28 Burst results for "Audio Engineering"

Make Your Zoom Meetings Soar  Remote Work  John Paul Mendocha - burst 14

A New Direction

05:46 min | Last month

Make Your Zoom Meetings Soar Remote Work John Paul Mendocha - burst 14

"Doing Zoom and working remotely because that's the world that we're currently living in today, and it's probably going to be the world that we're going to be living in for not just. A short period of time but because we're starting to understand that you know what we can get a lot of work done remotely in very a lot of industries we need to grasp, hold its concept being able to do as zoo meeting and do it right all right, and so we're we're GonNa talk about some of these little pieces here as we finish up here in this hour so. Let's talk about a couple of really we you talked about the green screen, but I think one of the things that two things that we need to talk about is audio and video. And bring up to really fabulous points and I am right on it and Let's. Let's talk about the video portion I, what should we know about video because we can make some mistakes there Why I think the the first mistake that we make is that is that when we get into the whole realm of video. We immediately go. Hey High def right I want high. DEF. and. All that sounds good because of course, we're watching I definitely and television and by the way watching something happened. Is Infinitely more. Is Easier and simpler than you actually making it happen. So you want to look at your resolution and see if you can actually tone down your resolution because. They're probably not gonNA WANNA see four K or whatever. And by the way very few people have the bandwidth to do four K. Right now. So video is important and and you WanNa make sure that you understand how your video works, how how it's going to be put together and you can. You could start out inexpensively and you can go very expensively You can actually get a really decent zoom call out of a iphone or android with with a face with a front facing camera. But what you WanNa do you WanNa get a stand and have this stand hold it instead of you because let's face it. If if you're holding your camera, you know if you're holding like this way you know and you've got this little jitter will cause your hand will get tired and you're doing this stuff You're not going to be not going to be very effective. So just make sure that you understand that and and you know. Test see what is like also, you can make videos on your on your PC, your Mac you know on your laptop makes videos and see what the camera it looks like. Big Mistake that people make is they got nostril cam going that's great. You know which one I'm talking about right. Looks like it looks like Sherwood forest up there but you know you got these guys who they don't even they're clueless by the way if you want to know how to make your laptop, go up up up, I will give you the cheap way to do it. You could go get some paper that would go into your printer and just keep stacking up keep stacking up. Reams of paper until have the right line of sight. So people aren't looking up there and going. I wonder. Don't want them to wonder, hey, how's how's that? For a really inexpensive way to do that and you're right you know you can take books or whatever to raise your laptop if you don't have a separate camera, I think probably you and I, I have a camera on a tripod that's a USB camera attached here so I'm looking right at it, but you don't have to have. That you don't have to spend that money to do that type of thing. So you most as you point out in the book, most of your laptops have a camera in there. Let's get rid of knows. Kim Let's. Let's get some books and let's get that. Let's get that raised there. So we can see you right. Let's talk about audio. Let's talk about audio because I think we we think that because Ron video that audio is not important, but it really is critical. Isn't it? Audio's very important. Now, I I happen to prefer just because of my personal style and what I do is I wear I, wear a gaming headset so you can go buy a gaming headset for seventy. Bucks. Plug into a USB and it does a good job. It it. You know it sounds good by the way it kills lots of surrounding noise and that makes me the MIC stand. You know. So matter how much moving my head and it's funny because I, what I'm. Looking at buying headsets I was talking to. Somebody. Who is really a good audio engineering and we're talking about my problem, which is I had a really nice microphones like Jay has in fact, I have several but the problem is I would come off center. So my volume would keep getting funky and changed and he said, well, tell me how much you move your head and I said, well, it's got like halfway between Ray Charles and Stevie. Wonder. and. Said Okay here's the solution. The solution is you have to be the Mike Stand. So I bought actually have multiple headsets but for for seventy bucks at a best buy, you can buy cheaper but you know you now have this and it's great isolation people are I watch a lot of people who take the little headset that comes with their phone and they have that they're holding the microphone up to them and let's face it a microphone. That's the size of a pinhole. That's that's what your voice is being replicated through. Right so you spend a few bucks you'll get a, it'll be a lot better. Some people don't like to wear these because it makes them look I. Don't know whatever. But you know you gotta think in terms of a good microphone and you can get pretty decent microphones for less than one hundred bucks.

Kim Let Mike Stand Sherwood Forest Def. RON JAY Ray Charles Stevie
Fresh update on "audio engineering" discussed on Dana Loesch

Dana Loesch

00:36 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "audio engineering" discussed on Dana Loesch

"These are affordable but their premium wireless earbuds. These are the best wireless earbuds on the market because I think that they are married to somebody who's an audio engineering. I work in audio every single day. I own two pair of these and the playtime. The bad. I mean, the charge last four forever. Practically They have a noise, isolating a compact design and things sound good. You can hear nuance in the audio. They're engineered incredibly well by people who get it, and they're stylish and discreet. So there's no hanging wires. No stems. You can take your calls. You can you know, go through your work out. They even have a waterproof pair. I know somebody who got them and they swim with them. So I mean, there's a lot of stuff. They're versatile come in different colors..

"audio engineering" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:24 min | 2 months ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on 600 WREC

"I think we have time for one call from the audience is go to Chris and New Mexico. You're on Thomas. Dolby. Go ahead. It's the honor and a pleasure to speak with you, sir. And agree with everything you've said a huge Ah, you thought or an audio engineer and I use technology. You know, on a regular basis and the disconnect of the human touches, you know really? What? We're missing A Z. We're talking really kind of made me think of Ah, William Gibson. I wrote a book called in the Room. Where you know technology is moving exponentially. Now I have to respectfully disagree that I almost kind of feel like this is a warning time. Because right now it's just a novelty. But the growth and the change of a I And you know, integrated with virtual reality and actual live event. If the live of them, you know, industry ever comes back with holographic technology that In a sense, you could really I see that you know, most of music industry is driven by money and product and less about music. And so I could really see like Hey, I taking hold Maybe even in five years that we would actually have. Well, dear, you kind of are right. Well, Chris, you know you do have a point because I didn't bring this up Thomas, and that is, you know, like Whitney Houston's doing a tour Now it's a holographic tour. I've seen holographic tours from two park. We've seen holographic tours. Gosh, they're planning these holographic tours for dead artists. What do you think of that? I think it's great. Actually, I think the problem is, you know, we need holographic audiences at this point, because they can't be social distancing. It's actually I mean, you bring up a very good point, which is that in the here and now you know, the life music industry has completely gone away on DH. This is tragic for musicians because You know, with streaming and so on. There's no record sales anymore. We've pushed the revenue downstream. So you know, it's a loss leader for your live concerts, and now they've gone away. You know, in a matter of Months.

Chris Thomas Dolby William Gibson New Mexico engineer Whitney Houston
Of a Certain Age, with Jim Metzendorf

Mac Power Users

05:02 min | 3 months ago

Of a Certain Age, with Jim Metzendorf

"L. Everyone. This is David sparks joined by my pal and yours Mr Stephen Hackett how's it going Stephen? It's good David it is. It is good. I have to say. That, our guest today really has on my toes. which will get reasons of like it's kind of like when you show up at work like the boss's boss's they're like and you feel like you can't goof off her do anything I'm going to be on my best behavior is what I'm saying that. Well, you know, well, why don't we just welcome to the show Jim Medicine Dorf Jim Nice to have you on the Mac power users summer of fun. The. Show it was so great hanging out with you guys last month that DUB DUB and San Jose. Wrong universe. Hey, guys, thanks for having me I. appreciate it. So for those who who may not know I, need to give a little back story to. With Jim a lot of you probably know Jim he's part of the sort of apple audio community online but when I came on the show now what a year and a half ago I over the editing that was kind of one of the one of my. Sticking points today was like I'll do it but I when I went the edit and I edited it for quite a long time and over time needed to hand it off to somebody else and. Jim is that somebody else will get into this but Jim at, it's a lot of podcast including a lot on relay FM and I'll tell you honestly we didn't get a single comment the week you took over because you are you're better editor than I am first of all, but it was so seamless and you're so good to work with and. That's all great. But you're also like this big MAC nurse we're GONNA get into that today. So that's when I say. I'm on my toes. So I take notes during the show via maybe places where we talk over each other we need to fix something and now gyms just here he here's all that anyways because he edits the show but now he's going to hear them in real time just how bad we are at the sometimes. Yeah. Jim. Is The all hearing ear of the relay network and I was joking with him earlier because when we record the show and I make a mistake, I can't help myself I say sorry Jim every time and we write it down. So there's probably a super cut of MEESANE. Sorry Jam like fifteen minutes long if you put it all together but the other thing that's where it is Jim here's all our shows before they released. So sometimes Jemele text me about something that happened on focus and say how's that going Wait anyway. But Jim is a pro audio engineer and Mac Nerd we talk about audio workflows and video workflows. Today Jim also has some of the things that he does a lot He's got a small business and we're GONNA, talk about that and he's a musician and we Jim and I got on the phone yesterday and we kind of worked out all of our jazz talk. So we knew ca Stephen is going to. Go crazy if I spend the whole episode talking about it but but Jim uses APPs and technology for some of his music too. So we got a lot to cover today. Jim, are you ready strapped in for this? I'm ready. Let's do it. All right. Well, give us a little background Jim, how did you get all this knowledge and get to where you right now? Oh my gosh. Well, I. The first thing to say is I'm. A person of a certain age I'm forty five to be exact. So wait wait wait. person of age. Forty five. Yeah. I used to catch myself doing that I'm not that old why? Why are we doing this to ourselves Jim? You're good. It works for some of us. Just remember what Indiana Jones says though it's not the years it's the mileage. Yeah exactly. So you know I say I'm forty five because I have been using the MAC for an awful long time. Now, at this point I got my first machine in Nineteen ninety-four. Was a quadra eight, forty, eight V. I'll try to go through the the life history of Jim as quickly as I can. So we can get to the stuff that's of use to will listeners hopefully, but I was exposed to audio and video and photography from birth more or less My Dad was a professional photographer. And he was also the recording engineer for a regional symphony where I grew up. Here in Ohio. and. So really at a at a young age, I would go with him to concerts. And by the time I was ten or twelve years old I was helping him. Rap Microphone Cables and. kind of learning. Some of the very, very basics of audio. Through through Osmosis of. Spending time with him while he was doing his thing.

JIM Jim Medicine Dorf Mr Stephen Hackett Engineer David Sparks San Jose MAC Ohio. Indiana Jones Editor Apple
Keri Roberts - Takeaways from 100+ Voice Technology Podcast Interviews

Future Ear Radio

09:31 min | 8 months ago

Keri Roberts - Takeaways from 100+ Voice Technology Podcast Interviews

"So we're joined here today by Kerrie Roberts Caritas a little bit about who you are and what you do thank you dave. I'm so excited to be here so I like to say that I am a brand. I'm a marketer and I'm a community builder So I work for myself and a company called Brandon connection and one of my main clients is voice summit so I help them with their podcasting strategy as well as lead their marketing for their big event. That'll be in October. That's awesome so I've gotten to know Carey. She actually brought me on the inside voice. Podcast that's Sort of like where. Our relationship started and I just think that it's so cool. Because outside of this podcast that she does she has her own podcast. And then I know that she's the host of another podcast. So podcasting is sort of in her life blood and I think that I've learned a lot personally from her. Just the way that she goes about it in post production in the way. That she disseminates podcast. She doesn't really like thoughtful in a meaningful way. And I think that it's incredibly It's a it's a really good way. I think to to build a network and help to connect that network. I know that's kind of a big theme for you and so I'm curious like You know I wanted to bring you on to talk about your experience on the inside voice. Podcast go through some of the different episodes that you've done in the different guests that you've had but like as you've gotten immersed into this world with like so many of us kind of have In you've done it as like being this conduit of Understanding like who people are different. Facets you've actually probably gotten a really wide education you know into the whole voice landscapes on curious like from this first year or so that you've really started to get involved into the space would have been some of your like macro takeaways You know in in things that you've learned since doing this. Yeah well again. Thank you for the kind words I appreciate it. I've been personally podcasting for a little over five years. And I took over the inside voice podcast and leading their strategy and hosting and kind of running it as their form of content marketing and one of the things that Pete Erickson the owner of waste summit that he and I share. Is this love for connection and community and to really showcase the diverse community that we have in voice technology and when I say diverse that means not only male female Or whatever gender you identify as Lgbtq Q Different races different backgrounds but also different elements within voice. So you know it's not just developers or CEO's it's linguists. It's audio engineers. It's voice artists It's startups it's conversational designers. And so my job is to really make sure that we're hitting the gamut as best as possible And I think we're doing that. I think we're doing that. Not only in the podcast that the events that we host And so for me. I personally love hearing what people are passionate about. What makes them great for every episode? I really tried to highlight them as a person first and foremost And then the work that they do within voice and so. I think you know one of the things that I've noticed kind of overdoing that podcast for the last year or so Is that you know first of all. There's so many people involved in voice and that it's important for us to learn the different things that they're doing And so within that also comes the importance of inclusivity with invoice. You know talking to people and saying okay election. Google tend to be a female voice when not everybody wants to hear that or identifies with that or feels comfortable with that You know when you're creating conversations are you including people in how they speak within their culture within their language translation is not always direct word for word. It's also the vernacular and how do we interact with people Are you including people who have disabilities? Who HAVE SPEECH IMPEDIMENTS? You know that I think really thinking about voice in a broader term And really the big question is how do we include the whole world and make them feel leg? They matter and that they can interact with voice. on a global scale. And that's that's not an easy answer but it's great to see that people are doing their due diligence to work on that and I think that's probably the biggest takeaway from the voice standpoint When we're looking at the other side from the consumer standpoint The challenge there is security and this is something I think people have heard about for a long time Of course people talk about well You know your mobile phones already have enough information on you. Are you worrying about Voice But you know there is concern when you're asking people to use their voice for passwords You know how easy is it for somebody to hack into something to take your important information? Your data your privacy and there is a very high level of concern from a consumer standpoint of. How are the big companies doing this? How are Amazon Google and Samsung Keeping the data protected but also every single person. That's doing voice if you are a startup or you own an agency or you're doing it on your own you know how are you proving to your clients and consumers that you're keeping their data and their information safe and it won't get hacked into. Yeah you've touched on a lot of different things there. I think first and foremost it's it's really cool that Because that is something that I've noticed about your podcast is. It's really really diverse and it's just like you said it's not necessarily like just the people but it's also their backgrounds in their interest. Because I think that one of the biggest takeaways that I had when I went to these different shows like I went to the Alexa conference which is now project voice and then I went to voice. Summit Was just a wide variety of different people. Like kind of coming into the space for different things just like you said like people with a linguist background developers designers. So I think it's so cool that it is like this melting pot and I think that the most insightful I think findings that people have come across. Have been when you have like this. Crossover like you have. People that are applying everything that they know in the linguistics world. And then you have the conversational designers that are coming in and when they're all starting to fuse their knowledge together. I think that's where some of the most interesting thing has come about. And you know going off of the point that you made around security and privacy. I think it's really important that this is something. That is a really centric to the whole conversation. Right now I think it's top of mind that a lot of people are realizing that like I think a lot of the people that are attending. These kind of conferences are They share the same sentiments. You know they are concerned about Where's the state of going? What is this data going to be used for? Are we comfortable with sharing the level of this data like I still go back to a the first Alexa conference that I went to where Brian Rahmani was speaking? And my big thing that I kept coming back to like. He kept saying that will need to have these like really deep relationships with voice assistance in order for them to be more impactful So therefore they're going to need a like a deeper level contextual understanding about the user but I feel like that's that runs counter to trust and security so like I'm only going to be able to. I'm only going to be comfortable with sharing the sensitive information that would make my voice assistant In even better assistant if I if I trust all of that so I totally agree with you that I think those are really critical pieces like as the formative period of time while technologies being built so I wanted to Because you've done so many podcasts. In you've brought on so many awesome guests. I thought that what would be kind of fun to do. While you're on here is to go through some of the different episodes that you've done In just go guest by guest in just have you share like either a key takeaway something you learned from that person or just something that you really enjoyed about that person in the conversation are you. Of course I would love to do that. Okay so I know that you shared today on on linked in or twitter. I saw it somewhere about the media people and so. I've had a chance to meet Claire Mitchell and Patrick. So let's start with Patrick. I know that you've done an episode with him. Patrick Gibbons GimMe something from that episode. Yeah I think you know I just WANNA say Intermedia. A lot of people got into voice because of Gary Chalk myself included the sub. Where I I heard about it. And there's so much hype about Gary and he's an amazing person but I think we really want to that. The people on his team are equally as amazing an equally as passionate And Patrick Really he's excited about stuff on the go here bowls a lot of the space that your in specifically And he also Kinda came from an artistic background and I love that he is willing to kind of reach out and say. Hey if you guys have questions like let's collaborate. Let's interact and so it's not just about okay. We're Bainer media and we're going to do our own thing it's like. We WANNA work with everybody and so I love that he kind of mixes his artistic background his ability to connect with others and then his personal passion within boys about how. It's going to be so much more on the go how we're going to be using curable and what that's going to look like

Patrick Gibbons Alexa Google Kerrie Roberts Gary Chalk Brandon Connection Carey CEO Pete Erickson Bainer Twitter Samsung Brian Rahmani Amazon Claire Mitchell
A Return To Simplicity...

Marketing Secrets

07:53 min | 8 months ago

A Return To Simplicity...

"Everyone who has awesome. So I'm in the middle of recording the audio books which as painful as writing a book is recording. An audio book might be more painful It is really hard to like steak cited your energy levels up in like an all these things while you're reading three ninety thousand were books which is really stupid that I look at it that way. It's funny the guys doing the audio engineering stuff. He's like. Some people read like one audiobook in their lifetime but nobody reads three in a week. So that's where we are right now and it's funny as we were driving here today have so tired and I were talking about starving artists Mike Panel. I'm not a starving artist. I'm just tired artist so I think I think when you first get started you're starving artists trying to figure out how in the world actually make money and then eventually figure that out and then you're just tired artist because you can't keep up with the all the stuff that's happening and all of the The opportunities in the things that you start creating insert figuring out your voice so Anyway as I was going today through the I'm about halfway through Mexico pays two hundred and fourteen in the The expert or the dotcom secrets book. I started expert. Sorry I started reading traffic secrets I because that one is next book or selling them going back and read the dotcom secrets and behalf that right now. So that's where I'm in the process halfway through all three bucks and I was reading kind of fun because you forget about these lessons that I wrote the the dotcom secrets book six years ago and kind of forget about some of the lessons. One of the ones that got me really excited as I was reading as. Oh my gosh like I talked about this. I did it for a while. Have been consistent with it. Was this concept of daily seinfeld emails and it's interesting because I think so many times. We're we We see here. We're trying to figure out. Okay what's the what's the what's what am I going to say. What's IT GONNA look like freak out and we get so caught up in like the? They got the right message that we have two times. Don't even publish anything. It was interesting at fucking live behind the scenes. I was sitting there is after Zephyr Garrett White spoke on stage me him and todd. We're backstage talking about stuff and talk about funnels complexity and it was funny because Garett head temporarily moved his email stuff to some other provider away from action over to To entrepreneur I think and And we can ask. Why do that? He said well we did it because we wanted all these things that actually do and he started talking about all the features and the things. He wanted to add a ton of complexity to to his office better sequences. And I wouldn't you move it over a year Mike. How's how's it going and he's like well like nothing's working like we. We haven't done it yet and todd starts laughing. That's the problem. Everyone has sit down. They wanted these insanely complex funnels and funnels and messaging and sequences is. We spend months mapping other things where they never actually get anything done most. Never actually go live looking. They want then shiny whistle. They want the the the you know. The the hack the technique the thing that the all the millions of features but the reality is the reason why people been successful click funnels so far is because it's simple right you can't build a funnel eight thousand variations like you build very linear like five page funnels in a page funnels and seeing things. That are very very simple right. Is We force people to like have simplicity and then because of that those people have success whereas other platforms like give you unlimited complexity ability. Jake Oh my gosh is amazing. I can do a billion things but then because you have so much complexity you never do anything and we have the same thing. We were We were looking at all. The different segments decided. Click funnels right. There's like people who who who started trial but in the cancel people who started trying to stick for month and they leave people who fill in step one of the order form and then they leave people who have been on for all these different segments of quick funnels users and so Almost a year ago we sat down said okay. We want to write different different messaging segments for each of these lists right so if somebody is on a positive cuts the sequence. We'RE GONNA use to get them. To Re upgrade their counts of is we sat and we mapped out like I think like nine or ten different segments and always email sequences right here. We're GONNA do that because it was so big and so complex. We never did and fast forward six months later. We had an funnel marketing retreat. We sat down and said Okay House those things going right where we still have done them like why not like woes too complex. We said okay. This dude against Mapfumo out again went back to the drawing board and last six months. We still have to him. So then we went. Hired this team to enforce because we can't even get these out the door hire somebody else to do a forest right so higher than I than us they map out the same thing we mapped out two hundred times and then they start saying well for email and you'd be able to split testing those in different headlines and accidents and do this yes and they were trying to get us to recode actually next Adam split testing all these things and finally months in. Todd's like we don't even have an email yet like little IMOs to split. Like what are we? Just make this simple and just put them in and just do it like just stop trying to make everything so complex. Just use it the way supposed to be built in so we did. We had them write emails. We plugged them in. And there's those split testings or nothing but guess what emails going out. Oh my gosh year. In two months later we finally have the thing out and I think that so many times. We get so complex things. I look at in dotcom secrets book. You know six years ago. I wrote this book. Initially and the strategy is so simple. Somebody joined your list. Take them on a soap opera sequence to build a relationship with you when they finish that sequence they drop into a broadcast. We daily broadcasts telling stories about what's happening in your current life right now and tie the story somehow back into your into your Endeavors you're selling and that's it. It's simply wake up every morning and that's it are so my team this last week and said you know if if if. I look at all the things I do in a day right I. I'm being the CEO. And I'm writing books and I'm creating content and I'm tweeting in videoing and instagram me. And all the things right. There's a million things I'm doing every single. All these things are critical. If you look at like what's the one thing that I can do everything that actually makes the most amount of money for me in the company. It'd be send out a daily seinfeld email. Email a million plus people a message to get some reminded about why they should use. Click funnels Builds a relationship with me. That's there's nothing more valuable not yet. I haven't done consistently for Click finals so it's been five plus years since I've done the one thing that would probably be the most profitable thing they could possibly do. And the reason why is because we keep trying to build up all this complexity in our sequences and they if somebody's this and then we're in the value-added moved they go from here to here and like all this stuff and we've been talking about it for years literally years and none of the things are live yet And so this is my commitment to myself to go back to simplicity. It's a commitment that Garrett at liking live after we talked about this he said I'm calling my guys up all my guys who've been begging me for all these insane features that would move everything on our platform over to and now nothing's happening we're going back to simplicity removing everything back when focus on simplicity. So guarantee that commitment to me making the commitment to to you into my team and everybody we're going back to simplicity and so my message for you today. Is that stop focusing on the complexity complexity keeps you from actually finishing the project ever and this is not just in business. It's business but it's also turn all aspects of life right in your in your relationships in your family life in your Just all the things we're doing I think a lot of times we get to these the super complex things I think about spiritually to have I know I if I woke up every morning read the Scriptures and that was my number one. That's the most important thing I could do. My life would be a lot better but instead I these complexities of all the things I gotta do to try to like you get closer to God. It'd be more spirit. Whatever it is that are so complex that keeps you from ever doing it. What's the simple thing? What's the very simple you can do? That actually has the biggest impact in your life and start thinking about it in all different areas of life in your personal life and your relationship in your business your marketing like whatever the thing is if you watered down and only done one thing each day would be the most vital most valuable most important thing and then just do that and then needs to take the rest today off. I don't know I don't pen you or then do the second thing after that. Then take the rest of the day off but anyway hold the help somebody out there again. Complexity is the killer of US having success in so simplify things. I promise you I promise you. Things will be better for yourself. Hope to help say she has all listening.

Todd Mike Panel Garrett White Steak Mexico Garett Jake Mapfumo CEO United States Adam
Marketing and Branding in a Voice-First World

Inside VOICE

12:11 min | 8 months ago

Marketing and Branding in a Voice-First World

"Have with me today. A Sanjiv n John of what Stone Technologies Welcome. Gentlemen on Yes so you guys did a talk earlier today about marketing and branding and a voice I world. Can you talk a little bit about what you guys were explaining in that workshop? So in fact. I'm going to give the JOHNSONS. He was the one that was on the panel. I love it right so There were a number discussed The one of which of course was Discover ability that's top of mind in for most brands agencies marketers is how to. How do you get to the skill of the action in the first place? How do you make people aware of Discover ability on this platform system is still an area. That's very much influx in very much development I know I know that there are teams in Amazon and Google and in Bixby. That are working heavily in that space. Now that said there been some creative solutions around Addressing that that we're discussing the panel including Social Media Marketing to in social media pushes doing time events. For example the rain agency didn't interesting release with The Nike Sneaker Shoe drop that tied in with the halftime show of an NBA game. So you you had a very present call to action and you know the television was informing the home users to use their Alexa. I'm you can't get much more direct than that. Yeah I mean when you're talking about discover ability because that is something that people struggle with. It's just like any other marketing. You have to push it out. How would you suggest people do that on? Social Media Brealey when you're when you're doing on social media for example part of that is just letting somebody know you can now talk to? This brand. Alexa opened my brand right. Or Hey Google talk to my brand. But moreover you can target S- Certain user groups on on facebook you can look for hashtags on twitter You can do more targeted marketing or two people that are interested in more information about the Surface area that your skill touches on and I'll I'll use the term voice application to be a little bit more broad because you know every rightfully so every business us every brand would wants to have as much reaches as possible so they they wanted to be on every platform as possible so I think targeted Campaigns that focus on. Let's say for example. I'll just pull out one case in point. Let's say you have An Agency for balloon rides right then you would be targeting. People that have been searching for a balloon rides in a given area. Maybe you would. You would target like travelocity As a as a marketing platform. So you want to think about you. Know the keywords the demographic that would be likely to use your skill likely to be looking for your skill that makes sense. I mean how important is it for you to also teach these people how to use the scale how to interact with that? You're not only marketing. That hey we have a skill but how do you kind of Tell Them? What is the best way to use it right so he wanted to be as intuitive as possible. So you don't have to teach in the first place so keep the interaction Light quick and direct and deliver value quickly like for example One of the peace process of our platform involves coupon delivery. So Oh so you would engage the user with a set of very quick. Yes no pre qualifying questions to ascertain whether they are interested in the coupon you're offering and whether they're the right target audience but you don't want to Overdo it with a litany of QNA's you want to keep it down to like two or three questions than okay yes It sounds like you're interested in this. Please provide your phone number. And we'll send you a discount code and of course you want to make that Discounts worth it to that person to give up their phone number because of course. That's another piece of personal data so Of course you have your privacy statements. That's you're not going to be solid to third party But with the particular brand at that that's Phone is a phone numbers. Offered up to that particular brand can still use it to do additional reminders. We always in the space. We tend to think voice. I and often forget that it's not necessarily has to be boys exclusive so you can capture that initial data and then keep the conversation going on another platform so you you've got the phone number you then have SMS capabilities. Yeah I like that. You're saying it's not just voice I. It's voice exclusive. Because a lot of people do think I should just doing voice. It's really about integrating with every single thing you're right you want to meet the customer where they want to be met and so if they're coming to you with a on the voice platform certainly. That's where you meet them and you can use the voice platform for doing it with the voices good at like we found. It's good capturing numbers is spoken numbers. It's not very good at capturing spoken letters so even spelling an email address like the letters z could be mistaken for being often is My last name for example spelled I W Z is pronounced. Iwata's what do you think the likelihood of my spoken last name? We'll get transcribed correctly by the smart speaker. Can I don't care which far speaker you're now? The two of you both worked at Microsoft right. How did the tune of you knew? And why did you decide to create this company together so we met in two thousand one when I moved to Philly and we worked at Microsoft consulting services? We've known each other. I nearly twenty years and then we had I think as we went from being co workers to where we actually spent seven years making short films together and then I was between jobs and then John had this idea about doing something with Alexa and I had this sudden thing of going. You know I could go look for a job or you know when I turned seventy. I don't WanNa be sitting on my deathbed going. What if I tried and tried? And and we're we're we're at here. We are and John. John came along for the ride of Your Role. So when you decided to work together is one of you. More technical wants where the vision where the marketing. How do you guys work together? So John John is the so. He's in charge of the architecture. The platform where where we take in this. I'm the Shiny Talker guy you know and so I work. I work on that. We also have. We also have Patty Curry. She's helping us with marketing and strategic initiatives. We have a GUY UP IN BOSTON. Vic South Who's helping us with business? So I love it a little bit so you guys knew each other for a long time. He started this company. But you've been doing film work as well. What do you do? Where did that come into play? Does that have anything to do with the voice? If you're doing as well to well we a lot of the filmmaking. We did was actually around horror comedy and stuff like because we we always found whenever we tried to write a series script. Just started goofing off and so in comedy lights and that kind of Trent but honestly where I think the filmmaking came in with audio is one of the things John and as we started to we we were self taught and I taught myself how to do sound. John taught himself how to be a director photography and as we started getting into the in into working with film you know part of part of making a film is understanding how to tell a story and having a beginning middle and an end and when you think of conversation conversational design. It's the same thing you need to have a beginning a middle and an end and also as you're working with the film one of the biggest components it's actually more I believe it's about sixty to seventy percent of a film is the audio and so when you're making an audio application. There's a lot of crossover audio engineering of how do you? How do you get a person to feel like? They're part of this experience. How do you communicate is it? Are you know when you make your choices? Are you using the voice of the assistant? Are you choosing to use a human just using way files? What kind of you know? Maybe you're mixing some different audio in the background. So there's there's quite a bit of crossover when you really get down to it. Yeah there is an one of the things I love about this voice text base is. It's pulling in so many creatives my background's in dance originally and I do writing. People are writers. They're filmmakers. Why do you think that there is such a big pull of the creative space into this piece of technology more than others? I think everyone wants to live star Trek. Because let's get real. This is what we're starting to see. This is this is star trek this her being able to turn around to the computer and say turn the lights on. Turn the lights off. Phasers on stun right John. Yeah I actually used if this then that to set up an experience on On our speaker so that if I say you know red alert it blinks might Philips Hue Lights Red and and the Star Trek klaxons begin sounding. I mean yeah I agree. It's an interesting. I never thought about it that way. But that makes a Lotta Sense. So what advice do you have four brands? That are considering voice technology. Invoice Skills Abou- where they should start especially when it comes to their marketing component. Let's say they have a skill. They're utilizing capacity. What should they be doing as a brand I? I think starting simple certainly start with a very simple interaction that goes back to earlier statement delivered value quickly to the consumer. Don't involve THEM INTO A LONG-TERM CONVERSATION. Attention spans are fairly short so And used that learning to then build on and augment the skilled use that to determine what customers are looking for where they engage in where they not engaging where they dropping off you know. And it's an iterative process so it's not a one and done deployment. It's an ongoing Is going process? And to build on that We had the experience from releasing a skill that was like a treasurer on adventure story That is like an audio drama. Meets treat hundred venture self guide to story and we had some engagement with it was designed for children. It was written up in in Pc magazine as one of the top one hundred skills for kids But once the skill is finished there's no incentive to return once the person's face the game. There's no new content for them to explore so something to consider and strongly so is. How do you incentivize the person to return to the skill to become a monthly active user? So it comes back to refreshing your content and making sure that contents is. What the user certainly whether you sorta looking for make fresh make it new and put that content creation into the hands of the brand managers because certainly they're going to be the ones that other customers

John John Alexa Social Media Marketing NBA Johnsons Microsoft Travelocity Facebook Pc Magazine Google Bixby Amazon Boston Iwata Treasurer Patty Curry
Sounds Week Morning Interview: Sound Engineering

Chompers

02:46 min | 9 months ago

Sounds Week Morning Interview: Sound Engineering

"Start brushing on the top of your mouth on one side and make sure to get the molars all the way in the bathroom. Three a two one. It sounds week so today. We're talking to someone who knows a lot about sound. Marcus yes hi I'm Markus and I'm the audio engineer for Chompers and what is an audio engineer. Do An audio engineer is someone who works with recorded. Sounds sounds so We're talking about trumpers. I take all of the sounds that make up an episode of choppers so the switch bells and all the talking and all all the farts music and I put it all together and kind of get it ready so that when you listen to it at home it sounds the way that it does switch to the other side of the top of your mouth and don't brush too hard. What are some of the different ways that you play with? Sounds so sometimes in trumpers we want to change the way that the voices sound to sort of suggest a space so if you WANNA make it sound like somebody's in a big cave we use this effect that called weaver. It sounds like this so it sounds like my voice is going off the walls and it makes me sound like I'm GonNA K- Eh switch to the bottom of your mouth make sure you're brushing the inside outside and chewing side of each. Okay okay so you said that you take all of the heart sounds and bells and stuff. So what are those sounds called so those sounds are called sound effects and we use sound sound effects to help tell the story right so if the story that we're telling takes place at a baseball game we want to find a sound that'll put the baseball game. So maybe we take you know the sound of the ball hitting the bat and then a crowd clapping and those sounds make you feel like you're out of baseball game switch to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and give your tongue a brush rush to so marcus you make a lot of the music that we use. Why do we even use music on chompers sue US music to help bring the story to life and help you feel what the story is about? So if we're telling a story that's really happy. We might have happy music great mighty music. That's really fast and exciting. Maybe something like this and if we're telling a story about a mystery maybe we'd put spooky music helping you feel the story

Chompers Engineer Baseball Trumpers United States Marcus Markus
Do this to save half of your export time in Hindenburg

1,000 Podcasters

08:50 min | 9 months ago

Do this to save half of your export time in Hindenburg

"This is a an answer to a question that came to me a day or two ago from another Hindenburg user. And I'M GONNA share with you. What was going on why I think it happens and what I do to fix this so that you can do that kind of thing as well? If you'd like to watch this kind of thing definitely recommend the video if you prefer to listen you can learn that way just find. There's really nothing that you have to actually see 'cause I can explain all of it but if you like to watch that's absolutely fine. I totally understand that. So here's the deal new Hindenburg user. Who was a an established audio editor? She he's worked with a number of other tools and he noticed when he exported his file. It took a lot longer than he expected. I think it was an hour and eighteen minutes to render the file which is pretty long time. I totally understand why why he was frustrated and why he had some questions so I totally totally get that. And I'll explain to you. Why this happens Hindenburg? Just like any other audio software can export a file. That does the mix down sends all that stuff out and it renders. unders that file which is absolutely what you'd expect but the cool thing about Hindenburg is that it can also mix that filed down to a specific loudness so if you think about a podcast. You're listening in the car. You want it to be at a certain loudness level and the Audio Engineering Society has set that target based on what they call. LUFF's I'm not going to get into technicals of that but you can automatically set your file to match a loudness target for broadcast TV broadcast radio. You can set it for podcast and you can set it for for a number of different targets and Hindenburg will automatically matt mix it down and set it to match that loudness target which means applying compression and limiting and doing all kinds of stuff behind the scenes. So that you get exactly what you want when you publish your file. Great thing but the way Hindenburg does that makes total sense. They sort of rendered file in memory. If you will and I don't know all of the technicals behind this so if I'm if I'm not technically correct on this I'm explaining how I see it happen but the reality is it's going to mix mix down. The file wants to understand what the peaks and the valleys are with. The loudness is as the file was saved. So after you've applied all the facts after you've you've done all of your mixing everything in you've done all that stuff it's GonNa mix that down and figure out what the loudness is and what it needs to do to make that file match the loudness target that you've you've told it to do. And then when when it's figured that out is going to mix down the whole file again and apply the additional effects to make it match the target loudness so in this particular case if it took an hour for that file to rent or took an hour and eighteen minutes for that file to render it's reasonable symbol to assume that roughly fifty percent of the time was spent mixing it down the first time and then fifty percent of the time spent mixing it down again to match loudness target to export it and publish it or ply three tags or convert the file all of the things that go into that taking the the raw audio making it down and converting it to an MP three or whatever final format right. You're working in. So that's what's going on is it's basically mixing the file down twice once to understand it and wants to make it match the loudness target and so for longer file that can take a while as an example right now I have opened in front of me a the the upcoming episode of my show the engaging missions show and I've done all the edits and I'm getting ready to mix it down. Here's the work around because I found a way to save at least fifty percent of the time that's involved in this. I'm going to miss this file down to a stereo file or a wave file and I'm going to tell the software not to match a loudness target when it does that so when a mix that down my guess is it's GonNa take probably about ten to fifteen minutes for this filed and makes down. I don't do that offline and we'll come back to it and then when I'm done mixing it down I'm going to bring that file back in and I'm a solo out the new tracks so that I'm only listening to that one gonNA use that to do my final expert to loudness so that's going to be the process. It's actually fairly straightforward. But here's what I'm going to do. The first thing I'm GonNa do is mixed this file down without matching loudness targets and in my case. I'm an export. I need to if you're watching on the screen. I'm going to choose where I want it to go so I'm going to drop but in a folder and the tell it to mix it down as a stereo wave an GONNA turn off my loudest matching so that there's no normalization and I'm GonNa hit save and it's going to render. That file is probably GONNA take think about ten or fifteen minutes. I'm going to pause and then we'll come back after. That's done and see what I do next all right. You're back and as you can see by the display. I did slightly miscalculate how long it would take took nineteen minutes and fifty five seconds to do the mix down to be fair. I did have some video editing going on in the background so I wasn't exactly being nice to my computer but if you think about it nearly twenty minutes for just the mix down a lot of effects applied complex stuff so I get why it took along. But if I'd done this the traditional way were mix it down and then it makes it down again. This would've taken forty minutes. Roughly Two K.. So we're nineteen minutes and and fifty five seconds right now. I'M GONNA go ahead and close his dialog box and find my way back to the beginning of the file S- actually kind of along file and and then I'm GonNa go find the file that I just created the one that I just exported and unfortunately I moved around so let me go find that again. So here's my mic down. Grab that file and just drop it into my production. Make sure that everything looks relatively good so everything looks clean. I've got a break here. That's on purpose to don't worry about that. A minute solo this track so that I only have that track and then I have a master track enabled with some effects on the master track. Go ahead and turn all those effects off. These four effects are actually really processor intensive. So that's why it takes part of why it takes so long so I've got that file I dropped it in. I sold all of it and I turned off the effects on the master. Track all of these other tracks that are enabled are going to be processed again. Because I've sold so that it's only processing this then. I'm going to go to export that file again and this time I'm going to make it an MP three file and I've got a preset for exactly how I want to go and then I just need to choose the destination if you're watching a long. I'm just dropping it into a destination so I've selected the file format that I want that I'm GonNa hit save and you'll see that this render is GonNa take significantly less time than it took me to render the original. It'll probably take about a minute or so what it's doing right now is is analyzing the file just like we talked about when the when the line gets about to the fifty percent. Mark that it's going to start writing the file and I'M GONNA go ahead hadn't positive video here and we'll come back to it all right we're back and the final mix down is done in this case it took three minutes and four seconds so all told call it twenty three minutes for the entire mix down whereas doing it the traditional way would have taken forty minutes or longer and the real power in this begins to come. I'm when you're exporting multiple files to different locations so in Hindenburg you can publish to more the same file to more than one destination. So my case I work in Lipson Jason primarily so I can publish a file Libson and I can also drop a file to Google drive or whatever backup system I have so I have another copy of that and then that can all happen automatically automatically but if I were to mix this entire twenty minute mix down and publish it to to different destinations. That would be twenty minutes for the original mix down plus twenty minutes to publish it to Lipson plus twenty minutes to publish to a backup folder. If you will sixty minutes for this file whereas is doing it this way would take twenty three to twenty five minutes still a little bit longer than it would've liked again. I was a little bit hard on my computer by editing video while I was exporting the audio but this can save significant amounts of time and it's really pretty simple just export the file to a temporary file if you will non normalized or non leveled to a location then bring that file back in Solo. So that's the only thing that you've got going on with no effects going on in a master track if you have a master astor track and then use that for your final export and publish. That will save you a good bit of time. When you're publishing files HINDENBURG? especially if you use a lot of effects or if there's there's a lot of complexity going on that's GonNa take a long time to

Audio Editor Audio Engineering Society Lipson Google Mark
"audio engineering" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

Marketing Upheaval

11:41 min | 1 year ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

"That's just hilarious. Maybe one day I'll write a commercial and you can record it. Yeah I would gladly do. It would be the worst commercial ever. Hey everyone this is rudy. Fernandez some creative outhouse in this episode I spoke with Matt still a Grammy Award. Winning engineer and music producer. The Matt's work that people like Elton John Stevie. TV Wonder Santana. He's worked with outkast Lady Gaga and the list goes on and on from legends to new artists a matinee. I've known each other for a long time and I always I enjoyed talking with them. We talked about how he got started. We talked about the changes in music and the rights of artists because Matt also advocates for the rights of performers and artists which Chide Meyer because I think people who make music have these magic powers they create this miraculous thing that profoundly affects us emotionally makes us think affects our lives. We talked about that to check it out. Welcome to marketing people. You're listening to marketing. Welcome marketing people. My guess is Matt Still Matt is is a Grammy Award. Winning music producer and engineer. He's a national trustee for the recording academy and an artist in residence at Kennesaw State University. It's twenty five plus years in the music industry. He sees a lot of things chains and he's managed to change with them. So we're gonNA talk about that. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. So I'm I'm GonNa just for the listeners. Start with shameless name-dropping that's okay. 'cause you're pretty modest guy but I don't think you ought to be you. You work with Elton John. If you'VE WORKED WITHOUT CASTING TESTING FILE Boy Lady Gaga Rod Stewart. Santana Alice in chains BBC King Arrested Development Tlc. You've worked with Stevie wonder Lebel then it goes on and on and on. So how does a kid who grew up in Georgia and loved Music Music Grow up and become a guy who works at all these legends well. I've been in music mind tire life. I started playing the piano and taking classical piano lessons at the age of four so music was was always part of everything I did and I never really thought about doing anything other than music. Yeah really and I wanted to be wanting to be the performer. I wanted to be the the next Elton John. My Mom bought me and Elton John Song Book when I was a teenager so I think it's kind of like that I'm I'm actually been working with him for over twenty six years now now but I wanted to be the performer. And I remember when I was in bands in high school and in college and we go into recording studios and and the recordings never came out sounding the way I wanted. They didn't sound coming out of speakers. The way it sounded in my head. I didn't know what to tell the engineer to do more the person producing because I didn't really understand the technical language of things. Okay I need to learn that I wanted to sound the way I want it to. I need to learn what these guys. Yeah so I started taking recording classes. as-as hanging out recording studios and kind of worked my way up from an intern to assist engineer to an engineer. And then eventually the chief engineer near the recording studio that I was part of I just kind of found myself starting to engineer for other people and it came a little bit naturally to me. It's much better suited for for my personality being in the studio being at the point when you're creating the art and when you're making some magic happen I really found that that was is more suited to me and I was fortunate enough to be at what was at the time the best recording studio Atlanta It was called soundscape. And and that's where anybody who was anybody came into record That's where I work with Elton. That's got to work with the rest of Development James Brown on TLC stevie wonder because if you were coming into Atlanta record that's where you went. I love that it's because you're a perfectionist and you wanted to sound as good as what you heard in your head that's neat. I guess I know some performance but you. You're more adding more introverted. You go you put yourself out there but still by nature. I think you so you tend to yeah. I mean engineering thing obviously seems to have worked out your engineers in general or probably more introverts perverts. Yeah because we get to we kind of go into our little caves and and we just sit there and turn knobs all day long and we try to make things perfect as possible but now now switching advertising because you can do a lot of radio pays it. Pays the bills inbetween album engineers engineering. I've done everything from mixing working on music in all genres of music. God recorded rock pop rap country classical jazz recorded a ninety piece Orchestra Abbey Road and then the very next day. I'll be recording the voice over for Toyota Commercial. Yeah you know I've mixed feature films I've mixed television shows. I've done you know anything that has to do with audio in his studio I will do it well. How do you balance that with like doing a Toyota commercial with? I just recorded Elton John. What's the level of perfectionism? Well to me I I really don't take A very different approach engineering. There's a part that is universal but in terms of my level of perfection of the way I approach it. It's still very similar. A client is a client. You have to give them each the same respect being paid to do a job so the music is. She's changed a lot. Obviously we all know it because we see it because I grew up with cassettes before and then you know there's growth eight trucks albums cassettes. How have you seen that? The distribution of impact the musicians that you work with just the fact that it's not going to be released on album anymore or a CD. You has an effect for artists. The economics of the industry kind of flipped upside down from what they used to be. I'm in Russell Prints on the purple rain tour. I had the STUB and I think the cost of the concert was like twelve dollars and fifty cents or fifteen dollars Max Prince fifteen bucks at the Omni because artists made their money through album sales merchandising. You toured to support album sales. You didn't have satellite streaming. You didn't have or Internet streaming and satellite radio so you only had terrestrial radio now if you wanted to hear someone that you had to turn on the radio in your car or have your stereo at home on the radio station. Artists made their money through album. Sales person shows now. There is so much less money in sales onto streaming so streaming and albums are put out and often given away for free to support the tour to make people come out to the tour and go to the show to the revenue model. Which is why concert? Tickets are now one hundred and fifty two hundred three hundred dollars. Yes this is that change the type of performers. Thank it recorded A. I'll give you an example. Many years ago now we saw a reunion of the police a lot of great songs but the police play instruments. And saying there's no explosions. There's no dances. They they just sing. It was okay concert. It wasn't let's say Bruno Mars. It wasn't U2 we was just them. Do you think up in commerce who just sing and play instruments. have as much of a chance as someone. Who's a better performer? I think that someone who is a great musician will always have a good chance as much they always have. Talent in. musicianship has never been enough through the entire history of music industry to any industry and it takes a a lot more than just while they're a great player They're great singer. They're great guitarist drummer. Matic's lot more than that. Yeah and that hasn't changed so with technology and the fact that you can record at home now where you can do an entire album on your laptop in your bedroom and there are people who do that and it sounds amazing. But I don't think that's necessarily going to change someone's chance in terms of like acute pixelbook guitar or chooses to play the piano now. I don't know that one has a a leg up over the other because it's all about the artistry you know in in if you write a song that catch the public eye. I think you stand as good a chance as anybody to be put into the limelight. Now you mentioned that I think one time Adele L. was in town and I think tickets for like three hundred bucks as she and there's someone who kept her album also streaming and sold like five or six million copies before a streaming so she was very smart. This hit again. She did not allow her albums to be released on spotify and all the streaming services first came out a huge smash mash success at the top of the charts and the only place people could get. It was to go buy it and see store and so they went and bought it. They can do that now. Emerging Artists won't won't really won't have that ability but she's a huge star so how is music normally promoted him. What's the standard when you're not super huge star like Adele? What would nowadays when you have you know things like Youtube Stars and all these kids have channels in APPs tick talking? And all these other Avenues for people to to to hear your music You've really got to build your social following. Yeah unfortunately record labels used to develop artists. They would sign an artist and they would commit to three to four albums with them to try and build that artists who they think they could be. You Know Youtube wasn't the smash two on their first record Rem Athens bans was not the RAM. We know today or at the peak on their first album. They had several albums under their belt before they kind of took gough labels don't really get into artists development as much anymore you are. You are already kind of have to have following. I've brought artists to labels also and one of the questions that they ask you know. How many streams do they get on spotify what how many followers on on subscribers on youtube how many followers on facebook facebook and instagram wow? What's the average number of us on our on our youth on a youtube video? So they have to. You have to be if you're going to make it now seems to me. There's more opportunity. Parity for emerging artists because they have more channels but at the same time you also have to be a good marketer. The tools are available to everyone to to try and let their voice be heard through the things that I mentioned. But now you have this sea of mediocrity. That's out there because it's so inexpensive and easy to do that everybody wants to do it. But that's technology emerging technology. It's going to do great things for you but then it's also going to you know have a downside to it so that you think the major major changes you see artistically music out that there's we just have access to more mediocrity and we did well in terms of changing in artistry industry. New Technology is always going to spawn a new direction in music People are gonNA find creative ways to use something and that is hard to predict. That's that that's where you know. The true artists comes out is someone who can take something and use it in a unique way getting more artist friendly now or the previous the way it worked. I don't view it as either. I don't view it as more artist friendly or less artist friendly. It's just it's a new tool people to use. You know you have like a idioms..

engineer Elton John Matt Elton John Stevie Grammy Award youtube spotify producer Atlanta Elton Lady Gaga Rod Stewart Toyota Commercial chief engineer Kennesaw State University Fernandez Chide Meyer James Brown Georgia Santana Alice Adele L.
"audio engineering" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"David oziel an audio engineer Alex in ten are here with us in studio twelve to keep things rolling along associate producer Cathy Johnson's in the newsroom and we are glad to have you where you are with us of course so Wall Street investors had to keep the seat belts on yesterday for that wild wide ride on Wall Street with the Dow losing over eight hundred points the selloff spurred by red flags that have some economic experts talking about the R. word we'll begin our coverage of John Lawrence and then we'll go to the White House but John your first some financial analysts fear a recession is looming out of the concern comes from outside of the US China and Germany both issue disappointing data this week and banks in India New Zealand and Thailand slashed rates greater than expected due to trade fears for not in recession globally were pretty close and it's gone away on us here at moody's analytics says president trump's trade war with China could cause the slow down if the president can't figure out a way to to find some kind of face saving arrangement with with China pretty soon we will be in recession the president decided to delay terrace against Beijing until December and Wednesday he tweeted that China wants to make a deal in the meantime Americans are keeping a close watch on their wallets and then Bob Constantini whenever there's bad economic news president trump's favorite target for blames the federal reserve and its chairman Jerome Powell the president tweeting from his New Jersey resort as markets worry about recession the federal reserve acted far too quickly and now is very very late that's a quote from the president who what the Y. street is a lot of like minded quotes from fox business network hosts but later he added other countries say thank you to clueless J. power on the federal reserve the president stands firm on his position that the trade war with China is not a big factor in the stocks flight but on Tuesday the administration backed down on broadening terrace he's one of the most vocal supporters of president trump's terrorists as a weapon on trade wars commerce secretary Wilbur Ross however on CNBC acknowledging the delay in the president's new or threat of terrorists on Chinese imports is strictly to prevent consumers from feeling the pinch and nobody wants to take any chance of disrupting the Christmas season we don't think for those so you're saying we didn't extract anything from China to do this there was no quid pro quo and quid pro quo terrace on electronics clothing and shoes will be delayed the new deadline is December fifteenth or not imposed at all the administration announced in pulling back on Mr trump's latest threat but to read the president's tweets is to hear that there was no backing down at Ole and to repeat China is paying the terrorists quote they are eating the terrace with the devaluation of their currency and pouring money into their system the American consumer is fine with or without the September date but much good will come from the shorts deferral to December it actually helps China more than us but we'll be reciprocated end quote the president doesn't say what that means in at this point it's hard to tell what it might mean all right thanks to John Lawrence and Bob Constantini both reporting for first light checking the markets this morning Asian stock markets followed Wall Street lower in Thursday trading market benchmarks in Shanghai Tokyo and Hong Kong all reach read it European markets though were narrowly mixed in early trading and U. S. stock futures actually picked up points in the early morning premarket trading it's ten minutes past the hour now and in Philadelphia well it is over that long standoff between police and the shooter that sense six officers to the hospital with gunshot wounds bill Michaels reports Philadelphia police chief Eric grip made the all clear announcement I got a hold the shooting started.

Alex Cathy David oziel engineer producer ten minutes
"audio engineering" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on Slate's Working

"And how long have you owned the farmer been running? Or how long have you been designing studios the choose somewhat started around the same time I had been doing some freelance design work for a few years prior to that? But just felt I could do more and was handed an opportunity to design a studio for someone and use that as the opportunity to start round business and been going ever since that was in the summer of twenty seven so eight years had you ever designed a studio before, then not from scratch, I kinda got started more as an audio engineer with also a design, background and was working working as a freelancer trying to become an audio engineer wasn't very good at it, and simultaneously, took a job working for a guy who built recording studio. So he was a contractor had spent about twenty five years building recording studios and took me under his wing. And so I got a real kind of behind the scenes look of how they're built and. And simultaneously had a, a mentor who was studio designer. I wanna pop back for a second here about your failure, though. There's numerous Bill along the engineer. Well, first off for people who don't know what is an audio engineer. So an audio engineer would be someone who works in a recording studio who records, any amount of content could be a band could be podcast. It could be sound effects for film television. You see you're the person in charge of making sure that sounds good. Yeah. You record it. You mix it and master. And so that's what you wanted to do. You said you weren't very good at it. What happened? Why were you so terrible? Oh, a lot of reasons wanted to pretty heavily saturated market. There are more people looking for jobs in that field than there are actually jobs in that field. So the competition is pretty high. I see all those ads like for like audio engineer courses on the subway. There are a lot of four profit colleges who tell their students that you too can be an audio engineer. So they're just like flooding the market, they are. Absolutely. And it's it's very much a market where where you intern. You get coffee. You do anything you can to get a job. And I was doing that. I was I was kinda paying my dues where you're getting coffee for anyone cool. Or is it just rarely not even occasional sessions that I would run with some pretty big name actors which was, which was a lot of fun, just to meet some interesting people. But because I had been working for this guy building recording studios. I'd get hired by another audio engineer, maybe a maybe a senior audio engineer on a project and say, let me let me help you had at your film, and they would say, yeah, that's. But my room sounds terrible, and I heard you can help me with that, too. So I had this kind of a pivotal moment that maybe I'm following the wrong path. Maybe they're more people out there who could use this other set of skills that I have, and I just started pursue it. That's I- useful, all mount of self-awareness air. Like, I'm not just going to keep beating down the door this thing that's not working. It's like, oh these other people want to pay me money to do this other thing. Oh, yeah. I mean I arguably work more hours now but I, I have a lot more control than I have a service that people need, and there are fewer people for our customers to call for our services. So the world is flooded with engineers, but there aren't a lot of people who actually build studios. Why is that tough to say I think there are a lot of audio engineers, because there's nowadays, we live in a world with a, a lot of content. There's millions of hours of podcasts and TV shows and movies and all sorts of things being produced every year. All of those things at one point are touched by audio engineer. So every sound effect you here on a film. Absolutely everything was recorded by somebody and put into that film, and Mick. So there is a great need for audio engineers in terms of why. There's not that many people that design studios. I think it's a unique intersection of different disciplines. There are architects who designed spaces interior designers who design interiors. There are AKU..

engineer Mick intern twenty five years eight years
Audio mixing tips and tricks

Brains On!

03:09 min | 1 year ago

Audio mixing tips and tricks

"Rob is an audio engineer here at American public media and all these tips work for real professional microphones as well as the microphones that come built into your smartphones, tablets rabs has it all comes down to -cation. Where you place the microphone in where you decide to do your recording. I up Mike placement which you don't want to do is take the microphone and put it right in front of your mouth. The microphone will end up capturing closes a close of is a blast of air that comes out of your mouth when you say words that begin with the letter p and you can demonstrate this on your own just by taking your hand putting it in front of your face, you know, three or four inches away. And you say Peter piper picked and you can feel the blast of air in your hand. So to find out where the correct might placement. Is you take your hand? And you move it to the side just rotated around a few inches off to the side. And you say Peter piper picked again. And now you don't feel the blast of air. And that's a good spot to record. And then you have to consider where to do the recording the bedroom works really nicely because there are lots of soft things in bedrooms, got your mattress. And you've got your blankets. You might have close or. Curtains and all those soft things help absorb the sound, and they make it sound a little closer. If you are in a space that is big and echoey, the microphone will pickup that echo, and it just doesn't sound very clean. And if you're gonna make edits I can make it really hard to edit voices because those echoes will interfere with at its you wanna try to make. I think people like to go in closets because there are lots of clothes in them. But it's also kind of hard if you wanna have say a conversation with someone else it's hard to squeeze too people into closet. So another way to do that. It's just a sit on a bed right again. That mattress in the blankets on the on the bed or nice and soft and you can both just sit down on the bed. If you're going to record yourself. It's just you talking. Another thing you can do is use a blanket almost like you're making a tent you'd be put it over your head. And you also put it over your microphone your phone, and you can record yourself that way kind of sitting under a blanket. And that if you want to interview someone outside say, there are other things you have to watch out for you have to be really careful about wind, especially if you're using your phone to record the air moving across the microphone can make it sound bad can make on distorted the rule of thumb. I always use. If the wind is moving enough to move your hair, it might be problematic for the microphone. If the wind is steadily moving at one direction, you can put your body between the wind and your phone. Another thing to do is just try to find a space that might provide some natural protection from the winds. So you're outside. It's really Wendy will what if you walked around the corner of the building just a little bit. And maybe the building protect you from the wind. Those are just a few tricks that we and other professionals us when we are recording. And now you can

Peter Piper Engineer Rabs ROB Wendy Four Inches
"audio engineering" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

The Nightly Rant

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

"Master your show. So that sounds good. I'll give tips on better equipment. You might need. I tell you something right now, we sit here we are holding microphones that. I looked up on Amazon. These were these are given to my son as part of his audio engineering stool. Cut. Eleven keep them, but dollars on ads on and the sound has improved on the show. So we started using that my point being if you've got the money for the five hundred dollar microphone, and you have the environment that worked go for you. You know, not everyone this Bill Gates, or you know. We don't have all the money in the world. So we go with what we can go, but thirty nine dollars microphone. Plugged into a hundred dollar quarter is doing the job for us right now. Right. And I'll help people with that hope people figure out with the need to make their show sound better. I'm telling you there, bro. Found his podcast. I can't remember what it's called at this point. He must recording while he's driving in traffic from work to honor. Here's car engine sounds on. The guy's got tons of listeners on a how imagine summit better. Then maybe it's like Garrett being truckers to say the beginning days of social media. Just record a video wherever you are record the video and put it out. No, one cares. If it's polished, and shiny and nice. Well, maybe that's true. Maybe these people that listen to podcasts. They don't give a damn if not polishing nice. I don't know. I like it polish. But if you wanna be on our network, I will help you with that help you get to where you wanna go with your sound. If we need to reedit something sometime, I'll do it with you or for you. It's all part of the helping Geddes this network going. I specifically have a show in mind called it's debatable that I would like to talk to somebody who likes to moderate debates. You like to debate in general might even be a good show for you. And I have a great concept. It's already to go. I even have some guests lined up. That would do it just need a host, and I'm not hosting sorry. Then the big push that I wanted that. I wanted to mention is that fitness freedom, which is on our network. Is going to move to. Once a month. Well, it's always been once a month. But it's been dead for a while. A once a month show, whoever. On the zoo media network. It's going to be a once a week show. Extra. You're gonna have to pay for that won't get released for free. And. I'm gonna talk to you about what I'm doing in the new year, which is carnivore diet yet again back being a meter. So I'm gonna talk to you about how did I feel this house my energy? What did I eat? What did I void? What cravings? Did I have house my feeling, and I'm going to have a place. I don't know yet where it'll probably be on the website where you can ask questions ahead of an episode. And then I can answer those questions on there. Now regular fitness freedom episode, that's free. We'll probably take a lot from that. It might even end up being a compilation pieces from it with some extra stuff done in the dot something that we're going to do. And we've got as Victoria mentioned when I dropped the f bomb at the very beginning. We've got the nightly rant on censored on that network you'd love it. You would love it. And we now have a virtually unlimited supply. Controversial topics that are not going to say where they're coming from. But we have a virtually unlimited supply of these controversial topics. So with that. That's what's happening in the new year. Happy new year everybody, we love all of you. And we're glad you're here. Life even if it's out of distance. We appreciate you if you can

Bill Gates Amazon Geddes Garrett Victoria five hundred dollar thirty nine dollars hundred dollar
"audio engineering" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"A second goes. Jimmy Williams, audio engineer I normally show host and Hari back from a week off doing who knows what I was doing a lot of who knows. What were you in isolation? This past week is that what will happen? No swimmingly into avoid though. Yes. That's exactly what you were doing. How you guys doing? I, you know, I gotta admit to you. I'm tired. I'm ill prepared for this podcast. What's new? Normally, I tried to read up, you know, that's been an hour before the show reading up, and I just didn't have it today. So we'll see how this goes. What's your excuse? I mean there was no apple or anything fatigue. Yeah. Fatigue. I don't know. I got this cold yet the old the I know what that is. Now case the old. Yeah, happens in update, we are now off the rectal scale, we're on the oath scale the rectal scale while the the Richter scale. Yeah. I gotcha. Right, right. In describing the PU I speak on behalf of a number of people in the audience, and they don't want to hear. I don't need to. All right. I'll tell you this morning was not kind. You're only. Oh skill. I'm on the scale. How does like, ooh. Poo. Shorthand? Well, how what was it was a four? Oh my gosh. Release. Yeah. We we had our first six oh last night. It was not good speaks anything over four os spillover. Anyway, let's get to some. Let's get to. Well. How about our top story?.

Jimmy Williams Hari engineer apple
"audio engineering" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on Science... sort of

"You're sure to get a whole lot more science, sir. Of ood does it science sort of dot com for show notes links to all the stories we talked about an waste interact with the host guests and other listeners. Science sort of is brought to you by the regular media network of podcasts with audio engineering by ten of the encyclopedia branch podcast. That's all for this week. See you next time on science or. I gotta run off. You didn't remind me to promote my. I have to promote. Oh, no, okay. We're back in it. Okay. So three go. What are you have? Pretend that you just finished plugging all your stuff in the hey, Ryan, you got anything. Hey, so yeah, that's what I got going on a Ryan do you have anything going on? Yes. Madam. Thank you for asking. I appreciate you. Remembering to ask in the moment. It's very important to me. That's that's what I do. We're definitely recorded this later. I want to mention that this episode is going to be coming out in late November and in early slash mid December. I will be at the annual meeting of the American geophysical union, which this year is taking place in my hometown of Washington DC. So that'll be from about Sunday December ninth through Friday December fourteenth. And I have a number of events going on I'm giving a talk on Tuesday. But my talk is only about five minutes long because it's part of the up goer five. So I'm also giving a workshop on science podcasting on Thursday afternoon. And then Thursday night. I am performing live as part of a story. Collider live show, which science storytelling in the vein of the moth true stories told live without notes rice. I have a draft of my story written. I'm waiting to hear back if my draft is acceptable to the her fingers crossed on that. You know, I joked with Matt earlier about high did some standup comedy in college. So one skill. I do have is I'm able to write in my own voice reasonably well. So fingers crossed that they when they read it. But other than that other than those scheduled things that I have I'm going to be covering the show as press. So if you are an earth scientists, and you will find yourself at the American geophysical union meeting, especially if you are going to be presenting your research. I don't care if it's a poster I don't care if it's a talk whatever it is. I would like to talk to you something I've started saying as part. Of my podcasting workshops that I give to people because in addition to these workshops being about how to do a podcast if you're interested in that. They're also about how to be a good guest on a science podcast, if somebody wants to promote your work, and one of the things I tell people is it frustrates me to no end. And I don't know if you deal with this Matt it frustrates me to no end when scientists I asked a scientist to come on the show, and they say, oh what I work on his interesting. I only had that that's weird because I just happened to me today. But I've only ever had that happen. A couple of times. And I say shut up that's for me to decide. Well, what I started saying is. So if I approached you and said, hey, I was going to invite you on my show. But actually don't think what you do is very interesting. You would be pissed at me rightly so because you don't actually believe your stuff is not interesting. We I say what I study is not interesting you are being disingenuous. Stop doing it. You would not be devoting your time and energy to it. If you weren't interested in it. So share that. With the world talk to me. Let me put a Mike in your face. If you don't like me able be there too. Could set you up for a time with Abe. The point is we you know, because we have built ourselves as a very broad tent of literally science sort of anything that is science anything sort of science.

scientist Matt American geophysical union Ryan Washington DC Mike Abe five minutes
"audio engineering" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on Science... sort of

"You can be certain that when you come back next time, you'll be greeted with a whole lot more science sort of. Does it science sort of dot com for shown oats links to all the stories? We talked about an waste interact with the host guests and other listeners. Science sort of is brought to you by the regular media network of podcasts with audio engineering by ten of encyclopedia branch podcast. That's all for this week's you next time on science or. I would love to see Mars from orbit so bad. That'd be so cool. You're a fly all the way they're into stay in orbit. Oh, yeah. Oh crash land on that thing. So you will you. So you wanna see it from orbit? But you also do want to go to the surface. Yeah. Right. That'd be fine. Being the first man of dial Mars, I would be fine with that to a monument to that. They have to put some kind of cool monument. Probably just you because you wouldn't really decay decay took you out of your suit. Would you mummify some girls, you would definitely dehydrate pretty gnarly way? But I mean, that's that would preserve you pretty well. Yeah. There might be some digressing some like boiling, but yeah, you'd be pretty well preserved. I think so if we if we once you die, we just put a pinhole puncture in your suit. So that you d gas slowly enough that there's not like a gross like bruising on you. And then like, I guess we'd have to just. Yeah. I mean, I. Preserve? I was I still wanna be vain even though I'm dead. So maybe as your dying you take a bunch of blade yourself. And I was going to say you take a bunch of antibiotics you kill all your gut flora. So that way you're not rotting from the inside. And then dry yourself out Moscow. Oaten that's gonna be spooky it's giving spookier if we get there and find one. Charlie. I knew that guy that is definitely one condition, which I do not tear for Mars if I land and see some skeletons turn it around.

Moscow Charlie
CNN's Jim Acosta has White House press badge revoked

The Ray Lucia Show

51:18 min | 2 years ago

CNN's Jim Acosta has White House press badge revoked

"The White House has suspended the right house pass of CNN's Jim Acosta, accusing him of harming an intern who was trying to grab his microwave during a contentious exchange with President Trump accuster responded on. CNN but didn't put my hands on her or touch her as they're alleging. And it's just unfortunate that the the White House is saying this, you know, we all try to be professionals over there. And I think I handled myself professionally in a statement CNN said White House spokeswoman, Sarah Sanders. Right. They said the White House revoked a Costa's press pass in retaliation for his challenging questions during the conference. Jury selection has wrapped up in the New York trial of Mexican drug Lord, Joaquin El Chapo Guzman. The jury of seven women and five men are to hear opening statements next Tuesday, the notoriety of the case has prompted extra security measures that include keeping all of the jurors anonymous. You're listening to USA radio news. Hi, I'm Wayne Allyn root, the conservative warrior my show. Wore now airs every day right here on USA radio from six to nine PM eastern. I'm also the star of the Wayne Allyn root show on Newsmax TV reaching over fifty million homes, but my favorite roles speaker extraordinaire, I was opening speaker at many. Donald Trump for president events, I speak at Republican conservative in college GOP events. And I'm available to be the star your next event. Contact me arranged for a Wayne root keynote speech. Call toll free eight eight eight four four four route. That's eight eight eight. I live alone and rarely have visitors. So when I slipped and fell in the kitchen last month and couldn't get to a phone. I knew I was in trouble. I could barely move. I tried calling for help. But no one could hear me as I lay there. I couldn't help. But think of my kids and grandkids having to go on without me. I was terrified it took eight hours from my neighbor to find me it could have been the end of me. That's when I knew I needed life alert one press this button. I'm connected to the life alert center where I can get the help I need even when I cannot reach a phone with life alert. I'm never alone. Go one eight hundred four one four one thousand nine hundred fifty eight for your free life alert brochure. That's one eight hundred four one four nine thousand nine hundred fifty eight one eight hundred four one four nineteen fifty eight call for your free life alert brochure today at one eight hundred four one four thousand nine hundred fifty eight. This is the Ray Lucia show. The best for the answers here. The one show that helps you make better money moves the program all about your money, your business and your life. Really? Than even. Call right now at eight four four ratio. Four. Why Joe w? This is the Ray Lucia show. Thank you very much. Thank you. Welcome to the one talk show in America. Helps you make better money. Moves Brad have you on board for this hour. Money power. Boy, the headline stocks set Bal another ten percent before finding a bottom. According to the piper Jaffray technician. Stocks due for a recession and a tumble CNBC's are cash. Stating that every decade since the eighteen fifties in the US has had a recession. We haven't had one yet. So it's gonna happen. My advice, you do not obsess over fear of recessions. Wayne, why also last hour I was discussing the seven-year asset class return forecasts by none other than GMO. Jeremy Grantham, the G in GMO also wanna talk about the market what's happening with the market right now because you know, we went from record highs. Everybody's now concerned that we're in the midst of a bear market, which is true, by the way for a lot of the SNP stocks down twenty percent from their high. But I'll get a chance to talk about that. But I wanna start today with the piper Jaffray prognostication. Just over a month ago, the standard and Poor's five hundred. Was setting record highs. According to leave now more than seventy percent of the indexes components isn't a correction or worse. With some high profile names like Twitter, Caterpillar, Ford and AMD deep in bear market territory. So what are you going to do about it? I mean this. This is really amazing to me because people will come out and say, yes, we're the stocks could fall another ten percent. But they sure as h won't tell you when because they don't know. And so what if they do? Another ten percent. When when you're up four hundred percents since the bottom back in March of two thousand and nine what the heck's ten percent. And will we recover along? We'll take for us to recover from another ten percent fall six months a year. I don't know. I do know this that obsessing about recessions, and so forth is not a good thing. You can go a long time without a recession. But art Cashin very highly respected person on Wall Street says that every decade since eighteen fifty we've had one. And since the great recession ended in two thousand nine. Obviously means we haven't had one this decade. But in reality. You can go a lot of years without having a recession. Australia hasn't had one since one thousand nine hundred ninety one according to Ben Carlson. Who's a researcher? And does this kind of research? Could we not? The entering into a period of time where we're not gonna have a recession. I find it highly unlikely to be honest with you in the near term. I don't know anything about the long-term. But I look at the economic numbers right now. An absent some squirrelly stuff with trades and so forth. That you have to hope that the president figures out a way to worm his way out of the pickle. He's gotten him with China now with Russia nuclear treaty and all that stuff. But but so far this dude is figured out. How to do that stuff? He's got the strangest way to negotiate, but it's it's pretty darn effective. So assuming he does and a lot of these companies that are freaking out like, Caterpillar and so forth. Because of tariffs with China at cetera et cetera. That too shall pass. No one ever said making money in the stock market was easy. No one ever said that it was easy. And it's not. But over a long time period you look at the charts. I mean, I'm not charter, it's okay. I hate looking at charts. I think it's a waste of time to look at charts unless you're looking at one like the past thirty or forty years and just put your finger at where it started thirty or forty years ago and put your finger where the other finger from the other hand, I should say where it is today. And you will see a nice line that goes from the bottom left to the top, right? That's what the stock market has done, historically. In between times. There have been some pretty wicked selloffs. I mean, pretty darn wicked selloffs we've had some pretty wicked ones over the last several years as a matter of fact. Since the market bottomed in early two thousand and nine. There have been corrections of minus sixteen percent minus nineteen point four percent. Minus twelve point four percent minus thirteen point three percent. And mine is ten point two percent. That's in the standard and Poor's five hundred and I can assure you every single time. The pundits came out of the woodwork said. Yep. It's over now. Harry dent probably said, Yep. This is the precursor to Dau three thousand. Which he has actually said in the past that the Dow was going to crash the three thousand and instead of crashing to three thousand it's stored the twenty five thousand. I mean. He's a smart guy. No question about it. He's from Harvard, and he's not the only one by the way. I saw Ron Paul the other day on some TV commercial, and he's expecting a whole world to go to heck and a Handbasket and many many many others. But let me repeat since two thousand nine we've seen the market, correct? By sixteen percent. Nineteen percent. Twelve percent thirteen percent and ten percent. So when I read about piper Jaffray prognostication that we're gonna fall another ten. Oh cares. Who cares? If you were smart enough to get out, and then doubly smart to know when to get back in then perhaps you would care, but I don't. All right, shifting gears to the market as I said, Jeremy Grantham produces his seven-year asset class real return forecasts and as of September thirty two thousand eighteen. Here's what he had to say. Now when I say real return that means after inflation. After inflation. US large-cap stocks after inflation. Minus five point two percent per year. For the next seven years. That doesn't look good. Now, I have to also tell you that Mr. Grantham has also been wrong small-cap, stocks, minus two. High quality stocks minus five. Large companies international minus point five small international companies, minus point four emerging markets. Plus three point two percent. So after inflation. Three point two percent. Which means a nominal return about five and a half percent. That's the best. You can do. According to grant them bonds. Don't look any better. US bonds flat for the next seven years. International bonds down minus one point eight emerging market bonds up two point two percent. Cash up one percent. So check this out the emerging markets have how do I say this? Really been sucking fair and wind lately. He had according to Grantham. That's where you should put your money. I'm not suggesting that you do. I am suggesting that your ten to fifteen percent or whatever you've allocated to the emerging markets stock and bond markets, you hang onto even though the emerging market stocks have been. But I'm also suggesting these stay the course with your plan when we come back. We'll talk more about the market where it's been and where it is year to date where it might be going and some ways to build wealth outside of the stock market. Jeremy Grantham is correct around. 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There are no application fees, no annual fees, just quick access to up to two hundred fifty thousand dollars. If your business did not receive your approval letter to get up to two hundred fifty thousand dollars. Call main street business loans approval desk now eight hundred four three seventy five seventy eight hundred four three seventy five seventy eight hundred four three oh, seventy five seventy that's eight hundred four three O seven. Five seven zero folks. Helping you make better money. Let's talk about the GMO seven-year asset class real return forecasts, and it doesn't pretty at all. Real. Meaning after inflation. US large-cap stocks expected to earn a minus five point two percent after you account for inflation. Which means they're gonna lose three percent. Per year for the next seven years. Nominally? Crazy stuff man who wants to lose money in the market. International stocks pretty close to break even down a little bit. After inflation. But emerging markets are the only ones. That actually are above water three point two percent. And on the bond side. It looks equally as dismal. International bonds down minus one point eight percent. Emerging market debt up two point two percent. So it's just not looking all that hot. I'm gonna talk about some alternatives here in just a moment. But I thought that I would refresh everyone's memory on where we are year to date. In terms of the market performance. And this could change. Any moment because Marcus have been pretty volatile lately, haven't they? The Dow's up three point seven two percent. The NASDAQ is up seven point seven four percent. The Russell small cap index is flat point three eight percent. And the standard and Poor's five hundred is up four point zero nine percent. Now, if you've got an adviser, and they're charging fees. You're going to have to subtract that that's just from the index itself. Now bonds have been in the tank this year. And I wanna talk about this a little bit later, hopefully an opportunity to do that. But core US bonds are down minus two point four one percent. Long core bonds minus six point four four percent year to date. People buy bonds because they're supposed to be safe. But in a rising interest rate environment and can be nasty corporate bonds. Minus three point three two percent long corporate bonds. Minus six point five five percent. Government bonds, the safest of all. Minus two point two one percent. Intermediate minus one point five eight percent. Long minus six point three five percent. Make alone that the government this year. A long term loan twenty thirty years. You lost six percent mortgage. Bonds minus one point seven seven tips treasury inflation protected securities, minus two point six percent. Knowing that really looks okay and the bond world high yields are up one point six percent. And T-Bills cash basically one point four one percent. So where do you go to build wealth in a market like this? Well, number one is you do not. Bail on your stock market portfolio. But as I have mentioned for years and years and years looking at alternatives to the stock market can make some sense. And alternatives to the bond market as well. Alternatives to the bond market. Could be other forms of debt private debt and so forth. And you gotta look hard for this stuff. You need a very very good financial adviser. You don't have to look quite as hard in the insurance world because insurance companies compete favorably with bonds with certain annuities. We talked yesterday about multi-year, guaranteed annuity contracts. They compete with CDs virtually no risk if you hold until the end and you'll get a better rate of return from most companies, then you'll get from treasuries. Fixed annuities index to new itys variable annuities with guaranteed minimum withdrawal benefits, locking in some kind of a guaranteed income stream in the event the whole world collapses. Those are great ways for you to diversify away from the stock market, but still have the benefits of the stock market. If things do well if they don't do. Well, you're still okay because you locked in a guaranteed income stream for the rest of your life, which will probably translate into a bond like asset, and depending on how long you live. It could be a dog on good bond. But more importantly, it gives you the ability to wait out the storm in the stock market. So what are some of these fresh alternatives to the stock market? Well, we've talked about rental properties and vacation homes. A lot on this show. And there was a company now I forget their name. It'll come to me that evaluated. A lot of these different strategies in terms of how much orders yield street. How much it costs and how hard is it to do? So rental properties, the drop in home ownership rates is obviously led to a rental, boom. But you've got to be very very careful here because some markets you could lose your shorts in. So here's what they said about rental property and vacation homes. The setup is hard. It is got to do your homework time commitment is high. Money required, medium, twenty to one hundred thousand bucks, and the research is on you. Then they went to commercial property. You got to put a lot of money into this money required. Two hundred and fifty thousand time commitment medium setup again hard. Franchises like a subway or Dunkin donuts and all that you can earn ten percent. But it's very very difficult to make that work for you, unless you're the person behind the counter, and even then you're not going to get rich. Now, if you own twenty six Dunkin donuts or Jack in the boxes, you can make a fortune if they all work, but they're not all going to work perfectly. But your time commitment is high. The setup is hard the money required. Big fifty grand for the little Mickey Mouse franchises. And even Dan if you hired a manager you still got to watch over them. If you put fifty grand down, and he made ten percent five thousand bucks a year. I don't know if it's worth the risk. There's peer to peer lending this actually pretty easy to do. Go online, and you can get pretty decent rates of return. Anyway. Some alternatives at least to the stock market. I wouldn't get too crazy here big allocating some of your money to alternatives wise move. My preference is to find a fund that does these types of alternatives for you be willing to pay a fee, and let them do all the hard work. So you can sit back and go to Dunkin donuts. Have a Cup of coffee in about eighteen hundred calories. We'll be back. Idea for an adventure new product. Do you think companies would be interested in your idea? Do you want to try to get a patent that helped? Now it keeps. Your idea confidential explains every step of the invention process. Joy, the thousands of people just like you who chose to pursue their idea. We your experience we are working for you. We are invent health. Get started with your idea. Call for free information, call one eight hundred six zero seven eighty nine forty five that's one eight hundred six zero seven eight nine four five whether you travel for business vacations weekend breakaways, romantic interludes, or family adventures. You'll learn about unique destinations and tips to make your travel, smooth, efficient, hassle free, and inspirational when you listen to travel with Stephanie Abrams. Hi, this is Stephanie Abrams. Enjoy our fast paced show, traveling from beaches to mountaintops cities to fairy tale castles, whether you're traveling for business or adventure, so pack your bags and join us this alert just came in this special. Announcement is for business owners and leaders of organizations who've been waiting for the right time to build general steel has made it impossible to wait any longer with rock bottom prices that could save you thousands. That's right. General steel, America's leader in pre engineered structures is offering buildings at prices. You will never see again. Don't miss these prices. A fifty by one hundred for under thirty thousand dollars. You heard right. That's five thousand square feet under thirty thousand dollars manufacturers if you need larger building try one hundred by one hundred commercial building for one hundred twenty nine thousand you can't afford to rent with these prices. 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And if you owe more than twenty thousand dollars, you may be at the top of their hit list. So don't take your tax debt lightly because it will not go away on its own. The IRS can seize your Bank accounts, your home, and even shut down your business. Call our tax experts today at one eight hundred two eight five four seven six five and let us deal with the IRS while you focus on your business. That's one eight hundred two eight five four seven six five again, eight hundred two eight five four seven six five. Back folks. This is the Ray Lucia show, helping you to make better money moves. I've got a couple of emails after the comments that I made on bonds yesterday. According to Morningstar's taxable bonded tables. Seventy three percent of the funds that they follow. Are down this year. Ninety percent of Muniz of lost money, so far and a lot of people are freaking out. Minds were safe. Well, bonds are safe. You just have to understand them and understand the role that they play in your portfolio. I mean in an ideal world. You'd figure out how much money you want to spend from your portfolio each year and ladder out some reasonably safe bonds and every year when the bond matures. You'd have the money go spend it and everything's cool. But as we discussed the other day. Most small investors get hosed when they do that. Because of the bid ask spreads and so forth. And you never really know what you're getting until you got it. So hence the bond fund over the years has come to fruition. And for the most part, they're pretty efficient way to buy bonds. In particular, if you're reinvesting all of the dividends, and you have them there for some form of safety. It's not what I would recommend you do with one hundred percent of your fixed income portfolio. But the question I get more than any other one on bonds is why do bond funds lose money. When interest rates are going up. I'm buying them for safety of principle. Well, we haven't had the deal with that much over the past decade or so because interest rates really past thirty years or so because interest rates had been on the decline. So bonds didn't really lose. But so far this year. They're hitting the skids, pretty hard. Pretty hard. Two six percent, depending on what you own. So as I've mentioned many times before there's an inverse relationship between interest rates and bond prices. So as interest rates, go up the value goes down. Let me give you an obtuse example to make the point. Let's say you went to the Bank. And the Bank was paying five percent interest on a CD. So the bond that you went out and searched for at least earn the same five percent or the person go to the Bank. So let's say you decide to put a grand thousand bucks in a bond that pays five percent. So now, you're getting the same interest from the bond as you're getting in the Bank. Now, what would happen to your bond? If the Bank happened to raise interest rates from five percent to say ten percent. You already bought the bond. So you're sitting there earning five percent. But you know, you can walk across the street and get ten percent. In a CD. So if you wanted to sell the bond. Paid five percent you'd have to reduce your price. Because anybody that would buy that bond from you would obviously prefer to go to the Bank and get ten percent rather than paying you par value for the bond and earn five. So the bond that you originally bought for a thousand dollars that pays you fifty bucks a year in interest. Would have to be reduced in price to five hundred dollars. Because a ten percent interest rate on five hundred bucks produces a fifty dollar per year interest payment. So therefore, you would have to reduce the value of your bond by fifty percent. That's what happens in the bond market. Now interest rate Dongo from five to ten percent. But I think you get the point. Now the Federal Reserve. Held interest rates at near zero for almost eight years. So we have not experienced this kind of dilemma with bonds and bond funds in the recent past and with interest rates rising bonds tend to look more attractive from a yield standpoint. But if they continue to rise, the total return may not be nearly as attractive. We've talked about alternatives. Many many times before. One alternative is to hire a bond manager that can go anywhere. Remember, I said before that high yields we're actually up so far this year not much but nonetheless up long bonds were down substantially. And most financial planners. Not me. Recommend allocating forty percent bonds. I didn't do it. When I was practicing and interest rates are on the decline and bonds were great performers. Because I always knew that at some point interest rates would change and people wouldn't understand why the safety portion of their portfolio was losing money. That is not to say, I wouldn't have some money allocated demands are just wouldn't do almost fifty percent of the portfolio. Especially when I can find alternatives like fixed annuities and fixed indexed annuities that produce returns that are very similar if not better. Especially when the stock market's doing well, but I wouldn't abandon them. But some people think well, wait a minute. Maybe my bond fund manager is asleep at the switch here. So maybe they are. But the problem with some bond fund managers is. What they're hired to do is by let's say government bonds. It's the government bond fund. So they can't switch to high yield. Because that's not doesn't have the same risk profile. So many times even if the manager frankly wants to go to cash or do something else. They don't want to let let the cat out of the bag here. They're in the business of managing money Abban managers in the business of managing money. Just like a stock managers in the business of managing money. And they don't want to not buy government bonds if their strategy is to buy government bonds, even when they perhaps think the buying government bonds not so hot. So rather than by a single purpose bond fund. You can buy a bond fund where you trust that the money manager will try to go to the right place to find the right bonds. I'm not suggesting they'll do better or worse. I'm just suggesting that they have more flexibility. I mentioned other alternatives fixed index the newest he's why are interest rates going up interest rates are going up because there's a fear of inflation not necessarily inflation. But a fear of inflation. And the unemployment rate is going down and wages are going up. And that bodes well for stocks. It does bode well for stocks. So if you have interest in a quote bond like an annuity, and the interest was calculated based on how well the standard and Poor's five hundred or some other stock index did. And there was no possibility of a loss. Why wouldn't you take some of the bond portfolio and put it there? I don't know it makes sense to me. Hi, did it to the tune of millions and millions of dollars for clients back in the day. And they never got angry because they never lost money. Now, they didn't make much either. There are making fourteen percent. When interest rates went down two hundred basis points on their bond fund, but they didn't lose six percent on a long year long bond year to date, and if you looked at the performance over a five six seven years, and in fact, there's academic studies on all this stuff. You'd find that their performance has been very competitive with bonds, and in some instances even competitive with stocks, although I would never ever buy. It has a stock market alternative. But if you want something that's safe, then has an underlying guarantees. You can also slip in one of those guaranteed income benefits. If you prefer that. And they're priced earn three to five percents. Don't let anybody give you any Gulf about eight nine percent. That's bogus information. They're price earned three to five percent. Just like bonds only, they have no downside risk. And bonds today with interest rates going up, certainly do have downside risks. Don't eliminate all the bonds because of interest rates come down. You'll do very well in a bond fund. A rising interest rate environment. Not so much emails next right here in the. He like business content. I mean, if he did like business, you wouldn't be listening to this show. Right. What if I can give you even more of what you like we've never met. But I'm willing to bet you are very busy between your work, family and outside. This little car ride is your time to catch up on your favorite show. But you always get to tune in. Exactly. Now, there's a business club with you in mind. This is the place for business videos on demand. We have partnered with this show to provide you more of the content. You like the best part? It's all on demand. That means you log it anytime from any device and watched shows the answer all of your business questions. For a limited time, you can try it for free for thirty days. Simply go the biz dot com, promo code radio, VOD dot com, promo code radio. It may have been a messy divorce that suddenly cut your income in half. But not your bills. It might have been an injury or illness or your boss, just cutting back your hours. It doesn't really matter. How you got in over your head? It only matters that you are and that we're here to help. If you've got over ten thousand dollars in credit card debt, and you can't ever see breaking free call action debt and do it now being in over your head is a vicious cycle one day late. They charge you a leap. Miss a payment w rate. You just don't think of fair and neither do we. 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It didn't get to everything. I wanted to get to today, but I do get to a couple of emails here. We'll start with Allen. Alan. Says right loved the show. I'm self employed. It looks like I'll have about fifty K leftover this year. How can I say some taxes? I take eight K per month out as income, pardon me. Well, self-employed probably means you are unincorporated. I might be thinking about a corporation. Probably not for this year. All though depends on how much money you're gonna earn between now and the end of the year. Because what you may be able to do. Is incorporate? As of mid November or something like that. And then not take any income out of the company until after the first of the year that way any money that you would earn the balance of this year, the corporation would earn and not you wouldn't show up on your tax return until next year. And you'd be able to do something. That could shelter that money between now and then. So really? That that tactic. It's probably something you'd wanna do for sure. Next year. This year and talk to your advisers. It may or may not work. Now, if you are self employed, and you have kids under the age of eighteen I've talked about this before. But we now and the end of the year is Christmas break there's thanksgiving. There's a lot of time those kids could work for you. You can

United States Jeremy Grantham Piper Jaffray Ray Lucia Bank America Wayne Allyn CNN President Trump IRS SNP Viagra Donald Trump White House Medicare New York
"audio engineering" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

Hollywood Handbook

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

"What is. On his couch staring straight ahead. Dude, no fun. With just like a half smile on his face. Empty space, master's diploma size space on his wall. Just imagining. Drift away and be masters cabin for a little bit. What do you want a master's in? Like? I think English. I don't know. Yeah. Maybe audio engineering. That'd be cool. He's playing out a conversation. He's having a barista, whatever. Sorry. I know I already asked for your name, but do you have a masters. No need to apologize. Miss. Yes, I do. That's such a treat for you. So. So I'm sorry, I stepped on the answer. You were gonna get an English masters? Yeah, English or screenwriting audio engineering. All sound like cool. Masters. Oh, yeah. And the fund would come wild doing it or or you said it would be fun? Once I have. Would your life be like if you were like, fuck at mass? Does. I think maybe the probably the same, but like I'm a little older and I have, I have a mass, maybe..

"audio engineering" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

15:03 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Allan Parsons is an English audio engineer songwriter musician and record producer. He was involved with the production of several landmark albums, including the Beatles Abbey Road and let it be any art rock band Ambrosia debut album Ambrosia as well as pink Floyd's the dark side of the moon for which Pink Floyd credit him as an important contributor Parsons own group, the Alan Parsons project as well as his subsequent solo recordings. Have also been hugely successful commercially. He plans to make a new album in two thousand nineteen called the secret. Allan Parsons, welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Terrific. Thank you hard to believe. I was just thinking I in the sky that album came out thirty six years ago and the reissue box set has just been nominated by the progressive music awards in two thousand eighteen for best reissue. Did you have a sense way back then that that song was really going to put you over the top? Or did it success? Take you by surprise. In fact, at the time that we were recording it back in. I think it was done too late to. I was ready to drop the song. Lucky? I don't like this. Let's move on Sunday. And of course, today period, Wolfson and the band played on it. Have never allowed me forget that. Why didn't you think it was working? What was it about the trouble? There. There are a million ways of interpreting a song. And you can do it five into slow. You can do you can do you can put a banjo on it which put the. I just didn't feel it was working. And it was only when we go that chugging. That that I kind of show. Yeah. This is gonna what no. Until that point. I really was ready to drop it fascinating. The Alan Parsons live project. You have you have dates coming up this fall in Texas. You'll be in Minnesota you'll be in Akron, Ohio touring in Europe this summer. I think the last time we spoke you were off to Poland. Now, if memory serves the Alan Parsons project, I mean, you didn't tour previously. I mean, you released an album, you're kind of a studio a group was performing live something you always imagined. You would enjoy doing some day. Coming from a producer sound sound engineer background. And that why the decision to start performing live. My previous experiences. Saying lives had been in a church hole in the in the home counties somewhere in the south of England. Berry berry hits shadows hits you know, as a rhythm guitar. I am I enjoyed it. But I didn't think I'd be doing it again twenty years later. I see. It's not it's not that. It's not that long. She did it. And anybody that tells you that? Standing in front of the stage. No matter how. Standing on a stage. Should I say with an audience of you being worshiped anybody that tells you that that that is not a fun occupation is lying to you? Is this something that you've discovered that? I mean, is it like a different muscle that you that you have to sort of exercise was it was did it take you awhile to get to get into that into that groove performing live. Well, like, I said I had limited experience of metro. Playing playing in front of a you know, a touch hole loden folk songs in a in a cafe or about somewhere. That was something. I always did. But yeah, yeah. It was it was a jump up jump up the ladder to. To to offer us tour, which which in Germany in the mid nineties. It was. Yeah. It was it was it was a challenge. But it was a challenge. I accepted with. With interest. I'm pleased to say thank thank goodness. The we we did that show in Hamburg. I think. Back in ninety five and we played that song in the audience applauded God. Thank goodness. And like this stuff. Indeed, they do. Indeed. Indeed, we do one of the interesting aspects of the Alan Parsons project was the fact that you you featured so many different vocalists are the late Chris rainbow and Colin blunt stone of zombies one of my favorites. Did you compose songs with specific vocalists in mind, or was it just kind of a happy accident that it all came together? So beautifully. So lucky that if if we we were quoted, in fact, we had nobody particularly mind other than the voice that we would hear him during the recording of the track which we Wilson. Coming along to to finish lyrics, and we would. Then analyzed can say, well, wouldn't it be nice? The voice to deal with that kind of goes to then we would we would think of the people. We we knew the people we were in touch with Colin Branston, thankfully, we've Lonzo John miles is one of the rainbow who finally passed away. Allen clock is only only people who I had had previous contact with literally through my job as an engineer at Abbey Road. These guys would would be contacted. Maybe we'll how do you? How do you feel about taking on an alum? Album. Thankfully, they said. Wouldn't accept that my selects Cullen on an island and. And didn't didn't say oh, goodness. This album doesn't make it. My career is not a pet does not depend on upon it. But yeah, I think in in old cases, they add that the profile was in hung by performing on Allen possibly was there ever time when it didn't work. I would I would never I would never tell you about that. In public. All right fair enough. That was the ramification where it didn't work. And we had to say that. Sorry, sorry. Mr. Oh, this is this is X. Not looking where we've got to. We're going to have to find somebody else. But I think you don't ever having one. That's a pretty good ratio. And I would not dream of cutting. And I wouldn't press further. We were talking about performing you performed recently at the burning man festival in the black rock desert in Nevada. And this year's theme was I robot. Of course, you've been performing that album live with a Symphony Orchestra. That and that album was released I think over forty years ago yet still so timely with all of this talk these days of artificial intelligence much of it is rather gloomy. This sort of foreshadowing about the arrival of AI, do you have any thoughts about about artificial intelligence? Um? I'm very intrigued by. The. Fine. We read about every day. I mean, we do get a magazine called wide way. Yes. Oh, yes. I know this because worldwide I for some reason I had it in my mind that this was coast to coast in Australia. Pass to Sydney. I'm sure they're picking up there. I'm sure he goes beyond that. But yes, I mean robots. What's the word? I can't figure out what the signs of adopting human human intelligence to two machines trans humanism. Close. Come up with it in the next five minutes and you're allowed to question. I should suddenly say, it's. Oh, you're wake up in a cold sweat at three o'clock in the morning. Hey, it's pretty late. Now, isn't it? Indeed. Yes. That's why I was about to congratulate on the radio on the halfway through its weekend. Already. Let's go back to the beginning in hundred ninety six with Alan Parsons project and. Obviously tales of mystery and imagination. Inspired by growl. And who was who is the big out? Edgar Allan Poe fan was was it. You was at Wolfson was at both of you. In the I I was. But I was I was mesmerized by by post toys. I I love to report and his. As I'm sure it's been. Documented over and over again. The vocabulary. I'm supposed. He would find what he would find was to use. No, no other rights in of found it useful. He was incredible. And. Pethick medium to read on on a kindle because you every time you come an interesting word or a strange. You can look it up. Right. Do you have a favorite of poll poem or story? My favorite is opponent quote to one in paradise and we actually named song Inc. A few lines from the punt into song. Yeah. It's only my although it's it's actually in a way somewhat romantic and non non pulling away. Somewhat. Somewhat beautiful and poetic which. I'm not sure shows I was strong point strong point. Was to to shock and to. Two. What's the word? Tonight. That's all right. That's all right. Is there anything that? You've always wondered about Edgar Allan Poe. The maybe you could give me a question because I have a guest in the second hour, professor English emeritus, Kevin Hayes talking about poem. I wanted to ask them about sort of the strange circumstances surrounding his death. But is there anything? That's you've always wondered about po- that I could write down and ask him. Yeah. What what what what were you doing that dunk night when you were lying in Augusta? And. Life. What? Right. What a horrible way to go. And what forty or in his forties? Yes. Yes. Absolutely. When when that album tales of mystery and imagination was reissued. I think in around sometime in mid to late eighties Orson Welles. Did the narration on a dream within a dream? What was it like working with Orson Welles? The thing is that the the script was compiled by a couple of guys at twenty cents. Hollywood. Label consensual echoes. And. We. One of these X is made a deal with with those Mago his management to to read the script. And then to to be part of this. The promotion for for. Possibly project tells mystery and imagination. And the next thing we knew was a tape on a little three inch practically all alive in the office. He was even certified mail, let alone thankful ups, and we we just stuck it on a machine and played it, and it was mesmerizing. And. The thing is we were ready to arrange obsession with Mr. wells and. You know, go through experience and record it, but he just sent the tape. And it was unbelievably. Unbelievably perfect in every way, and. The has the biggest revenge tool. This is that I never actually met him. Oh, dear listen. We'll take a timeout. Allen stay with us. We'll come back and talk some more your new recording studio, your new project the secret we'll find out how much of it is a secret how much you can divulge to us. And here is the effort mentioned Alan Parsons project, taking us into the break with time on coast to coast AM, stay with us..

Alan Parsons Allan Parsons engineer Edgar Allan Poe Allen Wolfson producer Parsons Colin Branston Orson Welles Ambrosia Poland Texas Pink Floyd Hamburg Germany Abbey Road
"audio engineering" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

14:35 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on KTRH

"Allan Parsons is an English audio engineer songwriter musician and record producer. He was involved with the production of several landmark albums, including the Beatles Abbey Road and let it be any art rock band Ambrosia debut album Ambrosia as well as pink Floyd's the dark side of the moon for which Pink Floyd credit him as an important contributor Parsons own group, the Alan Parsons project as well as his subsequent solo recordings. Have also been hugely successful commercially. He plans to make a new album in two thousand nineteen called the secret. Allan Parsons, welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Richard terrific. Thank you hard to believe. I was just thinking I in the sky that album came out thirty six years ago. And the reissue box set has just been nominated by the progressive music awards in two thousand eighteen for best reissue. Did you have a sense way back then that that song was really going to put you over the top or or did it success? Take you by surprise. In fact, at the time that we were recording it back in. Two. I was ready to drop the song. This isn't working. I don't like this. The song. Let's move on Sunday. And of course, the night walks in and the band played on it. Have never allowed me forget that. Why didn't you think it was working? What was it about? The. There. There are a million ways of interpreting a song. And you can do it slow. You can do you can do. You can put a banjo on it which puts a. I just didn't feel you know. It was working. And it was only when we go that chugging. Feel on it. I kind of. Oh, yeah. This is gonna what? Till that point. I really was ready to drop it fascinating the Allan Parsons live project. You have your updates coming up? This fall in Texas. You'll be Minnesota. You'll be in Akron, Ohio, you're touring in Europe this summer. I think the last time we spoke you were off to Poland. Now, if memory serves the Alan Parsons project, I mean, you didn't tour previously. I mean, you released an album, you're kind of a studio a group was performing live something you always imagined. You would enjoy doing some day. Coming from a producer sound sound engineer background. And that why the decision to start performing live. My previous experiences saying live had been in a church hole in the in the home counties somewhere. In the south of England. Cleancut berry berry who shadows. As a rhythm guitar. I am I enjoyed it. But I didn't think I'd be doing it again twenty years later. It's not it's not that. It's not that long. That she did it. Anybody that tells you that? Standing in front of the stage. No matter how. Standing on a stage. Should I say with an audience of you being worshiped, you know, anybody that tells you that that that is not a fun occupation is lying to you? Is this something that you've discovered that? I mean, is it like a different muscle that you that you have to sort of exercise was it was did it take you awhile to get to get into that into that groove performing live. Like, I said, I I had limited experience of. Playing playing in kind of a you know, a touch hole loaded. Oh. People songs in a in a cafe or about somewhere. That was something. I always did. But yeah, yeah. It was it was a jump up jump up the ladder to to drop us tour, which which happened to be in Germany in the mid nineties. It was it was it was it was a challenge. But it was a challenge accepted with. With interest. And. I'm pleased to say thank thank goodness is the we we did off the show in Hamburg. I say back in ninety nine five and we played the song in the ordinance approach. Oh god. Thank goodness. And like this style. Indeed, they do. Indeed. Indeed. Indeed, we do one of the interesting aspects of the Alan Parsons project was the fact that you featured so many different vocalists are the late Chris rainbow and Colin blunt stone of of the zombies one of my favorites. Did you compose songs with specific vocalists in mind, or was it just kind of a happy accident that it all came together? So beautifully. So lucky that if if we we recorded in fact, we had nobody. Mind other than the voice that we would hear during the recording of the track which would be air Wilson. Coming along to to finish. And we would. Then analyze decide to say. Well, wouldn't it be nice? Then we would we would think of the people. We we knew the people we were in touch with Colombian, thankfully, was one of those John mouth is one of the rainbow who passed away. Allen clock is only only people who I had had previous contact with literally to my job as an engineer at abbey run. These guys would would would be contacted say, well, how do you how do you feel about seeing on an alum posses album? Thankfully, they said. When when except that, you know. Call in an island. And and so and didn't didn't they own. Goodness album doesn't make it my career. Does not depend dependent upon it. But yeah. And I think an old cases they add that the profile. In by. Was there ever a time when it didn't work? I would I would never I would never tell you about that. In public. All right fair enough. That was the ramification where it didn't work and we had to say sorry. Sorry mR is ex. You know, this is not looking where we've got to. We're going to have to find somebody else. I think it on the other having one. That's a pretty good ratio. And I would not dream cutting into that one. And I wouldn't press further. We were talking about performing you performed recently at the burning man festival in the black rock desert in Nevada. And this year's theme was I robot. Of course, you've been performing that album live with a Symphony Orchestra. That and that album was released over forty years ago, yet still so timely with all of this talk these days of artificial intelligence much of it is rather gloomy this. This is sort of foreshadowing about the arrival of I do you have any thoughts about about artificial intelligence. Suddenly, I mean, I'm very intrigued by the. Two. That we read about every day. Anyway. The magazine called wide way. Yes. Oh, yes. I know this goes worldwide for some reason, I had it in my mind that this coast to coast in Australia. To sydney. I'm sure they're picking us up. I'm sure it goes beyond that. But yes, I mean robots. You know, what's the word? I confident what? Of of of adopting human human intelligence to two machines, trans humanism. Close. Michael come up within the next five minutes and you're allowed to question. I should suddenly. Oh, you'll wake up in a cold sweat at three o'clock in the morning. Hey, it's pretty late now. Indeed. Yes. That's why I was about to congratulate on the on the halfway through its weekend already. Let's go back to to the beginning in one thousand nine hundred ninety six with the Alan Parsons project and. Obviously tales of mystery and imagination inspired by Edgar Allan Poe. Who was who is the big out? Edgar Allan Poe fan was was it. You was at Eric Wolfson was at both of you. I bet. I know monthly Riga advocate. But I was I was mesmerized by by coach stories. I I love to report and his. As I'm sure it's been. Documented over and over again. The vocabulary background PO was. Unsurpassed? He he would find would he would find was to us. No, no other rights in history of founded a youthful youthful. Four. He was incredible. And. Perfect medium to read on on a kindle because you every time you come an interesting word or strange way. You can look it up. Right. You have a favorite of pope, home or or story. My favorite is upon quote to one in paradise. And we we actually named song. Incorporated a few lines from the song. And it's always been my, although it's it's actually in a way somewhat romantic and non non away. Somewhat. Somewhat beautiful and poetic which. I wasn't that. Sure. Shows obviously strong point strong point. Two two. What's the word? I'm I'm sorry. That's all right. That's all right. Is there anything that? You've always wondered about Edgar Allan Poe. Maybe you could give me a question because I have a guest in the second hour, professor English emeritus, Kevin Hayes talking about poem. I wanted to ask them about sort of the strange circumstances surrounding his death. But is there anything? That's you've always wondered about po- that I could write down and ask him. What what were you doing that dunk night when you were lying in Augusta? And. Life. I mean. What? Right. What a horrible way to go. Indeed and only forty or in his forties. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. When when that album tales of mystery and imagination was reissued. I think in around sometime in the mid to late eighties. Orson Welles did the narration on a dream within a dream. What was it like working with Orson Welles? The private time. Is that the script? Compiled by a couple of times at twentieth century. Hollywood. Label essential records. And. We. One of these X is made a deal with with those wild or his management to to re- descript and then to to be part of this. Promotion for for. Puffy project towns, you might say. And the next thing we knew was a tape on a little three inch arrived in the office. Does he was even define mile? Let land that day for ups, and we just stuck it on a machine and played it, and it was. Mesmerizing? And the sad thing is we were ready to arrange a session with Mr. wells and. You know, go through the script and recorded, but he sent to tape and it was unbelievably unbelievably perfect.

Alan Parsons Allan Parsons Edgar Allan Poe engineer producer Orson Welles Parsons Richard terrific Ambrosia Poland Pink Floyd Texas Hamburg Akron Germany Europe Eric Wolfson
Howard Gray talks to Airbnb's Head of Music, James Beshara

Tickets

00:11 sec | 2 years ago

Howard Gray talks to Airbnb's Head of Music, James Beshara

"Excited have you on the show we've spent a crazy amount of time with audio engineering problems and trying to figure out quicktime

Howard
"audio engineering" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"Sure audio engineer listeners hit us of any professional audio engineers thank you quickly before you get started i had to make amends on something last weekend r b p eight teens famous people we want to fight i confused jake paul and logan paul their brothers in their both uh youtube scum now i want to be clear about something i would fight either paul brother without hesitation or both of them at the same time regardless of whether or not that means getting my ass beat it would be worth it just to get a few shots in but i do apologise for the confusion and again to be clear both paul's can catch these pause if you will so there's there's equal hatred for either them i don't i don't really care but yeah i called in the wrong name the entire show let's get into it support our bp by checking out man outfitters dot com the premium online men's where destination we created here a grand ex offering only the best products from the best brands to make sure you look fly all the time you can use the code eat fresh one word eat fresh at checkout type it into the little code boxing get 15 percent off your entire order of over a hundred and fifty dollars including free shipping we have massive sales going on right now were a ton of great brands are fifty to seventy percent off to clear out all the winter stuff like patagonia travis matthew true grid under armor mizzen in maine ruka and more the north face and north face fifty to seventy percent off minutes a big that's a lot it's most of the money off so hitman outfitters dot com gear up for spring and summer grabs some other you know discounted winner gear use that code eat fresh at checkout and save big bucks just for listening dr b p that's our way of giving back to you we appreciate.

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"audio engineering" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"On my youtube channel you to dot com ford sasha rich role if you wanted to sit in your home and watching on television we have now made that available for you if you would like to support my work the best way to do that is to subscribe to the show on apple podcast that really does help with the programmes visibility it helps extent reach it helps grow the audience which in turn makes it easier for me to book a very best people for future shows but you can also to share it with your friends on social media you can leave a review on apple podcast you can subscribe to my youtube channel we also the patriarch set up for people who would like to contribute to my work financially i'm going to be doing a live video asked me anything may for all of my patriotic supporters in the coming month i haven't scheduled the exact date for that yet but that's coming soon and i will keep you guys posted exclusive content for people that support me on page ron you can follow me on twitter and on instagram at rich role and what else do i want to tell you i think that's pretty much it aside from thanking everybody who helped put on today's program jason kam yellow of course for audio engineering for production for inter still music for help with the show notes jason is like a an ace of all trades he's really helping me out in many different ways sean patterson for help on graphics michael gibson for filming today's podcast and editing at michael's new on the team is doing a great job thank you michael for that and theme music as always by allen thanks of love you guys so excited to be in two thousand eighteen can't wait to see what this year is going to present for all of us the challenges the beauty the successes the obstacles all of it embrace all of it you guys and i'll see you back here soon piece plants novelist.

social media ron twitter apple youtube jason kam sean patterson michael gibson allen
"audio engineering" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The greatest and you might be thinking i know come on a buddy i mean you can't really have the greatest anything it's all a matter of opinion but if you're going to lease categorize it in the world of something being the greatest is it about the lyrics is about the melody's is the stories behind the songs there's a lot of people out there who think that princes greatest album is one called sign of the times and there's no shortage of stories to go along with that record susan rogers is the person to take you behind the scenes of making that record sign of the times she was princes audio engineer back in the 80s which basically means she was in the studio with the man himself day in and day out you might even hurt her talk about her time with prince hair on the show last week what she sat in this is my favorite thing she said she said we look at like one it was michael jackson versus prince back then ramp but it was michael jackson and his team of dozens of people versus prints who was really just by himself sign of the times turned thirty this year so we asked susan rogers to give you a guided tour exclusively through this record take a lesson the let's set the stage for this album in 1980 six when it was recorded prince had finished the are under the cherry moon movie and and parade album but his life was going through some changes windy and lisa his long time collaborators were parting ways and shortly after that princes fiancee susannah melvoin wendy melvoin twin sister left also oh so prince was in kind of the dark time in his life and princes reflecting not just on his own personal life but he's reflecting on the world in general and the first song i want to talk about is the lead single in the title track sign of the times fred cuny man of the big disease within bayne spot chances girls came across the needle densely thing and all their seventy four five d is beer and.

susan rogers engineer michael jackson fred cuny bayne
"audio engineering" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Hey everybody it's teagle's era colors of power powers power everybody it's tiainen sara and you are listening to cuba with no power gucci mane that killed by fan and just me lacquer and very best fred question for you what does it take for an album to be called the greatest and you might be thinking i know come on a buddy i mean you can't really have a greatest anything it's all matter of opinion but if you're going to lease categorize it in the world of something being the greatest is it about the lyrics is it about the melody's is the stories behind the songs there's a lot of people out there who think that princes greatest album is one called sign of the times and there's no shortage of stories to go along with that record susan rogers is the person to take you behind the scenes of making that record sign that the times she was princes audio engineer back in the 80s would basically mean she was in the studio with the man himself day in and day out you might even heard her talk about her time with prince here on the show last week what she said in this this is my favorite thing she said she said we look at like when it was michael jackson versus prince back that ramp but it was michael jackson and his team of dozens of people burst is prince who was really just by himself sign of the times turned thirty this year so we asked susan rogers to give you a guided tour exclusively through this record take a lesson.

susan rogers engineer prince michael jackson cuba
"audio engineering" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Only way that came about those the i went to school for audio engineering because the answer every question he had me how long up a rapid uh i was writing all my life and i was at school teacher was ramsey he was up him skis engineer before he died so you can't see things yeah give seeing all the genera is the randy weaver ramsey ran track you down your based in atlanta you can look it up and he uh he basically told me everything about recorded on i'm suddenly clear on the recording is near so but i've been writing normalized sense i'm o obviously oms is blessed but opportunity i know you didn't approve of the show and i appreciate respectfully 'cause i might have press so i was like either i'm gonna go into their rooms is going to continue you know stand behind the boards and you know don't when i do we know i appreciate you guys want to say thanks for all your input and everything is south dr my little girl my uh my little baby girl and joe looks good daddy loves you if you guys keep up the good work interest want to give lessons all you know all the world's cruciate you guys la la la hello a man who mad you from the forty four and called up you're in a while you're doing how's everything else each hasbro i'm and i'm just struggling this cautious filing for angela ye uh i got a news page on instagram they don't get it you know get it going i know being consistent as one but as in the other keys to help me get it get it get it noticed what is it hates amazon rex is reckless tv are easy k l easy easy tv ariana look more log wailua assesit until last year but that was a great pleasure for you right there okay thank you and you're going to those embark met just give me all the keys or whatever you think you need to do to improve okc have 33 posts up yeah i'm john opposed every day i'm trying to be consistent i'm john a you know give people a place to comment and you know kind of like academics kinda like the treaty room positive closed good morning post things like that okay all right i meticulous begerow okay thank you all right get it off your chest eight hundred five eight five 105 one of your upset and you.

school teacher engineer randy weaver ramsey atlanta wailua assesit okc joe hasbro amazon
"audio engineering" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

Breaking Math Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"audio engineering" Discussed on Breaking Math Podcast

"So well it's initial no one of his for the free transform a as far as i understand it it was sowing the heat equation on a ring now he equation backing up a little bit is a differential equation which is just an equation the describes rates of change and other relate to another the described how heat is transferred and if you have what is called periodic boundary condition which you have on a ring it gets a little more complicated and had an immense holt of him ever it dealing the ad not much to that makusa arm nana mechanical engineer heat transfer expert at all but it is interesting that something that was invented for one purpose you know heat transfer somebody could apply it to something like audio engineering or electrical engineering communications systems sickle processed and i would also like to talk a little bit about the uncertainty principle is inherent in the voyage as warm dealing does aim of that oh yes oh what's interesting with before you transform uh at least when it's implemented practically see the full transform and actually takes an infinitely long signal k and then it transforms it into frequency now in real life we can't record an infinitely long signal so when we take a fouryear transform we only take it over a certain amount of time now what's interesting about that is the moon the longer time we take that foyer transform over the more information we know about frequency the the higher resolution in frequency we have and so that's really cool using say oh that tone it's at exactly four forty point zero zero one five hurts something you know if you're getting into audio engineering kind of thing now.

uncertainty principle mechanical engineer fouryear