it all.

Audio Engineering Society audio editor Mark
Do this to save half of your export time in Hindenburg

1,000 Podcasters

08:50 min | 11 months ago

Do this to save half of your export time in Hindenburg

"This is a an answer to a question that came to me a day or two ago from another Hindenburg user. And I'M GONNA share with you. What was going on why I think it happens and what I do to fix this so that you can do that kind of thing as well? If you'd like to watch this kind of thing definitely recommend the video if you prefer to listen you can learn that way just find. There's really nothing that you have to actually see 'cause I can explain all of it but if you like to watch that's absolutely fine. I totally understand that. So here's the deal new Hindenburg user. Who was a an established audio editor? She he's worked with a number of other tools and he noticed when he exported his file. It took a lot longer than he expected. I think it was an hour and eighteen minutes to render the file which is pretty long time. I totally understand why why he was frustrated and why he had some questions so I totally totally get that. And I'll explain to you. Why this happens Hindenburg? Just like any other audio software can export a file. That does the mix down sends all that stuff out and it renders. unders that file which is absolutely what you'd expect but the cool thing about Hindenburg is that it can also mix that filed down to a specific loudness so if you think about a podcast. You're listening in the car. You want it to be at a certain loudness level and the Audio Engineering Society has set that target based on what they call. LUFF's I'm not going to get into technicals of that but you can automatically set your file to match a loudness target for broadcast TV broadcast radio. You can set it for podcast and you can set it for for a number of different targets and Hindenburg will automatically matt mix it down and set it to match that loudness target which means applying compression and limiting and doing all kinds of stuff behind the scenes. So that you get exactly what you want when you publish your file. Great thing but the way Hindenburg does that makes total sense. They sort of rendered file in memory. If you will and I don't know all of the technicals behind this so if I'm if I'm not technically correct on this I'm explaining how I see it happen but the reality is it's going to mix mix down. The file wants to understand what the peaks and the valleys are with. The loudness is as the file was saved. So after you've applied all the facts after you've you've done all of your mixing everything in you've done all that stuff it's GonNa mix that down and figure out what the loudness is and what it needs to do to make that file match the loudness target that you've you've told it to do. And then when when it's figured that out is going to mix down the whole file again and apply the additional effects to make it match the target loudness so in this particular case if it took an hour for that file to rent or took an hour and eighteen minutes for that file to render it's reasonable symbol to assume that roughly fifty percent of the time was spent mixing it down the first time and then fifty percent of the time spent mixing it down again to match loudness target to export it and publish it or ply three tags or convert the file all of the things that go into that taking the the raw audio making it down and converting it to an MP three or whatever final format right. You're working in. So that's what's going on is it's basically mixing the file down twice once to understand it and wants to make it match the loudness target and so for longer file that can take a while as an example right now I have opened in front of me a the the upcoming episode of my show the engaging missions show and I've done all the edits and I'm getting ready to mix it down. Here's the work around because I found a way to save at least fifty percent of the time that's involved in this. I'm going to miss this file down to a stereo file or a wave file and I'm going to tell the software not to match a loudness target when it does that so when a mix that down my guess is it's GonNa take probably about ten to fifteen minutes for this filed and makes down. I don't do that offline and we'll come back to it and then when I'm done mixing it down I'm going to bring that file back in and I'm a solo out the new tracks so that I'm only listening to that one gonNA use that to do my final expert to loudness so that's going to be the process. It's actually fairly straightforward. But here's what I'm going to do. The first thing I'm GonNa do is mixed this file down without matching loudness targets and in my case. I'm an export. I need to if you're watching on the screen. I'm going to choose where I want it to go so I'm going to drop but in a folder and the tell it to mix it down as a stereo wave an GONNA turn off my loudest matching so that there's no normalization and I'm GonNa hit save and it's going to render. That file is probably GONNA take think about ten or fifteen minutes. I'm going to pause and then we'll come back after. That's done and see what I do next all right. You're back and as you can see by the display. I did slightly miscalculate how long it would take took nineteen minutes and fifty five seconds to do the mix down to be fair. I did have some video editing going on in the background so I wasn't exactly being nice to my computer but if you think about it nearly twenty minutes for just the mix down a lot of effects applied complex stuff so I get why it took along. But if I'd done this the traditional way were mix it down and then it makes it down again. This would've taken forty minutes. Roughly Two K.. So we're nineteen minutes and and fifty five seconds right now. I'M GONNA go ahead and close his dialog box and find my way back to the beginning of the file S- actually kind of along file and and then I'm GonNa go find the file that I just created the one that I just exported and unfortunately I moved around so let me go find that again. So here's my mic down. Grab that file and just drop it into my production. Make sure that everything looks relatively good so everything looks clean. I've got a break here. That's on purpose to don't worry about that. A minute solo this track so that I only have that track and then I have a master track enabled with some effects on the master track. Go ahead and turn all those effects off. These four effects are actually really processor intensive. So that's why it takes part of why it takes so long so I've got that file I dropped it in. I sold all of it and I turned off the effects on the master. Track all of these other tracks that are enabled are going to be processed again. Because I've sold so that it's only processing this then. I'm going to go to export that file again and this time I'm going to make it an MP three file and I've got a preset for exactly how I want to go and then I just need to choose the destination if you're watching a long. I'm just dropping it into a destination so I've selected the file format that I want that I'm GonNa hit save and you'll see that this render is GonNa take significantly less time than it took me to render the original. It'll probably take about a minute or so what it's doing right now is is analyzing the file just like we talked about when the when the line gets about to the fifty percent. Mark that it's going to start writing the file and I'M GONNA go ahead hadn't positive video here and we'll come back to it all right we're back and the final mix down is done in this case it took three minutes and four seconds so all told call it twenty three minutes for the entire mix down whereas doing it the traditional way would have taken forty minutes or longer and the real power in this begins to come. I'm when you're exporting multiple files to different locations so in Hindenburg you can publish to more the same file to more than one destination. So my case I work in Lipson Jason primarily so I can publish a file Libson and I can also drop a file to Google drive or whatever backup system I have so I have another copy of that and then that can all happen automatically automatically but if I were to mix this entire twenty minute mix down and publish it to to different destinations. That would be twenty minutes for the original mix down plus twenty minutes to publish it to Lipson plus twenty minutes to publish to a backup folder. If you will sixty minutes for this file whereas is doing it this way would take twenty three to twenty five minutes still a little bit longer than it would've liked again. I was a little bit hard on my computer by editing video while I was exporting the audio but this can save significant amounts of time and it's really pretty simple just export the file to a temporary file if you will non normalized or non leveled to a location then bring that file back in Solo. So that's the only thing that you've got going on with no effects going on in a master track if you have a master astor track and then use that for your final export and publish. That will save you a good bit of time. When you're publishing files HINDENBURG? especially if you use a lot of effects or if there's there's a lot of complexity going on that's GonNa take a long time to

Audio Editor Audio Engineering Society Lipson Google Mark
"audio engineering society" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"A completely different feature a universal protocol could lead a musician chained together multiple instruments or perform additional process sees on sound at the computer level related to this problem is one of competing proprietary approaches to musical interfaces without a standard each synthesizer manufacturer would be compelled to produce its own interface with other sent us I users and with computers in fact such standards did exist they weren't they weren't really standards their proprietary approaches that were unique to specific manufacturers like Roland for example or Yamaha then you would have a bunch of competing technologies on the market that more likely than not would be impossible to chain together so you be locked into one eco system you would have to be all in on Roland are all in on motor all in on Yamaha you couldn't mix and match because they wouldn't be able to talk to each other it's sort of like the early days of computing before arpanet came along and you had a set of protocols that would like computers talk to each other same basic problem existed at that the early nineteen eighties it was a huge mass for musicians and producers so universal standard would set a level playing field give musicians and producers the greatest number of options when creating music and avoid fragmentation of the market Dave Smith first proposed such a standard in nineteen eighty one at a meeting of the audio engineering society and he called his first approached the universal synthesizer interface Smith recognize that while manufacturers were able to create systems that would allow you to control multiple synthesizers made by that manufacturer there was still no standard that would allow for inter operability and manufacturers were concerned that this issue was costing them customers by creating this frustrating environment two years later he would release the first version of the midi protocols was nineteen eighty three he didn't develop the protocol all by himself major synthesizer companies like Roland Yamaha and several others were all involved in designing the set of rules and standards it was a pretty remarkable display of competitors working together to create a technology that will benefit the entire industry not just one company within it the designers decide that many would send information as a list of events or messages to instruct the device how to make a certain type of sound now again this wasn't music file or any other form of music but rather directions the recipient would follow to generate the appropriate sound I'll talk about some of the typical many messages in the next section but first let's take a quick break to thank our sponsor.

Roland Yamaha Dave Smith Roland Yamaha two years
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

08:10 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Ryan recor were profiling today. Justin, l Fisher who put a documentary out debut just recently at the Saint Louis international film festival. You may have seen it. It's called gateway sound when I look at some of the different professions out there where people will call you. They'll be like, hey, my computer's broken. If your computer guy, everyone calls, you Ma there's something wrong with my car. If you're a car guy, everyone calls you. We're starting to see a pretty big influx of people building home studio. So I got to magin someone wants to make a recording space for a podcast, or they just want record themselves fiddling on the tar you're probably in demand where they ask you your opinion on. Hey, how do I set this up? And what do I do a bit? Yeah. I I do get a lot of calls from people that are wanting to ask advice on what microphones tobacco interfaces to buy and all that stuff. So it happens pretty frequently. And. You know, I'm I'm fine with that. I'm not gonna bemoan like lost work because I fully understand how the business is now. So I don't go don't you just come in? And we'll make better. Yeah. You know, how that works? Well, I have a home studio to record some stuff at the house. If I need to record interviews or anything like that. And sometimes I'll do these little videos for my fantasy Hockey League, which is kind of dorky, but it's kind of fun to add that extra moment. But it's amazing. How the price is really come down on a lot of this equipment before when I was in college. It was a big deal if you can afford to buy the adobe software to get the onto your computer. Now today, it seems like you can buy some of the most, you know, even though it's really low quality, but you can put a rig in your house for like a hundred and fifty bucks if you really wanted to and just get a microphone in interface that way in for the most part, you know, people will still listen to it. It won't be unlistenable. Yeah. Yeah. It's not like you're recording Fisher Price Little recorder that you had. As a kid or anything like that? So the price as it continues to come down. I think is grabbed a lot of people interested into that field. The home studios are nothing new. They've been around since les Paul now. And there's nothing we can do to change that. But the quality has definitely increased significantly, and which is great because it kind of gives me an opportunity to go back and forth with demos on bands. You know, and they can bring me something that I can actually hear rather than oh, we recorded this on a cassette during band practice in the basement. Kinda make out what the guitar is doing. But mostly I hear snare drum. Yeah. So in that respect, it's it's great. You know, because it gives us a chance to communicate a little bit better. But I've had a lot of bands that I've actually kind of done a a back and forth with where they'll record a little bit in the studio and a little bit at home, and it saves them time and money makes the whole process more efficient with your documentary gateway sound when you walk into a recording studio. What's the first thing you look for? Well, I'm a gear nerd, so I'm usually looking at the gear first downs. But also kinda like listening to what the room sounds like his every room is totally different. So I'm kinda like talking in the space in assessing. And I I know I love doing that exploring different acoustic spaces daddy. Cool and is pretty neat. Do you get that feel when you're around other audio people all the time? It's just like, this is this is awesome. You know, it's funny. You mentioned that because I just last night. It was a audio engineering society meeting. So the audio community in Saint Louis is pretty tight knit group. You know, pretty much everybody knows everybody. So there's no competition between studios because we're all friends, which is awesome. And so we get together once every other month and eaten drink beer and talk nerdy. Yeah. Audio trade secrets and things, and it's pretty cool. So yeah, that's always exciting. We always have a lot of fun. Yeah. That probably helped you when you were recording gateway sound, you have the ability to just make a phone call and say, hey, can I talk to you about something, and you can just go and do it. Yeah. And there's a number of people in that group that are in the film as well. So how long did it take for you to film in four years? Well, not filming filming it for about three the whole process. Kept getting longer. You're originally gonna make it like a half hour or something. You stretched it out. Well, it was. At the beginning. I didn't quite wanna a limit myself. But I had a gas on like what it was going to be. But I thought to myself I'm going to let the creative process kind of dictate. It's not. So I didn't wanna put any kind of barriers there for myself. Yeah. You wanna be able to tell the story. No matter how long it takes. So you have that ability. When you're when you're the one putting it together where did you learn your video skills? Advice from friends Lynda dot com. You know, what's amazing? If you couldn't understand the audio side. A lot of those skills are transferable. Italy editing. Yeah. The shooting not so much. I am. Light. Look at some of the I didn't shoot many scenes, but I shot a couple of just because I had to travel by myself, or whatever, and I still look at certain scenes in the Mike. I wish I could have made that better. But it's probably only something I'm gonna notice most people won't notice four years could turn to six before, you know, overall. What was the reaction when you showed gateway sound really positive? I mean, not just from people like in the audio business, but musicians and people that weren't even in the business at all. They're like, oh, I had no idea about this. Or I didn't know that. This was an issue. I didn't know the music business was kinda working in this way. Also, everybody, I hope and I think learned something they had some sort of take away from it. You always hope that someone will be able to walk away with really like that. Yeah. Otherwise, what's the point? Yeah. I mean, you could do it for your own sake. But what's the would've killed me? If I was just doing it for me. What's the support of the wife during that process was she thinking Duracell, you're always working on that? Or was she getting frustrated ever at any point? But but you had this dream of putting it together. Yeah. She was extremely supportive, but at the same time, it's I would I would try my best to work really late at night for about a year. There are many nights where I was up 'til three four in the morning working on it because I didn't wanna take time away from the family if I can avoid it. So, you know, the shooting stuff, obviously it happens when it happens, all the editing. I tried to get done in in other hours. What do you think changed the most in the industry since you? When you first started paying attention. I mean, obviously the way music's distributed. You know, I think that the vast majority of people listen to music on their phone, and they listen to it via streaming services for the most part. I mean, even we saw a huge shift when we went from CDs to downloads on itunes, and even now that is kind of gone by the wayside. Nobody's really downloading music is much anymore. Why would they when you can Spotify or Pandora and just you have access to literally everything? So it's. It's hard to say what's next. You know, I don't see streaming going anywhere for a long time. The idea of his documentary was to film the history of recording studios in Saint Louis. And then it got bigger just in L Fisher is his name gateway sound is the documentary. More with him next on KOMO X profiles. More.

Saint Louis Ryan recor adobe Justin Hockey Fisher KOMO L Fisher les Paul Spotify Lynda dot Italy Duracell Pandora four years
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

08:59 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Initial d say Justin L Fisher. I don't ever call myself. Justin, l Fisher I put that there for credit reasons. Okay. Because there's another Justin Fisher out there. He's the bass player for the band Nerf herder. And so there's only a handful when I say handful, I mean to sites to track credits for engineers and producers and one's all music and one is discounts disguises, like really iffy in all music. There's no way to correct the information. Really? So does it pull from other sites kinda? Yeah. And so. The problem is you know, you have Justin Fisher year, Justin Fisher here and of his credits are in my stuff and some of credits her in his stuff, and it's just a big mishmash. So if you look at all music dot com, either it looks like I did a bunch of stuff or the guy from Nerf herder has all my work. Yeah. So that's why you had to put my middle initial end to kinda separate myself from. So that other Justin was there. I they it's like they planted the flag on the movie. Yeah. Yeah. A little bit. There's no turning around. Well, and the thing is too is with the film and with IMDB and stuff too. There's a bunch of Justin fishers, and and. You are an audio engineer producer musician. What not so great a musician. What do you play I play guitar, okay? Poorly. You have a lot of pride in the type of guitar you play. No, no allegiance to any particular brand. Oh, we'd like actual guitars. Oh, I'm Gibson fan through some never really got an offender stuff. Now, sits just it's not my sound and the the feel of it. I don't really care for. But I've always been a les Paul guy who's your favorite guitarist who that's a. That's a multifaceted question because it could be you know, depending on style. You know, I'm going to give a really lame answer. And that is my favorite guitar player would be someone who got me into playing guitar what you'll be Kurt Cobain. Okay. And he's by no means a great guitar player from a technical standpoint. But that's really Nevada's. What made me start playing? So I guess I would have to give credit where Credit's due you're gonna say prince or something like that. He's one of those underrated guitar players. Yeah. I mean, there's so many like you can't it's like what's your favorite song, you know, or what's your favorite movie? Well, there's so many criteria out there. It's like it's hard to make that decision and narrow it down. So you be an audio engineer. I just adjusted the Mike pods slightly, and you took notice that you always pay attention. Things like that. It's it's a movies, especially when I'm watching a movie, and I'm so microphones not plugged in. Drives me nuts. On camera performances. What happens when you see one of those microphones dip into the shot. Like, you're watching TV. Well, you know, luckily these days. You almost never see that. Because you know, a lot of things are shot in four k now so that stuff's easier to crop in. That kind of stuff. So you don't really see that too much anymore. Tricky. There's a lot of things that could hide the blemishes of the mistakes of the past. Yes, exactly. For better or worse. George lucas. And you also have on your t-shirt is the headphones. Yeah. Well, this is actually I teach over at Webster university. Yeah. Every year. We hold a like, a mini audio engineering society convention. It's called and it's the Saint Louis or I'm sorry. The central region audio students summit. Yeah. Crass? So they bring in people from all over the region to do talks and stuff like that. So it's a pretty cool event. What are the things that kids are interested in learning? Well, I mean, I don't think things have changed that much. It's, you know, so many people get into recording for music, you know, and I have a lot of interns that comes to the studio and a lot of people just want to learn how to record music and learn how to pretty spans and all that stuff. So that's the primary reason. The sad thing is is the jobs are few and far between so they might get into it for one reason and then end up shifting their career path. I mean, there's tons of opportunities and other things like, you know, live sound or post production for film and TV. But the music thing is just not what it used to be. You know, you were doing the research for your documentary that came up gateway sound one of the things I read that surprised you was you were worried that when you went to talk to some of these production houses, you would go in there. And they would only tell you about how they're about ready to lock the doors up and call it quits, but you were kind of surprised there's a lot of them that were just chugging along. Maybe not as strong. As they used to. But they're still finding ways in the industry to be viable. Yeah. It's different. Now. They might not be doing the exact same that they were ten fifteen years ago, but you know, a lot of places just found different methods. I went down to Memphis Sam Phillips, and they kind of found a revitalised niche in like, Americana music and doing a vinyl Jeff Powell down. There is doing he's like backlogged, like, months and months because the vinyl thing exploded. Yeah, he's doing a ton of it. What's the perfect recording studio set up for you? Do you have a do you have a preference? Do you prefer walking in and seeing know old school equipment, and you know, cigarette. You know, like the little trays or there's a cigarette butts in there, and you're like, yeah. This guy knows what he's doing. Or do you prefer like the modern studios were all the equipments digital? And there's a bunch of lights and everything set up perfectly. I'm I'm right down the middle because with the older analog gear comes maintenance issues. Incomes big time. Because if we're recording to tape. You know, you gotta sit there and wait for it to rewind record a tape. You don't hear that? It's still out there, not many people. Do it. There's there's an expense. You know, a real tape now cost you three hundred fifty bucks. Really? That's like fifteen minutes recorded. So that's kind of gone by the wayside for most places. But, you know, the big analog consoles and still are still a maintenance nightmare. Yeah. A lot of times when people don't, you know have tax in their studios anymore. So I I love a hybrid approach where I've got a digital on the record side and actually digital on the console side. But all my other gear as analog, and it's nice to kind of have the best both worlds. Yeah. How did you? Learn to do the things you're doing trial and error. I guess for a good portion of it. But I went to school to I went to Webster here in Saint Louis got a four year degree in audio. But. This field is like you never stop learning. I never pretend that I'll be an expert ever. But the beginning of it was wanting to record my own band, you know, and started out on cassette and. Is kind of a barrister, but I graduated well, a friend of mine went off school, and he had his audio books when he graduated he gave them to me. So I studied my butt off. And I was looking at this chart of like frequency response and saw that the frequency response of of VHS significantly better than cassette. So I went out and bought myself a second VCR. And I did like sound on sound kind of over dubbing between two VCR's. And so anyway, then I eventually got a computer and in the limit. So you are trying to sink to VHS recorders to make multi-track. Now, I would literally like record on one and then record on the second one over the existing tape. So I would like be bouncing back and forth from from deck to deck and it kinda worked. You got a name that technique. I've ever heard this waiting for like, the what is vintage now is going to be like old crappy digital technology eventually oily record on the mini discs. Like that we continue with Justin l Fisher audio engineer producer musician. Also chief engineer at Smith Lee productions here in Saint Louis talking about not only is time working inside the studio, but his new documentary that debuted at the Saint Louis international film.

Justin L Fisher Justin engineer Saint Louis Justin fishers Nerf herder producer Webster university Kurt Cobain les Paul blemishes Nevada Gibson IMDB chief engineer George lucas Sam Phillips Jeff Powell
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

08:12 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"The voice of Saint Louis. KOMO ex. I am your host Ryan recor were profiling today just Fisher who put a documentary out debut just recently at the Saint Louis international film festival. You may have seen it. It's called gateway sound when I look at some of the different professions out there where people will call you. They'll be like, hey, my computer's broken. If your computer guy, everyone calls you. There's something wrong with my car. If you're a car guy, everyone calls you. We're starting to see a pretty big influx of people building home studio. So I got to imagine someone wants to make a recording space for a podcast or they just wanna record themselves fiddling on the guitar. You're probably in demand where they ask you your opinion on. Hey, how do I set this up? And what do I do a bit? Yeah. I I do get a lot of calls from people that are wanting to ask advice on what microphones tobacco interfaces to buy and all that stuff. So it happens pretty frequently. And you know, I'm I'm fine with that. I'm not gonna Bologne like lost work. Because I fully understand how the business is now. So I don't go. Why don't you just come in? And we'll make it better. Yeah. You know, how that works? Well, I have a home studio to record some stuff at the house. If I need to record interviews or anything like that. And sometimes I'll do these little videos for my fantasy Hockey League, which is kind of dorky, but it's kind of fun to add that extra moment. But it's amazing. How the price is really come down on a lot of this equipment before when I was in college. It was a big deal if you can afford to buy the adobe software to get on onto your computer. Now today, it seems like you can buy some of the most, you know, even though it's really low quality, but you can put a Reagan your house for like one hundred and fifty bucks if you really wanted to and just get a microphone and interface that way in for the most part, you know, people will still listen to it. It won't be unlistenable. Yeah. Yeah. It's not like you're recording Fisher Price Little recorder that you had as a kid or anything like that. So the price as it continues to come down. I think is grabbed a lot of people interested into that. Field. The home studios are nothing new. They've been around since les Paul, and there's nothing we can do to change that. But the quality has definitely increased significantly, and which is great because it kind of gives me an opportunity to go back and forth with demos on bands. You know, and they can bring me something that I can actually hear rather than oh, we recorded this on a cassette during band practice in the basement tied to make out what the guitar is doing. But mostly I hear snare drum. So in that respect, it's it's great because it gives us a chance to communicate a little bit better. But I've had a lot of bands that I've actually done a back and forth with where they'll record a little bit in the studio, and then a little bit at home, and it saves them time and money makes the whole process more efficient with your documentary gateway sound when you walk into. To a recording studio. What's the first thing? You look for. Well, I'm a gear nerd so. I'm usually looking at the gear I but also kinda like listening to what the room sounds like every room is totally different. So I'm kinda like talking in the space in assessing. Anti. I, you know, I love doing that exploring different acoustic spaces the cool. That is pretty neat. You get that feel when you're around other audio people all the time. It's just like, this is this is awesome. You know, it's funny. You mentioned that because I just last night. It was a audio engineering society meeting. So the audio community in Saint Louis pretty tight knit group. You know, pretty much everybody knows everybody. So there's no competition between studios because we're all friends, which is awesome. And so we get together once every other month and eaten drink beer and talk nerdy. Yeah. Audio trade secrets and things, and it's pretty cool. So yeah, that's always exciting. We always have a lot of fun slept. Probably helped you when you were recording gateway sound, you have the ability to just make a phone call and say, hey, can I talk to you about something, and you can just go and do it. Yeah. And there's a number of people in that group that are in the film as well. So how long did it take free to film in four years? Well, not filming filming for about three the whole processes. It kept getting longer. You're originally going to make it like a half hour or something you stretched it out. Well, it was at the beginning. I didn't quite when a limit myself, but I had a gas on like what it was going to be. But I thought to myself I'm going to let the creative process kind of dictate itself. So I didn't wanna put any kind of barriers there for myself. Yeah. You wanna be able to tell the story. No matter how long it takes. I guess so you have that ability. When you're when you're the one putting it together where did you learn your video skills? Advice from friends Lynda dot com. You know, what's amazing? If you can understand the audio side a lot of those skills are transferable. Italy editing. Yeah. The shooting not so much. I am. I still look at some of the I didn't shoot many scenes, but I shot a couple of just because I had to travel by myself, or whatever, and I still look at certain scenes in the Mike. I wish I could have made that better. But it's probably only something I'm gonna notice most people won't notice four years could turn to six before, you know, overall. What was the reaction when you showed gateway sound really positive? I mean, not just from people like in the audio business, but musicians and people that weren't even in the business at all. They're like, oh, I had no idea about this. Or I didn't know that. This was an issue or I didn't know the music business was kinda working in this way. Also, everybody, I hope and I think learned something they had some sort of take away from it. You always hope that someone will be able to walk away with here. I would really like that. Otherwise, what's the point? Yeah. I mean, you could do it for your own sake. Yeah. But what's the would it kill? Me if I was just doing it for me. What's the support of the wife during that process was she thinking Duracell, you're always working on that? Or does she getting frustrated ever at any point? But but you had this dream of putting it together. Yeah. She was extremely supportive, but at the same time, it's I would I would try my best to work really late at night. So for about a year there are many nights where I was up 'til three four in the morning working on it because I didn't wanna take time away from the family if I can avoid it. So, you know, the shooting stuff, obviously it happens when it happens, all the editing. I tried to get done, you know, in in other hours. What do you think's changed the most in the industry since you? When you first started paying attention. I mean, obviously the way music's distributed. You know, I think that the vast majority of people listen to music on their phone, and they listen to it via streaming services for the most part. I mean, even we saw a huge shift when we went from CDs to downloads on itunes, and even now that is kind of gone by the wayside and nobody's really downloading music is much anymore. You why would they when you can have Spotify or Pandora and just you have access to literally everything? So it's. It's hard to say what's next. I don't see streaming going anywhere for a long time. The idea of his documentary was to film the history of recording studios in Saint Louis. And then it got bigger. Justin, l Fischer is name gateway sound is the documentary. More with him next on KOMO X profiles..

Saint Louis KOMO Ryan recor adobe Fisher Hockey Spotify les Paul Reagan Lynda dot Italy Duracell Pandora Justin l Fischer four years
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

09:00 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Initial say Justin L Fisher. I don't ever call myself. Justin health Fisher. I put that there for credit reasons. Okay. Because there's another Justin Fisher out there. He's the bass player for the band Nerf herder. And so there's only a handful when I say handful, I mean to sites to track credits for engineers and producers and one's all music and one is discounts disguises, like really iffy in all music. There's no way to correct the information. Really? So does it poll from other sites kinda? Yeah. And so. The problem is you know, you have Justin Fisher year Justin Fisher here. His credits are in my stuff and some credits are in his stuff, and it's just a big mishmash. So if you look at all music dot com, either it looks like I did a bunch of Nerf herder stuff or the guy from Nerf herder has all my work. Yeah. So that's why you had to put my middle initial kind of separate myself from. So that other Justin was there. I they it's like they planted a flag on the movie. Yeah. Little bit. There's no turning around. Well, the thing is too is with the film and with IMDB and stuff too. There's a bunch of Justin fishers, and and. You are an audio engineer producer musician. What not so great a musician. What do you play I play guitar, okay? Poorly. You have a lot of pride in the type of guitar you play. No, no allegiance to any particular brand. We'd like actual guitars Gibson fan through. I never really got an offender stuff now sits just it's not my sound and the feel of it. I don't really care for. But I've always been a les, Paul guy, who's your favorite guitarist. Ooh. That's it. That's a multifaceted question because it could be you know, depending on style. You know, I'm going to give a really lame answer. And that is my favorite guitar player. Would be someone who got me into playing guitar. You'll be Kirk obain. Okay. And he's by no means a great guitar player from technical standpoint. But that's really Nirvana's. What made me start playing? So I guess I would have to give credit Credit's you're gonna say prince or something like that. He's one of those underrated guitar players. Yeah. I mean, there's so many like you can't it's like what's your favorite song, or what's your favorite movie? Well, there's so many criteria out there. It's like it's hard to make that decision and narrow it down. So you be an audio engineer. I just adjusted the Mike Potts slightly, and you took notice that you always pay attention. It's movies, especially, you know. And I'm watching a movie, and I'm so at microphones not plugged in. Drives me nuts. On camera performances. What happens when you see one of those microphones dip into the shot. Like, you're watching TV. Well, you know, luckily these days. You almost never see that. Because you know, a lot of things are shot in four k now so that stuff's easier to crop in. Of that kind of stuff. So you don't really see that too much anymore. Tricky. There's a lot of things that could hide the blemishes of the mistakes of the past. Yes, exactly. For better or worse. George lucas. And you also have on your t-shirt is the headphones. Yeah. Well, this is actually I teach over at Webster university. Every year. We hold a like, a mini audio engineering society convention. It's called. And it's the the Saint Louis, I'm sorry. The central region audio students summit. Yeah. Crass? So they bring in people from all over the region to do talks and stuff like that. So it's a pretty cool event. What are the things that kids are interested in learning? Well, I mean, I don't think things have changed that much. It's, you know, so many people get into recording for music, and I have a lot of interns that comes to the studio and a lot of people just want to learn how to record music in one or learn how to pretty spans and all that stuff. So that's the primary reason. The sad thing is is the jobs are few and far between they might get into it for one reason and then end up shifting their career path. I mean, there's tons of opportunities and other things like, you know, live sound or post production for film and TV. But the music thing is just not what it used to be. Yeah. You know, you were doing the research for your documentary that came up gateway sound one of the things I read that surprised you was you were worried that when you went to talk to some of these production houses, you would go in there. And they would only tell you about how they're about ready to lock the doors up and call it quits, but you were kind of surprised there's a lot of them that were just chugging along maybe not as strong as they used to. But they're still finding ways in the industry to be viable. Yeah. It's just different. Now, they might not be doing the exact same that they were ten fifteen years ago, but you know, a lot of places just found different methods. I went down to Memphis at Sam Phillips, and they kind of found a a revitalised niche in like, Americana music and doing a vinyl Jeff Powell down. There is doing he's like backlogged, like months and months because the vinyl thing is exploded. And he's doing a ton of it. What's the perfect recording studio setup for you? You have a do you have a preference? Do you prefer walking in and seeing old school equipment, and you know, cigarette. You know, like the little trays or there's a cigarette butts in there, and you're like, yeah. This guy knows what he's doing. Or do you prefer like the modern studios were all the equipments digital? And there's a bunch of lights and everything set up perfectly. I'm I'm right down the middle because with the older analog gear comes maintenance issues. Incomes big time. Because if we're recording to tape. There's a, you know, you gotta sit there and wait for it to rewind record a tape. You don't hear that? It's still out there, not many people. Do it. There's there's an expense. You know, a real tape now cost you three hundred fifty bucks. Really? That's like fifteen minutes or recorded. So that's that's kind of gone by the wayside for most places. But, you know, the big analog consoles and still are still a maintenance nightmare. Yeah. A lot of times when people don't, you know have tax in their studios anymore. So I I love a hybrid approach where I've got a digital on the record side actually digital on the console side. But all my other gear as analog, and it's nice to kind of have the best of both worlds. Yeah. How did you? Learn to do the things you're doing trial and error. I guess for a good portion of it. But I went to school to I went to Webster. You're in Saint Louis got a four year degree in audio. But. This field is like you never stop learning. You know, I never pretend that I'll be an expert ever. But the beginning of it was wanting to record my own band. You know? And started out on cassette and crash is kind of embarrassing, but I graduated well, a friend of mine went off to school, and he had his audio books when he graduated. He gave them to me. So I studied my butt off. And I was looking at this chart of like frequency response and saw that the frequency response of of VHS significantly better than cassette. So I went out and bought myself a second VCR. And I did like sound on sound kind of over dubbing between two VCR's. And so anyway that I eventually got a computer and in the limit. So you are trying to sink to VHS recorders to make multi-track. Now, I would literally like record on one and then record on the second one over the existing tape. So I would like be bouncing back and forth from from deck to deck and it kinda worked. You got a name that technique Muslim. I've ever heard this waiting for like, the what is vintage now is going to be like old crappy digital technology eventually oily record on the mini discs. Like that we continue with Justin L, Fisher, audio engineer producer musician. Also chief engineer at Smith Lee productions here in Saint Louis talking about not only is time working inside the studio, but his new documentary that debuted at the Saint Louis international film festival next.

Justin Fisher Justin health Fisher engineer Saint Louis Justin fishers Justin Nerf herder producer Webster university Justin L Paul guy Nirvana blemishes Kirk obain Gibson Mike Potts IMDB chief engineer
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"L Fisher who put a documentary out debut just recently at the Saint Louis international film festival. You may have seen it. It's called gateway sound when I look at some of the different professions out there where people will call you. They'll be like, hey, my computer's broken. If your computer guy, everyone calls, you Ma there's something wrong with my car. If you're a car guy, everyone calls you. We're starting to see a pretty big influx of people building home studio. So I got to imagine someone wants to make a recording space for a podcast or they just want record themselves fiddling on the guitar. You're probably in demand where they ask you your opinion on. Hey, how do I set this up? And what do I do a bit? Yeah. I I do get a lot of calls from people that are wanting to ask advice on what microphones tobacco interfaces to buy and all that stuff. So. It happens pretty frequently. And I'm fine with that. I'm not gonna the like lost work. Because I fully understand how the business is now. So I don't go don't you just come in? And we'll make it better. Yeah. You know, how that works? Well, I have a home studio to record some stuff at the house. If I need to record interviews or anything like that. And sometimes I'll do these little videos for my fantasy Hockey League, which is kind of dorky, but it's kind of fun to add that extra moment. But it's amazing. How the price is really come down on a lot of this equipment before when I was in college. It was a big deal if you can afford to buy the adobe software to get the onto your computer. Now today, it seems like you can buy some of the most, you know, even though it's really low quality, but you can put a in your house for like a hundred and fifty bucks if you really wanted to and just get a microphone in interface that way in for the most part, you know, people will still listen to it. It won't be unlistenable. Yeah. Yeah. It's not like, you're recording Fisher Price. Little the recorder that you had as a kid or anything like that. So the price as it continues to come down. I think is grabbed a lot of people interested into that. Field. The home studios are nothing new. They've been around since les Paul now. And there's nothing we can do to change that. But the quality has definitely increased significantly, and which is great because it kind of gives me an opportunity to go back and forth with demos on bands. You know, and they can bring me something that I can actually hear rather than oh, we recorded this on a cassette during band practice in the basement. I kinda make out what the guitar guitars doing, but mostly I hear snare drum. Yeah. So in that respect, it's it's great. You know, because it gives us a chance to communicate a little bit better. But I've had a lot of bands that I've actually kind done a a back and forth with where they'll record a little bit in the studio, and then a little bit at home, and it saves them time and money makes the whole process more efficient with your documentary gateway sound when you walk into. To a recording studio. What's the first thing? You look for. Well, I'm a gear nerd, so I'm usually looking at the gear first downs. But also kinda like listening to what the room sounds like. 'cause every room is totally different. So I'm kinda like talking in the space in assessing. And I I, you know, I love doing that in exploring different acoustic spaces daddy. Cool. That is pretty neat. Do you get that feel when you're around other audio people all the time? It's just like, this is this is awesome. You know, it's funny. You mentioned that because I just last night. It was a audio engineering society meeting. So the audio community in Saint Louis pretty tight knit group. You know, pretty much everybody knows everybody. So there's no competition between studios because we're all friends, which is awesome. And so we get together once every other month and eaten drink beer and talk nerdy. Yeah. Audio trade secrets and things, and it's pretty cool. So yeah, that's always exciting. We always have a lot of fun. Yeah. Slept probably helped you when you were recording gateway sound, you have the ability to just make a phone call and say, hey, can I talk to you about something, and you can just go and do it. Yeah. And there's a number of people in that group that are in the film as well. So how long did it take to film in four years? Well, not filming filming it for about three the whole process. I kept getting longer. You're originally gonna make it like a half hour or something. You stretched it out. Well, it was. At the beginning. I didn't quite wanna a limit myself. But I had a gas on like what it was going to be. But I thought to myself I'm going to let the creative process kind of dictate itself. So I didn't wanna put any kind of barriers there for myself. Yeah. You wanna be able to tell the story. No matter how long it takes against. So you have that ability. When you're when you're the one putting it together where did you learn your video skills? Advice from friends. Lynda dot com. You know, what's amazing? If you can understand the audio side a lot of those skills are transferable. Italy editing. Yeah. The shooting not so much. I wore -able. And I still look at some of the I didn't shoot many scenes, but I shot a couple of just because I had to travel by myself, or whatever, and I still look at certain scenes and Mike. I wish I could have made that better. But it's probably only something I'm gonna notice most people won't notice four years could turn to six before, you know, overall. What was the reaction when you showed gateway sound really positive? I mean, not just from people like in the audio business, but musicians and people that weren't even in the business at all. They're like, oh, I had no idea about this. Or I didn't know that. This was an issue. Or I didn't know the music business was kinda working in this way. So everybody, I hope and I think learned something they had some sort of take away from it. You always hope that someone will be able to walk away with. I would really like that. Yeah. Otherwise, what's the point? Yeah. I mean, you could do it for your own sake. Yeah. But what's the killed me? If I was just doing it for me. What's the support of the wife during that process was she thinking Duracell, you're always working on that? Or was she getting frustrated ever at any point? But but you have this dream of putting it together. Yeah. She was extremely supportive, but at the same time, it's I would I would try my best to work really late at night. So for about a year there are many nights where I was up 'til three four in the morning working on it because I didn't wanna take time away from the family if I can avoid it. So, you know, the shooting stuff, obviously it happens when it happens, all the editing. I tried to get done, you know, in in other hours. What do you think's changed the most in the industry since you? When you first started paying attention. I mean, obviously the way music's distributed. You know, I think that the vast majority of people listen to music on their phone, and they listen to it via streaming services for the most part. I mean, even we saw huge shift when we went from CDs to downloads on I tunes, and even now that is kind of gone by the wayside and nobody's really downloading music is much anymore. You why would they when you can Spotify or Pandora and just you have access to literally everything? So it's. It's hard to say what's next. I don't see streaming going anywhere for a long time. The idea of his documentary was to film the history of recording studios in Saint Louis. And then it got bigger Justin l Fisher is his name gateway sound is the documentary more with him next on chemo X profiles..

Saint Louis Fisher Price L Fisher adobe Justin l Fisher Hockey les Paul Spotify Italy Duracell Pandora Mike four years
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

08:58 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Initial d say, Justin, Al Fisher, I don't ever call myself. Justin L Fisher put that there for credit reasons. Okay. Because there's another Justin Fisher out there. He's the bass player for the band Nerf herder. And so there's only a handful when I say handful, I mean to sites to track credits for engineers, and producers and one's all music and one is disguise disguises. Like, really iffy in all music. There's no way to correct the information. Really? So does it pull from other sites kinda? Yeah. And so the problem is, you know, you have Justin Fisher year Justin Fisher here. And some of his credits are in my stuff and some credits are in his stuff, and it's just a big mishmash. So if you look at all music dot com, either it looks like I did a bunch of Nerf herder stuff or the guy from Nerf herder has all my work. Yeah. So that's why you had started put my middle initial to kinda separate myself from. So that other Justin was there first they they planted a flag on the movie. Yeah. Yeah. There's no turning around who's well. The thing is too is with the film and with IMDB and stuff too. There's a bunch of Justin fishers, and and. You are an audio engineer producer musician. What tax not so great a musician. But what do you play guitar? Okay, poorly. You have a lot of pride in the type of guitar you play. No, no allegiance to any particular brand. Oh, we'd like actual guitars Gibson fan through. I never really got an offender stuff now sits just it's not my sound and the the feel of it. I don't really care for. But I've always been a les Paul guy, who's your favorite guitarist, Lou. That's it. That's a multifaceted question because depending on style. You know, I'm gonna give a really lame answer. And that is my favorite guitar player would be someone who got me into playing guitar was you'd be Kurt cobaine. Okay. And he's by no means a great guitar player from a technical standpoint. But that's really Nevada's. What made me start playing? So I guess I would have to give credit where Credit's they're gonna say prince or something like that. He's one of those underrated guitar players. Yeah. I mean, there's so many like you can't it's like what's your favorite song, you know, or what's your favorite movie? Well, there's so many criteria out there. It's like it's hard to make that decision and nail down. So you be an audio engineer. I just adjusted the Mike Potts slightly, and you took notice of that you always pay attention to things like that. It's you know, it's it's it's movies, especially, you know, and I'm watching a movie, and I'm so microphones not plugged in. Drives me nuts. Some on camera performances. What happens when you see one of those microphones dip into the shot. Like, you're watching TV. Well, luckily these days. You almost never see that. Because you know, a lot of things are shot in four k now so that stuff's easier to crop in. That kind of stuff. So you don't really see that too much anymore. Tricky. There's a lot of things that could hide the blemishes of the mistakes of the past. Yes, exactly. For better or worse. George lucas. And you also have on your t-shirt is the headphones. Yeah. Well, this is actually I teach over at Webster university. Every year. We hold a like, a mini audio engineering society convention. It's called. And it's the Saint Louis, I'm sorry. The central region audio students summit. Yeah. Crass? So they bring in people from all over the region to do talks and stuff like that. So it's a pretty cool event. What are the things that kids are interested in learning? Well, I mean, I don't think things have changed that much. It's, you know, so many people get into recording for music, you know, and I have a lot of interns that comes to the studio and a lot of people just want to learn how to record music in one or learn how to pretty spans and all that stuff. So that's the primary reason. The sad thing is is the jobs are few and far between they might get into it for one reason and then end up shifting their career path. I mean, there's tons of opportunities and other things like, you know, live sound or post production for film and TV. But the music thing is just not what it used to be. Yeah, you were doing the research for your documentary that came up gateway sound one of the things I read that surprised you was you were worried that when you went to talk to some of these production houses, you would go in there. And they would only tell you about how they're about ready to lock the doors up and call it quits, but you were kind of surprised there's a lot of them that were just chugging along. Maybe not as. Strong as they used to. But they're still finding ways in the industry to be viable. Yeah. It's just different now. They might not be doing the exact same that they were ten fifteen years ago, but you know, a lot of places just found different methods. I went down to Memphis Sam Phillips, and they kind of found a revitalised niche in like, Americana music and doing a vinyl Jeff Powell down. There is doing he's like backlogged, like months and months because the vinyl thing is exploded. And he's doing a ton of it. What's the perfect recording studio set up for you? Do you have a do you have a preference? Do you prefer walking in and seeing old school a quick moment? And you know, cigarette. You know, like the little trays or there's a cigarette butts in there, and you're like, yeah. This guy knows what he's doing. Or do you prefer like the modern studios were all the equipments digital? And there's a bunch of lights and everything set up perfectly. I'm I'm right down the middle because with the older analog gear comes maintenance issues. Incomes big time. Because if we're recording to tape there's you know, you gotta sit there and wait for it to rewind record a tape. You don't hear that? It's still out there. Now. Many people do it. There's there's an expense. You know, a real estate now cost you three hundred and fifty bucks. Really? That's like fifteen minutes record. So that's that's kind of gone by the wayside for most places. But you know, the big analog consoles are still are still a maintenance nightmare. Yeah. A lot of times when people don't, you know have tax in their studios anymore. So I I love a hybrid approach where I've got a digital on the record side and actually digital on the console side. But all my other gear as analog, and it's nice to kind of have the best of both worlds. Yeah. How did you? Learn to do the things you're doing trial and error. I guess for a good portion of it. But I went to school to I went to Webster here in Saint Louis got a four year degree in audio. But. This field is like you never stop learning. You know, I never pretend that I'll be an expert ever. But the beginning of it was wanting to record my own band, you know, and started out on cassette and. Congratu it's kind of a bear. But I graduated well, a friend of mine went to audio school, and he had his audio books when he graduated he gave them to me. So I studied my butt off. And I was looking at this shot of like frequency response and saw that the frequency response of of VHS significantly better than cassette. So I went out and bought myself a second VCR, and I did like sound on sound kind of over dubbing between two VCR's. And so anyway that I eventually got a computer and limit. So you are trying to sink to VHS recorders to make like a multi-track. Now, I would literally like record on one and then record on the second one over the existing tape. So I would like be bouncing back and forth from from deck to deck and it kinda worked. You got a name that technique. I listen I've ever heard this waiting for like, the what is vintage now is going to be like old crappy digital technology eventually oily record on the mini discs. Like that we continue with Justin L, Fisher, audio engineer producer musician. Also chief engineer at Smith Lee productions here in Saint Louis talking about not only is time working inside the studio, but his new documentary that debuted.

Justin L Fisher engineer Justin Saint Louis Nerf herder Justin fishers Al Fisher producer Webster university Justin Fisher Justin L blemishes Nevada Kurt cobaine Credit chief engineer Mike Potts Gibson IMDB
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

08:09 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Record were profiling today. Justin, l Fisher who put a documentary out debut just recently at the Saint Louis international film festival. You may have seen it. It's called gateway sound when I look at some of the different professions out there where people will call you. They'll be like, hey, my computer's broken. If your computer guy, everyone calls you. There's something wrong with my car. If you're a car guy, everyone calls you. We're starting to see a pretty big influx of people building home studio. So I got to imagine someone wants to make a recording space for a podcast or they just wanna record themselves fiddling on guitar. You're probably in demand where they ask you your opinion on. Hey, how do I set this up? And what do I do a bit? Yeah. I I do get a lot of calls from people that are wanting to ask advice on what microphones tobacco interfaces to buy and all that stuff. So it happens pretty frequently. And you know, I'm I'm fine with that. I'm not gonna Bologne like lost work. Because I fully understand how the business is now. So I don't go don't you just come in? And we'll make it better. Yeah. You know, how that works? Well, I have a home studio to record some stuff at the house. If I need to record interviews or anything like that. And sometimes I'll do these little videos for my fantasy Hockey League, which is kind of dorky, but it's kind of fun to add that extra moment. But it's amazing. How the price has really come down on a lot of this equipment before when I was in college. It was a big deal if you can afford to buy the adobe software to get the onto your computer. Now today, it seems like you can buy some of the most, you know, even though it's really low quality, but you can put a Reagan your house for like a hundred and fifty bucks if you really wanted to and just get a microphone and interface that way in for the most part, you know, people will still listen to it won't be unlistenable. Yeah. Yeah. It's not like you're recording Fisher Price Little recorder that you had as a kid or anything like that. So the price as it continues to come down. I think is grabbed a lot of people interested into that. Field. The home studios are nothing new. They've been around since les Paul now. And there's nothing we can do to change that. But the quality has definitely increased significantly, and which is great because it kind of gives me an opportunity to go back and forth with demos on bands. You know, and they can bring me something that I can actually hear rather than oh, we recorded this on a cassette during band practice in the basement. Kinda make out what the guitar is doing. But mostly I hear snare drum. So in that respect, it's great, you know, because it gives us a chance to communicate a little bit better. But I've had a lot of bands that I've actually kinda done a back and forth with where they'll record a little bit in the studio, and then a little bit at home, and it saves them time and money makes the whole process more efficient with your documentary gateway sound when you walk into a recording studio. What's the first thing you look for? Well, I'm a gear nerd so. I'm usually looking at the gear I down. But also kinda like listening to what the room sounds like his every room is totally different. So I'm kinda like talking in the space in assessing. And I I you know, I love doing that. In exploring different acoustic spaces down the cool, and is pretty neat. Do you get that feel when you're around other audio people all the time? It's just like, this is this is awesome. You know, it's funny. You mentioned that because I just last night. It was a audio engineering society meeting. So the audio community in Saint Louis is pretty tight knit group. You know, pretty much everybody knows everybody. So there's no competition between studios because we're all friends, which is awesome. And so we get together once every other month and eaten drink beer and talk nerdy. Yeah. Audio trade secrets and things, and it's pretty cool. So yeah, that's always exciting. We always have a lot of fun. Yeah. It probably helped you when you were recording gateway sound you have the ability to just make a phone call and say, hey, can I talk to you about something, and you can just go and do it again. There's a number of people in that group that are in the film as well. So how long did it take free to film in four years? Well, not filming filming for about three the whole process. I kept getting longer. You're originally going to make it like a half hour or something you stretched it out. Well, it was. At the beginning. I didn't quite when a limit myself, but I had a gas on like what it was going to be. But I thought to myself I'm going to let the creative process kind of dictate. It's not. So I didn't wanna put any kind of barriers there for myself. Yeah. You wanna be able to tell the story. No matter how long it takes. So you have that ability. When you're when you're the one putting it together where did you learn your video skills? Advice from friends. Lynda dot com. You know, what's amazing? If you can understand the audio side, a lot of those skills are transferable editing. Yeah. The shooting not so much. I am horrible. And I still look at some of the I didn't shoot many scenes, but I shot a couple just because I had to travel by myself, or whatever, and I still look at certain scenes, and I'm like I wish I could have made that better. But it's probably only something I'm gonna notice most people won't notice four years could turn to six before, you know, overall. What was the reaction when you showed gateway sound really positive? I mean, not just from people like in the audio business, but musicians and people that weren't even in the business at all. They're like, oh, I had no idea about this. Or I didn't know that. This was an issue. I didn't know the music business was kinda working in this way. Also, everybody, I hope and I think learned something they had some sort of take away from it. You always hope that someone will be able to walk away with here. I really like that. Yeah. Otherwise, what's the point? Yeah. I mean, you could do it for your own sake. Yeah. But what's the it killed me? If I was just doing it for me. What's the support of the wife during that process was she thinking Duracell, you're always working on that? Or was she getting frustrated ever at any point? But but you had this dream of putting it together. Yeah. She was extremely supportive, but at the same time, it's I would I would try my best to work really late at night. So for about a year there are many nights where I was up 'til three four in the morning working on it because I didn't wanna take time away from the family if I could avoid it. Yeah. So, you know, the shooting stuff, obviously it happens when it happens, all the editing. I tried to get done, you know, in other hours. What do you think's changed the most in the industry since you? When you first started paying attention. I mean have you seen the way music's distributed? You know, I think that the vast majority of people listen to music on their phone, and they listen to it via streaming services for the most part. I mean, even we saw huge shift when we went from CDs to downloads on itunes, and even now that is kind of gone by the wayside and nobody's really downloading music as much anymore. You why would they when you can have Spotify or Pandora and just you have access to literally everything? So it's. It's hard to say what's next. You know, I don't see streaming going anywhere for a long time. The idea of his documentary was to film the history of recording studios in Saint Louis. And then it got bigger Justin l Fisher is his name gateway sound is the documentary more with him next on chemo X profiles..

Justin l Fisher Saint Louis adobe Hockey Reagan les Paul Spotify Duracell Pandora four years
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

08:52 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Initial d say, Justin, Al Fisher, I don't ever call myself. Justin Fisher, I put that there for credit reasons. Okay. Because there's another Justin Fisher out there. He's the bass player for the band Nerf herder. And so there's only a handful when I say handful, I mean to sites to track credits for engineers and producers and one's all music and one is discounts disguises, like really iffy in all music. There's no way to correct the information. Really? So does it poll from other sites kinda? Yeah. And so. The problem is you know, you have Justin Fisher year Justin Fisher here. His credits are in my stuff and some of my credits her in his stuff, and it's just a big mishmash. So if you look at all music dot com, either it looks like I did a bunch of stuff or the guy from Nerf herder has all my work. Yeah. So that's why you had to put my middle initial end to kinda separate myself from. So that other Justin was there. I it's like they planted the flag on the movie. Yeah, there's no turning around. Well, the thing is too is with the film and with IMDB and stuff too. There's a bunch of Justin fishers and in. You are an audio engineer producer musician. What not so great a musician. What do you play? I play guitar. Okay, poorly. You have a lot of pride in the type of guitar you play. No, no allegiance to any particular brand. Oh, we'd like actual guitars Gibson fan through. I never really got an offender stuff now sits just it's not my sound and the feel of it. I don't really care for. But I've always been a les Paul guy, who's your favorite guitarist, who that's a that's a multifaceted question because it could be you know, depending on style. You know, I'm going to give a really lame answer. And that is my favorite guitar player would be someone who got me into playing guitar was you'll be Kurt cobaine. Okay. And he's by no means a great guitar player from technical standpoint. But that's really Nevada's. What made me start playing? So I guess I would have to give credit where Credit's you're gonna say prince or something like that he's one of those underrated guitar players. Yeah. I mean, there's so many like you can't it's like what's your favorite song, or what's your favorite movie? Well, there's so many criteria out there. It's like it's hard to make that decision and narrow it down. So you be an audio engineer. I just adjusted the Mike Potts slightly, and you took notice of that you always pay attention to things like that. It's it's movies, especially, you know, and I'm watching a movie, and I'm that microphones not plugged in. Drives me nuts. On camera performances. What happens when you see one of those microphones dip into the shot. Like, you're watching TV. Well, luckily these days. You almost never see that. Because you know, a lot of things are shot in four k now so that stuff's easier to crop in. That kind of stuff. So you don't really see that too much anymore. Tricky. There's a lot of things that can hide the blemishes of the mistakes of the past. Yes, exactly. For better or worse. George lucas. And you also have on your shirt is the headphones. Yeah. Well, this is actually I teach over Webster university. Every year. We hold a like, a mini audio engineering society convention. It's called and it's the Saint Louis or I'm sorry. The central region audio students summit crass, so they bring in people from all over the the region to do talks and stuff like that. So it's a pretty cool event. What are the things that kids are interested in learning? Well, I mean, I don't think things have changed that much. It's, you know, so many people get into recording for music, and I have a lot of interns that comes to the studio and a lot of people just want to learn how to record music in one or learn how to pretty spans and all that stuff. So that's the primary reason. The sad thing is is the jobs are few and far between so they might get into it for one reason and then end up shifting their career path. I mean, there's tons of opportunities and other things like live sound or post production for film and TV. But the music thing is just not what it used to be. Yeah. Is this? You were doing the research for your documentary that came up gateway sound one of the things I read that surprised you was you were worried that when you went to talk to some of these production houses, you would go in there. And they would only tell you about how they're about ready to lock the doors up and call it quits, but you were kind of surprised there's a lot of them that were just chugging along maybe not as strong as they used to. But they're still finding ways in the industry to be viable. Yeah. It's just different. Now, they might not be doing the exact same that they were ten fifteen years ago, but you know, a lot of places just found different methods. I went down to Memphis Sam Phillips, and they kind of found a revitalised niche in like, Americana music and doing a vinyl Jeff Powell down. There is doing he's like backlogged, like months and months because the vinyl thing is exploded. Yeah. He's doing a ton of it. What's the perfect recording studio set up for you? Do you have a do? You have a preference. Do you prefer walking in and seeing you know old school equipment, and you know, cigarette. Good. Little trays where there's a bunch of cigarette butts in there, and you're like, yeah. This guy knows what he's doing. Or do you prefer like the modern studios were all the equipments digital? And there's a bunch of lights and everything set up perfectly. I'm I'm right down the middle because with the older analog gear comes maintenance issues. Incomes big time. Because if we're recording to tape there's a, you know, you gotta sit there and wait for it to rewind recorded tape. You don't hear that? It's it's still out there, not many people do it. There's there's an expense. A real estate now cost you three hundred fifty bucks. Really that's like fifteen minutes or recording. So that's that's kind of gone by the wayside for most places. But, you know, the big analog consoles and still are still a maintenance nightmare. Yeah. A lot of times when people don't have tax in their studios anymore. So I I love a hybrid approach where I've got a digital on the record side and actually digital on the console side. But all my other gear as analog, and it's nice to kind of have the best of both worlds. Yeah. How did you? Learn to do the things you're doing trial and error. I guess for a good portion of it. But I went to school to I went to Webster here in Saint Louis got a four year degree in audio. But. This field is like you'd never stop learning. You know, I never pretend that I'll be an expert ever. But the beginning of it was wanting to record my own band. You know, and started out on cassette and crash is kind of a barrister, but graduated well, a friend of mine went to audio school, and he had his audio books. And when he graduated he gave them to me. So I studied my butt off. And I was looking at this chart of like frequency response and saw that the frequency response of of VHS significantly better than cassette. So I went out and bought myself a second VCR. And I did like sound on sound kind of over dubbing between two VCR's. And so anyway, then I eventually got a computer and in the limit. So you are trying to sink to VHS recorders to make like a multi-track. Now, I would literally like record on one and then record on the second one over the existing tape. So I would like be bouncing back and forth from from deck to deck and it kinda worked. You got a name that technique. I I've ever heard. I'm just waiting for like, the what is vintage now is going to be like old crappy digital technology eventually oily record on the mini discs. Like that we continue with Justin L, Fisher, audio engineer producer musician. Also chief engineer at Smith Lee productions here in.

Justin Fisher engineer Justin Justin fishers Nerf herder Al Fisher producer Webster university Justin L blemishes Saint Louis Nevada chief engineer Kurt cobaine Credit les Paul Mike Potts Gibson IMDB
"audio engineering society" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Five magazines but even the pro audio magazines mix magazine is the probably the longest current professional recording studio type magazine they've been around since at least the early eighties if not like seventies and their technical editor a couple years ago did a whole op ed about the importance of power wires and then i couldn't believe it you should know better than this i mean this is just complete nonsense and every issue and i've started writing whether the editor of some of the magazines when i really agree stuff thing i can't believe you said and i say it nicely but this basically i can't believe you made such huge gaffe here's the truth and here's what really respond yeah one of the magazines recording magazine has actually printed by a few times and the other ones all right to the other because i know them i'll just email them and they'll say yeah yeah yeah you're right i should have said that better or whatever so usually they acknowledge it yeah unfortunately it just seems like it's all being driven by money it is and that's why i said at the beginning really a consumer issue and there are so many boogeyman with audio there's something called facial which is not audible it's not a problem it occurs all audio equipment and you know in modest amounts and even large amounts you can't hear it it doesn't matter have several videos on youtube that are videos of workshops i put on for the eighty s the audio engineering society they have shows around the world and i have given a couple of presentations when they're in new york and i made videos of two of them and so identify here's what phase shift sounds like can't hear a kenya another one is something called jitter which affects a digital audio in its timing error you know with with old record players if the whole wasn't centered on you know like once revolution the pitch will go up a little down the little analog tape tape recorders have called flutter worth.

editor youtube new york kenya mix magazine recording magazine
"audio engineering society" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on TechStuff

"Then you would have a bunch of competing technologies on the market that more likely than not would be impossible to chain together so you'd be locked into one ecosystem you would have to be all in on roland or all in on mogre all in on yamaha you couldn't mix and match because they wouldn't be able to talk to each other it's sort of like the early days of computing before arpanet came along and you had a set of protocols that would let computers talk to each other same basic problem existed at the early nineteen eighties it was a huge mess for musicians and producers so a universal standard would set a level playing field give me sition producers the greatest number of options when creating music and avoid fragmentation of the market dave smith i propose such a standard in hundred eighty one at a meeting of the audio engineering society and he called his first approach the universal synthesizer interface smith recognized that while manufacturers were able to create systems that would allow you to control multiple synthesizers made by that manufacturer there was still no standard that would allow for interoperability and manufacturers were concerned that this issue was costing them customers by creating this frustrating environment two years later he would release the first version of the midi protocol says his nineteen eightythree he didn't develop the protocol all by himself major synthesizer companies like roland yamaha and several others were all involved in designing the set of rules and standards it was a pretty remarkable display of competitors working together to create a technology that would benefit the entire industry not just one company within it the designers decided that midi would send information as a list of events or messages to instruct a device how to make a certain type of sound now again this wasn't a music file or any other form of music but rather directions the recipient would follow to generate the appropriate sound i'll talk about some of the typical midi messages in the next section but i.

roland yamaha smith roland yamaha two years
"audio engineering society" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Um you know and a lot of what makes some high resolution tracks actually worth buying is because you know recording engineers went back in cleaned up a bunch amasses and mastered i'm a lot better even dr sean all of of whose uh i don't know if he's still the president of the audio engineering society but he directs acoustic research for harmony international he is the most hardcore science oriented beating biased conception and taking a lot of the voodoo an ad i can't see that word in a family friendly new show uh you know he's in a he says he's like he a piece hurts wonderful stuff in 24 96 but it doesn't really have it in the deal with the band with the high resonance it has youth the fact that they did a really good job mastering in engineering the album um you know the other thing some of those early hd tracks were actually made from cd audio files you know so what i'm hearing you say is that m q are uh the master aladi recordings are real that's a real thing it does give you something hour a high result he o israel hira's audio headphone we'll give you access to the band with that you can't get but what i'm not sure is is all of that worth it does make a difference for most people is this more than in each market it's you know it's going to be a you know at this point it's become one of those things like you know it's four k television which is better because with more pixels right there are going to be boxes based cool you look at a set of headphones you see the hira's audio tag on the box meets to thinks it can play audio at up to forty thousand hurts when she was way higher than you can ear number one number two it means they paid the co marketing dollars they paid to use that logo and there are you know i can probably walk into a you know a local you know you know that i i wanna say like tarzi or or whatever there there are there are.

president israel hira dr sean four k
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The am picks model two hundred a is is because of dishwashers and it's safely stone in a big class case but will once is he heard this two hundred eighty playing not to undergo kind of replies is your opinion about you know this kind of all technology how it relates to contemporary audio technologies with compression and all of the other playing so we except with me listen to say music in the nineteen fifties and picks produce the first video over quarter not long after you mean you're fred focus to demonstrated the technology to cbs executives for the first time in an interview with the audio engineering society first recalled how he recorded one of the second is giving his speech and then i mean on the tape and plated back and there is total silence for probably ten seconds of which time they realize what was happening and the clapping in shouting and foot stepping the team to produce that video tape recorder included read goal be one of several and picks employees who went on to start landmark silicon valley firms others include tare oracle and memory x again henry low it in away and picks was not only the first sort of an to ten meant technology company and stuck on belly was also probably a first company to generate does culture of employees moving on to found other companies you know that became a real characteristics of the valley later decades into the digital age audio and videotape machines gathered dustin baseman's back runs but they want true revolution and should you plug women today they might still try for the california report i'm between one.

henry technology company california ten seconds
"audio engineering society" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"audio engineering society" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Us in nineteen forty eight the am picks model two hundred a is is because of dishwashers and it's safely stolen a big class case but will once is he heard this two hundred eight playing not to undergo kind of replies is your opinion about you know this kind of all technology how it relates to a contemporary audi of technologies with compression and all of the other thing so we except with me listen to same music in the nineteen fifties and picks produce the first video recorder not long after in the near fred focus to demonstrated the technology to cbs executives for the first time in an interview with the audio engineering society first recalled how he recorded one of the league's second is giving speech and then i mean on the tape and plated back and there is total silence for probably ten seconds of which time they realize what was happening and the clapping in shouting and fuck stepping the team to produce that video tape recorder included read goal be one of several and picks employees who went on to start landmark silicon valley firms others include a tare oracle and member x again henry low would in away and picks was not only the first sort of entertainment technology company and suck on belly was also probably a first company to generate this culture of employees moving on to found other companies you know that became a real characteristics of the valley later decades into the digital age audio.

technology company fred henry low ten seconds