18 Burst results for "Audie Murphy"

"audie murphy" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Enforcement agencies shared information with U. S. Capitol police. And other state and local agencies. It will also examine whether there were any weaknesses in the protocols and policies that could have been hindered that could have handed law enforcement's ability to respond to the riot. Texas governor Greg Abbott is criticizing last week's attack on the U. S. Capitol. He spoken a meeting of the Texas Public Policy Foundation, saying he supports the right of peaceful protest is outlined in the Constitution but not the use of violence. He says no one should be above the law. In addition to your First Amendment right to protest, our founders also wanted to ensure that we were a nation. It was based upon the rule of law as opposed to the rule of man. He says. Violence and mayhem are not protected by the constitution. The covert 19 hospital numbers in Bear County could be turning a corner. Mayor Ron Nirenberg reported a decrease in hospitalizations tonight. We also have 1407 people in our local hospitals. That's down four. The mayor said The latest numbers are encouraging, but warned that the hospital system is still under severe stress. Metrohealth reported 1000 829 new Corona virus infections in Baker County yesterday. Meanwhile, people across the U. S or having a difficult time making appointments to get the covert vaccine. And that's true with the South Texas V, a medical center here in San Antonio. Look, I tried to call make an appointment advance. I am 70 or 75 or older, but I just couldn't get through CEO Christopher Sandals says veterans that don't fall into the priority group are also calling and that is overwhelming. The call center. Shots were delivered it Audie Murphy this past Saturday, the first attempt by House Republicans to force the state Legislature to take up legislation to abolish abortion has been stopped. Wook eyes Austin bureau chief Chris Box has more. It happened while the Texas House was passing their rules for the session. The proposed amendment to the resolution was authored by state representative Brian Slade, and it requires the body to debate and take a vote on abolishing abortion in the state of Texas, but for this body considers legislation that ring Names a bridge or a street. The author of the original resolution, Republican Todd Hunter, opposed the amendment. This.

Greg Abbott Texas Texas Public Policy Foundation Texas House U. S. Capitol Audie Murphy Todd Hunter Ron Nirenberg state representative Bear County San Antonio Metrohealth Brian Slade Baker County Christopher Sandals CEO Austin Legislature
"audie murphy" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"What of your last few episodes been about, for example. I'm finishing up a military history of World War one. But I've done a few that were covert related. This was a few months ago. One was historically what did people do during a lockdown because lockdowns have existed since time immemorial. Some people went hunting William Shakespeare and Isaac Newton composer. Great works. Isaac Newton invented calculus during the lockdown. All right, there's a Yeah, so he made good use of his time. There's a guy Well, there. That's debatable. Have you ever taken calculus? I did. Okay. Go ahead. What else? Yeah, I'm a failed engineer. So that's how I ended up where I am. So I tried but didn't go well. There's a guy named Giovanni. But Tokyo who? Boccaccio who wrote a work called that the camera on during the black plague, and it was a group of people basically spending the day telling stories to each other. S o. My family and I actually tried this out and my eight year old and six year old in three year olds. My wife and I, we would choose a topic in each of us had to tell a story about its. We tried to recreate this during the lockdown and Make the best of it because humans have dealt with these things before. So let's take a patron history and see if we can apply it to the 21st century. Well, Scott, you've got a great radio voice, which, of course, I want you to stay out of radio and stay in podcasting. But But tell me about the popularity of history Unplugged. S O. I've been surprised by it. It's about 15 million downloads. Today on episode will get about 30,000 listeners on its You know, radio, not his big that's kind of apples to oranges. And I always think to myself If I were teaching at the university, I would have probably 25 students in my class. Four of all of them, except for four wouldn't care because they'd be taking it as a requirement. Maybe three or four be interested, and then the rest will be plagiarizing papers off of Wikipedia. But this way I get to talk to thousands of people who are there voluntarily. S so I'm very grateful for that opportunity. Well, I am I'm astonished that the niche existed because there is a demand for good history. There is a demand for well delivery. I would be intimidated by the pronunciation issues. And people often hear me pronounce things. I just Rick. I'm very bad. Because if you are a learner by reading, you often don't know how to pronounce things. How do you get around that? You know here? I think we're simpatico is in that way, because a lot of the negative reviews I've gotten have been mispronunciation, especially foreign words. Now, if it's a Turkish word, which Turkish is my language specialty. I'm great. If it's a French word, I am a catastrophe I had, like, practically really recorded episode about Audie Murphy mentioning that ice Me River and France. Oh, no, my friend. It is Ein River and Well, that is what you know what No one reads World War history one history because they're afraid of the names. They're in French. So you just work with the How do I pronounce this app? Four vote dot com. It's a website where people native speaker will pronounce a word and I go there all the time. I still mispronounce things left and right. So it is. What is this? You know the content is wonderful History unplugged That is the podcast by Scott rank. It's my Christmas present to the audience When I'm away. You can't get you you it. Calm. Go to history on Pluck podcast. Com Scott rank. Merry Christmas to you..

Scott Isaac Newton William Shakespeare engineer Audie Murphy Boccaccio Giovanni Tokyo Ein River Rick French Me River France
"audie murphy" Discussed on Hellbound with Halos

Hellbound with Halos

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on Hellbound with Halos

"For sure so no rational Budnitz here. What makes him? Her. He's going back. Priscilla Moreau back building one more time. Building fall and it won't let come home baby tonight. Don't rational I mentioned. And nobody told him to go. People tried to stop him yet. The physically shrub people want to go back like a mother raising of building. To save a beloved child. Or hundred cops and firefighters died at nine eleven goal toward the danger. Thousands Runaway Wotton. How do you get someone down? You can't were people to die. What do you do generally if I don't do? Watching An order know when everybody's telling you to go. What we know. In nature the one place for the powerful natural instinct self-preservation. Is canceled out across different species. It, be seated, a Mama greater spitted. Different species of marketer will die for one thing what is? It in combat, we know three tour. Bunch of stranger frontlines together. They don't know anybody. They don't care about each other. As soon as darkness paper. They're out of their. Put together a band of brothers and sisters, men and women who know entrusted another fight long and hard. To each other. Audie Murphy's most decorated American soldier. World War Two. Audie Murphy has asked trump that why he did it. Is. Simple. They were killing my friends. All this research. Rumbled round one word love. The moment critter loves her babies more than life itself. Audie Murphy love to scuttle soldiers more than my. That suffered Christopher Burma Rosa. And all those other responders who went poured the danger of nine love. Love fellow citizens more than life itself. here's a crazy her. and. We've got our sheepdog children's booker sheep wool from the Sheep Children's book that really pretty powerful. It's just the sheep will die. They're productive ones in. Amman credible diaper baby! She won't die for notes babies. By the sheep will die, protect the ones that only the sheepdog. LOVES ENOUGH TO DOCTOR OTHER PEOPLE'S love. On gloves enough it I. Am we wrap it up saying. Sometimes the greatest love is not the sacrifice your lunch. But to live a life of sacrifice. And, not all called the and some tragic event, but we are all hall served. Sometimes the greatest loves not the sacrifice you love. But deliver left sacrifice. And do you.

Audie Murphy Sheep Children Priscilla Moreau Christopher Burma Rosa trump Amman
The End of the Paper Chart

2 Docs Talk

09:50 min | 2 years ago

The End of the Paper Chart

"So I a few definitions. You'll hear people using the terms. Electronic medical record and electric health record interchangeably. Heck I do that. But they're not exactly the same in. Mr Is a chart that is used within one specific clinic. It can't be accessed by anyone outside that clinic whereas an e HR electronic health record is usually system-wide or multi multi system wide providers from different clinics within the same health system or ACO can all access the record yes but for the purposes of this talk either Emr or E. H.. which are will do? I'm going to use 'em are okay me too now on when we say the. Mr We mean both Emr and EHR either one so moving on Comores are basically all the health records notes. Labs diagnostic studies insurance. People work demographic data for every patient and Mars have actually been around for decades in in fact the VA hospital system was one of the early adopters of Mars. Remember the Martha Audie Murphy and Mess Cooling. God that thing was the most user unfriendly no-frills eum are ever. Yeah but it was still pretty cool. I Love I would be taking care of a patient in San Antonio Audie Murphy and I could see what had happened to him when he was ed another. Va in the country. Green Flash Her sir okay to understand how cool that is. We have to talk about the battle days so back before. EMR's there were paper charts. It's yeah and they were often illegible. I mean doctors notes were hand written and most people's handwriting isn't what it should be and doctors have notoriously bad the handwriting. I don't I do. I still do horrible. Also data was often out of order. There were reams of unnecessary papers. Redundant paper someone else's papers burs and the chart and you can find charts when you need them. Someone else had them or they were just flat out. Lost or parts of the chart were lost. Yeah usually it was very important diagnostic success that was missing and also in residency. You could lose your privileges if you didn't dictate so you had to go through. I don't know if you had this. But we had to dictate the charts our own and are attending 's and they would our records of stack up down stairs in the basement and we'd have to go down there and get all these paper charts and dictate all this crap. It was horrible God too so awful. An on top of all of that hospitals and clinic seeded huge rooms to store these charts charts like the entire basement of a hospital medical records. Yeah so happily. Most of these problems disappeared with the arrival of electron ICK medical record. Right and wants wants. Things have been digitized. You can really do a lot of different things with them. You can actually find the data and read it for one. Yeah People's notes are now suddenly legible and charge. Don't get lost and the chart can be accessed remotely. You don't have to be in the radiology reading room to look at someone's x Ray for example you can which makes me a little sad but I always loved that and you can call it. Data and look at trends and that data can be sent electronically to and from other physicians clinics labs insurance companies anywhere. You needed to be sent as as as long as you will be patient privacy. Of course you should say that. Yeah anyway as with all technological advances there were a lot of promises in this case the promise was that. Mr would make make physicians better doctors. There'd be more accurate diagnoses. More timely therapies fewer mistakes streamlined billing practices and most importantly improved efficiency all this intimately physicians would have more time to spend with their patients exactly the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow more time with patients. and has this happened the the more time with patients part. I mean you know it. Hasn't there have been several studies showing that Dr Spent about twice as much time on the computer as they spend with their patient and tons of anecdotal evidence. Well Yeah Heck. I can confirm that just based on my own practice. And here's the thing. Physicians are spending more time on the computer when they're both with and away from their patients. Just look at what happened when my mom went to the pulmonologist so what is happening. Partly because of the increasingly complex regulatory environment in medicine Medicare Medicaid and insurance companies are demanding documentation for every bill submitted and the documentation must meet criteria. Set Out by Medicare Medicaid before or the physician will be reimbursed for their services so this documentation happens on. The computer is in submitted with the bill to the pair and the primary person. Who Does the documenting is? Is the physician right. Here's an example of typical day for a physician. Prior to seeing the patient will review the medical record mostly so they know what brings a patient in for the day the and also to remind them what meds the patient is on pertinent parts of the past medical history now then. The physician sits down with the patient in the exam. We're there as he gets another computer so while talking to the patient the physician enter data into the Mr about this current visit then after the visitors over the physician will finish documenting with the assessment and plan. Once the notice complete. The physician will then bill for the visit. Sometimes documenting takes so long. That notes aren't completed until the patients have been seen in. The clinic is closed for the day. That's also in. The physicians will correct any notes that need correctly so in my practice there is a person who was hired solely to review physicians knows and make sure her they meet Medicare criteria for the bill. They submitted at the notes. Don't meet criteria. They get sent back to the physician to cracked. And here's a very important point not all. EMR's ours are created equal Semimar. Great they're designed with doctors in mind the allow you to pull data Ford from previous notes. Limit the number of clicks needed to complete the relevant portions of the now they're customizable demise able in the end. Product is easy to read but most Mars have a primary function other than communication. And fortunately this is true. The primary function of many Mars uses billing. And when that's the case for the Mr for doctors will be inefficient and awkward US right. We can't customize it to our needs. We ended up doing a lot of data entry and the end product. Arctic is not something that's easy for other providers to read or understand so the physician spends more and more hours out of the working day with their face in front of a screen instead of making eye contact with her patience chance. Yeah so just a quick aside for second if there are any residents out there listening especially residents who are near the end of training interviewing for jobs. Make sure you talked to. Physicians is in the practice. You're considering and ask them about the Mar- they use exactly. Are they happy with it. Did they spend time at home documenting because they don't have time at work is is the MR efficient or awkward user friendly or the friend of the billing office if the docs you talk to your unhappy with their Mr. Then it's pretty likely you'll be too so move on so so I work with an Mr. Everyday I never look at a computer when I'm with a patient I don't have computers in the room and I don't bring my laptop into the room I had. I decided to make that time sacred without a computer to distract me. I can make eye contact with my patients Cedar subtle reactions to questions conversations. About feelings hopes expectations careers are more likely to come up although squishy subjective things. Your mom didn't get a chance to talk about exactly and I listened better my agenda doesn't dominate the visit. And I'm more likely to see the patient as a human being not a diagnosis our list of diagnoses. Some physicians might think you're no computer. Stance is a bit extreme. So be it. The time I spend with my patients is what makes my job worthwhile and meaningful and joyful and I suspect this is. This is the same for most physicians. Why would I want to compromise that the end result would be a miserable me an unhappy patient? But here's the thing you work in practice that allows you to do that. This is not a luxury Minna. Physicians can afford so what to do when the MR takes over your relationship with the patient first. We need to acknowledge that. This regulatory environment in which we practice is at the heart of the problem so we should all be you proactive about healthcare reform. Okay but short of ideology. What should doctors do? Well look at your Emr and see if it's the problem F it is lobby for a new EMR car or change practices if need be if you're Mars decent than there are a few things physician can do on a daily basis. That might improve things. Yeah so first position position computer in such a way that your back is not to. The patient also involve the the patient with a computer. Show them what you're looking at. Ask them to help update the record. Let them know what you're typing while you're doing it and make sure you spend time away from the keyboard during every visit for some doc sits at the beginning for some. It's in the middle. Whatever you feel comfortable with but at some point you should step away from the computer? Make eye contact with your patient so some practices have hired scribes to document for the physician. Yeah that's a luxury to adding additional staff as an expensive way to solve a problem. Yes it's true and it's kind of awkward to bring a third person into the examining room is so here's the thing. Technology Technology often promises to bring us together as human beings to give us more time to spend doing the things we love with the people. We love just look at the facebook motto. Bring the world closer together together. I thought it was making the world more open and connected or maybe move fast and break things. I think those are previous mottos but whatever my point is we don't always use use technology in a way that maximizes promise and the same is true for. EMR'S DO I want to go back to the paper charts absolutely not but neither do I wanna rule where I no longer remember my interactions with others because my head was buried in some form of technology. You know whether that's at home or at work amen to that so I suggest we take extreme steps to keep this from happening like keeping electronics out of the examining room or demanding a better. Mr Or as patients requesting that doctors move away from the screen. Yeah I think that's really good. Just interjecting here. Yeah as a patient. That's your time to. You can stand up for what you need in that moment with your doctor ask the doctor. Could we talk face to face for a moment if that's what you need and if a doctor has a problem with that you know maybe it's time look

EMR Mr Or Martha Audie Murphy VA ACO San Antonio Facebook United States EHR Comores Minna Medicare Dr Spent Arctic Ford
"audie murphy" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"It's funny when we listened to our cells telling our stories of how we try to avoid getting into the service and matter what we could do and I was talking to a a an anorak Afghanistan veteran and it was a female and she was telling me that she did everything possible to get into the service he says because they rejected her initially for some medical medical issues he said I went to a specialist and got a special letter and so on and so forth that I could get in the service and you guys are all talking about how you're trying to you know finagle a way out of it and I don't know if we were finagle in really I think we are just scared I mean this is something that was really the unknown and in a we did see all the movies without Audie Murphy and John Wayne and they never got hurt but or are they did they got up and they were in another film and you know we were reading the newspapers and as we were talking about near the history of the Vietnam War in many cases because all the people here tonight were involved at that time is that we started seeing it in the newspapers and on TV and so that started making it and I'll get a little bit closer to home and then maybe you heard about somebody from your local town that didn't make it and so forth what did get a little bit serious I think we are getting a little nervous about those things what transitioning gracefully here too who are willing yes for the night and this is a sandy Wilson sandy was retired from the army as a captain she was a nurse in Vietnam and she's got I think great story just as well to talk about how she got involved in the service so sandy Wilson come under the microphone.

Audie Murphy John Wayne Wilson sandy army Vietnam Afghanistan sandy Wilson
"audie murphy" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:35 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"AM six forty I heart radio station. The dark secret place in Houston here until eleven we were talking about Audie Murphy who this this week in nineteen forty five. This was the week that the the action that awarded him the medal of honor took place, but the the pre history up to that point is all the more remarkable. And almost as remarkable is that the horrible movie to Helen back. Starring Audie Murphy doesn't cover nearly half the stuff that that already. Murphy a went through string of going through continue listening to KFI for the latest for evacuations. To a river possibly over flood stage. We'll update you their second of three storm systems come through so Cal. So Audie Murphy is in in Morocco with the third infantry division. He is assigned because when against series a tiny guy, and they say, well, you're going to be a runner because of course in World War Two while radios were were down at the platoon and company level. It was much more reliable because air extremely short range. If you needed to get a message back to your battalion, the best thing to do was to get the smallest fastest guy because he's a small target and physically give him a message and tell him to get back to battalion with that message and come back with the answer. So he was a runner. The third infantry division was part of the invasion of Sicily and on ten July nineteen forty-three in the licotta, Sicily. Murphy had been assigned as a third infantry division division level runner. So he would be taking extremely important messages from the division headquarters down to different regiments in his case, see fifteenth infantry, regiment, he was the guy he was the conduit between his regimen and third infantry division during one of these runs he spotted two fleeing Italian officers near of Coty and he killed them and witness Assam kill him. And he killed them from a distance with his rifle, and that began the reputation of Audie Murphy that little Texan with that rifle of his so now fast forward to September of nineteen forty-three as the US and British forces invaded, the mainland of Italy this time at Salerno while on a scouting party along the Volturno river, Murphy and two other soldiers got ambushed German machine gunfire. Killed one of his comrades one soldier Murphy. And the. Other survivor responded by killing five Germans with hand grenades and machine gunfire. While taking part in the October allied assault on the Germans, what was called the Volturno line. Murphy this company repelled an attack by seven soldiers killing three and taking four prisoner. Murphy was promoted to sergeant on the thirteenth of December nineteen forty-three something consistent through his autobiography to Helen back. Is that Murphy even at some of the worst moments in hand to hand combat. Put the emphasis on taking prisoners and because it was inculcated into him. It was hammered home in the third infantry division that if you bring bring us back alive German, you're probably gonna save ten to twenty American lives. So Murphy took that to heart and one thing about his leadership style from squad leader platoon sergeant to later officer is that he emphasizes in whoever he's in command of the importance of taking prisoners period. And this is a feature throughout the the next year of the the intense ground combat that already Audie Murphy went through January nineteen forty four. He was promoted to staff sergeant he was hop- hospitalized in Naples with malaria, and we probably had malaria contracted malaria on Sicily. But it wasn't diagnosed until the winter of nineteen forty three. Forty four so January of nineteen forty four. He has diagnosed with malaria on twenty one January. He's unable to participate in the Anzio landing because he's in the hospital with malaria, he returns to his platoon on the twenty ninth of January and talk to any any bacteriologist. He's not cured of malaria yet. He's clearly still has malaria, but he goes back to his unit as a staff sergeant on twenty nine January nineteen forty four. He was made a platoon sergeant in the same unit company b the same unit. He came to back in July forty three he returned with the third if three division two and zero where they remained for months. Because that was a horrible operation, and they were stuck under German artillery fire for months and months and months on the second of March nine hundred forty four Murphy and his platoon killed the crew of a passing German tank. They actually pick them off with rifles. He crawled out alone close enough to destroy the tank he received the bronze star with the for valor device. He continued personally leading scouting patrols to take German prisoners before being hospitalized in thirteen March with malaria, so so it's it's late January. He goes into the hospital for malaria, January twenty ninth. He's out, but he's not cured of malaria. February goes by he still has malaria mid March thirteen March he goes back in the hospital with malaria. On the eighth of may his company were all awarded the combat infantryman badge. He was awarded. A bronze oak leaf cluster for his bronze star. Meaning he won a second bronze star. So now after the d day invasions in June of nineteen forty four. There were in August corresponding invasions in southern France. And Audie Murphy was part of those he received the distinguished service. Cross for action taken on the fifteen August on fifteen August of nineteen forty four. This is what happened. Again. Now, he's still platoon. Certain his platoon was making its way through a vineyard when the men were attacked by German soldiers. He retrieved a machine gun he returned fire, the Germans killing two and wounding one two Germans exited a house about one hundred yards away and appeared to surrender. This is one one of the corny scenes from the movie is absolutely true Murphy's best. Friend responded stood up to take their surrender the two Germans shot and killed him. Murphy went crazy. Remember backed with his temper problems. He advanced alone on the house under direct fire. He killed six Germans wounded two. And he took eleven prisoner. So he kills six walks back with eleven prisoners more on Audie Murphy, the untold story right after this. Again, he still has malaria, and he's fighting an infantry war back right after this. Let's catch up on latest from the storms.

Audie Murphy malaria third infantry division Sicily Helen Volturno river KFI Houston assault Salerno Naples US Italy Morocco Coty officer Assam France
"audie murphy" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Let's start talking about Audie Murphy. You I'm guessing by now. That many of you have seen the auto biographical movie to Helen back based on the nineteen forty nine memoir by Lieutenant Audie Murphy. America's most decorated soldier. And as you'll you'll hear in this montage from the movie of nineteen fifty five. Audie Murphy played himself. The the first guy you're gonna hear as chief of staff of the army in nineteen fifty-five endorsing the movie a little bit of Audie Murphy. And then you'll hear the rundown of everything he won if you've never seen the movie to Helen back. You know, what I gotta be honest with you. Until it's remade and done better. I would almost tell you to not see the movie problem is Audie Murphy plays. Audie murphy. And there's no denying that one of the one of the attractions of watching to Helen back is at Audie Murphy. Because the guy was so youthful looks exactly like Audie Murphy. Audie Murphy in one thousand nine hundred eighty five was twenty nine years old. And as you're about to hear what he won what he went through it World War Two the culmination of it was that he was awarded a battlefield commission in January of nineteen forty four and the action this week in nineteen forty five that led to him being awarded the medal of honor happened before he was nineteen years old. Here's here's a quick little montage of talent back. True story of the foot soldier esteemed through the eyes of one of them. Audie murphy. After we moved through the call mar area. We'll get things rolling. In the meantime, take a commission. Have I won't have to transfer on the ninth of August, nineteen.

Audie Murphy Helen chief of staff America twenty nine years nineteen years
"audie murphy" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Forty five a little more than three years after his enlistment and shortly after his nineteenth birthday. Lieutenant Audie Murphy at Boston seven major campaigns of World War Two. He had been awarded three purple hearts, LeBron's style. Metal metal with LeBron's service, Arrowhead, a legion of merit to silver star medals, the distinguished service cross and from the French government too crowded with palm and the legion of honor chevalier on this memorable day in his life. He was awarded his country's highest decoration looking rational medal of honor. Here was the deal and just to be quick and dirty about this. Audie Murphy was dirt poor one of the great things about the movie to hell and back is that Audie Murphy plays. Audie Murphy at the age of sixteen and then he plays. Audie Murphy at the age of seventeen eighteen and nineteen and he did this all when he was twenty nine. And if you see any of the pictures of Audie Murphy, you would not cast anybody. But Audie Leon Murphy to play. Audie Leon Murphy was he a good actor NATs. Hollywood seem to think so because he acted for the next twenty years until he was killed in nineteen seventy one in a accident as a passenger and a small private plane. This is what Wikipedia says about Audie Murphy's early life. It's funny because this is very much like my dad. My dad was born in the in the mid nineteen twenty s nineteen twenty four and my dad joined the navy at the age of seventeen underage as well. My dad is a very slight small guy. And so this this is my dad was born in Lhasa, Kansas, and you know, the United States was very poor in the thirties, especially in the dust belt. And that's where Audie Murphy came from. He was the seventh of twelve children born to Emmett berry, Murphy and his wife Josie bell Kellyanne in Kingston, Texas, Murphy's were sharecroppers of Irish descent, meaning they picked the cotton. But they gave most of the profits of the guy who owned the land, and they they were able to keep a little bit of what they picked. And that's what they lived on as a child. Murphy was a loner with mood swings. An explosive temper he grew up in Texas. Around farmers Ville, Greenville and Celeste or he attended elementary school is father drifted in and out of the family's life. And eventually deserted them, just like my grandfather did left my dad at the age of fourteen his father by just read that Murphy dropped out of school in the fifth grade and got a job picking cotton for a dollar a day. Which would be eighteen dollars in two thousand nineteen to help support his family. He also became skilled with a rifle hunting small game to help feed them. And as the movie shows he had the hit because he didn't have enough money from more munitions. So he had to become a good shot or else. They wouldn't need squirrel that night. I'm not making that up the movie shows a meeting squirrels after his mother died of Endo Carta Titus and pneumonia in nineteen.

Audie Leon Murphy LeBron Endo Carta Titus Texas chevalier Lhasa Boston United States Wikipedia Greenville Emmett berry Kansas Hollywood Josie bell Kellyanne Kingston Celeste eighteen dollars twenty years
"audie murphy" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"One of the best sergeants I ever ever worked with. He was with two nine in Marsha. He was probably five four and the is respected the baby would've followed him anywhere. Also reading we talked about last week reading about general Krulak who was sidefoot three. I think like like Marine Corps legend so shutouts in the show. Fill is out there. Lasts less fun fact about Audie Murphy though, he's buried in Arlington National Serra cemetery. He is the second most visited gravesite behind only president Kennedy. Wow, that's pretty cool. All right. Let's go to round number five. Number five. This one's kind of depressing one. The suicide rate is at an all time high. It's at a ten year high among active duty marines. So I think oftentimes we, you know, we're talking about Audie Murphy and people PTSD is always in the news. It's always something to talk about. And I was racking my brain trying to think suicide rate among active duty marines, and they said many most often they see it's it's people have not deployed, and I've been racking my brain trying to think of why this is thing happening and part of me thinks you think it might be because they look at people coming back from deployment in their frayed to ask for help. Because they feel like well, what would I need help for its these guys are coming back. I haven't gone yet. Like, I've just been racking my brain after reading this story trying to figure out how it's a really good question because I'm sitting here. Taking in. I really I can't come up with anything Nancy to that question. I can't imagine why guys who are not deploying who are just in the marines would have a reason to kill themselves. No, that's I mean to. But I think it's not that it's not that. They don't have a reason or something like that. But it's that they're afraid to seek help. They probably do. I obviously they have reasons, but I'm just saying like, I don't even know like why they wouldn't get help. But also, I think it's the culture of there's an inherent toughness. And I think that there's still this false perception that if you need to go get mental health treatment, it involves a weakness, and it's a little bit more understandable. I think in the culture of the Marine Corps, if you need help if you've been to combat you've been dangerous places not so much if you've been and it was people like me when I was that caused that kinda shit like whenever I would go. I remember very specifically. There was an air force person. Who? Who always had a deployment prior to mind with my counselor in my counselor one day told me he was like, yeah, it's different. Like, we have different people come in. He's like, obviously, you have issues that stem from combat, but I have other people like an air force. This rank add she comes in after she talks about how she had a stressful time on her trip to Chile with the band, and I was like chili like the country of Chile, and I remember going back to my unit in absolutely roasted this because they were in getting mental health treatment in they had only went to Chile, and I was like what the fuck this happened in Chile like why would you need this? I have no idea she was like sexually assaulted or raped or what could possibly happen to her. But I remember being a huge part of the culture that was a problem in. I would say that around junior marines of all things that I did as a leader those of the things that I wish I could take back the most. But I think all. Also, something doesn't have to happen to you for you to be experiencing, depression, suicidal thoughts. So I think a lot of times they feel like they need to have a reason to go or their shame to go. And I think you can still be a wonderful amazing marine army's soldier, sailor, whatever NB dealing with depression. I've been open about it. I suffered from depression, and I still function and I still get through, but I have to seek out for it in. That's just the way that it goes. But it is hard to take that first step in a specially when you're in like you're saying that it is so scary. Because can I read this really quick hill?.

Audie Murphy Chile Marine Corps depression Nancy Marsha Krulak Arlington National Serra cemet PTSD president Kennedy ten year one day
"audie murphy" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"He was young. He actually had his sister falsified documents. So he could join the army the marines trained him away. Because he was too young. I think he was only what sixteen or seventeen years old. He was to the army navy marines, alternate down. They said he was underage and underweight. So he will know the army did initially bound. Yes. And then he had a sister comeback with falsified documents. So that he could get into the fight during World War Two. And then he obviously after is his military career. He went on to have a very prestigious acting career even played himself in his own movie to hell and back and one thing that a lot of people probably don't know about Audie Murphy is it. He was one of the first people to speak out audibly about PTSD because he suffered from PTSD from insomnia. A one point he checked himself into a motel because he was tired of taking sleeping pills. He checked. Self into a motel and just went cold Turkey for a week and went through withdrawal SRA week in a motel by himself. But then as the Korean and Vietnam war veteran started to come back, and they were dealing with PTSD. He was one of the first ones to speak out and say, hey, this is a problem that our veterans are facing. And it's okay. And that was really one of the initial people who really kicked off that discussion. So he's really continue to serve us. Well after he was done fighting. And on that post that went kind of viral on Z people would comment underneath it. Like, we don't have people like this any more. Now. It's pussies go and get treatment and shit. Like that Audie Murphy was well on the record saying that he slept with a loaded handgun underneath this pillow. You've got addicted to sleeping pills and booze. He had money problems. All of those things are what they check off for PTSD. Like, if you're experiencing these things you most likely have PTSD, right? Have the most decorated soldier in the world in the United States military, at least talking about how terrible war was because we go through and we look at his uniform, whatever on that picture that cons posted. He looked bride bushy tailed with these piercing blue eyes Abuna form that he's so humble that when the lapel crosses over you can't even see the medal of honor ribbon on it barely. It's barely poking through like set every single valor award. That's possible. He had it on his. Chest. And when he goes through they had him on for Veterans Day show on an old army radio station to try to interview in. It's like us whenever we get somebody like a Kyle carpenter or flow of grow Burg or KOTA Meyer. When he eventually comes on. We talk about their accolades almost like it's like a football team. You know, it's like pumping up these things. So when he goes on this army show on veterans on Veterans Day, you think that he's going to talk about some of the great things about being a leader. How people look at him as one of the most Braith people ever to serve in the armed forces. That's not his reaction. Listen to his interview on this radio show for years. Now, Audie Murphy has been a well known motion picture star. But he is known also as the most decorated soldier of World War Two. What has stayed in his mind? What does he remember most about that time of his life to find out we go now to our man in Hollywood benched? Angelo, Carbone Davinci Dangelo on this Veterans Day. We've moved out. Armie our microphone to Hollywood California to talk to a man who has not only well known to the American public. But also highly respected by the military services is a major in the United States army reserve America's most decorated hero of World War Two is motion picture star. Audie murphy. Audie welcome to the army..

Audie Murphy PTSD army army navy marines sleeping pills United States army Kyle carpenter Carbone Davinci Dangelo marines United States Hollywood Turkey Angelo underweight California SRA KOTA Meyer
"audie murphy" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"So this story makes complete sense. I don't know. What what would you guys do if you find a great? I thought that. I mean at that point. What do you what are you gonna do with it? I guess maybe keep it as a souvenir. But there's no sense in calling the cops about it. It's not gonna explode. Well, you don't know you never know. I wrote a story the other week about a guy over in Sweden or something like that. He was taking his garden. He found it was bigger than a grenade, and he started to make a buzzing sound like there's something still functioning in it. No, he did it start to make a buzzing sound. Did this hold Swedish guy talking like the Swedish chef on the buffet? That could very well. But he covered it with his body until the cops came. Yeah. It'd be the Swedish Gardner Kyle carpenter. Like, I'm protecting my plants at all costs. So this is interesting because one question I had I looked at several news stories and they didn't answer. This for me is why would there be a World War Two Nayed in Florida, Bradley, somebody was out on a fishing boat. It was like I need to get rid of this bucket thing. Nobody's gonna go mega fishing someone to throw it. Yeah. Good or they were fishing with grenade. Some people do that grenade fishing, right? I mean, we're in oak, I've never experienced Okinawa. Obviously because I'm not in my fucking eighties four the battle of Okinawa. But there was a huge battle that took place on Okinawa. And we would do training in the jungles. We would constantly find old artillery shells that were unexploded ordinance in it was in the ass because God's would still alert on it. It'd be go. Throwing like, no, nothing's they're like, oh, wait. There was a big battle here. Let's check and you go over there need see like the butt end of their shell sticking out in just it never exploited. But it still has that smell to it. Pretty insane. Our next round is one of the he is the most decorated Terry person in the history of the United States. Con sells a little bit about Audie Murphy. Yes. So Audie Murphy over the weekend. It was the seventy fourth anniversary of when then second. Lieutenant Audie Murphy did what he ultimately received the medal of honor for and I won't read the full citation. If you have a second, you should read the full citation, but basically there was a American tank that was on fire from a German round. And Murphy climbed into the into the tank order all his men to go fall back and he got into the tank and started firing the fifty Cal from the tank that was still on fire while he was firing this round he fought the Germans by himself for an hour, an entire company size entire company side. He he killed or wounded fifty Germans and he's staying. Wound himself during the stand. But yeah, Audie Murphy for those who don't know on Murphy's pretty ridiculous. I mean, the guy he's received every notary combat award for valor, the vailable in the us army as well as French and Belgian awards he only this is the part that I actually did know until I started researching he only served active duty for three years, did you notice? Yeah. So in a matter of three years, he did all of that. I love that cons. This came up for me. I saw it making the rounds cause it was the seventy four th anniversary of his medal of honor started going on Twitter, and you did a good post on that really started going around somebody commented on that post you put up, and I thought that this is really cool not stir kata said most decorated voyeur in United States history was five five and weighed one hundred twelve pounds. Don't let anyone tell you. You're physical attributes a weakness there are more important attributes to have in life. This was the little guy. Yeah. And the other most impressive thing to me was not only he was a small fella..

Audie Murphy Gardner Kyle carpenter United States Okinawa Con Sweden Twitter Terry Florida Bradley three years one hundred twelve pounds fifty Cal
"audie murphy" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

The Final Furlong Podcast

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

"And it's going to be fascinating because this spring juvenile hurdle is become a really important form guide for the triumph for Cheltenham. So even if Sorek bolts up, you're still going to have a lot of people who go, well, I prefer faquir because he's been to Cheltenham and Domus. It's going to be fascinating. It really is. It's a it's a very very strong division for Joseph O'Brien, and we'll see how it all plays out with more to come with the weekend. And of course, we'll be discussing it at our Cheltenham festival preview nights for at the races live from the goat. More to be an an soon. Harry. Let's get your thoughts on old rival NICKY Henderson's Birkdale who was going to have a fight on his hands from Bruno a storm. I did see unsocial. There was a lot of people thinking that Murphy source who's going to win we talked about how all the regards this horse, very highly. But. Can you were more taken with Fergal O'Brien source, and he's put him away really release early Harry? What did you make of Birch tales away in irrespective of what was going to happen with Bruno a storm? Barry did say and he's in TV afterwards. The he thought he had an afford was going to was going to win anyway. But this was this was smart. It was the oversee to really nice most. It's just a shame wasn't it. Because it was about to be very informative race on a ended up ended up not so much that was oversee a real nice type. But it's very difficult to say because the most interesting Furlan was about to happen on it didn't happen. So while I'm sure that is a is a lovely horse it and some it's very difficult to judge them on that. Because we knew that he was quite small before. So it was it was a shame that Brunet pistol came dime. Just because as I say, it was a bite to it was about to come very informed. If was absolutely an we had some brilliant finishes at Cheltenham, we're about to have another one so ends up being a wide margin victory for for brookdale. What was your assessment of at camp? Did you think that it's it's almost a relevance in pointless to to try and some what? Would have happened. Barry thinks force in would have done. It think some from the Murphys stabled were saying they thought they were going to win. But it respective of Birkdale was a promising horse going into the race. And there's even more exciting now. Yeah. No can have even if prune up star had beaten Burke, stand say two lengths. It's there would have been a big step in the right direction for her style. Given his inexperience. Like on paper this race. It looked to see race on paper. But there is no pace. And it was a surprise to meet a brewing up the star went on. But I can understand why did is connections. Just wouldn't have wanted another crawl like they got in the shadow, and then he does ears pricked away is jumping was good onto the really matter typically enough, but it was really really was race on Birkdale would have convinced to with howling galloped off the handle. But that could easily if being just loneliness real hard, so inexperienced, I'm unicol. Anyone has made in hardwired Keno wandered look to make green. So I don't want to knock him to. I don't want to make a summer since based on that it could have been a very different story. If he if he had company up there, but I'm too lovely horses the tank fully Mercifully, I'm brewing up a storm was. Okay, A. Okay. Cement me. And Audie Murphy said today that he's going to go straight to Cheltenham, probably almost certainly for about him..

Barry Audie Murphy Birkdale Bruno Harry Joseph O'Brien Fergal O'Brien Sorek NICKY Henderson Furlan Domus Brunet Birch Burke
"audie murphy" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"All these dusty ass cracks racist garbage, dirty ass crap. Those are the heroes of the story at CNN. The black. Hebrew, Hebrew, Israelites. They're black nationalists. They're racists. And they're the heroes of the media's narrative because they just leave all that out. It's inconvenient to the telling of the story. And honestly, I talked about a Luke this morning. It's been how long now how long we've been paying attention to CNN ten years. And this is pretty consistent every day. They're just not in the journalism business. They're not legitimate news people, it's not a legitimate news organization. It is a cable station that spreads hate and division on behalf of the democrat party. And always always toes, the democrat party line with extremely rare exceptions Jake tapper over the weekend asked a legitimate question are two of Kirsten gillibrand didn't hold her feet to the fire, but she looked stupid nonetheless. Because they're always surprised Democrats when they got a straightforward question from a journalist a reporter and anchor they don't expect it they expect to be fluffed because that's what they're. This lunatic Nathan Phillips who has nobody's hero except the news media on the left on his victim. And he's the Vietnam war hero. Apparently, he's the Audie Murphy of Vietnam. He's talking to CNN and ask really pointed questions like we're you trying to calm the situation down. Basically when you saw kind of things seemed to spiral out of control first of all nice sentence. Nice cry and it's teeing up. The aren't you noble, and these horrible terrible white kids. And he said, oh, I think so now if they had looked at the tape they'd know that this is all a lie. But there are two dishonest too. Lazy too stupid to incompetent whatever their problem? Is there just a, you know, a friend of mine sent me a text about this on Sunday morning. I now it's my job. Unlike the people at CNN to find the truth. So I actually did something crazy. I I read about it. And then I found the long version of the video, and I watched it. Now, it's my job to do that. I would think that it would be your job if you worked at CNN too. But I would be wrong, Sarah, cider typed up this little piece for the democrat party. And what did the genius American hero? Nathan Phillips say in response to this. He said, I didn't feel I could just stand there anymore and not do something. It looked like these young men were going to attack these guys, meaning the racists, you know, the the black Hebrew Israelites just.

CNN Audie Murphy democrat party Nathan Phillips Kirsten gillibrand Jake tapper reporter Vietnam Sarah ten years
"audie murphy" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

The Final Furlong Podcast

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

"I think Ali Murphy has very very big opinions of ruin enough a store. He was good at Huntington like the shadow was a funny race. There were no guy left at the tapes went up there for about an hour before something that made the running and this fellow he was dropped into set. But he just didn't help himself. He was free enough and seemed to pay the price for late on. It's interesting that they're going back to the staying two and a half miles. And they clearly think the trip is fine. They're up blaming his stamina, I wouldn't take for that time. But he's going to have the settling give himself a chance. He's a winning point to pointer. He's actually bred by neighbor of mine, John Burke and his wife. Caroline, they bred. They bred western writer as well. And the very very very good National Hunt breeders, and I only had a drink with John over Christmas. And he was talking about this horse passing on I suppose, what's already in the public domain that Audie Murphy is very very sweet on him and thinks he's a proper proper horse. So for John I hope. Bounces back, and I'm belatedly bills, and that Hudson promise, but I would just for me would just be keeping a very close eye on how they set loose for you to make up my mind where he wants to go to and a half or could he benefits from potential potential drop in shirt because that's for me the jury's out on a now after two shallow. Okay. I'm gonna how strong strong. He was early and week. He was late. Hopefully, they go bit of a Gallup here. And find out what Brune up a storm. Both Jarvis place is this election like it. But we'll take you on the triumph. Fertile could have a bit of a market shakeup to winners of won this race. In the last ten years are the twelve forty triumph fertile trial juvenile hurdle. Obviously, there's Isaac Sweden somewhere near colder. It's towards the top of the market, but also still entered his chief Justice for Chieveley parking, Gordon Elliott, and I gave him a serious chance. And he's twelve to one. Surely, I happy running. I've heard I've heard that Gordon may not run out anything in this race. Okay. Don't hold me to both. That's hard. That's yesterday because the twelve to one would be bonkers if he did run. So Joe headed the betting Daryl Jacob onboard jolly. Now, I want to do the put bo- or Pilo our power. So Kevin we'll let you lead on this one juvenile hurdles you absolutely love it Joseph at a couple of inches. I don't think you're going to are you? No, no. Interesting. All right jolly, I think, you know, he sure he have based on the second and the finale, but I don't know about that form. I don't know about that form. I'm a little bit windy on a tour pillow. Problem for me, probably has the best form of the book. But he's going to have to prove that he's not just the mudlark and the conditions have been very testing when he's one when he's willing bolted starts overheard. He's got a quite an action on him. And he's going to need to prove that he hundreds something bear really testing going. But it wouldn't be a shock to me if he does. And I give it squeeze here to you're the Diraz. It looks like he's going to ruin the is to ruin him. Him and find Brunello. I don't think band of outlaws is going to go the intention that the mandate is to run the two and Fakhir. He's just he's a bigger price. Then I told he'd be he won he made it wouldn't start for Joseph their car class times in a maiden hurdle. I just liked the way he did it the bear form. And I wouldn't set you a night he was taking on four and five year olds that day, and you know, the bare form within the set you a night now. But what I liked most about him is that if you look back at his role in France, and he has good experience both boat. Overheard was an fences in France. But if you look back at those wrongs and watch the video does he was doing plenty row. Like he looked..

Joseph Audie Murphy Gordon Elliott John Burke John I Huntington France John writer Caroline Brune National Hunt Chieveley Isaac Sweden Jarvis Hudson bo Daryl Jacob
"audie murphy" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"With that racist garbage on these dirty ass crack. Those are the heroes of the story at CNN. The black. Hebrew, Hebrew, Israelites. There are black nationalists. They're racist. And they're the heroes of the media's narrative because they just leave all that out. It's inconvenient to the telling of the story. And honestly talking to Luke this morning. It's been how long now how long have we been paying attention to CNN ten years. And this is pretty consistent every day. They're just not in the journalism business. They're not legitimate news people, it's not a legitimate news organization. It is a cable station that spreads hate and division on behalf of the democrat party. And always always toes, the democrat party line with extremely rare exceptions Jake tapper over the weekend asked a legitimate question or two of Kirsten gillibrand didn't hold her feet to the fire, but she looked stupid nonetheless. Because they're always surprised Democrats when they got a straightforward question. From a journalist a reporter and anchor. They don't expect it they expect to be fluffed because that's what they're accustomed to. This lunatic Nathan Phillips who has nobody's hero except the news media on the left and he's a victim. And he's the Vietnam war hero. Apparently is the Audie Murphy of Vietnam. He's talking to CNN, and they ask really pointed questions like were you trying to calm the situation down. Basically when you saw kind of things seemed to spiral out of control first of all nice sentence. Nice cry and it's teeing up. The aren't you noble, and these horrible terrible white kids. And he said, oh, I think so now if they had looked at the tape they'd know that this is all a lie. But there are two dishonest too. Lazy too stupid to incompetent whatever their problem is they're they're just a friend of mine sent me a text about this on Sunday morning. I it's my job. Unlike the people at CNN to find the truth. So I actually did something crazy. I I read about it. And then I found the long version of the video, and I watched it. Now, it's my job to do that. I would think that it would be your job if you were to CNN too, but I would be wrong. Sarah, signer typed up this little piece for the democrat party. And what did the genius American hero? Nathan Phillips say in response to this. He said, I didn't feel I could just stand there anymore and not do something. It looked like these young men were going to attack these guys, meaning the racists, you know, the the black Hebrew Israelites this racist. What.

CNN democrat party Nathan Phillips Audie Murphy Kirsten gillibrand Jake tapper reporter Luke Vietnam Sarah ten years
"audie murphy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:14 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"What stories are you hearing? Oh, well today was a great interview. I interviewed a World War Two hero. Who is a hundred and three years old? He was born in nineteen fifteen and he was the first guys drafted in the state of Nebraska, and he saw a lot of combat. He fought all the way from North Africa, Sicily up, the boot of Italy, and he was a platoon sergeant which means he's in charge of about forty two men lie. Live and he was in a famous division called the third infantry division. Where Audie Murphy served in. Audie Murphy's the most decorated soldier from World War Two. Right. And this man he was wounded twice. He had multiple bullet wounds, and he's still alive, and he's so active at one hundred and three he drove to South Dakota from Denver just a couple of days ago. It's amazing. How do these people receive you, you know, for a lot of the veterans? This is the first time they're talking about it in seventy five years. So at first they're kind of timid. But once they kind of get to know, me and know that I'm not there to judge them. And I'm just there to learn the most welcoming how amazing and Hello people. Anyone will ever come across in their lives? They're so generous, you'll you'll never meet another generation where every single day of their life has been about other people, you know, from school and the great depression to put food on the table how lying about their age to get him to survey. It's always been about how to help other people. And I just think that every single day I get to spend and look one of these heroes, and there is such a blessing. So tell me reshi do any of these people you say, it's the first time they've spoken about their experience in some cases to any of them get emotional in the court. Of sharing their story. So a law the veterans, you know, as you mentioned, I focus on World War Two combat veterans. I tend to focus a lot of the infantry soldiers, you know, which were the dog face soldiers who actually saw the enemy and lived in a foxhole and for a lot of them. They told me things that they've never told anyone else, and it's an opportunity to get some things off their chest before they pass away. You know, killing people thought that was a really big thing. And it is a big thing. But it seems that what affects the veterans more being their friends killed a lot of them talk about guys who they trained with for years and guys who they become really close to only to get into combat and see them get blown apart or shot right in front of them to really tears apart. When people are shooting at you. It's a lot easier to shoot back, but when you know, someone and, you know, their family, and you know, the kind of person they are and. To see them getting killed that's really terrorism apart and a lot of them. They feel that they can finally share that do they cry when they talk about these things sometimes even the toughest World War Two veteran, sometimes tear up. I've had a few veterans breakdown when talking about losing their friends or having to kill people. Yeah. So what were some of the most amazing things that you have been shown, you know, items that were memorabilia from their experiences. Well, in all honesty, if I just go there really for the interview, I take pictures of the veterans, but some of their belongings logged them picked up souvenirs off of the dead soldiers, whether it be dead, Germans or dead Japanese. They would have pictures one. Very sad story. Can I share that short? Please I interviewed this paratrooper up in Erie, Pennsylvania, very nice, man. And he talked to me about his experiences. He jumped in during the Normandy invasion, and he also made a later jumped in Holland called market garden. Yup. And he was eighteen years old when he was in combat. He was a paratrooper. So he volunteered put himself in that position. But he talked to me about a patrol that. He went on. Squad about twelve guys were walking along and a group of German, ambush them came out of the woods to their right? And he just instinctively he saw a German. He fires and he hit the German in the chest. And he killed him. And that was the first time he had to kill someone and he such a friendly. First thing he wouldn't hurt a fly. You know, this man, but the fact that he had to do that it really tore them up, but the story goes on and some of his buddies wet through that dead German talk it, and you know, they were just looking for cigarettes and things like that. And they came across some pictures, and they just through the pictures and the pictures landed at his feet, and it was a picture of this German soldier the one who had just killed. And he told me the German soldier was about his age about seventeen or eighteen a young kid. Yeah. In the picture. It was a picture of the German soldier with his mother and his little sister. And at that point the veteran looks up to me and says, I know I did just kill an enemy. I sort of person. You know, it was someone a lot of veterans have souvenirs that they picked up like samurai swords or Japanese or why falls the Luger pistol was a really highly sought after item. What you're fighting the Germans. But really the thing that I'm therefore the veteran memories another veteran who's really been impactful him and his twin brother Serbs together, they were in a rifle company and usually brothers were not allowed to stay in the survey. That's right. They were separated during training, but they were so upset because they were so close that they begged their mother to write a letter to the commanding officer at the base and ask the big put in the same year that she gave her probation, and they did that. And they go overseas they fight together. And they were a dynamic duo is what I like to think of them as the two of them received the silver star, which is a nation third highest award for valor. They knocked out four German takes three machine gun nests and four German mortar position all by themselves in a matter of about half hour during the battle of the boat. Hey, truly amazing. And they were both eighteen when they were doing this. And the story goes on the veteran who I interviewed James cribs, and he talked to me about his brother shake and they were running in the field. They came under machine gunfire and his twin brother identical twin his twin. Brother was shocked right in front of him. And he talked to me about what it was like to hold your best friends and your twin brother your arms is going to die. And he was telling me about the kind of things that his brother was telling him, and they were both were and are very religious and the veteran who I interviewed was able to give his last rites that his brother, but right as he finished German sniper shot and killed his brother instantly and think that you know, this man had to go through all that you talk to me about how he lost his face. For a while after that experience and how upset he was at the world, but he eventually regained his face. And it was just such an inspirational story of how you can truly persevere through anything. And if you think you're having a bad day 'cause you're stuck in traffic. You're right. You don't know what you're talking about? And we're so fortunate to have the problems that we have in this country. I just problems that they have elsewhere. That we really need to wake up. Well, you are absolutely amazing. And if you know somebody who's a World War Two hero that you'd like Rishi to interview you can reach him at area code.

Audie Murphy third infantry division Nebraska Sicily Brother North Africa Italy South Dakota Holland Erie Pennsylvania Denver officer James cribs seventy five years eighteen years three years
"audie murphy" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

08:23 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"And interviewing World War Two combat veterans season, Denver, Colorado, as we speak today and reshi let's just get an idea who've you been talking to today. What stories are you hearing? Oh, what today was a great interview. I interviewed a World War Two hero. Who is a hundred and three years old? He was born in nineteen fifteen and he was the first guys drafted in the state of Nebraska, and he saw a lot of combat. He fought all the way from North Africa. Especially up the boot of Italy. And he was a platoon sergeant which means he's in charge of about forty two men live, and he was in a famous division called the third infantry division where Audie Murphy served. Audie Murphy's the most decorated soldier from World War Two. Right. And this man he was wounded twice. He had multiple bullet wounds, and he's still alive, and he's so active at one hundred and three he drove to South Dakota from Denver just a couple of days ago. It's amazing. How did these people receive, you know, for a lot of the veterans? This is the first time they're talking about it and seventy five years. So I kind of timid, but once they kind of get to know, me and know that I'm not there to judge them. And I'm just there to learn the most welcoming humble amazing, and who looks people anyone will ever come across and their lives. They're so generous, you'll you'll never meet another generation where every single day of their life has been about other people, you know, from serving school immigrate depression to put food on the table to lying about their age to get him to survey. It's always been about how to help other people. And I just think that every single day I get to spend them look one of these heroes. And there is it's such a blessing. So tell me reshi do any of these people you say, it's the first time they've spoken about their experience in some cases to any of them get emotional in the court. Of sharing their story. So a law the veteran, you know, as you mentioned, I focus on World War Two combat veterans. I tend to focus a lot of the infantry soldiers, you know, which were the dog face soldiers who actually saw the enemy and lived in a foxhole and for a lot of them. They told me things that they'd never told anyone else, and it's an opportunity to get some things off their chests before they passed away, you know, killing people I thought that was a really big thing. And it is a big thing. But it seems that what affect the veterans more is seeing their friends killed a lot of talk about guys who they trained with for years and guys who they become really close to only to get into combat and see them get blown apart or shot right in front of them back to really tears apart. When people are shooting at you. It's a lot easier to shoot back, but when you know, someone and, you know, their family, and you know, the kind of person they are. And to see them getting killed. That's a really tears them apart and a lot of them. They feel that they can finally share that did they cry when they talk about these things sometimes even the toughest World War Two veteran, sometimes tear up. I've had a few veterans breakdown when talking about losing their friends are happy to kill people. So what were some of the most amazing things that you have been shown, you know, items that were memorabilia from their experiences. Well, it all honesty, if I just go there really for the u I take pictures of the veterans with some of their belongings logged on picked up souvenirs off of the dead soldiers, whether it be dead, Germans or dead Japanese. They would have pictures one. Very sad story. Can I share that shore? Please I interviewed this paratrooper up in Erie, Pennsylvania, very nice, man. And he talked to me about experiences he jumped in during the Normandy invasion, and he also made a later jump in hall and called market garden. Yup. And he was eighteen years old when he was in combat. He was a paratrooper. So he volunteered put himself in that position. But he talked to me about a patrol that. He went on. Hit squad about twelve guys were walking along and a group of German, ambushed them came out of the woods to their right? And he just instinctively he saw German he fired and he hit the German in the chest. And he killed him. And that was the first time he had to kill someone and is such a friendly person. He wouldn't hurt a fly this, man. But the fact that he had to do that it really tore them up, but the story goes on and some of his buddies went through that dead German pockets, and you know, they were just looking for cigarettes or things like that. And they came across some pictures, and they just through the pictures and one of the pictures landed at his feet, and it was a picture of this German soldier the one who had just killed. And he told me the German soldier was about his age about seventeen or eighteen young kid. Yeah. In the picture. It was a picture of the German soldier with his mother and his little sister. And at that point the better, it looks up to me and says, I know I didn't just kill an enemy. I person you know, it was someone tips. A lot of veterans have souvenirs that they picked up like tamra sore sharp that Japanese or why does the Luger pistol was a really highly sought after item when you're fighting the Germans. But really the thing that I'm there for the veterans memory another veteran who's really been impactful him and his twin brother Serbs together, they were in a rifle company and usually brothers were not allowed to stay in the survey. That's right. They were separated during training, but they were so upset because they were so close that they begged their mother to write a letter to the commanding officer at the bay and. And asked if they could be put in the same year that she gave her permission, and they did that. And they go overseas they fight together. And they were a dynamic duo is what I like to think of them as the two of them received the silver star, which is a nation third highest award for valor. They knocked out four German takes three machine gun and four German mortar position all by themselves in a matter of about half hour during the battle of the boat. Truly amazing, and they were both eighteen when they were doing this. And the story goes on to veteran who I interviewed his name is James crabs. Any talk to me about his brother, Jake, and they were running in the field, and they came under machine gunfire and twin brother identical twin his twin brother was shot right in front of him. And he talked about what it was like to hold your best friends and your twin brother your arms, it's going to die. And he was telling me about the kinds of things that his brother was telling him, and they were both were and are very religious and their veteran who I interviewed was able to give his last rites that his brother, but why does he finished a German sniper shot and killed his brother instantly and think that you know, this man had to go through all that he talked to me about how the lost his faith. A while after that experience and how upset he was at the world, but he eventually regained his faith. And it was just such an inspirational story of how you can truly persevere through anything. And if you think you're having a bad day because you're stuck in traffic. You're right. I don't know what you're talking about. And we're so fortunate to have the problems that we have in this country. I just problems that they have elsewhere, but we really need to wake up. Well, you're absolutely amazing. And if you know somebody who's a World War Two hero that you'd like Rishi to interview you can reach him at area code.

Audie Murphy Denver Nebraska North Africa Italy Colorado South Dakota Erie Pennsylvania officer tamra James crabs Jake seventy five years eighteen years three years
"audie murphy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:14 min | 3 years ago

"audie murphy" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"What stories are you hearing? Oh, well today was a great interview. I interviewed a World War Two hero. Who is a hundred and three years old? He was born in nineteen fifteen and he was some of the first guys drafted in the state of Nebraska, and he saw a lot of combat. He fought all the way from North Africa Sicily up the boot of Italy. And he was a sergeant which means he's in charge of about forty to live. And he was in a famous division called the third infantry division where Audie Murphy served and Audie Murphy's the most decorated soldier from World War Two, right? And this man he was wounded twice. He had multiple bullet wounds, and he's still alive and so active at one hundred and three he drove to South Dakota from Denver just a couple of days ago. It's amazing. How do these people receive you, you know? For a lot of the veterans. This is the first time they're talking about it and seventy five years. So I kind of timid, but once they kind of get to know, me and know that I'm not there to judge them. And I'm just there to learn the most welcoming how amazing and Hello people. Anyone will ever come across in their live. They're so generous, you you'll never meet another generation where every single day of their life has been about other people, you know, from school in the great depression to put food on the table lying about their age to get into survey. It's always been about how to help other people. And I just think that every single day. I get to spend them look one of these heroes. And there is it's such a blessing. So tell me reshi do any of these people you say, it's the first time they've spoken about their experience in some cases to any of them get emotional in the course of sharing their story. So a law the veterans, you know, as you mentioned, I focus on. On World War Two combat veterans, and I tend to focus a lot of the infantry soldiers, you know, which were the dog face soldiers who actually saw the enemy and lived in a foxhole and for a lot of them. They told me things that they've never told anyone else, and it's an opportunity to get some things off their chest before they pass away, you know, killing people I thought that was a really big thing. And it is a big thing. But it seems that what affects the veterans more is seeing their friends killed a lot of them talk about guys who they trained with for years and guys who they become really close to only to get into combat and see them get blown apart or shot right in front of them back to really tears of apart. When people are shooting at you. It's a lot easier to shoot back, but when you know, someone and, you know, their family, and, you know, the kind of person they are and to see them getting killed that's a really tears them apart and a lot of them. They feel that they can finally share that do they cry when they talk about these things sometimes even the toughest World War Two veteran, sometimes tear up, and I've had a few veterans breakdown when talk about losing their friends are happy to kill people. So what were some of the most amazing things that you have been shown, you know, items that were memorabilia from their experiences. Well, it all honesty, if I just go there really for the interview. I take pictures of the veterans, but some of their belongings logged on pickup up souvenirs off of the dead soldiers, whether it be dead, Germans or dead Japanese. They would have pictures one. Very sad story. Can I share that? Sure. Please. I interviewed this paratrooper up in Erie, Pennsylvania, very nice, man. And he talked to me about his experiences. He jumped in during the Normandy invasion, and he also made a later jumped in Holland called market garden. Yup. And he was eighteen years old when he was in combat. He was a paratrooper. So he volunteered put himself in that position. But he talked to me about a patrol that. He went on him. Squad about twelve guys were walking along and a group of German, ambush them came out of the woods to their right? And he just instinctively he saw German. He fires and he hit the German and the chest and he killed him. And that was the first time he had to kill somewhat. And he is such a friendly person. He wouldn't hurt a fly. You know, this man. But the fact that he had to do that it really tore them up, but the story goes on and some of his buddies went through that dead. Germans talk it, and you know, they were just looking for cigarettes and things like that. And they came across some pictures, and they just through the pictures, and one of the pictures laid it out his feet, and it was a picture of this German soldier the one who had just killed. And he told me the German soldier was about his age about seventeen or eighteen young kid in the picture. It was a picture of the German soldier with his mother and his little sister. And at that point. The veteran looks up to me and says I know I didn't just kill an enemy. I sort of. I said, you know, it was so a lot of veterans have souvenirs that they picked up like samurai swords that Japanese or rifles the Luger pistol was a really highly sought after item. What you're fighting the Germans. But really the thing that I'm there for the veteran memories another veteran who's really been impactful him and his twin brother Serbs together they were in a rifle company. And usually brothers were not allowed to stay in the survey. That's right. They were separated during training, but they were so upset because they were so close that they begged their mother to write a letter to the commanding officer at the bait and asked if they to be put in the same year that she gave her permission, and they did that and they go overseas and they fight together. And they were a dynamic duo is what I like to think of them as the two of them received the silver star, which is a nation third highest award for valor. They knocked out four German take three machine gun and four German mortar position all by themselves in a matter of about half hour. Our during the battle of the boat. Hey, truly amazing, and they were both eighteen when they were doing this. And the story goes on the veteran who I interviewed his name is James crabs. And he talked to me about his brother Jake, and they were running in the field, and they came under machine gunfire and his twin brother identical twin his twin brother was shot right in front of him. And he talked me about what it was like to hold your best friends and your twin brother your arms is going to die. And he was telling me about the kinds of things that his brother was telling him, and they were both were and are very religious and their veteran who I interviewed was able to give his last rites that his brother, but it right as he finished German sniper shot and killed his brother instantly and. Think that you know, this man had to go through all that talk to me about how he lost his faith for a while after that experience and how upset he was at the world, but he eventually regained his face. And it was just such an inspirational story of how you can truly perseveres through anything. And if you think you're a bad day 'cause you're stuck in traffic. You're right. You don't know what you're talking about? And we're so fortunate to have the problems that we have in this country. I is problems that they have elsewhere. But we really need to wake up. Well, you are absolutely amazing. And if you know somebody who's a World War Two hero that you'd like Rishi to interview you can reach him at area code.

Audie Murphy Nebraska Italy North Africa Sicily South Dakota Holland Erie Pennsylvania Denver officer James crabs Jake seventy five years eighteen years three years