12 Burst results for "Aubrey Degray"

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:35 min | 5 months ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"It's a huge amount. And so it seems like a really intuitive target. Yeah, and what's the biggest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease? It's the APOE gene, right? And the APOE gene is a cholesterol transporter, and people, it hasn't gotten nearly enough research, and it's still not well understood, is why is your particular elite of APOE, the most predictive, it's not an allele of something that creates Sam line beta or something related to tau. It's an allele of cholesterol metabolism, and it's not well studied or understood enough yet, but clearly, in my mind, cholesterol should be involved in the disease. So what's next for underdog? Aside from these drugs which are targeting the oxidized cholesterol, what else is in the on the whiteboard or potentially in the pipeline? Yeah, so first and foremost, we're trying to get our first drug approved for an aspect of cardiovascular disease caused by atherosclerosis. Secondly, we want to see if there's other indications of their diseases that will benefit from our lead drug. But third, we have this platform for designing cyclodextrins to bind small hydrophobic junk, biomolecules that accumulate with age. So there's other oxysterols that result from free radical damage that we can target. Other things that build up in the lysosome, other aspects of that may be good targets. There's other things in the eye. Not only does oxidize cholesterol build up in the eye and contribute to macular degeneration, but so do retinol derivatives like biz retinoids that are the result of damaged retinol, which also happens to be small and hydrophobic, and something that we might be able to target with our technology. So those are some examples of things that we want to go over and go after with our technology. So where can people learn more about aging biology and longevity technologies? Yeah, so more broadly you can listen to podcasts like this to podcasts that are focused on aging itself. You can go to websites of organizations like the life extension advocacy foundation, their social media is fantastic and their messaging on aging and damage repair is great. The Sens research foundation, which is where our technology spun out of is a good source, the buck institute on aging has a lot of great resources. I almost shouldn't be picking winners here because there's so many that I'm going to leave out so much. But there's also some great books that people could read. I think books, the most curated and densest way to learn, if you're not, you know, a scientist reading the primary literature and you want to absorb an entire field in one or a few books, I'd recommend ending aging and ageless by Andrew Steele a second to the first by Aubrey de grey. Okay, that's really helpful. And maybe along that same line..

Alzheimer's disease atherosclerosis cardiovascular disease Sam life extension advocacy founda Sens research foundation buck institute on aging Andrew Steele Aubrey de grey
"aubrey de grey" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Sergei Young, who is the founder of the Longevity Vision Fund, and also author of the New book, The Science and Technology of Growing Young, Sergei. It's so great to have you on today. Hi, David. Thanks for having me today. My pleasure. So let's just jump right in. Um, I've recently been reading, Uh, In addition to your book, the book scale by Geoffrey West. And one of the things that Jeffrey West talks about is that when it comes to human aging, when you look mathematically at metabolic rate and a few other sort of basic factors, it seems as though the top and kind of natural lifespan if you avoid car accidents and infectious disease, and you know the best scenario. Is about 120 years of age. Now, one of the things I find really interesting about your book. As you start to talk about this in steps you talk about living to 1 50 You talk about that. So you're not just jumping in and saying as some do 1000 years of life span is very, very soon on the horizon. You're you're talking about incremental, so talk to us about that. I mean, how do we go from this natural limit of 100 to 1 20 up to 1 50. Perfect. Great question. So Well, let's let's start from today. What are the options that we have today? To extend our lifespan? So, frankly speaking, all of them? You know, people could colon boring or my mom told me that So it's lifestyle changes its early diagnostic using power of wearables technologists. This will help us to live 200. Healthy and happy years. So that's that's what we can do today from today's like a stage of development of technology and science. This is actually pretty important because we have something exciting in the field of longevity, science and technology coming to all of us in the next 10 to 20 years within what I call in the book near Horizon of Longevity innovation, but it's very important to stay on Longevity Bridge. And be asked, healthy and happy as possible. So then, in 10 20 years time our body and mind is worth extending its resource. So that's one and it's like a separate part of the book is a bonus chapter is is as as twice as long as any other chapter. There's so many things you can do today I call it 10 longevity choices. So then, the second piece, uh, is a near horizon of longevity, Innovation and again. This is technologists and scientific breakthroughs, which will be available to all of us in the next 10 15 20 years And when people ask me what are the most exciting from this list? I'm always talk about Jin editing engine therapy. Organ regeneration, our ability to regrow and replace organs inside our bodies similar to what we do with the old car, extending its resource and longevity and appeal in the next 10 years will have Completely new class of drugs, which will focus on aging and score rather than any particular disease. This is the kind of drugs that we have today. So that's again near Horizon of longevity, and then There is something more on the horizon it its goal far horizon of longevity innovation, and I'm talking about technologies, which will be available to us in the next 25 to 50 years from now, And this is when men and machine will become one where, when we talk about integration between computer power and and human intellect. And, um, without changing the definition of human. It's going to be very difficult to live beyond Huntington, 2400 and 50 years, So okay, let's let's stop there for a second, because that's really important. So You. You seem to be acknowledging that there is this sort of metabolic and cellular natural ceiling to human longevity. That is going to need some more major change for intervention in order to be extended significantly. Yes. So what we can do within the car and biological view on the human body biological perspective. Here's a limit whether it's handed or 124 130 years. I don't know, but it's obviously in this field, so then we need we would need to complement the biological perspective and engineering or technological perspective and look at the integration of this for us to be able to live longer, but The bigger question is not the science and not in technology. The biggest question is ethics and regulation because we have created technology to extend our lives, David, but We haven't created life that we want to extend 60 to 80% of people in the world, depending on the country would say no to life extension opportunities, so we will need to sort out a lot of ethical issues and almost create a new, amazing version of this world and society. For us to embrace the idea of longer living. I call it morality of immortality. And this is my biggest war. This is my biggest concern. This is what we need to have a conversation about ethical choses before we embrace the technology. Yeah, well, you know, I've interviewed, uh, longevity researcher Aubrey de Grey several times over the last 15 or so years, And he often makes news for the things that are more Salacious that, he says, like the first person to live to 1000 has already been born or something like that. And, you know, maybe that's true. Maybe it's not. But that's what I find more interesting about what he says are when I bring up The ethical considerations how triage considerations change If the upper limit of life is extended, or what is the economic impact? What is the environmental impact of people living so much longer? He says. It's sort of. Well mostly work itself out like if people live a lot longer, the birth rate will go down. For example. What do you think about that? So I do believe that there's so many things that we need to change in this world for us to be able to enjoy this far horizon of longevity, so few of them like I do believe in longevity and longevity. Technology has an opportunity to become a unifying theme for the nation and for society because someone need to close inequality gap. Which is widening all the time. So I did. My mission is to.

David Geoffrey West Sergei Young Jeffrey West Aubrey de Grey 60 200 1000 years Longevity Vision Fund 100 The Science and Technology of 1000 2400 today twice 80% second piece 10 longevity Huntington 1 50
"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Epicenter

"To projects that have already shown some some value and this coupled with basically like a prediction market through an investment ecosystem. Right so like one of the ways of doing this. Well obviously you you could just as a solo developer develop something like spend your own time work for free and then if you create something that's really valuable then. After two years you get a big attractive granted and it was all worth it but you could also do. Is you could do you issue. What what. I call project tokens right. So you just create a project token for a project and you could set up some mechanism. Anyone who could you be project. Some project tokens. I'm you couldn't even sell. Some project tokens on unit swap. And then the project tokens become tradeable. And you think about it. Was that right like a project token for the world computer definitely And the would be that like these. This retroactive grant mechanism. Would then basically just by up. The project tokens after the facts. Right and so not only do the founders of the project benefit but also anyone who bought into the project silken and so gave the gave the founders like funding in fiat or ether. Whatever normal currency is to actually do the work ahead of time they would also get rewarded for that. So i think the core principle behind attractive public goods finding is that like institutions in general. I think they're either centralized or decentralized if an institution is centralized than it ends up excluding a lot of important perspectives and if an institution is decentralize conformist right. Those are both problems and so but in both cases it's easier for something conformist to be right about retrospective questions to be right about what what already was important than it is for something to inform us to be right about prospective questions and look back on the last years we can say like certain vaccines were. Yes if certain certain vaccines were humanity. Had we thought about that years ago perhaps it would have been right exactly alike. I think can take life extension research for example right like this is sort of my one of my pet entrepreneurial public goods that i think is really important so there's like someone like aubrey de grey like he has just been working really hard on just making life extension research happen ever since the early two thousands of pretty much. Nobody believed him. And there just isn't an institutional structure by which people who believe in these kinds of things ahead of everyone else get any kind of reward for it and so like kind of structure existed then. Aubrey could have gotten quite a bit more. I kind of fire economic firepower behind him much more quickly without also worked for private investment. If you think that there could be like retroactive. vc investment. Well i think like the investment already is retroactive investment right because the investment itself as proactive and retroactive is the exit right so like a lot of the ecosystem is already implicitly. A retroactive grants program. Because there is an entire set of startups who is exit. Strategy is entirely entirely designs on the possibility. They'll just get bought up by facebook and google. This is this literally exists right and there's plenty of start up so just pitched to of this as possible exit for us so basically i think still a large extended already exists in the startup space. Try truck public goods finding isabel taking that same principle and basically making an equivalent version of that but where the metric people are optimizing for instead of just.

aubrey de grey Aubrey facebook google isabel
"aubrey de grey" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"Our event and the intersection of industry finance philanthropy and in regulation that is really of paramount issues of the of the day. Yes yes i mean. I was looking at the agenda because we we just wrapped our day to day coverage vice. Seo twenty twenty I realized that the world stem cell summit was just a couple of weeks before that Which it's the flagship event of course And there were big names in the stem cell field specifically like gordana boom kuniaki. No novakovic. Sorry about that. Takanori takebe of course Who is also is a cr. Should know but but you alluded to it. Also there's other other elements that need to be lever d- To move the field forward. There are notable figures in pop science. I don't want to reduce up more popular science as well as hard science Aubrey de grey. Was there also politics. Nancy pelosi showed up in in sports. Shorts and dinner saw sterling sharpe x. Nfl player not to mention nih director francis collins. Also there on the agenda. So yeah i mean i could go on but neither say it was real. All star cast but diverse Specifically like the the more notable popular culture figures. What's exactly the role there in advancing. The mission is getting the visibility amongst public. We need ambassadors amongst popular culture to to relay this information. Science are these just advocates for for their own reasons. I think you've hit upon something at the core. My world view of the field of stem cell research and regenerative medicine. It's basically self therapy's and When we think about medicine we think about drugs. Biologics medical devices and another platform. Self therapy's i didn't originate that idea. came from some writings. A friend dr. chris mason had a in london but In i think that's a real solid understanding of what we have here. Cell therapy's is different. There are a whole array of challenges to bring this into the practice of madison whose ox is being gored right. How does it lets the interplay with the pharmaceutical industry How do we Regulate this What are the challenges. The financial challenges. Who's going to fund the research all of these societal issues Crop up and if this is profound is i think it is Of course if we're going to need ambassadors house the normal person myself included before. I got involved. The field didn't think much of the national institutes of health or the role of the food and drug administration.

gordana boom kuniaki novakovic Takanori takebe sterling sharpe Aubrey de grey francis collins Nancy pelosi nih Nfl chris mason london madison national institutes of health food and drug administration
"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Checkout. Right guys take care and be legendary Okay so that's the first. That's the first category then. There are two categories that they're all about having too many seldom a sort of about talk of one kind or another one of those categories is concert in other words. Having south of the bad in the fact they divide uncontrollably when the not surprised and they take out that and the of course there are many different ways that people have thought about to address cancer. Cancer therapy had exploited in the past ten years which is much more recently than When i i think that when i started thinking about this the only approach that i thought was sufficiently generic for cancer was to address telomere mentioning the end of the chromosomes which are which showed with division and cancers invent bass by typically by turning on a gene called telomerase So i'm about trying to stop that from happening. There are various ways to do that is actually been massive progress in that area recently with the development of drug that essentially turned to lama right into a suicide gene so basically when fell. The dilemma is and give the body destroyed by self jeff keylogger once which is much better than the version put forward into them to. Do you selectively do that. The point is the selection is done by the cancer cell itself. the concerts are has turned onto. Raise expecting it at a high level so it sounds expressing too long record not affected by the drug but expecting to lumber. Is they incorporate this drug into that dna and that goes into it are the only cells that are expressing salama. Race cancer cells. I didn't think i thought about that. Many cells clinton now so the stem cells of rapidly renewing tissues like the blood and the lining of the gods. They do express them right but only really trace level far far lower than what kinds of. So there's plenty of therapeutic window in terms of duration to be able to kill off the county with well without having a bad if a significant effect on stem cell population and is that universal cancer. All cancer types express televising nearly a great question quite About ninety percent of concert Mentioned let's hear giving that method the other ten percents you. The method called port which sounds alternative lengthening of telomeres and all still really very poorly understood. I'm afraid Though actually there's been massive progress over the past two years we met class But yes we definitely to to those kinds of as well and in fact one of the main weaknesses of my original anti too long ride. Anti-taylor approach was that if a cancer would expecting lows alumnis and you stop them from doing so it would switch to oils. The great thing about this new drug is that the country have time to do that. The cells digest quickly. So the other way which you can have too many bad cells busy so not bad by virtue of dividing too much but the some other way. So they get into a state where they Perhaps they're still doing what they're supposed to do. Or maybe some of what to do with are also doing bad star and the most well known. Category of this subcategory within this category is sells local. Senescence out the cells that get into a very characteristic state where they secrete nasty chemicals that about the cells around them in fact they have some of those chemicals on genyk they can actually promote cancer in neighboring south but there are other ways in which these cells can be bad so we. Let's get rid of that cell now again. This is an area where there's been great progress in the in. The last twenty originally might view. Was that the only way we're going to get rid of these south with by essentially a a massive also do suicide gene. So essentially introducing a An engineer jane virus which in therapy into the excel that would cause them to die without the other things they were doing already. And that's still a perfectly reasonable approach and it's being pursued by at least one company in this space but the remarkable thing that we've discovered less than ten years ago now. Is that in fact. We may very well be able to do this with years ago. The maybe small molecule drugs that can actually get in and selectively kill off the nothing's essence out and there's a bunch of companies at least dozen companies during that right now so that's all good news all right so that's three things so far really cell number. There was having too few cells and with to having too many cells about talk now. Things are all at the molecular level and took them inside cell to outside to the inside i i. One of these is martikan. Conroe mutation so magical andrea are across the Machine within the cell. That does the chemistry of breathing it you know. They combine oxygen with nutrients as a way of extracting energy from the nutrient and mike andrea have their own dna. The only part of the dog outside of the chromosomes in the nucleus and You know that day. Essential the only thirteen protein cut in it but the proteins Absolutely required components of machinery that mex-mexico andrea and sure enough. That diana gets me in fact had really far as compared to the dna nucleus. Really bad place for dna to be it's You know basically the process of extracting energy from nutrients with oxygen chemically. Very harry elaborate thing that has lockwood up in particularly as reactive chocolate bar. Free radical which damage. Dna seems to be bachelor from. We'd like to fix it but unfortunately fixing it. Could it turns out that. The even though where i mean you think when not very good at gene therapy you know like getting immune jane into into the nuclear dna. We have no way to do anything. In the mighty. Dna the factors. That don't get their. You know it's not going to happen not for a very long time and we need a radical this coverage possible but we can me up what we can do. We can put back up copies of that might conrail. Dna into the nucleus into the nuclear night with.

first two categories first category excel One one thirteen protein ten percents years ago ninety percent one kind three things less than ten years ago jeff keylogger at least one company dozen companies few cells martikan past ten years main weaknesses
"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"The chain black car is that machines are set up to tolerate a certain amount of damage without any really appreciable decline in function. So this is why the health problems of light live our lives and we do not see them at all until is to middle a they're in a certain threshold below which we are fine even up. Twenty twenty five year old has stom- quite a bit actually of damaging their body. But you wouldn't know it so this means that if we take someone who let's say sixty or seventy and they got plenty of damaging their body and they getting sick or thereabouts start declining in how we even only half of the damage got. They haven't nobody's then they will be back to the same amount of danny de they were when they will let say forty. And that is it's fine. They will be restored to absolute function both mental and physical of what we need to do but so imposing which develop therapies that repair that and suppose we become fairly good at say so that we kinda indeed repair half of the damage. Let's partition damage into two categories. To bucket we call them easy damage. Difficult damage the easy dominated by definition the stuff that we can repair with the first generation damage repair therapies that pats not very far off now and the difficult one then we can restore somebody from the edge of. Let's say seventy to the forty biologically of course. Now what's going to happen up to that what's going to happen. Is that going to of course carry on being alive and damaging themselves more and eventually they're going to get back to the The magic damage in their bodies that they had before they would treat now. Here's the tricky part. Even if we continue to give them the damage repair therapy every year. Every day. they're still going to get back to the amount of damage that they had before they were with less crete because the discipline damage on its own. It's going to add up to that amount. After a certain amount of time. Maybe at when they reach the age of one hundred tan even gather the negligible amount of damage. Because we're constantly getting rid of. It is the critical thing guy by that time when they reach one hundred thirty years after i created and we the scientists will have been busy during that time we will have been abra away improving the therapy and that means that when someone aren't they won't be guessing version. One point of this damage repair. They will be getting therapies that not only repaired the damage but they also therapath some still not all but some of the difficult damning which means that the area will be able to be rejuvenated so they have the damage of a forty year old again hero even though the inherent difficulty of doing so is greater than it was when they were originally sixty. Or seventy. so you've got the idea and now it's In order to keep the level of damage in this person's body down to the level that would naturally existed in a thirty or forty. Four we need to do is progressively improved how comprehensive. The damage will pass therapy arsenal. That we have people are getting the steadily art therapy to any point. They can stay one step ahead of the problem. I've talked and we get closer and closer to being able to repair all the damage and other words the damaged but still not repairable gets less and less it takes longer and longer to become problematic and therefore way can even slow down in the ratio which we continue to improve therapy. This is why. I believe that once. We got even the first generation therapies that give with only twenty or thirty years of additional healthy live with we will never fall below the threshold of minimum rate of improvement life. Go lunge guy left so yeah sorry. That was a long answer. But i felt i need to go into every step of it is again thirty to people who may not have had it before. Now i love it. I think that's really helpful. And this is what makes your book so interesting and You sort of a leading personality so useful is you really give people an understanding of what's happening and so i actually want to go into these types of damage and the intrinsic nature that to me is one of the key insights that i got from. You is look yes. You can slow things down and you should. I've heard you talk about that before. Absolutely eat better down smoke exercise but recognize that you know. We've we've been running. Whatever two hundred thousand year experiment and no one ever has managed to live forever doing just that so we know that there's going to have to be more and the way that you look at how that intrinsic damage is done. I found incredibly interesting. So if you can like walk us through just like quickly. What the seven types are. And then we'll sort of dip into some key moments in each of them all right damage about so looking about damage repair. That makes it so attractive as a therapeutic modality therapy the concept is that all we need to do is to identify what the damage is to characterize the nature of the damage the differences in molecular and cellular competition between older people younger people and then figure out ways to reverse that to turn to restore that the young young stage. Now let me first. Federal clarify one thing. That people do often get wrong. I am not saying that. Only seven types of damage. There are hundreds and hundreds of talk down it what i'm saying. Vote hundreds and hundreds of times can be classified into seven categories and this classification if a useful thing to do because it corresponds to therapeutic modality so for example one of the categories loss of cell to what it me means so dying and not being automatically replaced by the division and differentiation of other cell. Simple idea right. And of course. This happened in various different tissue. O'brien in harley and in order to fix this you would need to do different therapies. But wh- therapies. Come under one heading. They're all stem cell therapies of one sort or another and stem cell therapies or have a lot in common of course. There are differences of data. Sure but that's really important because it means that you've got one or two stem cell therapy working for one or two issues. Then you've learned a lot about how gets down south african general to work. They're getting the next one to the one that is going to be far easier and faster than last one was. This is the general principle that underlies the holiday pro league. I end up with a lotta therapies. That will be applying to the people at the same time but the way we develop those therapy will not be one therapy.

sixty forty hundreds two seventy Twenty twenty five year old seven types two issues south african Four thirty seven categories first forty year old thirty years twenty One point two hundred thousand year each two categories
"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Yes i was saying. Well look the body of the machine. It's might have asked him to molecules and stuff right You know it's functioning determined by structure that for You know restoring the structure will restore function. That's the only real question is are the aspects of the structure that are inherently even in principle impossible to restore to they were young adulthood and it seemed to me that there obviously are now and nobody came along and said yes there are the only real difference at the beginning was in terms of the degree of difficulty of the next thing and of course now most people would be somewhat more pessimistic than me in terms of ice. And that's where in terms of the timeframes for developing this all that damage repair technology for that type of molecular orthodontic within each other's rank. You know You know it's not. It's not that we think we're crazy about that. Even right back at the beginning when i was first talking about all of this You know i would bring together a lot of different ideas from different areas of biology because of course the damage repair purchased inherently divide. And conquer. One you know the people who divide and conquer simply that they're not too different type to damage we've got to fix them all and is going to be fixed by a different technology and that You know you've got to apply the same technology a lot of different things to the people at the same time without a lot. so yes. so we'll i was talking to especially in any given particular area like for example magical mutation i would generally not say very much pushback from people in regard to their area. You know. I'm not be a little bit more optimistic. Than but i would be basically talking sense and they would understand that. I knew i was going with this. And you know they wish me luck but when you ask these people about each other area about which they knew very that's all they would immediately up and this is complete science fiction way this work you know. So this was the kind of consequence of the balkanization. They um sorry. Lowering of expertise in biology that has happened increasingly over the is and it took a while to brag that that's actually a really interesting insight that the more somebody knew about the area. The more plausible your take on things seemed but the less they knew the more than they're sorta defaulting to base assumption that they have about longevity is self Now is this where you see people spilling into just sort of a dog. Matic approach about humans are never gonna live forever. I'm not willing to let myself become optimistic about that. People for thousands of years have been saying that they've cured it and people are gonna live forever Is that what you're up against. Yeah it kind of. It's kind of even wouldn't that because of the fact latch vichy's aging. You know and everyone's been saying this since the beginning of civilization that for you know everyone's been wrong therefore i'm lucky to be willing as well on top of that. There is the general fat that within science overrule experts Very reluctance to risk of promising and under delivering. That really really want to you. Know whenever they have the misfortune to be talking to the general public they wanted to say we do not in most in most walks of life. Saying you don't know what you wanna do. You wanna pretend you do nice stuff that you don't in signs it's the other way around. You pretend stuff that you actually do not that that's actually fascinating and there is something to that sort of level of humility that i like but he can obviously distort in itself become pathological So i think now. It's a good time because i wanna frame. We're going to get into the weeds of like what the seven types of damage are and what the sort of antagonistic thing that we apply to that to repair will be but now i think we do need to get into what the escape velocity is here and what you think will ultimately happen. I don't wanna put words in your mouth. But when i hear you speak Maybe i hear what i want to hear. But i i hear sort of the ultimate hope So but before. I put words in your mouth. What when you talk about escape velocity. What do you mean right. Yeah okay so let me given like the background to it. So at the end of the day. Because i mentioned earlier the human body is a machine i'm beth lawrence function of determine but structure We can therefore say that the health of the body and therefore the likelihood that the body will cease to function in the way that we will die anytime to is determined by the amount of damage that the body is carrying around. And this damage. That i went talking about is a result of the body's normal operation in other words. He's self inflicted. We're inflicting damage upon ourselves throughout life even starting before we're born because this is simply consequences of things that the body needs to do and it's really intrinsic consequences. No way that we can have the buddy. Actually you know. Keep us alive without the body. Also creating an inflicting this damage appoint sell. And that's an agent body or any other living organism not two different than aging a simple manmade machine like a car an airplane or whatever you know that accumulates rusted out of you know the right. Well it means is that we could in principle improve the likelihood of living a bit longer just by repairing some of the damage. But it's better than that the key thing that we have to take into account and again just justice true for living machines. Like you and me..

seven types thousands of years first two beth lawrence each One
"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

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"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"To you about better help. Better help makes therapy more accessible. And affordable better help is professional counseling done securely online using your computer. Your tablet your mobile phone. It works through video. Calls phone calls or even text messaging with licensed therapists who are certified by their states. Board to provide therapy and counseling. This is not self help. It's not a crisis line. Better help is an on line service available worldwide and it has a massive network of counselors with a broad and diverse range of specialties. So you get a counselor with the sort of expertise that might not be available to you locally. Better help assesses your needs and matches you with a licensed professional therapist within twenty four hours. He's in log into your account anytime to message. Counselor better help also has group in our sessions every week where members can learn groups directly from licensed counselors on multiple topics things like relationships in ways to overcome anxiety and all kinds of useful topics especially the thought of seeking help. Makes you nervous be sure to check out over. Sixty thousand positive reviews posted on the website. And just for maximum clarity. That's better help and help us belt. H. e. l. p. is committed to making it easy for you to access the therapeutic help you need even if you've never gone to counseling before it's free to switch therapists. It's more affordable local therapy and they even have financial aid available. Better help wants you to start living a happier life today. Visit better help dot com slash impact theory. Again it's better. H e l p dot com and join over five hundred thousand people. Taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced professional. Better help cost just sixty five dollars per week and financial aid is available for those who qualify during the sign up process as an impact theory listener. You get ten percent off your first month so visit better help dot com slash impact theory and get the help. You need today guys. You gotta take mental health seriously. I know first hand if you need it. Give this a shock. Take care and be legendary..

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Unexplained

Unexplained

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on Unexplained

"The quest for immortality the urge to escape the inevitability of death has long been a preoccupation for us as evidenced by the ancient sumerian poem the epic of gilgamesh the oldest example of written literature known today in the poem written sometime around eighteen hundred bc in mesopotamia. The titular gilgamesh part hero part. Arrogant demi-god undertakes nordic <unk>. Mission to find the secret to immortality ought to being confronted by the inevitability of his own death though we might not be demigods like gilgamesh his desperate refusal to accept the inevitability of his fate is a deeply human one and something that many of us can sympathize with whether we elect to place our hopes in the promises of religious teachers or in the invention and imagination of our leading bio gerontologist those that studied the mechanics of aging throughout many of us. Who haven't contemplated the possibility of existing forever in one form or another however although some of those may want for it being mortal israeli portrayed as something desirable and at the very least. There's something that can only be achieved at a great cost from the burdens of connor macleod in his pursuit to become the only remaining highlander to the pitiful efforts of melmeth the wanderer to convince another soul to take on his pact with the devil in return for another one hundred fifty years of life. In fact we take great pains to dissuade ourselves from wanting it. Perhaps this is simply to provide some comfort in the face of such a futile desire. But it doesn't stop us trying back in october this year. A team led by tel aviv. University professor shy f ratty published the results of an extraordinary study in the journal aging study to determine the effect of pure oxygen on the aging process involved placing thirty five adults over the age of sixty four in a hyperbaric chamber and giving them pure oxygen for ninety minutes a day five days a week over the course of three months through this process of frats team found they were able to successfully limit the build-up of senescent cells in the body cells. The today's to the point where they can no longer replicate leaving the body. Susceptible to many age related diseases incredibly not only to this delay the aging process but actually reversed it. Aubrey de grey. One of the best known by. Oh gerontologist has long insisted that medical technology will one day allow us to control the aging process. Even making the stunning claim this back. Two thousand and eight that the first person who lives to one thousand years old is already alive today through some however who'd say that this person isn't just a live right now but they've already lived to be a thousand years old. You're listening to unexplained. And i'm richard mclean smith. It was sometime in the seventeen. Seventies that counted adema marie-antoinette's personal attendant. I met him for her. It was his is most stood out. They were like nothing. She never seen before his teeth to were immaculate and all the more noticeable for being framed by such a thick head of luxury jet black hair and his clothes were simple they were nonetheless made from the finest materials decorated with the most exquisite jewellery. It wasn't a period. She assumed would be accompanied by a certain steely if not arrogant countenance however when she finally plucked up courage to approach one afternoon at the court though was penetrating so too. Was it soft and inviting despite everything countess. It heard about the man. It was quite something to see him. Finally in the flesh looking no more than forty five years old and yet it was back in seventeen forty three over thirty years previously. The first appeared mysteriously one day at the palace of versailles home to king of france. Louis the fifteenth looking exactly the same age

connor macleod mesopotamia tel aviv Aubrey de grey richard mclean smith
A Man of Wealth of Taste

Unexplained

04:34 min | 1 year ago

A Man of Wealth of Taste

"The quest for immortality the urge to escape the inevitability of death has long been a preoccupation for us as evidenced by the ancient sumerian poem the epic of gilgamesh the oldest example of written literature known today in the poem written sometime around eighteen hundred bc in mesopotamia. The titular gilgamesh part hero part. Arrogant demi-god undertakes nordic Mission to find the secret to immortality ought to being confronted by the inevitability of his own death though we might not be demigods like gilgamesh his desperate refusal to accept the inevitability of his fate is a deeply human one and something that many of us can sympathize with whether we elect to place our hopes in the promises of religious teachers or in the invention and imagination of our leading bio gerontologist those that studied the mechanics of aging throughout many of us. Who haven't contemplated the possibility of existing forever in one form or another however although some of those may want for it being mortal israeli portrayed as something desirable and at the very least. There's something that can only be achieved at a great cost from the burdens of connor macleod in his pursuit to become the only remaining highlander to the pitiful efforts of melmeth the wanderer to convince another soul to take on his pact with the devil in return for another one hundred fifty years of life. In fact we take great pains to dissuade ourselves from wanting it. Perhaps this is simply to provide some comfort in the face of such a futile desire. But it doesn't stop us trying back in october this year. A team led by tel aviv. University professor shy f ratty published the results of an extraordinary study in the journal aging study to determine the effect of pure oxygen on the aging process involved placing thirty five adults over the age of sixty four in a hyperbaric chamber and giving them pure oxygen for ninety minutes a day five days a week over the course of three months through this process of frats team found they were able to successfully limit the build-up of senescent cells in the body cells. The today's to the point where they can no longer replicate leaving the body. Susceptible to many age related diseases incredibly not only to this delay the aging process but actually reversed it. Aubrey de grey. One of the best known by. Oh gerontologist has long insisted that medical technology will one day allow us to control the aging process. Even making the stunning claim this back. Two thousand and eight that the first person who lives to one thousand years old is already alive today through some however who'd say that this person isn't just a live right now but they've already lived to be a thousand years old. You're listening to unexplained. And i'm richard mclean smith. It was sometime in the seventeen. Seventies that counted adema marie-antoinette's personal attendant. I met him for her. It was his is most stood out. They were like nothing. She never seen before his teeth to were immaculate and all the more noticeable for being framed by such a thick head of luxury jet black hair and his clothes were simple they were nonetheless made from the finest materials decorated with the most exquisite jewellery. It wasn't a period. She assumed would be accompanied by a certain steely if not arrogant countenance however when she finally plucked up courage to approach one afternoon at the court though was penetrating so too. Was it soft and inviting despite everything countess. It heard about the man. It was quite something to see him. Finally in the flesh looking no more than forty five years old and yet it was back in seventeen forty three over thirty years previously. The first appeared mysteriously one day at the palace of versailles home to king of france. Louis the fifteenth looking exactly the same age

Connor Macleod Mesopotamia Tel Aviv Richard Mclean Smith Aubrey De Grey Adema Marie Antoinette Palace Of Versailles France Louis
"aubrey de grey" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"aubrey de grey" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Seventies and eighties work out Cynthia I'm look come back to me okay okay it would you like to go next sure I mean it was one of the things I was going to say is the the the answer to that question that no one really wants to hear is exercise and and and so that's important and I think another another huge killer is stress so do whatever you can to reduce the stress in your life that's much easier said than done but it's really important because it will it will get you and what do you do to reduce your stress to actually I I'm I meditate and I also tell myself don't do that you know I mean a lot of other disciplines yeah I mean a lot of times on and off and get myself in trouble with with projects or something and and then I go my god you know this is so stressful so I decided I'm not doing that anymore but five article you have to have lived a while before you lived learn that lesson okay what's your top tip when I go to get three the bronze medal position is essential to your own body because everyone's different you come take any common denominator into account to very much extent to what works for you in the film L. position is write me a large check so that I can another okay the only if you have actually done that my my global business get Larry pace to write me a check as well thank you all very much I hope you've all enjoyed tonight's program brought to you sorry I'm so sorry Cynthia well I believe what I said about Brussels sprouts number one number two exercise number three taking time to be happy having good social bonds actually does increase your your lifespan education is correlated with lifespan staying active mentally I think is is is good I think diet is important all right personally I think you should just keep your eye on it they're all sorts of different kinds of diets I personally at a low glycemic index diet which may or may not be good for you there's that but I think it is but I don't know because there aren't very good studies really if it's very difficult to do studies of diet some people just hard on intermittent fasting is another thing that's become very popular diets ketogenic diets keep your eye on the literature people are starting to do real studies now scientific studies about these inspecting your food can be quite important so those are the things and also I think I just want to win one more little point about our breed with a reset I shouldn't do this but he said that we have a duty to predict how long it's going to take I think we don't have a duty to protect I think what we have a duty to do is to tell you what can happen in animals and that there are many different ways of slowing down aging in animals the really different from one another with enough time to go into all of them and we're animals right so maybe they'll work in us but they might not but to me that's the responsible thing to say and if they do it through thick right thank you very much Cynthia so I hope you've all enjoyed at this evening's program brought to you by the Commonwealth club Silicon Valley again I would like to thank Dr Aubrey de grey Dr Robert hurry ready Dr Cynthia Kenyon and chip Walter for being here tonight and I'd like to thank our audience here in Palo alto and they were those of us joining us on the radio and now at this meeting of the Commonwealth club is adjourned this event took place in late January the panelists include Dr Robert Herrera MD neurosurgeon or bridge gray my medical juror anthologist Cynthia Kenyon molecular biologist and geneticist and science journalist chip Walter author of the book immortality ink renegade science Silicon Valley billions and the quest to live forever here's a look at some authors who recently appeared or will be appearing soon on book TV's afterwards our weekly author interview program that includes best selling non fiction books and guest interviewers last week Pulitzer Prize winning journalists Nicholas Christoff and Cheryl were done discussed issues facing the working class and rural America coming up new America senior fellow Lee Druckmann will argue that the way to save American democracy is to create more political parties Washington times columnist cal Thomas weighs in on whether the United States will remain a superpower used to be when you have an election the losing side would go look at swoons they've had meetings how do we read to our message how do we win next time now it's how do we bring this guy down this person down M. they were arguing about impeachment the Democrats were even before the election and certainly the day or two after some of the quotes from some of the more radical members of Congress that's not the way to do it and this poisons the atmosphere as people said during his recent impeachment fiasco impeachment was supposed to be rare and now I fear that when Republicans get back in control of both houses of Congress and there's a democratic president they're going to go the same route and that that will polarize and poison the political atmosphere even more than it is now which is bad enough afterwards airs Saturdays at ten PM and Sundays at nine PM eastern and Pacific on book TV on C-SPAN true all previous afterwards are available as podcasts and to watch online at book TV dot org here are some of the current best selling non fiction books according to the Wall Street journal at the top of the list is a very stable genius in which The Washington Post White House bureau chief Philip Rucker and staff writer Caroline egg suggests that the trump presidency has been defined by self enrichment after that is Peter Schweitzer's critical investigation into progressive politicians in his latest book profiles in corruption then in built not born businessman Tom Golisano offers this advice for entrepreneurs Tara Westover recalls growing up in the Idaho mountains and her introduction to formal education at age seventeen in her book educated it's been on the best seller list for two years and wrapping up our look at some of the best selling non fiction books according to the Wall Street journal he is becoming former First Lady Michelle Obama's memoir which was the best selling book.

Cynthia