35 Burst results for "Audie Cornish"

"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

03:22 min | 2 months ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Even <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> then, I changed <Speech_Female> hosting jobs a <Speech_Female> couple of times. So I think <Speech_Female> there's a part of me that's <Speech_Male> like every two to three <Speech_Female> years. <Speech_Male> I get a new breast <Speech_Male> ring. I want to <Speech_Female> challenge and make the challenge <Speech_Male> happen. <Speech_Male> And then when the challenge is <Speech_Male> done, I'm like, where's the next <Speech_Male> mountain? I think <Speech_Male> that's just part of <Speech_Male> how I'm built. My <Speech_Male> mom was a little bit <Speech_Female> the same way. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> to my <Speech_Male> mind, the <Speech_Male> change <Speech_Male> was probably even <Speech_Female> a little bit overdue. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> And it's been like, <Speech_Male> it's been wild, <Speech_Male> like watching how <Speech_Male> people processed <Speech_Female> it or had <Speech_Female> a dialog about <Speech_Male> it, right? That's one <Speech_Female> of the fascinating things <Speech_Female> about the news is like <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> narrative is not necessarily <Speech_Male> your story. <Speech_Male> But it is <Speech_Male> a communal <Speech_Female> kind of <Silence> exercise and <Speech_Male> people <Speech_Male> making <Silence> sense <SpeakerChange> of things. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We have a listener <Speech_Female> question. <Silence> Oh, awesome. <Speech_Female> Alicia. <Silence> Alicia <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> wants to know. <Speech_Female> Were you nervous <Speech_Female> at all to start <Speech_Female> over at a new <Speech_Female> organization and how <Speech_Female> did you get <SpeakerChange> over <Speech_Female> those nerves? <Speech_Female> Was nervous, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> is nervous, <Speech_Female> continue to <SpeakerChange> be nervous, <Speech_Female> nervous right <Speech_Female> now, hate <Silence> being on camera. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Every single <Speech_Male> day, I'm like, I can't <Speech_Male> believe you did this. <Speech_Male> I'm like, <Speech_Male> why did you think you could <Speech_Male> do this? It's like <Speech_Male> I have the full <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> scale <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> that. <Speech_Music_Female> Do <SpeakerChange> you find <Speech_Music_Male> that motivating though? <Speech_Male> I don't <Speech_Male> recommend it. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> I think I did <Speech_Male> start to get <Speech_Male> worried when I <Silence> lost it a <Speech_Female> little bit. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> There's the feeling <Speech_Male> of like, I have <Speech_Male> mastered this. <Speech_Female> And then <Speech_Female> there's this feeling <Speech_Male> of like, I <Speech_Male> think I can do this with <Speech_Female> little to no effort, <Speech_Female> but the <Speech_Female> caveat is <Speech_Male> that when I <Speech_Male> had my kids, <Speech_Female> it was really, I was <Speech_Female> really grateful <Speech_Female> to be in a job that <Speech_Male> I had mastered. <Speech_Male> Because <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> didn't have to <Speech_Male> be going <Speech_Male> at the pace. I <Speech_Male> had gone when I was younger. <Speech_Male> I knew <Speech_Male> how to conduct 5 <Speech_Male> interviews a day. <Speech_Male> I knew where <Speech_Male> to focus and <Speech_Male> when I knew how <Silence> to compartmentalize, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> you know, this is <Speech_Male> the kind of thing <Speech_Female> that I think people <Speech_Male> should process a little <Speech_Female> bit more for themselves, <Speech_Male> which is <Speech_Female> there's a <Speech_Male> right job for <Speech_Female> you and a <Speech_Male> right time <Silence> to job. <Speech_Female> You know, you may be in <Speech_Female> a great job and it may <Speech_Female> not be the right time <Speech_Female> in your life to <Speech_Female> be doing it. That's a <Speech_Female> great point. <Speech_Female> When I was having <Speech_Female> my kids and they were <Speech_Female> just born, <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> it was <Speech_Female> great. <Speech_Male> Being at a job <Speech_Male> that I knew <Speech_Male> understood and could <Speech_Female> come back and just do. <Speech_Female> Hence the overcompensation, <Speech_Female> right? Because <Speech_Female> I'm like, I'm so good at this. <Speech_Female> I'll do two others. <Speech_Female> Don't <Speech_Female> do that. But now <Speech_Female> I'm out of that phase, <Speech_Female> right? They're at least like <Speech_Female> potty training. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> now I did feel <Speech_Male> more comfortable <Speech_Male> taking on something <Speech_Male> more learning <Speech_Male> new skills. It <Speech_Male> was sort of <SpeakerChange> the right <Speech_Female> moment to do <Speech_Female> it. Adi, <Speech_Female> one of thank you <Speech_Female> for this therapy <Speech_Female> session today. <Speech_Female> They've <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> saved us both money this <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> week. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It goes both <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ways.

"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:44 min | 2 months ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"And slow down. Well, I think one that was a defense mechanism. But two, it was a very honest answer of I can't possibly think about changing my personal life identity at home until I get my career into the place and my company into the place that I want it to be. And for those that are listening that maybe haven't gone through the life changes yet, that come with having a family in whichever way that looks like for you, what is your advice around how to think about planning ahead and how to think about not sacrificing your ambition and career, but also creating the personal life that you want to have. First of all, your answer is completely in line with many, many, many women in the U.S. right now. The reports about fertility rates, the reports about why people are waiting to marry. Those are all the reasons. And in fact, there's been a lot of reporting about the fact that how marriage has become basically an upper class institution because people who feel financially ready and all these things you're talking about are the ones who end up doing it. Number two, someone said something early in my career, I watched an interaction happen where a mom was like, hey, I'm going to go home, but I'm going to come back and finish this work in blah, blah, blah. And this person said after they walked away, you know, this is so annoying. Don't make your kid my problem. And it was a woman who said this. And it really affected me. It really made me more empathetic, but it, again, you asked earlier, like, maybe why I overcompensated. You know, I think I still had that comment ringing in my brain, all the years later, that even other women in the workplace might be kind of unsympathetic. In terms of your actual question about figuring it all out. You can figure it all out. There's no way to, so don't try and do that. You can like freeze your eggs and then maybe X money or something else happens. A blah blah blah. So I would not worry about all that. And I've been telling people to partner well, meaning the partners in your life, you two are partners, right? Foster your working relationships and personal relationships, keep the ones close, where there's reciprocity. You know what I mean? Where the friendship is based on a little bit of empathy and understanding..

U.S. Foster
"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:40 min | 2 months ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"I want to transition a little bit to you becoming a mom, which you've talked about. So you have two sons, and in the beginning you said they're foreign too. I have an 18 month old, and I'm very pregnant with my second story. Congratulations. Please give me all the advice because I feel like my world is about to get turned upside down. You had what you called a professional identity crisis. When you became a mother, like to tell. Look, I think if you're really ambitious, you spend so much time, especially as a fam or woman in the workplace, basically being like, this is who I am. You know what I mean? This is why you should take me seriously. Look at me. I'm putting in the most hours than anyone. I'm speaking up at all the meetings and I'm super prepared and you spend a lot of time preparing for and making yourself ready for the work, whatever your work is. And all of a sudden you don't have that. Like you just don't have it. Like you haven't slept. Your baby has decided to be in the middle of its sleep regression or only wants to breastfeed or only once a bottle or all of these things that will go by quickly, but it's just so intense. It's another whole job. And the thing that people don't tell you in all the movies is you want to be doing it. And the thing you're trying to manage is you is that disconnect. And you're like, wait, I didn't want this. I'm so happy you said that. Because I feel like so much of the conversation out there is how to keep going and manage around it..

"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:56 min | 2 months ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"I don't know how this works. I need to figure this out is listening and really hearing. Because sometimes people are saying something to you, but they're really telling you something else. And a lot of times I've had to stop myself and say, okay, I need to listen all the way to the end of this sentence. And then when it's done, if I don't understand, sometimes I have to say, can you tell me that again, I don't think I fully grasp what you are trying to articulate here. And if you say it in a way that says, no, I'm really listening and I want to understand. It's funny how people will reframe and say something in an easier way to explain. And that's something I use as an interviewer all the time, but I've used it in arguments with my husband or my kid, you know, just saying slow down, what are you really trying to tell me? And then lastly, to have some empathy because everybody was raised in very different ways. And some people being loud is their way of communicating, right? Or not quite telling you what they want to say right away, that's a learned behavior. And I found that that book about attachment styles, it helped me understand that there are some people who like, they want to avoid conflict at all costs. Even if that cost is efficiency in the workplace, or efficiency in your communication style. Some people just need a lot of hand holding. They need to be told all the time. You're doing okay. You're doing okay. This book actually really helped me get a grasp on where am I on this spectrum? And what does that mean for the way I interact with people? I know I'm not alone when I would say that the pandemic has caused me and literally everyone I know rethink the way we live. We work and we travel. I have heard of so many people I know just picking up and moving somewhere completely new as companies embrace, remote lifestyle and work style and hybrid. And guys, Iowa appears to be where it's at. U.S. news and World Report ranks Iowa as the number one state in the entire country for opportunity based on affordability, education, and economic data. The more you know. Speaking of affordability, Iowa is also ranked the fourth most affordable state overall and the number one state for housing affordability. Iowa has an amazing and vibrant food art and live music scene, a ton of iconic landmarks, and I gotta say, I think I'm booking a flight to Iowa right now. So you should compare your current cost of living, see how much you could save by moving to Iowa, maybe I'll come visit you and go to this is Iowa dot com. That's.

Iowa U.S.
"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:47 min | 2 months ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"You know, I was just like a kid at state school on financial aid being in RA, having three jobs, and I wanted to work. And I wanted to work for money, which in journalism is actually a complicated ask because so many places expect you to in turn before you're somehow viable to work. Or you have to take a job that isn't quite the journalism you want to be doing in the hopes that you can somehow leap once you're quote unquote in a building. And it just makes it very difficult. And I think now many more places have paid internships. But at the time, that wasn't that common. So for my friends who were able to just sort of move to New York, be in an apartment and work for some place. That worked great for them. But I just did not have that option. And then there was also a little bit of a cool kid factor, I think, to that period of blogging as well. Snark was the highest compliment you could be given. And I wasn't like that. You know, and so I think I just kind of inadvertently boxed myself out of it. And I just figured, I might as well lean all the way in, you know? I really like radio, no one cares about it. I really like talking to real people, no one cares about them right now. I'm just going to do that. I think I approached journalism as a working class job that you did because you cared about your community. That's sort of where my head was at. I'm going to preface this by saying I mean this as a compliment. You are really good at talking. How did you develop that strong communication style? That's an interesting question. I come from a household of talkers, I'm Jamaican, my parents are both Jamaican and I come from a family of professional people, everybody is like a nurse or works in some office job and we have fun together. And when I was a kid and we were at the dinner table, my parents spoke about the day's events or things they were thinking of with us. And while we were cleaning up the table, we were also expected to kind of chime in and what do you think about that?.

RA New York
"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Audie Cornish and NPR was there for you. Then room there is little or no doubt remaining now that Richard Nixon intends to give up the presidency, dismantling of the best known portion of the Berlin Wall between the Brandenburg Gate and Checkpoint Charlie began last night after the housing bubble and the crisis on Wall Street. Some are starting to lose some faith. And NPR is here for you. Now protests against racial injustice and police brutality continue. 2020 basically matched 2016 as the hottest year ever recorded on the White House says more than 22 million doses of covert 19 vaccines will be distributed in the next week. Man. And with your help, NPR will be here for you for whatever comes next, You can support another 50 years of public radio. It all starts with your donation. Here's how to contribute. We hope you'll go do WN y si dot org's or call us at 8883769692 to begin or renew your membership during W. N. Y. C s spring fundraiser. It's Day one and we're trying to start strong and we know we can If if you help us along. It's in fact, a goal of 3000 donations by noon tomorrow. And we'd like you to help us get there. The number again is 8883769692888376 W. N. Y. C. To support basically 50 years of coverage that you've heard from NPR in W. N. Y. C and to bring us through 50 years more. We really count on your support. My name's Julian Welby. I work in the newsroom along with Rebecca Ibarra. And it is essential for everyone in the community to be informed in New York City. We have an upcoming election that really will determine the future of our city. And that is why w n Y. C is and will remain free and available to all. Even those who can't donate during this pledge drive. And we know it's been a tough year. So if you can't donate, we understand But if you can make a contribution, your support now is just So important and so meaningful And if you are in a position to give, maybe you can chip in a little bit more to ensure that w m Y C is here for those who can't give right now, So if you've already donated to thank you so much truly And if you haven't then please support W N Y C. As.

Rebecca Ibarra Richard Nixon Julian Welby NPR New York City Audie Cornish 2016 Brandenburg Gate 8883769692 White House 2020 Wall Street Berlin Wall 50 years 3000 donations last night W. N. Y. C. W. N. Y. C next week 8883769692888376
"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Considered. I'm Audie Cornish in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. After deadly blackouts gripped Texas in February, state lawmakers vowed to protect people from future power failures. But now lawmakers air pushing measures that critics say could do the opposite as most Bushell of member station Kut reports. They may also threaten the growth of renewable energy in Texas when weather forecasters warned of the winter storm heading to Marfa, Texas in February, Leslie Very al started getting text messages from friends. They were asking if they could come over if the power failed. That's because not only does her house have a gas stove. It's got old fashioned gas heaters, too. We don't really use that often cause it's not maybe the safest thing because you're talking about some, like old gas heaters actually have flame like there's fire, but they keep the house warm without electricity, she says. Over three days without power, her place became a hub of activity with friends, neighbors stopping by Martha's tiny so the word gets out fast when there's somebody that has He stories like these have become a powerful argument in a battle at the state Legislature House Bill 17 relates to energy choice off a Texas and hearing this spring Democratic State. Rep. Joe Desert tell, introduced a bill that would stop Texas cities from banning natural gas hookups in new buildings. Such bands are part of a growing trend to electrify new housing to fight climate change. But does it tell made that sound risky because of the mass power outages in February? I know in my own home, I was able to keep things going because we had generated at kicked on Iran on natural gas. But the thing is his bill was filed before the blackout. It's similar to preemption laws adopted with industry support in neighboring oil and gas states like Oklahoma and Louisiana in Texas. The plan is opposed by environmental groups, but it's also under scrutiny for another reason. Some say it would actually increase the likelihood of another large scale blackout. This bill absolutely unequivocally would make the problem worse. This is Doug Lewin. He's an energy efficiency advocate and president of the consulting firm, Stoic Energy. Understand his argument. You've got to remember one reason the power went out in Texas was limited gas supply. While most homes got gas during the freeze many power plants couldn't get enough of it to run, Lewin says. Does it tells bill will create even more residential gas demand? That could mean even less gas going to power plants during the next big freeze. Look, there's an important debate to be had over whether or not he should have this power to allow gas and homes. But it should not in any universe be part of a package meant to prevent the next storm. This proposal is not the only gas friendly bill that's been pitched as a blackout fix. Another would raise the cost of renewable energy that's controversial in Texas, a state that leads the country in wind power production. Meanwhile, bills to regulate the natural gas industry to improve supply during cold spells. I've been abandoned or significantly watered.

Elsa Chang Doug Lewin Stoic Energy Los Angeles Lewin February Washington Oklahoma Louisiana Audie Cornish Texas Joe Desert Kut Democratic one reason Martha Rep. Over three days Marfa, Texas Leslie Very
MLB All-Star Game yanked from Atlanta over voting law

BBC World Service

09:11 min | 1 year ago

MLB All-Star Game yanked from Atlanta over voting law

"This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Totally unnecessary. That is what a top lieutenant in the Minneapolis Police Department said today about the way that former police officer Derrick Show Vin Pressed his knee into the neck of George Floyd, he testified on the fifth day of Sheldon's murder trial. NPR's Adrian Florido has been covering the proceedings and joins us again from Minneapolis. Hey, Adrian. Hi, Elsa. All right. So today wrapped up the trial's first week, which, as you know, I've been talking about has been packed with so much emotional testimony, like from bystanders who watched Floyd died to first responders who couldn't revive him. But today the trial seemed to shift a little right. Tell us a little bit about that. Yeah. Today, the prosecution worked to build its case that Derrick show Vin used excessive force on George Floyd. And to do that they called Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman to the stand. He is the longest serving police officer in the Minneapolis PD. He's been on the force since 1985. He's the head of the homicide division. And importantly, after George Floyd's death, he was one of the department employees who publicly condemned what show Vin did. Prosecutor Matthew Frank spent time today asking him about the dangers of restraining a suspect by laying them face down. Have you ever in all the years you've been working for the Minneapolis Police department. On been trained. To kneel on the neck of someone who is handcuffed behind their back in a prone position. No, I haven't. Is that if that were done with that be considered force absolutely. What level of force might that be? That would be the top tier the deadly force. Why? Because of The fact that if you need is on a person's neck That can kill him. Not not mincing words. They're obviously right. Well, what exactly did Lieutenant Zimmerman's say about the way show Vin handle George Floyd. So here is the same prosecutor asking Zimmerman a question about what he saw in the body cam footage of George Boyd's arrest. What is your? You know, your View of that use of force during that time period. Totally unnecessary. What do you mean? Well, first of all. Pulling him down to the ground face down. And putting your knee on the neck. For that amount of time. Is just Uncalled for. I saw no reason why The officers felt they were in danger if that's what they felt. And he said, the danger is what show then I would've had to field to justify keeping his his knee on Floyd's neck for that, Monk. E mean it's not every day that you hear. A police officer, especially a senior police officer criticized Another officer, even a former one, right, right? Yeah. But on cross examination, eyes show, Vin's attorney, Eric Nelson, worked to poke holes in his testimony, his main focus being the latitude that police officers are allowed during under the police department's use of force policy when they're responding to incidents, So here's Nelson asking that the same witness a question. You would agree, however, that in the fight for your life generally speaking in a fight for your life, you is an officer are allowed to use whatever force is reasonable and necessary. Correct? Yes. And that could even involve improvisation, agreed. Yes. Minneapolis Police department policy allows a police officer to use whatever means there never are available to him to protect himself and others, right? Yes. The defense attorney there, obviously giving clues about the kind of arguments he's going to make when it's his turn to present his case that show been feared for his life that he was dealing with the dynamic situation. Struggling suspect an angry crowd. And real quick. When do we expect the defense to start calling their own witnesses? Well. The prosecution is expected to wrap up their case by the end of next week. And then it'll be the defense's turn. We expect starting the following week that is NPR's Adrian Florido in Minneapolis. Thank you, Adrian. Thank you, Elsa. Critics say that George is controversial New election law restricts voter access and disproportionately effects people of color and in protest Major League Baseball announced today It will relocate the summer's All Star game and draft out of Georgia and under pressure from voting rights advocates. Major companies like Delta and Coca Cola have issued critical statements. Now. Stetson University law professor Ciara Tourist Spellissy studies the influence of corporations and lawmaking earlier today, I spoke to her about what she found striking about this wave of corporate criticism. One of the things that's remarkable about the new statements from Delta and Coca Cola is that they have changed positions a few days ago. They put out pretty Tepid criticisms and or support for the Georgia legislation, and now that the legislation has become law, and they've been under pressure from voting rights advocates They have changed their tune on. That doesn't happen that often. Let's dig into that a little more, because obviously corporate America lobbies. Statehouses Congress for all kinds of things, right? Can you talk about how aggressive they can be in this area or how reluctant they have been in this area in the past? So corporations have two main ways that they influence policy. One is through corporate donations to particular candidates. They then spend even more money lobbying lawmakers to get the policies that they want. Now, most of the policies that a corporation wants are for its own benefit. No, this is a little bit different because voting rights advocates in Georgia put pressure on corporations not just because they were located in Georgia, but also because they had given money to Some of the politicians who created this regressive Election law in Georgia. Can you talk about a moment in recent history where we've seen corporate activism lead to significant legislative change? I think the biggest Example of this was the 2017 tax cut. And the tax cut was literally for corporations. So you had political donors putting enormous pressure on Members of Congress and the corporate tax rate was cut significantly. Another example is bathroom bills and so by bathroom bills. These are Laws at the state level that direct individuals to only use the bathroom of the gender of their birth. And one of these bathroom bills was passed in North Carolina. The end see double a pulled championship games from North North Carolina. And that got AH lot of attention and and North Carolina. Rolled back that bathroom, Phil. We've been hearing a lot, especially in the last year about corporate responsibility, so to speak. What you going to be looking for going forward to see whether this is Real or not, well, one of the things that we saw after the riots at the Capitol on January 6th. Woz corporations deciding to pull back corporate PAC money from the Republicans who objected to The electoral college votes for Joe Biden. But now there is pressure from the U. S Chamber of Commerce, which is one of the largest trade associations in America. It's also one of the largest Dark money, political spenders in America, and they're urging their members to get back in the political spending game. So one of the things that I will look at After Georgia and after the riots on January, 6th is Do any of these corporations actually changed their political spending behavior. Ciara Torres Spellissy is a professor of law at Stetson University in Gulf Port Florida. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you. There is a new attempt to bring the U. S and Iran back to the 2015 nuclear deal with one The Trump administration left in direct talks are set to begin in Vienna next Tuesday.

George Floyd Minneapolis Police Department Adrian Florido VIN Audie Cornish Elsa Chang Derrick Show Vin Minneapolis Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman Matthew Frank Lieutenant Zimmerman Elsa George Boyd Floyd NPR Adrian Georgia Sheldon Eric Nelson Coca Cola
4 victims of California office shooting identified, as suspect charged with murder

BBC World Service

05:12 min | 1 year ago

4 victims of California office shooting identified, as suspect charged with murder

"Sir Chang and I'm Audie Cornish. This hour. We'll look at how faith communities approach pandemic lockdown differently. One day, we're gonna look back. And this is just gonna be a story that we tell what kind of story do you want to tell? Also one of President Biden's campaign promises was to overhaul the criminal justice system, and advocates say they are waiting for some real action now. Absolutely anxious form or change to come from this administration on criminal justice reform and how the Biden administration hopes to reverse systemic racism that's been baked into America's infrastructure. Now the news Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Veteran Capitol police officer is dead and an unidentified suspect was also killed after police say the individual rammed his car into the officers, then into a barricade outside the U. S capital today. We say the suspect was shot and killed after emerging from the vehicle, brandishing a knife and moving towards police. It all happened here. The Russell Senate office building just after one p.m. today still not clear what was behind the incident, though it comes on the heels of the January six attack on U. S Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump that also claimed the life of the Capitol police officer. U. S Capitol police officer who died today has been identified as William Billy Evans, an 18 year veteran of the force. A second Capitol police officer was injured. Have the Minneapolis Police Department homicide division testified today. Kneeling on the neck of a suspect who was handcuffed amounts to top tier deadly force and it should have stopped. Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman, a long time officer on the force testified today and travel Derrick Show Vin the actions by the former officers saying they were totally unnecessary putting your neon and neck For that amount of pot that amount of time. Is just Uncalled for. I saw no reason why The officers felt they were in danger if that's what they felt showing faces, murder and manslaughter charges in the death of George Floyd last year, prosecutors say corrected police video shows Trovan, who was white, kneeling on the black man's neck for more than nine minutes. Man has been charged with the murder and attempted murder in the Wednesday attacking a Southern California office building that left four people dead, including a nine year old boy. The Orange County district attorney's office is 44 year old Harmony, a dob galaxy. Gonzalez was charged with the attempted murder of two police officers after shooting at them when they reached the scene. Police say Gaxiola knew the adult victims. It's not clear what the motive was behind the attack. President Biden says the latest jobs report shows the U. S economy bouncing back, But he said the country still has a long way to go towards recovering from the pandemic. NPR's Asia, Roscoe reports employers added 916,000 jobs in March. That was the biggest game in jobs since last August. President Biden says the economy is doing better because of rapid growth of covert 19 vaccinations and government aid. He warned. That is too soon. For Americans to return to life is normal. So I ask I plead with you. Don't give back the progress. We've also fought so hard to achieve. Need to finish this job. Every American to buckle down and keep their guard up. This home stretch bite and also pushed for Congress to take up his $2 trillion infrastructure plan. But some Republicans have opposed the proposal, which would raise taxes on corporations. Aisha Roscoe NPR news U. S. Financial Markets are closed today for good Friday. This is NPR from W. H E News in Atlanta. Good afternoon. I'm Jim Burress. Right now we have clear skies 55 degrees. It's 504 Major League Baseball says this July's All Star game will not take place in the Atlanta area following the signing of a bill that makes sweeping changes to Georgia voting laws. Meal. Moffett reports. Baseball was set to hold its Midsummer Classic and truest Park on July 13th, but Friday announced it would be relocating the game. A Republican backed bill signed into law March 25th has received substantial pushback from voting rights groups and corporations. Measure overhauls many of the state's election laws, including restricting the use of absentee ballot, Dropbox is adding I d requirements for vote by mail and giving lawmakers more control over the state's election board. In a statement, Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred said moving the game was the best way to show the MLB supports voting rights and fair access to the ballot box. Mio Moffett W. ABC News The Cobb County says it's rental assistance program was the target of a cyber attack. Stephanie Stokes has more The county's program offered $21 million to help tenants who are behind on rent demand was so strong earlier this year that the cab closed applications after little more than a week. Now, the county says it's email for receiving those applications may have been compromised. I found out within five minutes and disabled the email. The county says it also disconnected the affected server. It's unclear how much information was compromised. An investigation is underway. The cab was one of several counties around Georgia who received federal rental assistance funding.

President Biden Capitol Police Sir Chang Audie Cornish Biden Administration Npr News Jack Spear Veteran Capitol Police Russell Senate William Billy Evans Minneapolis Police Department Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman Derrick Show Vin George Floyd U. Orange County District Attorne Gaxiola Donald Trump NPR
"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Audie Cornish and I'm Ari Shapiro this week has already brought to setbacks in the search for Corona virus, vaccines and treatments. Eli Lilly has confirmed that its clinical trial for an antibody treatment is now on pause because of a potential safety concern. Johnson and Johnson announced a pause yesterday in its trial of a Corona virus vaccine here to bring us up to speed is NPR pharmaceutical correspondent sitting Lumpkin Hi, Sidney. Hi, Ari. Let's start with Johnson and Johnson. What are the details with the pause there on the vaccine trial? Sure, Johnson and Johnson put all its Corona virus vaccine clinical trials on pause after one of the patients enrolled, came down with an unexplained illness. The pauses temporary while they figure out what happened, for instance, they don't know whether the patient got the vaccine or a placebo, says Johnson and Johnson's head of R and D But time a men. We know very little of that plant in. It'll be a few days at a minimum for the right to be gathered on evaluated. Doctor in our bar. Xev at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health tells me pause is pretty normal for a clinical trial. So what we want is to have safety outcomes occurring so that we can Measure them and quantify them until the public what the risks are. With so much attention surrounding a Corona virus vaccine. We're just hearing more about them now. So that's Johnson and Johnson. But that's not the only company that's putting things on pause in the search for Corona virus, vaccines and treatments. That's right. Last month, AstraZeneca put its Corona virus vaccine studies on hold when a British patient developed a neurological condition, although trials started back up in the United Kingdom and elsewhere just a few days later. They remain on hold in the United States. We don't know why. But the company says it's working with the Food and Drug Administration to facilitate a review that could eventually restart the trial. And today we learned about the pause in the study of Lily's Cove. It 19 antibody treatment because of a potential safety concern, and independent data Safety monitoring board recommended the halt, and the company said it supports the decision. But there are still other vaccines and development where the trials are ongoing. Bring us up to speed on what's happening there. How are they doing? Visor's experimental vaccine looks to be in the lead, followed by modern a cz. Pfizer CEO has predicted that it would know whether the vaccine worked this month. Moderna isn't expecting trial data until November at the earliest. Over all these trials can only move as fast as they can enroll patients, but enrollment requires resource is money. The federal government has awarded billions of taxpayer dollars to accelerate things through operation Warp speed, But that process has its own pitfalls. Like what? What people have to be worried about. Well, The goal is a vaccine that safe and effective as soon as possible. But federal contracting can be slow, so the government is using a nontraditional contracting mechanism to speed things along. And NPR has learned that it's issuing contracts through a third party, but that can leave out some taxpayer protections and limit transparency. Rick Bright, headed the federal Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority until he was ousted in April. The next month, he filed a whistleblower complaint alleging that the administration was awarding some contracts based more on politics than science. The third party contracting concerns him. We don't know the rewards or the incentives that the companies are getting, which might drive some companies to take additional risk, or maybe do things inappropriately. So several lawmakers and advocacy groups are calling for the contracts to be made public. That's NPR Pharmaceuticals correspondent Sidney Lumpkin. Thanks, Sidney. You bet. Pope Francis was elected with a mandate to clean up the Vatican's murky finances, and he's made strides in doing so. But as NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports, the Vatican is still plagued by scandal and intrigue. Lurid tales of financial malfeasance in the Vatican are making headlines They paint an image of Pope Francis is a bright white spot in a world of shady figures, black clad monsignors financial Raiders and middlemen. This month, the pope took the unusual step of appearing publicly with European financial inspectors to reassure them. He's cleaning house Aurora for Alcivar than a swap of Indians. Sometimes, the pope said in the effort to amass wealth, there is little concern for where it comes from, whether it was acquired legitimately or through the exploitation ofthe others. Citing Jesus casting the money changers from the temple, Francis said. One cannot serve both God and money. That remark was taken as a reference to his firing last month off Cardinal Angelo Bet you the Vatican did not explain why better was fired as head of the Vatican office on statehood. But in a previous position bet you was in charge of the church's financial investments. Invasion. 7 30 bitches firing his cardinal is directly linked to our investigation, which revealed Beattie's family affairs had become affairs of state That's reporter Massimilliano culture of the weekly lisp, RSO. His recent expose accused Bet you of nepotism, including steering church funds for charity to an NGO run by his brother. Espresso previously linked the cardinal to a shady investment in high end London Realestate The day after he was fire. Bet you called an extraordinary news conference to defend himself. He insisted the money he directed to his brother's NGO was in fact for charity. He sounded outraged as he described what he called his surreal reading with Francis. He.

Johnson Pope Francis NPR Sidney Lumpkin Sidney Eli Lilly Ari Shapiro Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Audie Cornish Food and Drug Administration Bet federal government AstraZeneca United States NPR Pharmaceuticals federal Biomedical Advanced Re Pfizer CEO United Kingdom Moderna Lily
"audie cornish" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Audie Cornish. This hour. President Trump's rhetoric on race. It's no accident that all of these comments they all co here around a narrative of elevating white Americans as the rial Americans. Also yet another huge storm bearing down on Louisiana will have the latest on Hurricane Delta. Plus the Nobel Peace Prize goes to the U. N World Food program, and they're sending a big mess. Is that for a very important issue that we need to take foot more seriously, and a new book that's a meditation on kindness and moving forward through grief. Now news Live from NPR news. I'm Janine Hearst. The Trump campaign is pushing back on the cancellation of the presidential debate next week, saying there's no medical reason to stop it. The campaign says the president is healthy and ready to debate, calling the commission biased and overlords. And said that Trump would be glad to debate without the commission's interference. The nonpartisan Commission on Presidential Debates, though, said Next week's debate in Miami would have to be virtual because Trump has Covad 19 Trump refused to participate. Virtually A debate scheduled for October. 22nd is still on for now. Congressional Democrats and the Trump Administration have once again failed to reach a compromise on the next round of Corona virus relief funding. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. The latest setback will most likely postpone a bipartisan agreement until after Election Day. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the administration put forth and new proposal, but a top aide for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, said it lacked a broad plan to contain the pandemic. Congressional Democrats say they're also awaiting language from White House negotiators on the overall cost of the measure. Spending has been the biggest sticking point between the two sides. The House has passed a $2.2 trillion measure that includes additional federal aid for state and local governments and an extension of extra weekly unemployment benefits. The administration says the Democratic plan is too costly and wants to keep the next bill under $2 trillion Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington, Ohio's largest board of elections, says 21% of ballots into voters on the first day of absentee mail outs were sent to the wrong address is Adora number today from member station W. O. S U has more Almost 50,000 voters received an inaccurate ballot. The county board expects to send replacement ballots to the U. S. Postal Service within 72 hours and every voter who received an incorrect ballot will receive a new one. President Trump tweeted about the incident Friday afternoon. Commenting quote out of control a rigged election, the Franklin County Board of Elections responded, saying, quote our borders bipartisan and our elections are fair and every vote will be counted. Absentee ballot requests have reached record highs this election due to the Cova 19 pandemic. For NPR News Amadora NAMI got dead in Columbus. Hurricane Delta has made landfall as a Category two storm near Creole, Louisiana, with maximum sustained winds of 100 miles an hour. Forecasters say the storm is causing flooding a dangerous storm surge power is out to nearly 200,000. Belt is hitting the same area devastated by Hurricane Laura in August. That storm left 27 people dead. All street higher by the closing bell. The doll of 161 points the NASDAQ gained 158th S and P 500 up 30. You're listening to NPR news. Live from the news. I'm terrorist. Siler, forecasters say more warm, dry and occasionally windy weather will arrive in large parts.

President Trump Trump Administration NPR Hurricane Delta Windsor Johnston Louisiana Audie Cornish Trump Franklin County Board of Elect president Janine Hearst White House House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Siler Hurricane Laura
Romney's vote surprised Trump impeachment team

All Things Considered

04:33 min | 2 years ago

Romney's vote surprised Trump impeachment team

"From NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm very that was Kelly the impeachment trial of president Donald J. trump is over it is therefore ordered and a judge that the said Donald John trump be and he is hereby acquitted of the charges in said articles the Senate has voted to acquit Donald Trump the votes on two articles of impeachment came after two years of impassioned speeches from senators from both parties justifying their decisions acquit or convict and while most fell in line with their own party's position one broke away creating bipartisan opposition to the president NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey snow has been following it all from Capitol Hill she joins me now he kills hi there so it has been abundantly clear since before this trial began that Democrats were not going to have the sixty seven votes they needed to convict president trump what struck you as you watch this final historic day play out today was very somber very quiet the senators and all of their staff or just simply exhausted it was really interesting to me that the gallery of the public areas where people can come and sit and watch were as full as I have ever seen in my ten years up here in this was nearly a party line vote as he said and we knew what the outcome was but people are really interested and you know the person that we watch so closely through all of this was Mitt Romney of Utah and he went to the Senate floor earlier today and broke with his party on the first article of impeachment abuse of power and that really kind of set the energy back in play around here where there are protesters everywhere and it kind of give a break to the shuffling through of speeches that kind of brought us to the end of this trial thank you senator honest decision on that to vote on that one count against the president we were all watching for it it still was quite dramatic to to to watch him actually vote for it on the Senate floor just walk us through how he explained his vote well it was very dramatic because he is the first in order to vote to convict the president of their own party and he delivered this very emotional speech where he repeatedly tie this decision back to his religion I am profoundly religious my faith is at the heart of who I am and then he took a very long pause and composed himself and his voice broke several times when he was explaining that he took an oath before god and knew that making this judgment would be one of the most difficult he had ever faced but he said he was convinced that the president was guilty of what he was accused of and he did meet the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors he says he knows will be pilloried for it and he didn't see any other choice this is what he said I'm sure to hear abuse from the president and his supporters does anyone seriously believe that I would consent of these consequences other than from an inescapable conviction that my oath before god demanded of me Kelsey is he hearing abuse what's been the reaction to mit Romney's decision well Donald Trump junior says he should be kicked out of the party but the Republican senators I talked to basically don't agree with that as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was asked about this repeatedly after the vote today and he said he was surprised and disappointed buddy said rami still works with the party and there are no dog houses in the Senate but I will note that Romney was the first senator out of the chamber after he shook hands with his desk mate hi what about on the other side of the aisle there had been some suspense that maybe Democrats would cross party lines in particular three Democrats who represent states that president trump one in in twenty sixteen that that didn't happen it didn't happen they were all United and a senator Joe Manchin in particular of West Virginia was really lauded and and celebrated when they came to the Senate floor before the vote he had basically a receiving line of people coming to give him a hug it's important because president trump and no longer can claim that there was bipartisan opposition to his impeachment like that he could claim in the house yeah so impeachment the trial is over but is the Ukraine drama over on Capitol Hill it doesn't seem like that a Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says it's all in the rear view mirror but he doesn't control of the house and over in the house house Judiciary Committee chairman Jerry Nadler said a subpoena could be coming for former national security adviser John Bolton and they're still that book that Bolton has written and should be coming out shortly so there is still drama around impeachment even if the final votes are cast NPR congressional correspondent Kelsey smell speaking to us from Capitol Hill thank you Kelsey thank

Audie Cornish NPR
An deep dive into Trump’s 2020 State of the Union speech

Q

12:10 min | 2 years ago

An deep dive into Trump’s 2020 State of the Union speech

"I'm Audie Cornish in Washington earlier we heard from president Donald Trump and we just heard the voice of Michigan governor Gretchen Wimmer who presented the democratic response to president trump stated the union speech we have several folks here tonight to do some analysis about all that we heard we're gonna start within the within eighteen L. Shammi who was the chief of staff to speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi and Brendan Buck who was a spokesman for the former house speaker Paul Ryan bring you guys both in for your expertise how what we heard tonight now if you're on Twitter there were a lot of conservatives you you're you're using a lot of exclamation points and saying this is the best thing that they've ever heard Democrats not saying the same I want to start with you Brendan what did you make of the president's focus tonight how we deliver that yeah and this is certainly a confident president in a way that you know you might expect a president who's at his all time high in in the latest Gallup poll who is just really defeated impeachment and have the Democrats sort of in disarray he started off with all of those economic status just making the case that things are going well in this country talk about how we're we're not gonna turn back and really was just riding high right some of his quotes it insane three years of my administration three and a half million working age people of join the work force in leaning really hard into that at the top in it and it was a lot of job well done on my part and very little agenda going forward I counted this is not an official count but I counted only ten things in which he is calling on Congress to do anything in a lot of those were relatively small ball usually a president comes in with a big agenda here's all the things I want to do and you really have to dig in there to find them some of it is funding neo natal research funding a child tax credit sanctuary cities sending Americans to Mars things like that that don't really come together in a real way but another take way as as sue was talking about from the room if I've seen a lot of state of the union this was as divided and cold as I've ever seen you could almost hear brewing from some of the Democrats and that is just really stark and the Nancy Pelosi interactions yeah she she tried to shake his hand and he did do it she actually tore up his speech at the end that that's remarkable I've never seen anything like that the team let's have you jump in on your former boss there people were watching her and her behavior very closely but first your reaction to some of the things you heard tonight shoring it was a fascinating speech the king can I give you a look into president trump's mine and that we were hoping that he would meet the commander in chief test but then said that I believe he produced a speech that was made for TV made for TV moments and Brandon is exactly right some of the big issues bi partisan issues that he could work with Democrats on infrastructure he had two lines and infrastructure of prescription drugs he really did not go into specifics as to get me a bell and I will sign it these are opportunities lost a lucky get a showing at age she has to do is to tell Democrats thank you for working with me on U. S. M. C. A. and he didn't right you mentioned that it was signed by it was that yeah and and I and also in terms of I've I've seen many states to the union I've been there and I think this is stands up to when president Obama was to during the ACA negotiations and trying to get the bill passed it was it was that same feeling that you had in those to complete the process I want to take a moment now to fact check some of what we heard both the president's speech in the democratic response NPR's Scott Horsley is here to help us do that welcome Scott they do with it this speech was kind of the theme of it was the great American come back the president spent considerable time talking about the economy both his and the prior administration's but here's a sample of that in just three short years we have shattered the mentality of American decline and we have rejected the downsizing of Americans destiny we have totally rejected the downsizing we're moving forward at a pace that was unimaginable just a short time ago and we are never ever going back Scott who was Anderson economy were looking at the one the president's describing characteristically here Donald Trump exaggerates how strong the economy is now and how weak it was when he came into office the fact is the economy was pretty good in twenty seventeen and it's still pretty good now the economy last year grew two point three percent that is exactly the average for the last decade the U. S. added six point seven million jobs in the first thirty five months after trump took office pretty impressive but not unprecedented in the previous thirty five months the U. S. added nearly eight million jobs so really less of a comeback than a more less straight line continuation a lot of people also measure the economy by the size of their own paychecks right in this president described this as a blue collar boom after decades of flat and falling incomes wages are rising fast and wonderfully they are rising fastest for low income workers who have seen a sixteen percent pay increase since my election Scott Horsley is our chief economics correspondent and of course was a long time White House correspondents so to help us understand how he's trying to frame these specific numbers wage wages have been rising faster than inflation that's good for workers there read real purchasing power's been going up but wage gains of actually moderated in recent months in the twelve months ending in December average wages rose just two point nine percent compared to three point four percent earlier in the year and that deceleration in pay hikes is a little surprising given the very low unemployment rate we have now is encouraging as the president says that wages for people at the bottom of the income ladder have been rising faster than those the top that's partly because a lot of states have raised their minimum wages the present also talked about the very large stock market gains that we've seen since the election of twenty sixteen it is way up not seventy percent as he said but the Dow's up fifty seven percent stock ownership are is heavily concentrated among the rich eighty four percent of those gains have gone to just the top ten percent of earners and forty five percent of Americans don't own any stock at all I want to pause for a second and go to Ron Elving because when you think about the last impeach president he was giving a seat at the union is also the person we attribute this it's the economy stupid kind of sloganeering and so is this something that the president should lean hard into especially given what his democratic rivals are talking about why would he not why would he not take credit for where the car a condom use today presidents have suffered when the economy was poor even if it wasn't their fault and even when it wasn't really that bad and even when it was recovering I'm thinking here by George HW bush in nineteen ninety two very short very shallow recession and yet he was pummeled with it and that has happened in other occasions and we've also seen presidents come and office riding on a long recovery such as the one from say about two thousand nine two thousand ten forward into two thousand seventeen and tack on a few more years with policies and there's no question that this president has cut regulations and cut taxes what particularly for a corporations and to some to be wealthy individuals which has juice the economy if you're further but he did come in riding on a long recovery which may be slowing down a little bit now but he basically takes credit for all of it and says that when he came into office it was a situation of American carnage I want to come back to Scott Horsley here because another issue one of factcheck health care promises the president spoke about also Michigan governor Gretchen Widmer who delivered the democratic response here's an example of something the president spoke about one hundred and thirty two lawmakers in this room have endorsed legislation to impose a socialist takeover of our healthcare system wiping out the private health insurance plans of one hundred and eighty million very happy Americans to those watching at home tonight I want you to know we will never let socialism destroy American health care members we talk about the language is using their this is obviously divisive issue even within the Democratic Party some of the presidential candidates on the democratic side Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren have favored a single payer plan that would eliminate private insurance in warrants case over a period of time other Democrats though want to preserve a role for private insurance for those people who want it we should also point out the president did make what he called an iron clad pledged to protect patients with pre existing condition did he explain how we do that he he did not in this this is surely the biggest Whopper in tonight's speech the president knows a protection for patients with pre existing conditions as popular so he pays lip service to it but if anything his administration has has whittled away at those protections and of course they're they're fighting to overturn the affordable Care Act which is where those protections come from I want to talk about another big issue border security the president talked about this one even before he you know what it was the nominee and hit that thing again tonight my administration has undertaken an unprecedented effort to secure the southern border of the United States this statement seems vague but it's got I believe you've kind of dug into it what do you know the administration has made a series of sweeping changes to limit access to asylum seekers at the border I'd sent tens of thousands of migrants back to Mexico to wait for their day in immigration courts and administration credits those policies for a very sharp drop in the number of migrants who are being taken into custody the border in a last may we saw that number peek at a recent high about a hundred forty thousand last month the number was down to around twenty nine thousand so a drop of about eighty percent our allies in this gets at some of what we would call kind of red meat or culture were issues that we heard the president talking about he said he was calling upon members of Congress to pass legislation banning late term abortion of babies he talked about the idea of a sanctuary cities and kind of going after sanctuary states how did he balance this part of the speech with what we heard about the economy well I think those are the two parts of the president's campaign message one is to say you're better off now than you were four years ago the economy is great he said it's greater than ever before in American history but also the president is at heart a culture warrior and he believes that cultural issues are more powerful than economic ones and there is some evidence that might suggest he's right for instance the parts of the country that are reaping the most benefits from the trump economy are the ones where his approval ratings are the worst and the parts of the country that are not reaping the benefits that are doing badly record farm bankruptcy is a manufacturing recession those are the parts of the country where his numbers are the highest why I think because of the cultural issues he's pretty face the voters in those places think he's protecting them against criminal immigrants he talked about those he highlighted once again this is a staple for him a family whose family member has been killed by an undocumented immigrant so these are the two parts of his message one is you never had it so good and the other is you know the Democrats want to ruin your your way of life and that's the message to the public we want to talk about what it was like inside the capitol congressional correspondent kills the smell is there tonight moments ago she spoke with the second highest ranking Republican representative in the house that Steve Scalise we did see a pretty tepid response from Democrats on most things including things other were bye bye things that should have been bipartisan that always have been bipartisan it almost is is like they have this personal hatred against the president and they're letting it see through where they're opposing good policies and you should always put your personal differences on the

Audie Cornish Washington President Trump Donald Trump Michigan Gretchen Wimmer
Putin meets with Ukraine leader Zelensky for the first time

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

Putin meets with Ukraine leader Zelensky for the first time

"From NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro the leaders of Russia and Ukraine have just wrapped up talks in Paris it's an attempt to end the war in eastern Ukraine where thirteen thousand people have already died this is the first time you cranes new president Philo demerits Lynskey has met with Vladimir Putin the two leaders talked about the outcome of the meeting in a joint press conference and we're joined now by NPR's leucine Kim who's been watching from Moscow hi Lucy in a R. E. this was supposed to be peace summit in hopes of resolving a five year long conflict between the two countries that were there any breakthroughs no this was largely a confirmation of the status quo of the peace process called the Minsk agreement that started in twenty fourteen this process has been completely frozen for the past three years so in some sense it could be considered progress that the lens can Putin even met the less he said going into this meeting he was looking for a lasting ceasefire along the whole front line and an exchange of all prisoners

Audie Cornish Russia Paris Ukraine President Trump Philo Lynskey Vladimir Putin NPR KIM Moscow Lucy Ari Shapiro Minsk Three Years Five Year
"audie cornish" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:22 min | 3 years ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on KCRW

"Audie Cornish for decades California has had a powerful tool and its fight against air pollution that's the authority to set its own rules for auto emissions rules that thirteen other states currently follow but the trump administration says there is no reason California should have this ability and by revoking the state's authority to set these rules president trump argues that cars will become cheaper and safer for everyone and create more. now this sets up the latest of many legal fights over the environment between California and the trump administration California Attorney General heavier but Serra says the state is ready for it. we like them I have looked at the law and the facts and know that what you're trying to do would be a violation of law you know one of the things the president tried to argue on Twitter today is that he said that that there wouldn't be much of a difference between the California standard in the news U. S. standard and he's also trying to make the argument that somehow this would make cars safer and less expensive because they would be produced more cheaply under uniform standard well if you don't believe that climate change is real then of course you could say that but the wild fires and droughts the floods and mudslides so to start for you the the California standard in the U. S. and are too far apart the California standard and the U. S. standard are the same and the trump administration is trying to backslide from those standards they're also trying to California that we can continue to do what we've done for nearly five decades and that is to do what we must for our state to make sure we're cleaning our err the EPA administrator and Wheeler has said federalism does not mean that one state can dictate standards for the nation can you make the case why California it should and not just a case based on historical precedent we're moving the way Congress permitted us to move the clean air act provides for this waiver authority the consequences have been great for everyone in that not only have we been able to keep California cleaner when it comes to our but the rest of the nation is also benefit with cleaner cars step cleaner air and the kind of economy and healthcare system that allows us to let our people live longer. back in July the state made a deal with vehicle manufacturers on fuel economy standards and the ministration says they think that might be illegal the department of justice has launched an antitrust investigation into this deal is an example of antitrust violations the word that comes to mind is ludicrous and it's unfortunate because the American public is being treated to the type of circus that comes when you use the weight of the oval office to try to threaten an industry to do what you want them to do even though they're signalling clearly that they want to move in a different direction after the announcement from the White House have you heard from auto manufacturers are they gonna stick with you the interesting thing is you haven't heard the automatic sector saying anything about being with the president there is not an automatic section that I know of that has publicly articulated a position in line with the trump administration so right now you're taking that silence as a kind of tacit support I think the trump administration recognizes that that silence is a clear sign that industry is hoping that the trump administration will pull back before we dive into this precipice because the industry understands that its ability to prosper requires us to be able to move together towards cleaner burning vehicles the state has to the trump administration I think more than two dozen times on environmental issues alone and you say that you will be challenging this one in court so you lose we don't say well those we seen this movie before it was a P. rated movie the first time administration tries to stop us from moving forward and we won we have the facts the science in the water behind California's efforts it's the trump administration that continues to delay its release of its proposal one because I think they realize they can't square the facts the science in the wall behind what you're trying to do so we feel pretty confident that not just a lot but the entire American public wants is to move towards cleaner burning vehicles if this is tangled up legally. what does that mean for your attempt to move quickly on this issue we're gonna keep moving we're not stopping the authority right now is for California to try to clean it's here there's no legal authority there's no legal order telling us not to is the administration it that's trying to put the brakes on this progress we're not going to backslide and so we will continue moving forward have you heard from any of the other states that had planned on joining you in similar standards we've had some great partners throughout the country on this and they are ready to go as we are and so that was thirteen states and the district of Columbia you're saying they were going to join you and a legal challenge to this we have our partners ready to go with us that's California democratic Attorney General heavier but Serra thank you for speaking with us thank you. secretary of state Mike Pompeii landed in Saudi Arabia earlier today he's there to meet with officials about the recent attacks on the state owned oil company Saudi Aramco Saudi officials say those attacks were unquestionably sponsored by Iran the U. S. has the same view Iran denies involvement the way the US response will be guided at least in part by president trump's complex relationship with Saudi Arabia and its leaders and yes Jackie north has followed that relationship for years and she is here in the studio to walk through how to multi Jackie hi are you begin with from before he was president today he seems really committed to standing by the Saudis but that wasn't always the case right now certainly not for years he spent a lot of time complaining about the Saudis basically odd that they weren't paying the way the US was protecting the kingdom at all times and that the Saudis were only paying a fraction of what they should have been paying it out she went to a some point back in nineteen eighty seven he took out full page ads in several major newspapers around the US just laying out these complaints saying that it was costing us too much money and that they need to start carrying their own baggage anyone even went on TV making this same complaint Japan Saudi Arabia Kuwait who's very very wealthy countries that we're protecting should pay for their own defense they should pay us for the defense what they should defend themselves and then I started to shift as he was running for president in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen right yes certainly his tone became friendlier towards Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia.

Audie Cornish California five decades
"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The check and Audie Cornish some welcome news today for disabled veterans with student loan debt president trump announced an executive order for giving all federal student loan debt for vets who are permanently and totally disabled that's hundreds of millions of dollars in student debt held by are severely wounded warriors it's gone for ever he was speaking at the national convention of the group amvets and your school Lawrence covers veterans he's on the line now either quill so can the president actually do this to start and what does it mean that this order that all federal that would be forgiven for these folks well it's a lot easier to do it because this is actually a pre existing program since nineteen sixty five the higher education act was amended in two thousand eight but the problem with that was it was essentially often you have to know an applied to have your debt forgiven under the a bomb Obama administration the they had studied the social security roles founded who is disabled and who was in debt and sort of match these records and found tens of thousands of people who were eligible and sent them letters but the onus was on them to participate and pressure kind of continued into the trump administration for this to change and in just January forty seven states attorneys general had urged that they do something to make this easier and they were bipartisan bills in Congress so there was a lot of momentum for this to happen so what exactly does the executive order do in a new way it makes it opt out it sort of automatically if you qualify for this because you're a total and permanent permanently disabled veteran you don't have to do the paperwork anymore you can opt out if you want and there had been some concern about tax issues if you get a debt forgiven that can kind of get you in your taxes the president said today he was going to act to allay that and this is really welcome news for these veterans own only only half of the people who were eligible when they got that letter in the mail bombings ministration had done anything about it so the people who hadn't now they'll have their debts forgiven I thought veterans got tuition benefits through the GI bill though and can you run through this history again I mean shouldn't they be though the last ones with student loan debt at all you would think so the the problem is that in one part of this problem is that vets have been really aggressively courted by for profit colleges veterans actually end up making a a really disproportionate number of students who are in default on their student loans and part of this is because these for profit colleges are so much more expensive and often give a a less valuable degree than say community college and I should say that education secretary Betsy device has been criticized for being too friendly with for profit colleges in rolling back obamacare protections for students from for for profit colleges you know how many people will be affected the administration says about twenty five thousand who have an average debt of about thirty thousand dollars each so we're talking about seven hundred and fifty million dollars there are questions about how quickly it'll roll out and what might be done for that tens of thousands of vets who were in default of their loans because in some cases the IRS could have garnish their wages or disability checks being and follow your student loans ruin your credit rating an activist I spoke with that veterans education success said as she wants to know if they're going to do any anything to repair the people who weird had their credit ratings damaged or wages garnished over the over the years another point that was made to me is that in this fifty year old law it applies to non vets as well so the president's announcement today really helps veterans who are permanently disabled and have student loan debt but there may be ten times as many non vets maybe hundreds of thousands of Americans who are disabled and they're not even aware that they're eligible to have their debts forgiven so it's it's great news for disabled veterans today and maybe other people will also find out that they have been eligible all this while to have there your federal student loan debt forgiven that's will warranty covers of veterans for NPR thanks so much thanks on king of student loans the federal government has a new student loan watchdog now the jobs been vacant since last summer laughs when the previous watchdog resigned arguing the trump administration was not doing enough to protect student borrowers isn't yours Corey Turner.

Audie Cornish trump president thirty thousand dollars fifty million dollars fifty year
"audie cornish" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro secretary state Mike Pompeii starts a commission to review the role of human rights in American foreign policy any taps a long time opponent of abortion and same sex marriage to lead it basic human rights are being misunderstood by many manipulated by many and ignored by the world's worst human rights right plus what happened to the moon rocks gathered on Apollo lunar missions I've also been known to get the samples out on the night of a full moon and stand there in my office when I can see them going out my window and thinks look you know I got party here you know we're on to you now this news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Louise Schiavone billionaire financier Jeffrey abstain faces charges of sex trafficking and conspiracy in New York prosecutors say that this weekend following abstains arrest they found a trove of nude photographs of what appeared to be under age girls while executing a search warrant at his Manhattan mansion Jeff Berman US attorney for the Southern District of New York spoke to reporters combat in sex trafficking and exploitation of children is a priority for this office for the department of justice as the sexual abuse of a minor can have devastating effects on victims often lasting for years Eckstine is being held in the federal lockup forecasters say the federal government may run out of money to pay its bills in early September unless Congress acts to raise the debt limit before that NPR's Scott Horsley reports that is an earlier deadline then lawmakers were expecting lawmakers thought they had until at least early October to cut a deal to raise the debt ceiling but forecasters from the bipartisan policy center now say crunch time could come sooner as early as the first half of September that up the pressure on Congress which is scheduled to be in recess for most of the month of August it's possible the federal government could still limp along till October but money is flowing out of the treasury faster than tax revenues are coming in corporate tax revenues in particular are falling short of expectations corporate taxes to the first eight months of the fiscal year were down nearly nine percent from the previous year after lawmakers slashed the corporate tax rate Scott Horsley NPR news Washington president trump says he plans to hold another expanded fourth of July celebration next year and yours clothing a great solace reports that the comments came the same day that democratic lawmakers called for a federal probe into the event president Donald Trump called the salute to America tremendous success and said it will happen again next year on Thursday trump gave an address from the Lincoln Memorial with military flyovers and tanks on display today Democrats on the Senate Appropriations Committee called for the government accountability office to probe how much that event will cost taxpayers democratic senators Tom Udall of New Mexico Patrick Leahy of Vermont and Chris van Hollen of Maryland wanted geo to investigate whether trump's event complied with restrictions on taxpayer funded political activity a video produced from the event was later shared by the White House in the trump campaign cloudy Silas NPR news Washington long shot democratic presidential hopeful Eric Swalwell is bowing out of his party's crowded primary contest the thirty eight year old congressman from California says he will return to the house and then run for reelection on Wall Street at the close the Dow fell a hundred fifteen points the nasdaq dropped sixty three points this is NPR news in Washington from KQED news I mean I can state workplace regulators launched an investigation today into a malfunction at chevron's Richmond refinery it led to the evacuation of some of the facilities workers cake you with these ten Goldberg reports a chevron spokeswoman says on Saturday morning a refinery unit had some sort of problem that forced the facilities non operational workers to leave the plant the company did not provide more details but in a brief report to state officials chevron says the incident may have led to the release of at least five hundred pounds of sulfur dioxide after a system that controls gas releases malfunction the Richmond refinery has experienced a spike in flooring episodes this year incidents in which the facility is forced to burn off excess gasses because of operating problems I'm Ted Greenberg KQED news a statewide look at the impact of sea level rise by the Los Angeles Times finds that the options for dealing with California's disappearing coastline are painful trucking in extra sand is costly building sea wall as San Francisco has done sacrifice is part of the B. and the most politically charged of all managed to retreat ultimately surrenders homes to nature which pacifica is grappling with Ellie times environment reporter Rosanna shot wrote the comprehensive article just because all our choices how costly consequences and none of them great doesn't mean we should keep waiting until a good option comes out because it's not going to happen Shaw says while the C. rose less than nine inches in California in the last one hundred.

Audie Cornish ari Shapiro secretary Mike Pompeii five hundred pounds thirty eight year eight months nine percent nine inches
"audie cornish" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Audie cornish. For the past few weeks. We've been bringing you stories about sex. How we talk about it how we don't want. It matters. We've explored LGBTQ sex, Ed and abstinence before marriage. Today's story is about pornography. Not whether it's good or bad. But that it's everywhere. And it's shaping the way people think about sex millions of people in the US watch porn. Thanks, largely in part to the internet and free tube sites like porn hub. That's not alone has over a hundred million visits a day people in the US make up the biggest chunk of that traffic and most of those views come from people under thirty four years old people who've always had easy access to porn. It's on Twitter Instagram, even in gifts sent around in text messages. The bottom line is porn is easy to view. But it's still hard to talk about NPR's Khatlon store went to Los Angeles to do just that to talk about it. And just a warning, obviously. For the next eight minutes. We'll be talking frankly about pornography and sex, which may not be suitable for all listeners. It's nine AM on a Wednesday morning and director Jackie Saint James is worried about patio furniture or the lack thereof. Heat me if I make them have sex. We're in back of a big house of a winding road in the San Fernando Valley. This house is a filming location for movies TV shows and today, a porn shoot. Jackie's getting ready to direct a scene that's pretty standard setup. A guy shows up for five at yoga lesson without his girlfriend, the tension with the female instructor slowly builds, and well, you can probably.

Jackie Saint James US Audie cornish San Fernando Valley Twitter Los Angeles Ed NPR instructor director Khatlon thirty four years eight minutes
"audie cornish" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:41 min | 3 years ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Elsa chain. We turn out to the issue of collusion. One of the biggest questions surrounding the molar investigation was whether it would find that the Trump campaign colluded with the Russians to undermine Hillary Clinton's campaign in two thousand sixteen attorney general William bars. The conclusion was clear at his press conference this morning, the special counsel found no evidence. No collusion. Any by any did not find any evidence? That men other words, there was no evidence of the Trump campaign colluded said from the Russian government there was in fact, no collusion. So that's the bottom line. But the report documents number of instances where Trump associates met with Russian operatives to find out more about what we learned from those encounters. We turn out to MPR political reporter, Tim Mack who's been looking closely at this question throughout the day. Hey, Tim hither. So let's look at bars. Claim not enough. Evidence to charge anyone in the Trump campaign with conspiracy with Russia. Tell us what the report found. So the Miller report more specifically does not establish that there was any criminal coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia, but in case after case the report at lies efforts by figures, and the Trump orbit seeking to arrange meetings in Russia or even meetings between then candidate Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin from campaign advisor, George Papadopoulos, for example, he made efforts to arrange a meeting between the campaign and the Russian government and told the special counsel's office that Trump was interested in meeting with Putin. There were multiple efforts by multiple officials to establish links between the Trump campaign and Russia, but nothing that rose to the level of conspiracy or coordination not quoting to the team right nothing to the level of conspiracy. But Trump's team and Trump himself maintained throughout the campaign and into the administration that they had absolutely no links to Russia that claim is contradicted by a lot of detail. In this report. Right. That's right. I mean, the molar report outlines in great detail that in September twenty fifteen Trump gave approval to his fixer Michael Cohen to negotiate with a Russian real estate Development Corporation throughout the campaign. They were aware this Cohen breath. Donald Trump, Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump junior about the Trump Tower project in Moscow, according to Cohen, Trump even agreed to travel to Russia during the campaign, if it would help them with their real estate deal, and while this might have had an impact on Trump's views towards Russia during the campaign this project automatically fizzled out. Right. All right. Let's focus on event that got a lot of attention when it came to questions of collusion. The Trump Tower meeting in June twenty sixteen that was the conference in New York City at which Donald Trump junior the president sun hosted a Russian delegation after he had been promised quote, unquote, dirt on Hillary Clinton. What did we discover about that meeting? So Trump junior was promised information that he could use against Clinton. Ultimately. He didn't get what he expected to get at that meeting and the special counsel said that that meeting wasn't illegal because it was based on the legal meaning of the word conspiracy based on that legal meaning a law wasn't broken. Will also said that no one involved in the speeding effectively acted as a foreign agent in violation of the law. All right. Let's take a step back. There have been multiple links between Trump and the Russian government. But no coordination is this a matter of the Trump campaign being willing to coordinate with unsavory characters, but just not being able to let me give you just one last example that the mall report outlines the special counsel team looked into the president's comments urging Russia, the fine thirty thousand emails, and they tried to find the Trump campaign tried to find, but they alternately failed. This is a recurring theme in the long narrative. Arc of the Trump campaign. They repeatedly tried to connect with the Russian government at times were receptive to the idea of receiving assistance from the Russian government. But they never executed there. Efforts successfully that's NPR's Tim Mack. Thanks, tim. Thank you. We're going to turn out to Republican strategists Antonia farrier. She's a former senior communications adviser from Jordi leader, Mitch McConnell. She's here with us in the studio. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. So Trump's senior adviser Kellyanne Conway described today as quote the best day since President Trump's election. What's your take on whether or not that's true? I think there's mostly good for the president and his team. But the report has some not so flattering parts in it. I think if you read into the report like I said, there are some vets where there little embarrassing, but I think from their perspective, and actually I think mostly for most people in the country they wanna move on. And I think that we probably gonna have another month with the attorney general, and maybe Mr. Muller going before congress. But I think there's a distinct view on frankly, both parties that they should probably move on. I wanna get into the details of that more. But as a communication strategists. How did you feel about this load unquote rollout? I really thought the the criticism of the attorney general giving a news conference was a little overwrought because I think he wanted to explain what it was that he was trying to do and the process by which he came to release this report. So I thought the criticism of him was overblown report came out. I didn't think it was redacted as I. Had thought it might be. And so I thought there was too many process arguments by attacking him today. Now, what Republicans have been saying today, essentially is case closed, but to your mind when you're listening to what Democrats are out there saying is that the case is that possible. I think it is case closed. I think it will be more case closed in about a month jump in. You yourself said it creates a unflattering portrait. Right. I mean in one case, you it's basically saying look, the the president tried to do a bunch of different things to to interfere. And the only reason it didn't happen is because aids just ignored him. Well, here's the thing though. Didn't we already know a lot of this? I hate to say that. But there was a lot of contemporaneous reporting. There was more a lot more color and a lot more context that was given in the mall report today. So for example, the New York Times did report on former White House counsel, Don Mcgann, threatening to quit over the president's request to fire Muller that never happened. And I think that's good for the Republic. But I think again, what was this investigation special counsel investigation about it was trying to find what kind of coordination. What happened in the twenty sixteen campaign? We. I remember what it was focused on and the ultimate concluded. There was no conspiracy to collude between these two entities to sway the election in favor of President Trump. But there were plenty of contacts. And we heard former Esser Michael McFaul say why and is that something Democrats can keep pursuing. They certainly can it is their prerogative. They choose to do. So I think it is in there. I mean, I'm not in the business of Democrats advice, but it would not be in their best interest to do that. And they're voters. If you see these twenty twenty candidates, they're not being asked about Russia and collusion they're being asked about things like health care. So you're going to have an activist core that push them to continue talking about the report and talking about Russia, but there's going to be sort of the law of diminishing returns here and over time after VAR the attorney general testifies after Bob Muller testifies. It's just going to seem like this is just a partisan. Activity trying to draw conclusions that no one else is drunk Republican strategists Antonio furrier. She's a partner at the definers firm served as senior communications adviser to majority leader, Senator Mitch McConnell. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you for having me. You're listening to special coverage from NPR news, then we'll get right back to the program after a look at bay area traffic. Here's Michael Bennett. All right. Thank you. I don't go to Sunnyvale. We have a four car pileup northbound one zero one this is right at fair oaks avenue. Everything's been moved over to the shoulder, but traffic is pretty slow past the scene car fire. This is westbound on the Richmond San Rafael bridge. Just as you get to the toll plaza that too on the shoulder watch for fire crews responding.

President Trump Trump Trump Tower Russia president Russian government special counsel Hillary Clinton attorney Senator Mitch McConnell Mr. Muller Tim Mack Audie Cornish NPR MPR Michael Bennett Esser Michael McFaul Michael Cohen Vladimir Putin Richmond San Rafael bridge
"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:03 min | 3 years ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And Audie Cornish seeking asylum in the US could get more difficult for thousands of migrants in part due to a policy change announced last night by attorney general William bar. His decision seeks to prevent certain asylum seekers from being released on bond while their cases are pending. It's the latest effort by the Trump administration to discourage immigrants from crossing the US border illegally and requesting asylum NPR's Joel rose covers immigration he joins us. Now. Joe I explained the attorney general's decision. What exactly was decided? And what does it mean? Well, before this decision was announced standard policy was that asylum seekers in detention could ask for bond hearing and an immigration judge could decide whether to release the asylum-seeker on bond until his or her court date someday in the future. What the attorney general William bars decision would do is to eliminate those bond hearings. This is for migrants who have already been found to have a credible fear of persecution or. Torture back in their home country and who crossed the border illegally before requesting asylum. President Trump's had recently had a campaign rally that some asylum claims are quote, a big fat Khanjar, unquote. And this is the latest legal step by his administration to limit silent. As you said, how will this actually change things at the border in the short run? It may not make a enormous difference. Attorney general bar implicitly acknowledged in the decision it self that implementation is going to be challenging he said he's going to delay the effective date of his decision for ninety days that is in order to give the department of homeland security time to look for additional detention space to hold more asylum seekers, and then there are other practical limits on the impact of this decision. For example, it does not apply to people who are asking for asylum at legal ports of entry. That's a different process and migrant families and children won't be affected by this decision. At least not for now because there are strict limits on how long immigration authorities can detain children in particular under longstanding federal court. Settlement. All right. So that's what could happen on the ground. What about immigration courts where could we see this effect? Well, immigration courts are not like most other courts part of the department of Justice, the executive branch, not the judiciary. And so what the attorney general the head of the DOJ says is legal precedent and immigration. Judges have to follow it that said the administration's critics believed the attorney general's decision here is wrong on the law, and they plan to challenge it in federal court talk about that legal challenge because this isn't the only immigration policy from the Trump administration that has been challenged, right? This is not a new fight. In fact, there's a case about asylum seekers and font hearings that is already in front of a federal judge in Seattle and just two weeks ago that judge issued a preliminary injunction it says some migrants with legitimate asylum claims do have a right to bond hearings. I talked to the lawyer who argued that case here's Matt Adams with the northwest immigrant rights project every single one of these people have already been determined to have a bona fide claim for. Silent. The government is really unable to demonstrate why people locked up other than to punish them other than this effort to deter them from pursuing their claims, the judge in that case found that asylum seekers do have a right to a bond hearing within seven days. So we've got a federal judge is ruling on the one hand, and which is now in direct conflict with the attorney general's decision that there is no right to avant hearing at all. And what we have is a high stakes legal clash in the making that that could play out in the next few weeks in Seattle. That's NPR's Joel rose jolting for your reporting. You're welcome. All right for more on this story. We're joined now by Leon fresco during the Obama administration. He was the deputy assistant attorney general and oversaw all civil immigration litigation on the part of the US government. Now, he's a member of the nonpartisan DHS advisory council. Welcome. Thank you. So do you agree with the attorney general's reasoning here that there is a legal basis for doing this? This is a very complicated case is a legal issue. This is a fifty fifty issue. And here's why there are two clearly established principles of law that our intention here. The first is if you are outside the United States waiting at a port of entry to get in that is undisputed that those individuals do not have due process rights that would allow them to ask for bond if they're detained while we're making a decision whether to let them internet then there is also a similar under. Understanding that even if you commit the most heinous crime in the world, and you're inside the United States. You get a chance to show that you're entitled to bond doesn't mean you get bond, but you get a chance you have to show that you're not dangerous and that United flight risk. And so the question is what do you do with individuals who've been in the United States five minutes are they like the people who are waiting at the port. But instead of actually waiting at the port like one would normally intend actually evaded the ports and entered for five minutes, or are they like someone who's lived here, and as a criminal case, and is entitled to Bunn because this is immigration on even criminal cases and civil detention. And so this is a debate that the supreme court has intentionally avoided resolving for the last thirty or forty years, but it's finally coming to a head with attorney general bars decision, and so as a policy matter, I don't support it. But as a legal matter it really is a fifty fifty. Matter. Okay. So given the perspective that this is legally speaking fifty fifty are you saying that the challengers to bars decision here don't really have a very strong case. Well, I think they have a very strong case. I think the problem is I think it is. I would say ninety nine percent likely they will get an injunction at a district court level and at the court of appeals. But the question is I can guarantee you there will be four supreme court justices who will say this bar memo is unconstitutional and four who will say it's just fine and will be up to Justice Roberts to beat the deciding vote on this case, okay? Let's put the legal issues aside and talk about policy. I mean, one big practical problem here is that detention centers on the border are already overcrowded. So from a pragmatic standpoint, what are the chances that this policy can actually be implemented? Correct. But writ large this not going to have the sort of change that the authors of the. Memo anticipate it will have because mandatory detention ability is useless without beds. All of the beds are already full. And the only way they would be new beds is the congress authorized new beds, and that was a massive fight in the last appropriations Bill. There's no reason to think that that massive fight will move any further invisible creations Bill right now, you're a member of an advisory council for the department of homeland security that issues recommendations to the department on various issues last night. Your group issued a set of emergency actions that D H S should take immediately to address the flow of migrants at the border. And this was one of the concerns. You flag that there aren't enough asylum officer judges or even buildings to process all the migrants. Correct. That's exactly right. I think if you have two alternatives one on one side is a border wall of two thousand miles and a massive deprivation of rights, which is sort of one way of solving this and another extreme on the other end. Which is do nothing and continued to allow the situation that's happening now to increase numbers, a compromise in the middle would be do not diminish the rights people have but expedite the consideration of what we're ultimately trying to consider. And I think that is right down the middle. You know, zero to one hundred that's right there at fifty of what may be can be a bipartisan compromise, right? Leon fresco is a former deputy assistant attorney general in charge of immigration. He now advises the DHS on immigration issues. Thanks, very much find you..

attorney United States deputy assistant attorney gene Trump administration NPR Joel rose Seattle DHS Leon fresco Audie Cornish advisory council President Trump department of Justice Joe I William bar Matt Adams DOJ William bars Obama administration
"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Audie Cornish Chang with just two sentences in a legal filing. The Justice department shifted its policy towards the Affordable Care Act before it had wanted to repeal only some parts of the law including protections for people with existing medical conditions. Now, it says the entire law should be overturned if that happened the consequences would reach deep into the healthcare system and beyond NPR health policy. Correspondent Alison kodjak is here to explain all to us. A Alison I also so I explain the context here where did this legal filing happen? Yeah. So this is all happening in relation to a legal case brought by a group of Republican attorneys general who wanted to overturn the law and in December a federal judge in Texas granted them their wish and ruled the entire affordable characters on constitutional so yesterday. It's very short filing. The Justice department basically said yes, we agree with that judge. And we want the entire. Log onto our thinking Republicans had won control of the White House and congress in two thousand sixteen promising to repeal the ACA. But then there was a shift where we saw a lot of Republican candidates promised during the two thousand eighteen term elections that they would preserve parts of the ACA. So this feels like another shift doesn't it? It is a bit of a shift, and you know, this is what most people were of post to in the ACA or those provisions in the law that required people to buy health insurance. People didn't like that last year or in late two thousand seventeen so the tax Bill Republicans essentially succeeded in getting rid of that part of the law. So what happened in Texas is that the judge they're ruled that without that part of the law the entire two thousand pages of the ACA fall apart even the parts that people like a lot of legal scholars say the legal reasoning behind that ruling is weak at best and mostly politically driven. I talked earlier today to former attorney general Eric Holder, and he said that the Justice Department's action backing that ruling is quote. Depressing distressing an alarming, and here's what else he said, see the Justice department signing up to support that decision shows how ideologically driven the department has become now this latest move by the Justice department. It won't have any immediate effect on people's healthcare. Right. No. This case is still in the courts. And this doesn't change that. Until it gets resolved the law stands and right now there are more than ten million people with insurance just through the Medicaid expansion. And then there's almost twelve million more who have private insurance through the exchanges those insurance policies won't change now. But if this ruling by the judge in Texas, stands then healthcare coverage for all those people could end up being in jeopardy now you've said before on our air that the is more than just health insurance. What else might change if the whole laws overturned? Yeah. I mean, it is it's two thousand pages. And when it was written. They were trying to basically both expand insurance coverage. But also. Cut costs improve health..

Justice department ACA Texas Alison kodjak Audie Cornish Chang Eric Holder NPR White House attorney congress
U.S. backing of Venezuelan opposition comes with risks

All Things Considered

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

U.S. backing of Venezuelan opposition comes with risks

"New York advocacy group. He says his family scattered around the world because of authoritarian President Nicolas Madura rose regime. We have some family members in the United States is paving. Chile Argentina Colombia. No, we all feel that this moment will be key to that dream of like getting back together. My daughter was reelected in a vote that was widely seen as rigged. And as you've been hearing Venezuelan opposition leader one Guido was has declared himself the interim president this week. Our coverage of the situation in Venezuela continues after news headlines, New York City health officials are pushing members of the public to cut sugary drinks from their diets a new ad campaign. Pointing out that the not so sweet effects that can come from soda, sports drinks and fruit punch can be detrimental to your health and WNYC today city health Commissioner oaks IRAs Barbaro said that the list of health risks starts with cavities and obesity. And then the dominoes start falling in terms of increase risks for diabetes, heart disease, and the the contributions that those conditions have to ultimately things like cancer. The health department says New Yorkers have been drinking fewer sugary drinks since two thousand seven but about one in four adults and one in three high school. Students still drink one per day. And the MTA board is delaying its vote on possible fair and toll increases until next month at its meeting today. A board member said the agency needs more time to consider options the MTA had planned and approximately five percent fare hike to go into effect in March. It's unclear whether that will happen for every month that postpones the fare hike. Transit officials say they lose thirty million dollars. Currently fifty six degrees raining in central park at four zero six support for NPR comes from creative planning an independent wealth management firm whose advisors are fiduciaries legally bound to act in their clients. Best interests, more, creative, planning dot com slash NPR, wealth management redefined. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Mary Louise Kelley today is the thirty four stay of the longest government shutdown in history and in congress. The Senate took their very first votes on bills to reopen. The government one Bill backed by President Trump would have reopened the government in exchange for five point seven billion for a border wall. The other backed by Democrats would have opened the government for a short time to continue talks about the border both bills failed as everyday people across the country are coping with the shutdowns of fact like in Huntsville, Alabama where the greater Huntsville humane society gave free food to more than one hundred pets for Lord furloughed workers yesterday. Some people asked for a month supply and at the Salt Lake City international airport where the Utah food Bank set up donation bins outside TSA checkpoints for workers a room. There has been cleared to hold the items. NPR's congressional reporter Kelsey Snell has been following the politics of the shutdown. She joins us now from Capitol Hill and Kelsey as we've talked about for the last thirty plus days, roughly, eight hundred thousand federal workers will miss a paycheck. What is congress finally doing about this in short and they're not doing anything right now? Both Senate bills needed sixty votes. And both of them came up short six Republicans voted for the Democrats Bill and only one democrat Joe Manchin of West Virginia voted for the president's plan. Now, there's a lot of support for just opening the government, but we're in the same places we've been for weeks, nobody in the capital want the shutdown to last, but they simply can't figure out how to pass something that Democrats support and the president will sign so it's starting to feel like the same thing over and over the perception has been that Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell was on the sidelines throughout all of this. And now the Senate is engaged, right? Or congressional Republicans feeling pressure to end the shutdown. It would be an understatement to say that people are getting irritated. They just simply want a deal. I was talking to a lot of people including Republicans, and I think one person. Who described it, really? Well, was Ohio Republican Rob Portman? He told us that there shouldn't be so hard to get a deal. And there is a deal to be had. Here's what he said. Shutdowns are always stupid. This is one because the underlying problem is one we can't resolve we're not that far. This is not healthcare. He went on to say, it's not abortion. It's not one of these big social issues that people are used to fighting about. But they just can't get there. And, you know, Senate Democrats are pretty angry to this whole place is kind of a tinderbox. And there was this big fight on the floor between Michael Bennet from Colorado, a democrat and Senator Ted Cruz Republican from Texas and cut reheated. Here's what he said. How ludicrous it

Senate Rob Portman NPR President Nicolas Madura Congress MTA Kelsey Snell Chile Argentina Colombia President Trump Huntsville United States Interim President Diabetes New York Audie Cornish New York City Venezuela
Nancy Pelosi on Record Number of Women in Congress

All Things Considered

00:38 sec | 3 years ago

Nancy Pelosi on Record Number of Women in Congress

"Under a partial shutdown. She called on members to respect each other and the truth in dealing with one another Don gonyea, NPR news, Washington. Members of the US. Congress are a largely religious group, or at least claimed to have a faith NPR's. Tom gjelten says about nine and ten say they're Christian with Catholics the most popular denomination. Among the members the religious profile of congress comes from the Pew Research Center based on how members describe themselves across congress, just one member democratic Senator Kirsten cinema Zona reports having no particular faith, among all US adults one in force has that one explanation for that disconnect. Maybe that candidates think voters won't approve of someone who's unchurched. So they're reluctant to describe themselves that way, no matter their actual beliefs. Thirty percent of members say their Catholic of the Protestant members Baptists have. The largest share more than six percent identifies. Jewish three times the share of Jews in the US adult population. Tom Chilton NPR news, Washington, Mexico's foreign affairs ministry says it's calling on the US government through its embassy to investigate a January first incident in which US agents fired tear gas into Mexico agents said they were attempting to disperse a group of rock throwers in the first hours of new year about one hundred and fifty migrants attempted to breach a border fence in Tijuana was financial markets plunged again in the second trading day of the new year all three of the major US stock market indices closing down more than two percent stock market jitters were prompted by Apple's warning showdown in China admitted escalating trade war between the US and China. Arthur Dong is a professor of strategy and economics at Georgetown's McDonough school of business overall, the United States economies far less dependent on exports. We are very heavily diversified service based economy, and so on that respect the United States. You know, is is I think sitting. In a in a better position overall. But it certainly will be some some repercussions felt apple stock dropped almost ten percent today racing more than seventy four billion dollars in market valuation. The Dow was down six hundred and sixty points. This is NPR and you're listening to WNYC. I'm Jamie Floyd. A federal judge is blocking implementation of a New York City law that would have regulated Airbnb home hotel business. The law would require Airbnb and other short term rental platforms to divulge the names of hosts and addresses of rentals. But the court said the amount of information amounts to unreasonable search and seizure. The law was to go into effect early next month will now be put on hold while the lawsuit moves forward, mayor de Blasio had championed the law saying it would it make sure the city's precious housing supply could be devoted to New Yorkers rather than tourists. A special election for New York City. Public advocate is set for February twenty six it's the first citywide especially election since nineteen fifty and WNYC's bridge Bergen reports the rules are unique for this race. You won't see anyone running as a democrat or Republican to actually appear on the ballot candidates must create their own party name. And collect nearly four thousand signatures from registered voters. And there's another quirk, Melissa Mark Viverito. Former city council speaker running on the fixed the MTA party line explains. The other interesting thing is that unlike a primary here whoever files I their petitions is first on the ballot Merck. Marito is vying for that top spot. Among nearly two dozen declared candidates turning in her petitions just one day after candidates were allowed to start collecting them. New Jersey is one of the state's least affected by the partial shutdown of the federal government. That's according to a new study, which says the Garden State will be hard hit by delays in process. Messing federally financed mortgages, but less so in other categories, New Jersey ranked forty four th out of fifty states and the district of Columbia the study by the financial website, wallet hub, ranks state based on the number of federal jobs contracts, real estate activity, national parks, and percentage of families receiving food assistance. New York ranked thirty fifth on the list in part because New York is among the five states, receiving the least money in federal contracts. The district of Columbia, not surprisingly is most affected by the shutdown. Currently forty two degrees. Partly cloudy at six oh, six support for NPR comes from the Walton family foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton family foundation dot org. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish, and Mary Louise Kelley the government shutdown grinds on over funding for President Trump's border wall. But meanwhile, the Trump administration is moving ahead with plans to construct or upgrade border fencing, some one hundred sixty miles along the Arizona and California borders with Mexico, active duty military will take up the task here to tell us more is NPR's Pentagon. Reporter Tom Bowman and Tom what exactly is the task with? What is the Pentagon going to be doing? Well, I'm told this fencing said likely combat engineers for the fencing portion of this effort, but it goes beyond that homeland security's requesting medical units, of course, two children died along the border with in the custody of US officials at the centers they need additional help for the migrants coming through and also told aviation units would be part of this as well. They provide surveillance along the border to help customs and border protection, monitor any movements. And again, this is so. Support for that effort. Active-duty troops can't get involved in any arrest or detention of any migrants, it's against the law and to be clear. This is something new. This is on top of the existing troops already deployed to the border. Right. So this is new this is just coming out. Now this request was made from homeland security. How many more we talking? Well, we don't know at this point. I heard some one official said maybe thousands of troops and other said, well, the existing truce might be able to help. There are now twenty three hundred act of troops there on the border along with twenty one hundred guard forces they could provide some of this effort, but clearly they're going to send additional troops. They could change them out or some could be extended but acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan hinted about more support at a cabinet meeting at the White House yesterday. Let's listen restoration of the fences building out and additional mileage from the law. The army Corp. Engineers is dialed in on doing this cost-effectively quickly on the right amount of urgency as to where we built additional stand up walls quickly get after the threat. The threat is real. And he goes on to say that he'll provide assistance to homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen who's making the request to the Pentagon anytime line on how long these duty troops might be there. No idea. I was told it could be months to construct the fencing or shore up existing fencing, you know, we're talking one hundred and sixty miles or so now fencing right act of troops were supposed to end their deployment, by the way at the end of the month. So some could be extended maybe other units could take their place. But what we don't know. Right. Will the Pentagon is working on the specific? So we don't have a lot of detail at this point. Let me insertive skeptical question here, the president has said if he doesn't get money for a wall from congress. He might just order the military to build it is that what is going on here. The president doing something of an end run around the border standoff. That's quite possible. At this point, the talks with congress, the Democrats in particular appear to be going nowhere. The Pentagon the president wants five billion dollars for the wall. The Democrats saying that's far too much. In the standoff continues the government shutdown. But of course, a Pentagon has not shut down. And they're ready to take orders from the commander in chief. Thank you. You're welcome NPR's. Tom Bowman one person. And we'll be looking at the Trump administration's immigration policies is the new chairman of the House Judiciary committee, New York, Democrat Jerrold Nadler, welcome to the program. Thank you. Now. Your committee has oversight over many key areas. Right Justice department, voting rights and an immigration as we mentioned on that last issue. You told CBS that the zero tolerance policy that led to the separation of migrant families on the border was a deliberate creation of the White House that they're trying to make things as miserable as possible. In quote, if kids die there apparently willing to have that. Yes. To investigate the deaths of those two migrant children. Yes, we are. We're going to investigate the deaths of those two migrant children and the entire family separation policy. And there are a lot of questions. How could they for example, deport parents to foreign countries? He's making no provision to give the kids back I or even to figure out identification for the kids. So we have kids now months later that may never find your parents again. State-sanctioned kidnapping. Does it feel like investigative actions and oversight? That's really the only recourse. Democrats have right now. Does it feel like you have no real ability to change Trump administration policies? No doesn't feel that way. At all. And you can't talk about that the first day of democratic control, and the new congress, we have a we have leverage investigation, and, publicity, and and oversight is a major constitutional responsibility. And ability that we have the number to the power of the purse, you can't pass a budget without the house as well as the Senate, and we can put requirements in that budget. We can put limitations on the use of funds we can put requirements for the use of funds and so forth. So even if you cannot pass. Subject matter Bill through both houses of the president would veto it. They can't pass a budget without the house consent. So we have considerable leverage. You've also on another topic. You've sponsored a Bill that would protect the special counsel office. Robert Muller was investigating interference in the two thousand sixteen election introduce that Bill today, and you've also threatened to subpoena acting attorney general Mr. Whittaker what do you hope to learn from him? We are very concerned about a massive fraud. And the American people by the president by his campaign in order to obtain office through fraudulent means hush money payments to women Michael Cohen working with the Russians plus obstruction of Justice in the investigation of that we have to look into all of that. And the special counsel is looking into that or into some of it insofar as they may be crimes, but we have to look into all of that to protect the integrity of our elections and the integrity of our democratic system and to protect the American people from being defrauded by by the Trump campaign Ovalles future campaigns for that matter. So that is the prime thing that we have to do we have to put an end to Republican efforts over the last two years to interfere with an undermine the special counsel's investigation. If the Muller investigation uncovers evidence of high crimes and misdemeanors are you prepared to pursue impeachment? And even if it's politically unpopular it's too early. To talk about impeachment. But what is important at this point is to follow all the facts where they lead to make sure that those facts are public and to make sure that they're not interfered with by the Trump administration. So if a special counsel issues report, we have to make sure that that report is is it becomes public. If necessary we'll subpoena it necessarily will quote Muller to testify in front of the committee about it. We have to make sure that it's not varied by the Trump administration. Bye bye Whitaker or by bar. The President Trump has been implicated and campaign law violations. As part of Michael Collins plea, something like that an impeachable offense. It could be that. I don't wanna get into impeachment now. 'cause it when we're not prepared for that. At this point. The some of what he's been accused of could be impeachable. Offenses. But the real question now is to find out what happened to find out. What frauds were committed but frauds against American democracy. And to make sure the public knows that the public can judge, and we can judge in the judiciary committee instead of where we should go from there whether to be impeachment whether it should be protective legislation for the future. Whatever it may be. And you were earlier you were speaking about William bar, the White House nominee for attorney general. Yes. And and the acting attorney general Mr. Whittaker is it possible that you will overplay your hand.

Trump Administration NPR United States President Trump Congress Pentagon Washington Apple Tom Gjelten Robert Muller New York City Mexico Tom Bowman White House Tom Chilton Don Gonyea New Jersey
"audie cornish" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"audie cornish" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. While many federal buildings in Washington DC remained closed due to the shutdown. One government facility will be open for the first time tomorrow. It's a new day care for the house of representatives that will cut the weightless for new parents from three years down to one lawmakers say they wanna make the house a more competitive employer with the private sector. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis has this report in the shadow of the US capitol dome. A new dome is set to open its on the playground of new daycare facility, which is designed to look like a mini National Mall with kids size landmarks like the US capitol and the Washington Monument and house majority leader Kevin McCarthy is pretty stoked about it. This is the only Washington Monument in DC that you can climb up the California Republican becomes minority leader when the new congress begins Thursday, but during his time in the majority he helps secure the office space in a building Jason to the capital. And more than twelve million dollars to build this state of the art daycare facility that use of taxpayer funds could open up congress to criticism. But McCarthy says the goal here is to keep highly qualified staff on the hill, if somebody is working for you and wants to continue to serve government, but says, I don't have daycare. So I can't stay here. The wait list is too long. The quality is not there. Then you're disadvantage in who could actually serve and work in government at the same time in recent years, the weightless for the house daycare became so long that staffers were signing up before they were even pregnant I've had friends who the minute. They got engaged. They're putting themselves on the list. That's Melissa Murphy. She's chief-of-staff North Carolina. Republican congressman David rouser. Her two kids are currently in the house daycare. Murphy says it's common for staffers to make a reluctant decision to leave the hill for more lucrative jobs in the private sector when they decide to start a family. It's really upsetting to see because they make the decision to leave the hill and leave public service because the cost of private daycare is difficult to maintain on some of the congressional salaries the house daycare costs between eleven hundred and seventeen hundred dollars a month, a fraction of the cost of comparable private daycare in the DC area. This modern twenty six thousand square foot facility will be able to care for up to a hundred and twenty infants and toddlers it's only a benefit for house, employee's and members of congress, but lawmakers get no special treatment over staff just asks Washington, Republican congresswoman Jaime Herrera Butler, I never made it off.

congress Melissa Murphy DC Kevin McCarthy Washington Monument US NPR Audie Cornish Washington Jaime Herrera Butler congressman Susan Davis National Mall David rouser California Jason seventeen hundred dollars
White officer who shot neighbor inside his apartment indicted for murder

All Things Considered

00:25 sec | 4 years ago

White officer who shot neighbor inside his apartment indicted for murder

"Have shown up, but it probably wouldn't have been in a number. It's right now in this climate, Michelle Obama will also be speaking at the Barclay center in Brooklyn, tomorrow night, Saturday, and Manhattan and Brooklyn are both vying to light the world's largest minora in celebration of Hanukkah this year, the thirty two foot high four thousand pound gold colored minora is going outside of the plaza hotel in Manhattan today, and it will be lit on Sunday marking the first night of Hannukah across the river the river Brooklyn's largest minora roughly the same size will also have its first lighting of the season Sunday night at grant. Army plaza a concert kickoff for the festivities and Brooklyn organizers, we'll have music Lakas and the rest every night of Hannukah currently forty one degrees cloudy at five. Oh, six. Support for NPR comes from Baird for one hundred years. Baird has partnered with individuals businesses institutions and communities working together toward their financial goals. More information is available at Baird one hundred dot com. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And Mary Louise Kelley President Trump's sit down with Vladimir Putin looked set to go ahead on the sidelines of the g twenty summit this week. Then Trump threatened to call it off yesterday. He said it was probably on. And then from Air Force One on route to Argentina Trump tweeted. He was pulling out the bottom line is they may have an impromptu chat in Buenos Aires who knows there's nothing on the formal schedule. What we do know is that hanging over any meeting between the leaders of the United States and Russia is Robert Mueller, the special counsel who has been investigating ties between Russia and Trump and who this week showed his hand in a number of interesting ways, prompting journalist Garrett Graff to ask is Robert Muller's in game. Incite graph explores that question in wired magazine this week, and he joins me now hither Garrett by now as is prone to happen in two thousand eighteen there have been twists and turns even since you file. This story, and we're gonna get to some of those but to travel far far back in time all the way to Monday this week forgotten the dark ages. This was the day that Muller's team alleged that Paul Manafort, former Trump campaign chair had lied to the FBI. And you argue in your piece in wired that this day Monday may end up breaking among the most consequential days yet of the Muller probe. Why it's an incredibly hard, obviously to read the tea leaves of this investigation surprised us at every turn and often surprises us multiple times within a single day. But it seemed like Monday was the beginning of the end that the decision to declare Paul Manafort as non-cooperative and move forward with his sentencing appears to be perhaps a way that Muller is trying to move forward with publishing something that could. Look like the Muller report that he plans to file sometime presumably next week. A document outlining with the court all of Paul manafort's lies in crimes. So if that is one way that Mueller may be showing his hand or about to show his hand. Let me fast forward you now to yesterday, which is when longtime Trump lawyer Michael Cohen pleads guilty again this time of lying to congress about a proposed Trump Tower in Moscow. How does it that shift the picture? It's one of the most significant moves that we've seen so far from Muller because what it does is connects Donald Trump and the Trump organization directly to Russia in directly to Russian President Vladimir Putin during the course of the two thousand sixteen campaign and how so how are they now coming together? We'll what you have is Michael Cohen trying to contact in game the assistance of Ladimir Putin himself. To secure the funding and the approval for Trump Tower Moscow as late as the spring of two thousand sixteen well into the period where Donald Trump has secured the GOP nomination for president of the United States. One of the aspects of Muller strategy appears to have been he's kind of rating, whatever final report he's going to produce at the end of this as he goes, I mean, he's been producing these very detailed court filings. Exactly. And people seem to be waiting for there to be some hard back book that gets published at the end of this. That is labeled the Muller report like nine eleven commission style. Exactly. And I think most people are missing that. He is writing a lot of that report in public with every court filing where the details that he puts into these are far more than is strictly necessary for the criminal prosecution that he's attempting to pursue. So when you look at the. Totality of what? Bob Muller has published in these indictments in these plea agreements, there's a lot there. Well, it's about three hundred pages of what a Bob Muller report would look like at the end. So to your key question is Bob Muller's in game. And I think it is it's incredibly hard as I said to understand where this investigation is going day to day. But Bob Muller has to know that his investigation was under threat, potentially after the election, and after attorney general Jeff Sessions being fired. Absolutely. And that he I think appears to be ready for some rapid movement in the weeks ahead now that doesn't necessarily mean this is going to come to a quick conclusion. The prosecution's for Watergate stretched out over the course of almost a decade. But this is I think a case where George popadopoulos went to prison for his. Fourteen days sentence last Monday, another former trumpet, we should mention. Yes. And that I think by the time George popadopoulos comes out of prison. We're gonna know a lot more about this case, journalist and Muller biographer Garrett Graff Garrett. Thank you. My pleasure. So as we just heard one of the most significant developments in the Muller probe this week was President Trump's former lawyer and fix Michael Cohen pleading guilty to lying to congress about efforts to build a Trump Tower in Russia during the two thousand sixteen campaign and that effort came after decades of President Trump trying to build in Russia to be NYC's. Ilya marritz, co host the Trump Inc podcast. He joins me now to give us a more of the long view. Welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. I should say Trump Inc. Right. I have to get to Trump Inc. So we know some about Michael Cohen's work during the presidential campaign. How does this week's news ads what we already knew about Trump's efforts to build in Russia? Well, we now know because Trump's former lawyer said it in court that Trump was actively pursuing a tower in Moscow while he was campaigning for the Republican nomination for president. This is something Donald Trump has long denied what history tells us is that Trump has long wanted to put his name on a building in Moscow. So in one thousand nine hundred seven he visits the US. Czar the Soviet Union, and he talks about how they need luxury hotels in Moscow and Leningrad. He makes another trip in one thousand nine hundred ninety s doesn't get anywhere. And then in the two thousand Trump's starts to lend his name to developers around the world. And there's a there deals around Russia. There's one in Azerbaijan there's one in the Republic of Georgia which Michael Cohen helps to arrange in twenty thirteen Trump's comes to Moscow again for the Miss Universe pageant. He owns the pageant, and he says again that he's in talks with developers. And then finally we see a renewed effort in two thousand fifteen and two thousand sixteen to build in Moscow.

Mary Louise Kelley President T Donald Trump Muller Trump Inc Trump Tower Trump Tower Moscow Michael Cohen Bob Muller Robert Muller Russia Vladimir Putin Moscow President Trump United States Paul Manafort Garrett Graff Garrett Baird Robert Mueller
President Trump, President And President Putin discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 4 years ago

President Trump, President And President Putin discussed on All Things Considered

"With the president of China this weekend. Both are locked in a multi-billion dollar trade war. Civil rights leaders say the indictment of four Saint Louis metropolitan police officers reveals a troubling mindset. Inside the department Saint Louis public radio's Rachel Lipman reports. The officers are facing federal charges for their roles in the assault of an undercover officer during a two thousand seventeen protests. The charges include excessive force obstruction of Justice and lying to a grand jury four officers have been suspended without pay the undercover detective was among hundreds of people arrested at downtown Saint Louis in September of last year. It was the third day of protests after a white for a police officer was acquitted of shooting and killing a black, man. That's Rachel Lipman reporting. This is NPR and I'm Jimmy Floyd for WNYC. Some New York City council. Members are introducing a Bill to make the government bidding process with corporations more transparent. The new law would prohibit officials from signing nondisclosure agreements with companies as happened in the Amazon deal councilmember Brad Lander says he feels that level of secrecy should not happen again. If the law had been in place, the city would have had to say we can't sign a non disco. Agreement. So there's two choices. We can make a bid, but it has to be public and people would be able to see it. The Bill is cosponsored by council members Monty Williams and Jimmy van Bremer atop regional Federal Housing administrator is calling for the arrest of three Niger officials after a report found they regularly lied about elevator. Inspections. Lynn Pat overseas region, two of the department of housing and urban development, which includes New York and New Jersey yesterday. She tweeted that the Niger employees should be jailed after they were charged with dozens of felony counts. For falsifying inspection reports. Daily news reporter, Greg Smith says Patten has little authority to pursue the case herself. She has almost nothing to do with this. I guess it's well intention that she does ask a question that is important. And that is did anybody higher up the ladder condone this behavior that isn't really important question. That's the most important question. Smith says the case will be handled by. The district attorney, and Shirley Chisholm story is coming to the big screen and Oscar winning actress viola Davis is bringing it to life. Davis is set to produce and star in a new film about Chisholm for Amazon studios called the fighting, Shirley Chisholm Chisholm, the first black woman ever elected to congress represented New York's twelfth district in the house of representatives from nineteen sixty nine to nine thousand nine hundred eighty three. She was also the first woman to seek the democratic party's presidential nomination in nineteen seventy-two Chisholm died in two thousand five at age eighty and we'll have a retrospective later on all things considered tonight. We've got a twenty percent chance of light rain, otherwise cloudy with a low around thirty four degrees. Currently forty two degrees and cloudy at four oh, six support for NPR comes from farmers insurance committed to helping people understand the ins and outs have insurance. So they can prepare for lives ups and downs. Coverage op. Options and more information can be found at farmers dot com. This is all things considered for men. PR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish all is run. President Trump's first day the twenty summit in Argentina. He's working his way through a series of meetings. There Trump's visit comes on the heels of a big development and special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation a guilty plea by his former attorney Michael Cohen, and what it revealed about Trump's efforts to land a business deal with Russia during the two thousand sixteen campaign NPR White House correspondent tamra Keith is traveling with the president and joins us now from when his IRAs their town. Hey, ATI sometimes when a president goes overseas. The White House is trying to leave all the domestic troubles behind is that the case this time, the answer would seem to be no. And and the reason I say that is that President Trump was supposed to have a meeting here with Russian President Vladimir Putin, he abruptly cancelled that on the way to Argentina via tweet saying it was because of Russian aggression against Ukraine, but then this afternoon there were. Reports of a possibly an informal meeting happening between Trump and Putin. Those reports were being pushed from Russia and the White House put out a sort of an odd statement referring to the Mueller investigation. Sarah Sanders sent this along she said the Russian witch-hunt hoax, which is hopefully now nearing an end is doing very well. Unfortunately, it probably does undermine our relationship with Russia, which was not entirely the answer to the question that we were asking another way that we know that the president's thinking about it is that he's been tweeting about it from here in Argentina a little while ago. Reporter's got to ask the president questions, and and one of the questions was about why he cancelled his meeting with Putin. He insisted it was because of Ukraine, hopefully, they'll be able to settle it out. Flowers amazing with president. The basis of what took place. With respect to the ships, sailors that was the. In the meantime, what else has been going on at the g twenty one big thing that happened today was before the g twenty started a signing ceremony at the president's hotel with the leaders of Canada and Mexico signing the US MCA that is the trade deal that will replace NAFTA. One interesting note is that during remarks, President Trump and president Pineyro of Mexico. It was his last day on the job both referred to it as the US MCA, which is the preferred title that President Trump likes, but prime minister Trudeau kept calling it new NAFTA, even though President Trump does not like the term NAFTA at all. But you know, this is a notable moment because this is a step in the process of President Trump, keeping a campaign promise that said congress and legislatures in Mexico and Canada still need to sign off on this on another subject. The Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman is there. He's of course, been under scrutiny since the killing of journalist Jamal kashogi has he actually interacted with President Trump yet. So a White House official says that they just exchanged pleasantries that there was no discussion. This comes in pretty big contrast with a video that's been circulating of Russian President Putin, and m Bs exchanging sort of an intricate high five that looked very celebratory the president is under some scrutiny about this because he has questioned the CIA assessment that NBS ordered the killing of Jamal kashogi. That's NPR's tamra Keith tamra. Thank you. You're welcome. And we're going to start right there with the g twenty talks in Argentina for our regular week in politics chat. We also need to take stock of another wild week in the Russia investigation. David Brooks of the New York Times is here in the studio as he often has on Friday, David with you and Susan Glasser. The New Yorker, welcome to you. Thanks so much. So President Trump signed this new NAFTA deal today, except as we just heard we're not supposed to call it NAFTA anymore. That's controversial. We are referring to the United States Mexico Canada agreement the US MCA, Scott, I'm tempted to call it also maybe prospects for a trade deal or some sort of agreement with China that may be coming together down at the g twenty Susan. Let me start with you does this count as progress in a year where we have spent a lot more time talking about trade wars than trade deals. Well, look, I think President Trump made a decision to sort of pull back from the brink and to declare victory with the reincarnated NAFTA. Whatever you wanna call it, most experts, and I'm not one on this subject. Do believe that it essentially is a reincarnated NAFTA that it builds on the foundation substantially of the original went and by the way, it's not attend deal. I should point out that there's going to be a real political fight. I think. Up here in Washington on Capitol Hill over approving this. So it's not over. Although President Trump was was taking it as a victory lap. Today was also strengthened by government coming in Mexico, which will inherit the steel by a president on his last day there. That's right. And and I thought you saw the lasting hard feelings as a result of these very tough negotiations with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who did appear at the last minute was uncertain at the signing ceremony today in Buenos Aires. But had some strong words for President Trump, and you've had this amazing spectacle. What have we taken to get here of the United States going after candidate one of its closest allies, David your takeaway, so far from the g twenty well, so far the image of Muhammad bin Salman and Putin doing an end zone dance together is the big takeaway video circulating of them doing a hi fi. Looking very cheer an image. It's a symbol. It's a symbol of an era in which the wolves of the global international order are on the March and undeterred because there's no one. Deter them. And so that's one thing. The second thing I think is the China US relationship and this thank heaven is not a Trump related story to me the big change in US China relations is that we used to have people who were friends of China somewhere, foes of China and the foreign policy establishment sort of split. That's no longer the case. Now, everyone sees China as a challenge, but as a foe Hank pulse in the former treasury fare gave a speech in Singapore recently in which he laid that very clearly and he was very much in the camp. So when Trump talks tough on China trade, he now has a lot of people who are not normally his friends actually thinking he's doing the right thing me loop.

President Trump President Putin Nafta NPR China Donald Trump Mexico Argentina Us Mca New York Shirley Chisholm Chisholm White House Russia President Pineyro Congress Robert Mueller Jimmy Floyd Rachel Lipman David Brooks
Saudis use Trump's Khashoggi statement to cast doubt on CIA assessment

All Things Considered

00:23 sec | 4 years ago

Saudis use Trump's Khashoggi statement to cast doubt on CIA assessment

"Audie Cornish. Republicans in congress are reacting to President Trump's extraordinary statement on the US relationship with Saudi Arabia. It was in response to the CIA assessment that Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman approved the killing of Saudi journalists Jamal kashogi yesterday, the president signaled he would not take strong action against Saudi Arabia or the crown prince and some Republicans say that sends a dangerous

Saudi Arabia Prince Mohammad Bin Salman Saudi Crown Audie Cornish President Trump Jamal Kashogi CIA Congress United States
Student loan company Navient used deceptive practices, audit suggests

All Things Considered

00:57 sec | 4 years ago

Student loan company Navient used deceptive practices, audit suggests

"Washington debate is slated this evening between two candidates in unexpectedly. Contentious Mississippi Senate race, Republican Senator Cindy Hyde. Smith faces a runoff next week against democrat. Mike Espy the runoff race has become embroiled in controversy after a video surfaced on Twitter from a campaign event for Senator Cindy, Hyde Smith in Tupelo Mississippi earlier this month, and it she can be heard praising supporter by saying, quote, if he invited me to a public hanging. I'd be on the front row given Mississippi's history of racist violence against black people many observers heard that comment as a disturbing reference to lynching Hyde Smith who is white said in a statement that quote, any attempt to turn this into a negative connotation is ridiculous her opponent. Former congressman in US agriculture secretary. Mike Espy is African American. No candidate got more than fifty percent of the vote on November six sending the race to a runoff. Next week. You're listening to NPR and this is WNYC in New York. I'm Jamie Floyd, the head of New York City's board of election says the ballot is the reason for long lines on election day, the perforated to page ballot presented a series of problems never before experienced by the board or anywhere in the country. The only executive director Michael Ryan, he spoke to city council members during a nearly four hour long hearing today said his agency just didn't have enough time to test the scanners with that amount of paper city council speaker Cory Johnson said he expects a full plan from the city and state officials about how to fix these issues for quote, the next election and the one after that and the one after that. The man accused of killing a New York City. Toddler best known as baby hope has died in custody. The New York Times reporting that Corrado Juarez died Sunday due to complications related upon create a cancer. The fifty seven year old former restaurant worker was awaiting trial for the last five years. What is was charged in the murder of four year old on Djelic Custodio whose body was found in a cooler left in a wooded area area in upper Manhattan back in nineteen Ninety-one. Prosecutors say she had been suffocated and molested her killing remained unsolved for more than two decades, and predatory lenders in New Yorker taking advantage of an arcane legal document that allows them to immediately sees borrower's assets when they default, and in some cases, even when they don't the loophole is called a confession of judgment it forces small-time borrowers to forfeit their rights. If the lenders. Decide to sue Bloomberg BusinessWeek reporters Meyde Meidlinger says that most of these lenders are actually from out of state. The lenders have figured out that the New York state court system is the best for what they're trying to do here. And so they typically go to upstate county clerk's offices where people are just kind of sitting there rubber-stamping these judgments, there's no judge involved and mitre says these are impossible to overturn forty seven degrees. Support for NPR comes from i-drive may grow remote PC, providing real time remote access to PC's Maxon servers from anywhere for use win telecommuting or for remote management. Learn more at remote dot com slash NPR. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. Ari Shapiro before heading to his mar-a-lago resort for thanksgiving today. President Trump took questions from reporters on the lawn of the White House as his helicopter waited. The topics included his statement on Saudi Arabia. A legal setback on his new asylum. Restrictions and his daughter Ivanka is use of a personal Email address. He spoke out against the ninth circuit court of appeals the federal appeals court for the western US. That's where judge yesterday temporarily halted the administration's new restrictions on asylum-seekers, Trump suggested the court was biased. No matter. What you do? No

New York City Hyde Smith Mike Espy NPR United States Senator Cindy Hyde Senator Cindy Tupelo Mississippi Mississippi President Trump Washington The New York Times Twitter Cory Johnson Ivanka Audie Cornish Senate
U.S. prosecutors talking with accused Russian agent to resolve case

All Things Considered

00:55 sec | 4 years ago

U.S. prosecutors talking with accused Russian agent to resolve case

"In US stocks today, though for the week the US natural markets still posted losses. The Dow was up one hundred twenty three points today to twenty five thousand four thirteen. The NASDAQ fell eleven points, the SNP up six points. This is NPR. And this is WNYC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson, New York City officials say plummeting temperatures and an unexpected amount of snow contributed to widespread chaos last night. Marital Bazi city Commissioner said they were expecting one to two inches of snow instead of more than six transportation Commissioner Polly trot and Burg says without enough warning the city was not able to salt and plow roads, effectively this event had been described to something where it was not going to get below freezing. And everything was going to it got icy and not just on the George Washington Bridge. Bayonne bridge cross Bronx major Deegan. A bunch of places where trucks and cars started slipping and sliding marital Bosnia said there will be an audit of how the city and other agencies like the port authority could have reacted more effectively. Meanwhile, New Jersey transit has suspended service on to train lines due to damage from this storm. The agency says the north jersey coast line will be shut down until tomorrow morning. That's because overhead wires came down in Middletown that significantly damaged signal lines. The Gladstone branch will also be shut down until Monday morning. That's to make time for repairs to a signal crossing in new providence where a strain or a train struck a car last night. Nj transit. Bus and rail tickets and passes will be cross honored across the system and with private buses for the rest of tonight. Mayor de Blasio says he has fired the head of New York City's watchdog agency to preserve its honor and integrity, the mayor announced this afternoon that he removed department investigation Commissioner Mark Peters. The Blasios said his decision was spurred by recent report, accusing Peters of abusing his power the very top leadership at DIO. I've repeatedly undermined the values critical to its mission. My job as mayor to make a change. So that deal I can do. It's important work going forward. Tensions between the two men were high after Peter's issued hard hitting investigations of the city's housing authority correction department and child services agency earlier this year to Blasi reportedly the ordered his staff to find ways to get rid of him. The mayor has nominated the state's executive deputy attorney general for criminal Justice says Peterson replacement for the rest of tonight mostly clear with a low of thirty five wind chills between thirty and thirty five wind gusts to twenty eight miles an hour. Support for NPR comes. From the YMCA committed to opportunities for all and the belief that no one should be defined by zip code. They're born into details on the impact of donations YMCA dot net slash for a better us. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. It's another day of counting actually recounting in Florida across the state workers are counting ballots by hand in the US Senate race where Republican challenger Rick. Scott maintains a narrow lead over democratic incumbent Bill Nelson in Broward County this morning. Local election workers went through a PowerPoint full of instructions on how to decipher ballots that have been remarked with crossed out. Check marks even written on by voters voter marks

New York City United States Commissioner Mark Peters NPR Mayor De Blasio New York Bayonne Bridge New Jersey George Washington Bridge Commissioner Polly Trot Sean Carlson Ari Shapiro Commissioner Bosnia Audie Cornish Middletown Bill Nelson
Kavanaugh: More women come forward with claims of sexual assault

All Things Considered

00:42 sec | 4 years ago

Kavanaugh: More women come forward with claims of sexual assault

"Audie Cornish. And I'm Mary Louise Kelley more women are making allegations of sexual misconduct and sexual assault against supreme court nominee. Brad kavanagh. One of them is speaking out by name. Julie sweat Nick came forward today to say, she observed cavenaugh as a teenager drinking excessively at parties and pressing himself against girls without their consent among other things Christine Blasi Ford had already accused cavenaugh sexual assault when they were both teenagers and Deborah Ramirez. Says he exposed himself to her when they were both college students Cavanaugh denies all the allegations and the Senate Judiciary committee so far is sticking with its plans to have

Assault Audie Cornish Deborah Ramirez Mary Louise Kelley Christine Blasi Ford Senate Judiciary Committee Brad Kavanagh Julie Cavanaugh Nick
President Trump, Trump and Brenda Lopez discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

06:28 min | 4 years ago

President Trump, Trump and Brenda Lopez discussed on All Things Considered

"Election day is less than eight weeks away. But in a midterm year majority of voters don't cast a ballot and particular young people are far less likely to vote than older people in the last midterm election. Only about twenty percent of voters underaged thirty showed up at the polls NPR's Muhammad has been exploring why so many people sit out elections in America and has this report from Nevada in the two thousand fourteen election the area around the Las Vegas strip. Which is Nevada's first congressional district had one of the worst youth voter turnout rates in the country less than five percent of eighteen to twenty nine year olds voted that's according to estimates. From Tufts University, Brenda Lopez was one of those non voters the day, we met she left. Her house at five thirty in the morning for a job at an armored cash handling company by the time, she gets back home the home. She shares with her parents, grandma siblings. Her husband and her daughter. She is exhausted. It's not easy. You know, being being mom in Hawaii having to cook. And still trying to. Keep up with work and school. And I feel like I have no time for myself. Lopez is twenty six and she's not registered to vote. One of the main reasons why haven't voted is. Because I feel that. I'm always too busy. Lopez doesn't like how President Trump talks about immigrants. She would love better healthcare Medicaid. She says was a godsend when she was pregnant. But even if she registers she's not sure who she would vote for many young people like Lopez feel they haven't learned enough about American politics in high school. And so like Twenty-three-year-old Shelby. Maybe they don't see the point in voting. Maybe this is a stocky blond marine corvette taking a mandatory political science class at a community college in Vegas. I've never voted before from what I know about voting shop so whole place, and you hope I don't know what I need to bring. I don't even know what happens during their a recent survey of working class youth found that nearly twenty percent say they don't think they know enough to vote as for how and where to vote that can be found with an internet search, but for Mavis. It's not just about education. It's about location. He grew up in Missouri. That's where he registered to vote right now being away from home. I don't feel connected to the the political system here at all analysts say young people tend to move around a lot. And so they often feel less invested in local elections. They also want to choose individual candidates. Not just a party label many say they felt uninspired by both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen so like Jonas rand they

President Trump Donald Trump Brenda Lopez United States President Bill Clinton Israel Washington Audie Cornish Yasser Arafat New York Ari Shapiro White House Palestine Liberation Organizat Ramallah Nevada Binyamin Netanyahu Prime Minister Tel Aviv
Kelsey Snell, Brett Kavanagh and Senator Corey Booker discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

02:06 min | 4 years ago

Kelsey Snell, Brett Kavanagh and Senator Corey Booker discussed on All Things Considered

"Some birds and insects have an innate drive to migrate. Not. So for big hoofed mammals, like sheep or moose NPR's. Nell greenfieldboyce reports on a surprising new study that shows these animals have to learn to migrate. And they are not exactly quick studies. Brett Jasmer isn't a colleges at the university of Wyoming. He says there have long been hints that large mammals aren't born knowing how to migrate but learn from their parents so biologists might be in the field, observing moose, and they see that the moose calf followed its mother on its spring and fall migration moving from place to place to follow new green grass to see if knowledge about migration really was passed down from generation to generation he and his colleagues studied, moose and Bighorn sheep in the western US some populations had lived on the same land for a long time. We know they were there at the time of the Louis from Kark, expedition and probably for. Hundreds or even thousands of years prior others had moved in over the last sixty years as conservationists brought animals to areas where the original populations had disappeared due to hunting or disease. What the researchers found using GPS tracking and satellite imagery is that animals put into vacant unfamiliar land. Didn't migrate Matt Kaufmann is a wildlife researcher at the US Geological Survey that was sort of a little bit of an aha moment for me of like, wow, they really have to learn where things green up and where they need to move next in the journal science. The researchers say it took Bighorn sheep nearly forty years to develop a robust migration. It took moose nearly ninety years. The study impressed. Jackie freyre. She's a wildlife ecologist at the state university of New York in Syracuse dimension that they're bringing to migration ecology is memory and cultural transmission of information. She says this shows we need to protect animals existing migration routes now because there's no easy fix. If a migration culture is

Kelsey Snell Brett Kavanagh Senator Corey Booker Senator Booker President Trump Senator John Cornyn Senator NPR United States Brett Cavanaugh Senate New Jersey Nell Greenfieldboyce Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro Nobel Prize Glenn Close Judiciary Committee
Top Pennsylvania Catholic leader vows to ensure abuses 'never recur'

All Things Considered

02:56 min | 4 years ago

Top Pennsylvania Catholic leader vows to ensure abuses 'never recur'

"We learn more this week about priests sexually abusing young people in their care more about the number. Of victims and more about how Catholic leaders have. Covered up these crimes as the scale of the scandal has grown so has the cost to the Catholic church lawsuits brought by victims have, forced diocese to page settlements totaling more than three billion dollars plus the cost to the church Has reputation, more on all this now from NPR's Tom gjelten after grand. Juries in Pennsylvania this week. Reported what they'd learned about the abuse of. As many as a thousand children by Catholic priests they offered some recommendations among them that victims should have more time to sue for damages beyond what statutes of limitation currently. Allow that would open the door to even, more lawsuits bigger settlements and probably more diocese. Going bankrupt attorney James staying who represents groups of abuse victims has so far lead bankruptcy litigation in about a dozen diocese The montana Spokane, Washington watchdog, it's Milwaukee Wilmington Delaware stinks. Has church payments to abuse victims won't, make up for. Their suffering but it's important he's has to hold church leaders accountable for their negligence. In allowing abuse to happen I don't like the word healing 'cause it's too. Much of an individual process but I think at, the end of the day that accountability is demonstrated by the payment of money in all nineteen Catholic diocese in religious orders in the United States have filed for bankruptcy protection because of lawsuits brought against them by abuse victims that. From the group Bishop accountability the image of the Catholic church. Has also taken a hit the Pew Research firm found earlier this year that. The abuse crisis has tainted the reputation of pope Francis among Catholics and non-catholics alike at. The Catholic university of America Stephen Schneck specializes in the role of the Catholic. Church in American public life he says his conversations with Catholics have led him to think the abuse crisis. Will have far reaching effects one, set of. Catholic currents Said that they were thinking about taking their children out of Catholic schools as a result of this I. Mean that's just a hint So it will impact everything indeed the potential cost of this crisis to the. Catholic church, alarms even, some who are critics father Thomas Reese adjusts with priest who has had harsh words for many in the church hierarchy worries for example that church. Bankruptcies and huge out of. Court settlements won't necessarily have. Much of an impact on the, church leaders who bear personal responsibility, for crimes you don't punish the, Bishop he's not gonna be hurt if the bat diet goes bankrupt what. You're, punishing is the parameters the school children and the donors the, people in the pews who have given money for particular church projects actually even though this abuse crisis has been years in the making it may be too soon to know what. Final effect will have on the,

Catholic Church NPR Catholic University Of America Mary Louise Kelley Tom Gjelten United States Audie Cornish Bishop Pew Research Pennsylvania August Harvey James Derek Freeman Port Arthur Spokane Milwaukee Montana Houston
Audie Cornish, Paul Manafort and Russian Defense Ministry discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

00:10 sec | 4 years ago

Audie Cornish, Paul Manafort and Russian Defense Ministry discussed on Here & Now

"A suicide bomber targeted students. At a private education center in a Shiite neighborhood of Kabul today the attack blamed, on the Islamic state group killed at least forty eight

Audie Cornish Paul Manafort Russian Defense Ministry Sharon Brody Kabul NPR Chairman Reporter Gupta Manafort Fraud Moscow New York
Trump targets Obama-era critics' security clearances

All Things Considered

02:10 min | 4 years ago

Trump targets Obama-era critics' security clearances

"Casey foundation This. Is all things considered from NPR news I'm Ari Shapiro and Audie Cornish we're following a number of stories unfolding today here in Washington there's the recent release of previously classified documents related to the surveillance of a former Trump campaign adviser but first we're, going, to dive into news out of the White House, this afternoon, that the. President is considering revoking the security clearances of former national security officials and pure Justice reporter Ryan Lucas here in the studio to tell? Us, about these developments hey there Ryan going to start with the security clearances White House. Press secretary Sarah Sanders came out today, to say, the president is, exploring ways to take away clearances for, for several. Senior officials who are they well these are some of, the, top national security officials, of of the past several years you have, former director of national intelligence James Clapper former FBI director James, Comey the former FBI deputy director Andrew, McCabe, you have the former national security. Adviser for President Obama Susan Rice Then two former, CIA director's Michael Hayden and John Brennan here's. A bit of Sanders explaining why the president is exploring the mechanisms to remove security clearance because. They've politicized and in some cases monetize their public service insecurity clearances now Sanders also accused them of. Making baseless accusations about improper contacts with Russia and maybe the most recent example of that sort of criticism came from Brennan who is Bama CIA director Brennan called Trump's performance at the Helsinki summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin quote nothing short of treasonous, let's, talk more about the release of those documents related, to the, surveillance of..

President Trump Director White House Ryan Lucas Sarah Sanders President Obama Susan Rice John Brennan Deputy Director CIA James Clapper FBI Donald Trump Ari Shapiro Audie Cornish Vladimir Putin Casey NPR Washington Russia Press Secretary