35 Burst results for "Atwood"

Discussing Sleep & Circadian Rhythms With Nutritionist Shawn Wells

One Life Radio Podcast

02:26 min | Last month

Discussing Sleep & Circadian Rhythms With Nutritionist Shawn Wells

"Wasn't important subject. We're talking about today. Sleep and circadian rhythm. So what would you say is the number What would you say is the is one of the best things that you can do. For your energy sean. Starting with that because the energy that you burn during the day helps you sleep at night right exactly. Extra sleep is so critical and overlooked for sure. And i you know. I was just recently doing that. Passion test It's a book by Chris and janet atwood. It's a really brilliant Method of finding out what your true passions are. What lights you up. And i ended up putting One of my passion or desires in my life is to get a great night's sleep you ended up having to compare like all your other passions against it and like and then you have to ask the question like would you rather not have a great night sleep but have you know money flow into your life easily or would you rather have a great night's sleep every night but not have money flow into your life more easily and things like that and that was It ended up like the great night's sleep like at the top of my list. And i was like something i didn't expect literally behind your vitality and ability to live. Your life is sleep and underappreciated n. p. like here's the here's the data like at seven in some studies. Say six and a half hours or less. You start getting more insulin resistant in your rain. Acutely at first like if you know you just get one bad night's sleep. It's a cute insulin resistance. And you have insufficient cellular energy in the brain. Meaning your neurons. These brain cells are firing more slowly and that breen fog. You feel. it's real because they're not firing fast because there isn't enough energy because it's not taking in the glue as well so what you do when you wake up all tired and groggy is. You're reaching for caffeine and sugar to get your brain going right. No that can be a downward spiral and can lead to decision fatigue bad decisions whatever so we are the only species that deprives ourselves of sleep. When we're tired

Janet Atwood Sean Chris Breen
"atwood" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

07:03 min | Last month

"atwood" Discussed on Science Friday

"I enjoyed your book and Is it going to be made to a movie like the handmaid's tale which was also a great book and a great movie. Well thank you We have been doing movie talk. Talk talk goes on before movies actually happen and in order to make this a movie of any interest whatsoever. You'd have to make it quite well and you'd have to because otherwise it would be a strange looking person hopping around in the shrubs or maybe jackson. Well that's impossibility possibility But you have to do it You would really have to put a lot of thought into it. And i do believe we. Would you allow hollywood to take this on our smaller film. Hollywood isn't always bad. When people say hollywood's negotiable core throw up. your hands. royer is but you know. Hollywood isn't always bad. In fact hollywood has done some great movies And with any movie you have to You have to keep in mind that you can have the best director. The best group writer the best actors the best everything and it can still be horrible movie. Kind sorry yeah you can have a completely unknown person. Who makes them terrific movie. This science friday from wnyc studios in case. You're just joining us. You're listening to a two thousand and four conversation with author margaret atwood author of the handmaid's tale and orix and creek talking with margaret. Atwood go ahead david you all were you happy. With the way handmaid's tale was made tell was a movie right and any movie is going to be more literal than a book artists. Movies movies can't handle metaphor I think considering the fact that it was a movie it was really pretty good. They they did change the ending and they couldn't do the ending. That's in the book because it would have meant a whole new cast of characters and it would have been very puzzling But i think on the whole and if you see it now it actually seems a bit closer to something that might happen. Then than when it came out came out an eighty nine just when the cold war was ending. The wall was coming down and everybody thought we were entering a brave new future in which there would be no further conflict and everything would be wonderful forever and that hasn't happened all right david. Thanks for calling. Thank you very much. So who would you have starring in your new movie starring vendors a category of questions. I can't answer. I knew there was something going on negotiations. I usually turn to my people to work with me in the office. Both of them are under thirty. And they're really up on these things. They've got a lot of opinions. So i say to them. Who do have starring and they they would reel off about ten names But i'm not I don't read movie magazines. The way they do. Let's go to is it oriented in arbor. Yes it is. Go ahead hello Just like star. This is a great honour margai. Thank god you're. I'm an english teacher. Matter of fact in in michigan here and i'm teaching a creative writing class and i'm thinking about having read art critic I'm wondering what you might be able to say to this crew. Who is you know Just starting off in very interested in writing and all that What kind of thing could you tell them to kind of. I dunno get them started along the route of becoming a writer. How old are they They're juniors and seniors in high school so seventeen. They're seventeen eighteen one page at a time. One one foot at a time. Don't look down. Why don't look down because you're on a tight rope. Don't look down. Just keep going one page at a time. Okay wonderful well thank you for that. I'll pass it on. Thanks for calling. Okay you know in an article in the new scientist magazine. They asked you asked you about you. Taught cosker to engineers in british columbia. I did why well. I was supposed to be teaching them. Grammar right at eight thirty in the morning. And i thought how can i teach grammar to engineers in any way. That's going to keep them away. Without our plus myself cape awake and so i gave them calf kaz parables which are quite short and also have a have puzzles embedded in them and engineers. They're problem solvers. So of course this idea this idea of having a puzzle in a pace of writing appeal to them and i asked them to write little parables like that. That had puzzles and so it was a way of getting them to write english sentences. You know sentences made of words in english language on a subject that would appeal to them because of as them to write my summer vacation. Or why i love flowers. You know it's gonna work. I know that actually worked quite well. Yeah they that was something for them to solve and they could make puzzles of their own. Baffle the other engineers and They could examine the idea of paradox. okay so are you working on something now. I'm always working on something. I knew that was the wrong question to ask you do that. I always more. He's working on something. And i will never tell you what it why didn't ask you did. I didn't ask you just installing gonna elliott. Because because it's a puzzle. It's a pair of conundrum. But you always say that. when you. What motivates you the right. It's something in there that has to come out with something has to come out now. Yes yeah okay it does. Well how old stonewalling. Well i know. I know from talking with you before that. You're not the kind of person gonna write something once and it comes right out and it takes a while to rewrite and rewrite correct. I do yes i do. I pour over it. It's too yeah well join. Join the rest of us who. That's the only thing. I think i mean my ability to write and your ability to write is the are on opposite ends of spectrums but that's the only thing that we share take forever to write something also We pour thank you very much margaret for taking time to be with us and good luck to you is always a pleasure. That conversation with margaret atwood was recorded seventeen years ago in april of two thousand and four. And you know you can dive into the dystopia of rx and craik by revisiting. Our sci-fi book club from two thousand sixteen and listened to more interviews with margaret atwood. It's all up on our website at science. Friday dot com slash atwood..

hollywood wnyc studios Hollywood margai royer margaret atwood handmaid david Atwood margaret jackson arbor michigan british columbia elliott craik
How to Improve Your Website and Get New Customers Online

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:00 min | 4 months ago

How to Improve Your Website and Get New Customers Online

"So it let's get even more specifically. I like continuing to drill down. How do we get our message in front of where our customers are actually looking. What do we do chris to do that. So the first thing you need to do is what's keyword research to understand. Exactly what you'll customers such for yawn i want to people technicalities but there's a few few different ways you can do that. Google google's atwood's to is a great one. Yeah Pretty much That gets a little bit technical but workout. What they're searching for made such as yourself see who you competitors i you probably know who they are but what you were talking about before is like being really granular on and a good example of that is one of our customers who's a painter so he does residential painting and on his website on the front page was like indoor dining out painting facebook offense meaning and so if someone searching fence binding the my land on that page the first thing was about indoor dining and then there's out opining and they they might just leave because it doesn't say anything about fence binding. Where if you have a specific page that they land on like fence. Pain may may land on that page. And it's all just that painting. And then i off stables. This is exactly what her name so the more granular get with your website than the better. It's going to convert as well. It's going to rank for the rocky woods and and comes up because the message is exactly what that person's searching for so a couple of things here. Sem rush when. Chris said sam rush. Sem russia something to check out. Google ad words. You can learn a lot through that as well and really at the end. They're the key thing that i've seen. People have a lot of success with as long tail keywords. Not just like one broad vague word but how can you be the best solution for an entire sentence and entire long tail keywords stretch because if you could win that you're going to win all of those customers all of the time

Google Atwood Chris Sam Rush Facebook Russia
Car Crash Kills 1 in Banks County, Georgia

Mornings on Maine Street

00:29 sec | 6 months ago

Car Crash Kills 1 in Banks County, Georgia

"Name's not been released. A man from Homer killed in a two vehicle crash early yesterday morning on Georgia 51 in banks County 34 year old Westley Allan Atwood died at the scene of the accident, according to the Georgia State Patrol. The Ford F one F 2 50, driven by Atwood was traveling north bound when it crossed over the center lane and hit another truck head on the driver of that other truck. 35 year old Gerald Justin pause of Demory is taking the Northeast Georgia

Westley Allan Atwood Banks County Homer Georgia State Patrol Georgia Atwood Ford Gerald Justin Northeast Georgia
Mark Morris: Buying a Home as Investment Can Become a Heavy Burden

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

07:18 min | 6 months ago

Mark Morris: Buying a Home as Investment Can Become a Heavy Burden

"When you hear the name mark morris. I want you to high cashflow. Portfolios mark is an expert at building developer relationships and helping house builders achieve discrete volume sales at speed alongside in. It freelance career. He has been a property investor for the past twenty years building a portfolio of biden alette apartments and houses across greater manchester. He is also built a solid income generating portfolio in the mid west of the us. Including ohio. where. I grew up outside of cleveland. So mark take a minute in philly for tidbits about your life. Sanju sheddings absorption. So yes she switched on. I was was in icu. Freelance i was employed full sudafed mid twenties and then when we came to the what would what you may remember the Units thousand mobile. Everybody believed that when the clocks when the diet changed nine thousand nine hundred ninety two thousand. Who's going to be magadan. None of the computers worse on in those sort of times. You know companies. I work for finance initials. Just paying ridiculous amounts only for contracts is just to get bums on tested and as we all know now it was a complete dump squib in the wall a really lights the freelance world. All the who wants to two thousand dollars over loss of come shots. As if finished the assignments finish they could find new signings and allow people became employed or went back to just the danger. I was really really adamant levels. Gonna do the fumes out an illness you know it. Nearly money was tight. And i was struggling on a realized needed some way of raising faceting to government with these to kuwait for these breaks in between science. And that's really started looking at property. I was really keen on. I started building very small. Folio parents were involved in property. And i really realized that was chain to enable mix to continue a freelance career. And that's really where stars interesting and you said your parents what experience today they were places or yeah they were they were actually renting holiday homes and a cold the lake district which is about an hour an hour and a half wave on. When i was very young i used to go. There needs to clean and they used to take book in. So i could see how the property the property business. Words open cell becoming a freelancer. Never at any sort of money at the anger means so i needed started actually finding the walls. A cash should the under the move on a bit of fox together. That's all yeah let's start invested in bronson. It's an interesting story because sometimes what we learned in our youth comes back later to help us so well. Now it's time share your worst investment ever since no one ever goes into their worst investment thinking we'll be tell us a bit about the circumstance leading up to tell us your story. She'll so probably around the year. Two thousand five prophecy prices about point very boyens. No you went down to the pulp. Everybody was talking about. Everybody was getting surprise. You not taxi. Drivers rids tropic is getting closer with you know with all the height how to threaten to was an estate agent and he said look you know i two or three approaches but i got gotta cashcall together wanted to try and create more cash to give me this sort of space for when i was out the contracts so he suggested. Why don't we go. This loss of new build new built developments in a place called wales. Which is you know in the uk on marinas. And let's go and have a look. And i was quite impressed by him because he owns his own business. Not saying yeah yeah. Let's show enough with when which sold round the few places. In wales armed with came on warm marina development was being sold off clump so all the walls literally we went to the agents. All the world's a big model booth this arena development was going to sell useful the ashtray by the marina. The guy that wo- he was selling like a dream was these properties are selling. Those should off planet two hundred k. You know within his twelve pro build within eighty. They'll give you two fifty six day boy. Was i just call in the height within ten minutes of full a deposit down you know never really saw that was it. You know how solta. I was gonna make quick this quick book. Wow brilliant advocacy was gonna to go so well how was i. Think he's probably hounds with all developments with side gets in delays so twelve months into eighteen months eighteen months tune into years. All this time it was thinking. She's great of a to k reservation. Fee doubt on this property is increasing crease in talk about gray leverage on a suitcase investment and then after about two years start completing development lit chalet within me completing in two thousand seven with about two months. The crash happened know would so can big time. Us england every you know suddenly. Wow a suddenly realize on this fifty sixty k though is gonna make was gonna become essentially a fifty sixty k loss because very quickly. Nobody was buying. These apartments wasn't gonna turn. I wasn't going to turn over the thing. So many i mean it was. It was a castle varis. Now only because i felt was though a wasn't to be keeping old at the time used finance put a small deposit down and offensively but not finished. I couldn't i couldn't remortgage because i was in negative atwood said just couldn't evaluation would have been sixty k. Down i would have thought another eight just to get another

Sanju Mark Morris Boyens Biden Manchester Cleveland Folio Kuwait Ohio Bronson Wales FOX United States UK England Atwood
"atwood" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

How I Found My Voice

02:35 min | 6 months ago

"atwood" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

"I <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Advertisement> wouldn't want to be <Speech_Male> in a room alone <Speech_Female> with him either. Might <Speech_Female> you know something <Speech_Female> terrible might happen. <Speech_Female> I might i might. <Speech_Female> I might devour <Speech_Female> him. <Speech_Female> Now they'll <Speech_Female> go in and there would be no more <Speech_Female> my pants. And <Speech_Female> why did what have you done <Speech_Female> with mike and there and just basam <Speech_Female> shoes <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> of sorry. I'm <Speech_Female> playing with <Speech_Male> my which <SpeakerChange> image <Speech_Female> here <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> okay. I'm gonna take moss <Speech_Female> question because this is a good <Speech_Female> one patricia williams. <Speech_Female> My worst example <Speech_Female> of discrimination <Speech_Female> was when i read through <Speech_Female> our building society <Speech_Female> about our marriage <Speech_Female> and they replied <Speech_Female> to my husband. <Speech_Female> Dame is to <Speech_Female> horse. Thank you for your wife's <Speech_Female> letter. What's the <Speech_Female> worst <SpeakerChange> example <Speech_Female> you've had. <Speech_Female> Well <Speech_Female> you mean a <Speech_Female> a a <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> female prison. <Speech_Female> Yeah oh <Speech_Female> boy. <Speech_Female> I think i've <Speech_Female> been fairly <Speech_Female> lucky. In that <Speech_Female> respect. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I suppose the the <Speech_Female> university <Speech_Female> professor who said <Speech_Male> why didn't i forget all <Speech_Female> this roger <Speech_Female> school and writing <Speech_Female> staff and just get <Speech_Male> a nice <Speech_Male> nice husband. <Speech_Male> Yeah that was <Speech_Female> pretty stupid. <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> you know because i <Speech_Female> was brought up pretty <Speech_Female> gala -tarian <Speech_Female> way. I never paid any <Speech_Female> attention to those people. <Speech_Female> Anyway and <Speech_Female> and why would <Speech_Female> you respect the <Speech_Female> opinion of somebody <Speech_Female> like that. <Speech_Female> Why would you give it <Speech_Female> any weight. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> ask you. I know <Speech_Female> we do of <Speech_Female> course because we feel <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> hurt <Speech_Female> or we feel <Speech_Female> attacked in some <Speech_Female> way. But but <Speech_Female> as i said other <Speech_Female> people's stuff is about <Speech_Female> them. Somebody has <Speech_Male> displayed. They're <Speech_Female> not <Speech_Female> admirable <Speech_Female> part of their personality <Speech_Female> to you <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> As far as taking <Speech_Female> it personally her <Speech_Female> thinking they're they're <Speech_Male> right. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Blow <Speech_Female> it off <Speech_Female> lovely. That's a <Speech_Female> great way to end <Speech_Female> boca. Atwood i can't <Speech_Female> thank you enough for your time. <Speech_Female> I have to say <Speech_Female> for all your personal <Speech_Female> support <SpeakerChange> for me over. What's <Speech_Female> been <Speech_Female> a year and <Speech_Female> for you. <Speech_Female> You know you <Speech_Female> you struggled. <Speech_Female> You triumphed <Speech_Female> rain <Speech_Female> for you and by <Speech_Female> doing that. You made <Speech_Female> life easier <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Female> winter weather people. <Speech_Female> I had <Speech_Female> a hold of import <Speech_Female> people doing the heavy lifting <Speech_Female> that my union and my <Speech_Female> lawyers of course <SpeakerChange> but <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> this. Podcast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> made <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by intelligence scrat- <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> with juice <Speech_Music_Female> who is far sat. <Speech_Music_Female> And if you enjoy this podcast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> please do subscribe. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Tell your <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> friends and your family <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to check it out. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And which would appreciate <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it if you could also <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> take a quick moment <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to rate and review <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> us on apple podcasts. <Speech_Music_Female> This helps <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> us to raise the profile <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of the podcast and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it helps <SpeakerChange> other people <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to find the show.

patricia williams apple mike Atwood a
"atwood" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

How I Found My Voice

04:21 min | 6 months ago

"atwood" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

"Because a lot of others are really quite antagonistic to other portrayals of their work and they might veto for really fairly small reasons. So you don't have you don't have that power and anyway. The tv rights went with the original movie back in nineteen eighty nine so head actually power over who got to make it. I had no decision making power. I just got lucky. I happened to get people who really wanted to make it with a fair amount of accuracy rather than than somebody wanted to make maidens and leather or some something of the kind that have been some sexy handmade outfits that on sale for a very briefly they hang thankfully because it wasn't even me did anything about them. The the readers rose up in a swarm. You can't do that. You can have sexy. Handmade hellene costume with little serve freely skirt. You cannot do that. Tell me about the puppetry because you did a version of the mask of the red death. Speaking about plague with tableware for for bbc. Tv during lockdown the puppetry is one that you've kept over the years isn't it. Well you know. What is it about that. So i started the puppetry really quite early and i had a little being an entrepreneurial person. I had a puppetry business and in highschool where we did children's birthday parties and we ended up with an agent. You know we did this. We got paid. I had a partner and we did all the voices we built the stage we built the puppets and we did the essential shows for five year. Olds which are all about cannibalism so hansel and gretel little red riding hood and the three little pigs. Cannibalism down the line. So kids love it. So those are the shows that we did but if you have any any young people in your house anything can be made to talk so my name is supporter them saying hello to us. Know hello year. isn't it just you know. Hello sh no death. Yes i mean we did that. My sister and i did it just really because mary bearded had said. Can you do something a little something or other. That's plague related. And what immediately comes to mind. But edgar allan poe and our rule was that we wouldn't make puppets out of anything that was not available to us right in the house so we did the the table setting players. We used the champagne bottle for prince prospero and We used upside down wine glasses for the courtiers dress. Them up and we did the fortified abbey. Prince prospero with knives and forks. That looked very fortified. I've more question. I ask you. Which is your image with these particular wonderful photographs view in a british newspaper around the time of the testaments with beautifully styled but quite wild had long robes you have a devoted following. I thought you're playing with the way that you're seeing a kind of seer. Kind of profit tests element perhaps with of witchcraft. Is it a burden being recorded as you are as a kind of protests. There's a good side of bad side and a really stupid tied to everything so good side. I won't have to have a job. And and the other part of that. Good side i suppose is that i can afford to say things publicly. That other people can't because they might get fired so there there's that which is a a responsibility i wouldn't call it a burden. On quality responsibility the bad side of courses that some people really do think euro which and not not a totally good history. Which is you know not not always turned out well for them. Not easy to meet mike pence and have i paid to see that conversation with you mayo. Knowle's fun..

mike pence five year edgar allan poe Knowle nineteen eighty nine three little pigs british mayo mary bearded
"atwood" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

How I Found My Voice

04:20 min | 6 months ago

"atwood" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

"Of the handmaid's tale. I come to you. Because did that come to long. Before yet she began writing the novel not long. Before so in the seventies there was a lot of second wave. Women's move and activity and a lot of what rights were actually one in that decade across the spectrum all kinds of rights including divorce rights. And whether you can have a bank account and this kind of stuff which we've sort of forgotten it was ever like that but it was so the eighties is start seeing a pushback politically and is dr tsing. Yeah yeah about the pushback about And you start seeing the rise of the religious right as a political forest. Focus on those ideas so books like that. Come out of questions that you're asking yourself in the questions. That i was asking myself number. One is women are out there running around and effectiveness way in the world and having jobs and incomes and things and if if what you want to do is push them back into the home. How do you do that. You know what would be the mechanism for doing that. The credit card had been invented. And i thought well we'll just castle all their credit cards and fire them all. And that's what they would do. And the second question would be because of always been interested in totalitarian. 'isms autocracies growing up when i did if you're going to have totalitarianism in the united states. What kind of totalitarianism would it be. So it wouldn't be hi. My name is joe. Let's be communist. That would not fly. But if it if it would be some form of caused by theocracy which you see people pushing for this all the time you know they wanna get god back into politics which the founding fathers explicitly did not do because they had seen what had happened in the seventeenth century in in europe with religious wars so they explicitly did not do that. And you're constantly seeing a push. This faction that has always been there in the united states which is a theocratic group of people which is what the puritans were trying to get. A you know back in there so that they can start telling people what to believe and getting rid of other people when the tv series spun off in two thousand seventeen and people started dressing up. I've handmaid's at political protests. How how did you feel about that. What did you mean that. They had actually started doing that before the show. But but that really gave new impetus to it because even before the show people knew that up at mount it was visual signal. You didn't have to disrupt anything you could go into a legislature. Nobody could you out because you weren't saying anything and you weren't immodestly dressed. Heaven knows you were all covered up so nobody could inject you for having you know belbow sticking odors loose thing like that so so it became very effective and television age. Wouldn't have worked if we'd only had radio but you can be there and just symbolize just wetness. What was going on and people started in texas doing that. Women started in texas and then spread all over the place including places like argentina including including ireland really quite widespread when it was a question of laws being introduced that were countered to the universal declaration of human rights..

europe seventeenth century texas ireland argentina second question eighties seventies second wave one united states two thousand seventeen One joe
"atwood" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

How I Found My Voice

02:04 min | 6 months ago

"atwood" Discussed on How I Found My Voice

"Much anticipated sequel to the handmaid's tale was the literary event of two nine thousand nine hundred and won the prize for fiction. And i say. I interviewed margaret a legitimate. The national theatre and it was quite something because this is my teenage copy of the handmaid's tale which i read in the late. Nineteen eighty s and it had a huge impact on me at the time. It was second booker prize for the testaments. Her are the fifty five accolade. I counted them today. Include the arthur c. clarke award for imagination in service to society. I think might revisit that particular ward and in two thousand nineteen. She was given to one of canada's highest honors joining the order of the companions of honour for services to literature but more than fifty years margaret atwood has been avoid sending out stories that have explored the realities of the past and the possible future. Her books have been translated into more than thirty languages and have inspired screen adaptations and even an opera. Welcome lovely to see you again. Take me back you born also but you spent a lot of your early childhood in the forest of north quebec because of your father's job studying insects. What was young margaret and young margaret's lifelike there. Well let's say when i was born which was november nineteen thirty nine and that would be a couple of months after world war two who began so that my my earliest story is i was born into time of great anxiety so canada went into that war as soon as britain did really couple of days later and my early childhood was there for a world war two childhood but not the way people in england would have experienced it because of course nobody was dropping bombs on northern quebec. We did however have in the in the winter. When i lived in ottawa of the family would spend spring and fall and the in the bush with the insects. 'cause my dad was a forest entomologist and in the winters we would live in cities ottawa to begin with and we would have the blackouts owned..

ottawa england northern quebec november nineteen thirty nine margaret margaret atwood two nine thousand nine hundred fifty five accolade more than thirty languages world war two north quebec more than fifty years today second booker couple of days later canada two thousand nineteen eighty s one britain
Interview With Author David Yoon

What Book Hooked You?

06:35 min | 9 months ago

Interview With Author David Yoon

"This week. I'm thrilled to have david yunan. Whose newest book super fake love song is out now. An conversation that we pretty much covered all talk about his newest book a his debut his writing journey and a lot about what he was like as a young person so really enjoyed talking to david. Hope you enjoy listening listening so david. What book hooked you. What book hooked me It's it was when i was in middle school. I don't know exactly how old i was. But i remember talking to my librarian and i was like i don't know to read their so many books in the school library and she just pulled out the halloween tree by ray bradbury and If you read this book but it's it has these awesome woodcut Drawings in it and it came up a long time ago. Like in the sixties. I want to say and this is way before like killington and the newspaper from the nightmare before christmas. But it's kind of there's a character in it. That is the skeleton dude with. I think he has a pumpkin for a head. I know he doesn't but he's like this very skeleton like figure and he's very creepy and he's very Theatrical like jack's kellington was and he challenges This group of boys on halloween when their trick or treating to to give up a year of their lives to save the life of their best friend Pippin who's at homesick can't trick or treat and so they travel around the world and learn about like all these Reports and customs that surrounding death and they wind up in mexico and they eat The sugar skulls and that is like. I'm going to give up a year my life to save my friend and It was just so it's like super atmospheric and super moody. This is awesome so then at of course read all very bradberry. I could find reading stuff. I shouldn't have been reading and so middle school time. Was that in age. Like were you a big reader. Then was it hard to get you to read or was it something where you pretty much constantly always had some sort of book. You're working your way through. I mean i was always reading. Yeah for sure Is reading a lot of stuff But then that book kind of it was like my first sorta grownup book. I guess and after that i started reading a of piers anthony fancy novels and i read like fifteen close and i was like wait a second. It's kind of the same story over and over again and that's florida and Then i started reading a lot of stephen king which i know i shouldn't have been reading And my dad was a weird guy to he. he He studied victorian like them. He he focused on the metaphysical poets. Okay it adds seoul university in career and then when it came to the united states he studied library science all things. wow and so he was like you need to be reading old man and the sea You need to be reading. Was it on human bondage and then lady chatterley's lover and was like that. I don't think i should be reading this. But he didn't care he's like the crazy. Daddy shows like the horror movies to his kids because he wants them to to Have a good sense of the canon. Anna is exposed to a lot of stuff that i probably shouldn't have been but i'm grateful for it and i would imagine while it was definitely helping Definitely helpful for your reading life to have a dad like that and that was kind of pushing it but was there any sort of rebellion there. That because you were being forced to read so many books were pushed upon you that reading. You rebelled against or turn against it because it was it was assigned by by dad I don't know it's hard to remember like like reading moby dick before high school. Sure looks like there's no way. I'm gonna finish so even if it did come from like a friend i don't know if i would have just cause but it did. It did feel like homework for sure At the same time like my older brother. I have one older brother. And he was a big reader to He used to read at the dinner table and it was like a problem. You know But i you know. I'm a little brother saw. I'll read to on just like him. I want to compete in everything we do. Because we're siblings. So he also turned me into the reader just sort of inadvertently and so when you got to high school especially when those are when in in those english courses you're being assigned full size novels and things like that. Didn't you find and really getting into what's canonized literature. We'll call it. Were you kind of a step ahead. That you think In those courses because dad already sorta had you on that home regiment of a reading those types of books. That's a funny question. Because i just realized really recently i mean my dad passed away like over a year ago. and so It just when you're when your parent passes away and makes you think a lot about your relationship in like your whole history. And i was like dude. My dad was like an outsized influence in in my interest in writing in books. I never appreciated him fully for that. He just kinda did it sure Yes and when. I hit high school. It was english. Classes where my absolute favorite My english teachers were my absolute favorite. My locker got broken into one time. So isis i was like no lockers and i used my english teacher's classroom as my locker That's how much we trusted. Each other's liked each other so that was sort of the year of You know camus. And ray bradbury. Shirley jackson and margaret atwood. That's like when i started really getting into those guys and and then i was like all right. This is this is really important to me. Plus i also had study hall. Not how i had studied hall but Journal i wrote in my journal pretty much every day so and so i take it

David Yunan Kellington Bradberry Ray Bradbury David Seoul University Chatterley Pippin Piers Anthony Stephen King Jack Mexico Moby Dick Florida Anna United States Shirley Jackson Camus Margaret Atwood
"atwood" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

07:46 min | 9 months ago

"atwood" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"And not one but two booker prizes. Most recently for the testaments margaret. Welcome thank you so much for joining us. My pleasure so the poem you've chosen from the archive is stranger by jones. Tell us what was it about this particular poem that caught your attention. Well it's about a dead mother. And of course i've got one And i think probably a lot of people have but also it's it's very clear so you get it you don't have to dwell a lot on analyzing. There aren't a lot of puzzles in except the big puzzle which is where two people go and they die and As we say it spoke to me. Let's listen to the palm. Here is margaret atwood reading stranger by jones a stranger. I wonder if my dad mother's still thinks of me. I know i don't know her new name. I don't know her not now. i don't know of. Her is the word burning in a strangers. Mind when he sees my dead mother walking down the street in her bright black dress. I wonder if he inhales the cigarette smoke. That will eventually kill him and thanks. I wish i knew a woman who is both the light and every shadow the light pierces. I wonder if a passing glance at my dead mother is enough to make a poet out of anyone. Wonder if i'm the song she hums as she waits for the light to change. Or if i'm just the traffic signal holding her up. That was a stranger by jones which was published in the july twentieth. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine. I love that you chose this poem. It feels to me exactly right in that way thinking of of grief and as you said the big puzzle and this part that also strikes me hearing again as i wonder if a passing glance at my dead mother is enough to make a poet out of anyone and in a way. It has this self-referential quality that i think is great especially been to the title. Stranger implication if not an explicit discussion of. What's it mean to have this person you loved and was so important to now be somewhat a stranger to you but then there's also the stranger who might be encountering the mother. How did you take that kind of set of self referential qualities and sort of the poetry of the poetry. Well it's just it's a thing poets do then he did it but i think those kinds of things are the are part of the fabric. But they're not the main pattern so yes they add to the resonance of the poem but they don't They're not in the foreground. What's in the foreground. Is and i think probably a lot of people have had this. Experience is the a person walking down the street that you think is a person who has actually dant and that has happened to me and may also happen to you but it happens a lot. You say somebody who reminds you very strongly about prison and for a minute. You think it is that person so he isn't seeing someone that Reminds him of his mother. He's actually seeing his mother in the poem. And you can take that however you like right while also love. How cited says. I don't know her not now and there there's a sense of that Sort of double loss. The loss that occurs when the person passes away but also the loss of memory. She's living on a different plane of existence. She she has a different name this right at the beginning that she must have a new name and he's wondering whether he is part of that life that other life that she appears to be leading or whether he hasn't so do the dead remember us we remember the dead but do the dead. Remember us and that takes us right into the extensive literature of ghosts. Yeah i think goes a career you know is that something The poem believes in or do you think it's something to pull him is is playing with the poem believes in it. The poet may not but the poem does. Well there's a kind of ghosts form in the poem these kinds of rhymes and are coming. No and shadow. But there's also this other kind of I would call it rhyming. But it's almost like paradox. Bright black the light in the shadow and he's trying to get out. I think the internal workings of the mother who's gone. Who is i. Think a paradox. In that way that we all are And i wondered how you you saw that usa form in the poem and how you saw that kind of tension. I don't think. I thought very much about it at all. has not something poets have think about but the the listener to forget about them. So you ought not to have to think. Oh well look at that resonance. So when i was in high school of course they they made us analyze all of this down to the last detail because it was the age of new criticism. Sure we talked a lot about form and we had to make proceeds of poems and that kind of thing we almost never talked about the poet's similarly. We talked about novels. But we didn't talk about the novelists right So when i was about twenty two. I thought the poet's life doesn't matter only the poem matter but i've changed my mind about that so what i'm thinking about when i when i chose this poem and when i read this poem is This is a poem about loss. But it's also a poem about memory and and one thing that poems do is they they conjure so may conjure up they evoke and what they evoke is in the reader not necessarily the poet so When you're reading the poem when you're with the poem you are the person seeing the dad mother one. I also think that you know part of the power. Thinking of the poet is is. The poet is fairly young. There's a sense at least for me that the mother still has this Vitality monday died young when he sees dead mother walking down the street and her bright black dress. And then there's the stranger smoking you know something that we know and the poem says will eventually kill him And then this this kind of wish to know her which is of course. The poets wish to i think but it be gets. I don't think project is the right word imagined as part of the strangers. Wish and i think there's something about that that you touch on wonderfully which we all kinda wanna know what that mystery as the unseen the after but also we were sort of. We're also wondering if other people including the dead might wonder about it too. There's a kind of a power in wonder that the poem thinks about it and it comes about in some of the line breaks who. I wonder break. If i'm the song she sheahomes or.

jones margaret atwood margaret usa
freeCodeCamp with Quincy Larson

Software Engineering Daily

04:28 min | 1 year ago

freeCodeCamp with Quincy Larson

"To make as well so let's first just talk about products surface area. Sure so free co camp is really three different core applications. There's the curriculum and. Portfolios? That's one of the pillars. And that is all custom code part. That's when we say the platform nationally what we're talking about we also have. A free co Camp Dot Org Slash News, which is our publication and published several articles today they're often in-depth explanatory journalism about technology. Then we have the free forum, and that's the third pillar of Free Co camp now. All three of those run on separate servers, the free cocaine forum is powered by discourse, which is a really cool self hosted open source form tool created by the founder of flow. Jeff Atwood in his. And that's very well maintained, and you can get your own discourse running really easily if you want to. You can just deploy to the cloud, and it'll live on its own server in docker container, and there you go. Same thing with free. Co Camp Dot org slash news that is running on ghost, which is another self hosted open source project that just released version three of their tool, and it's like wordpress, but it doesn't have a lot of the baggage that comes with wordpress. wordpress is excellent. But it does have some vulnerabilities in it does have. A very complicated plugin system in wordpress is trying to do a lot of things whereas ghost is just trying to be. A publication tool. So we have maybe. Seven thousand articles on. Free Co powder slash news at this point and we have. Hundreds of thousands of posts on free cochem dot org slash. So those are those who now if you want, I can drill into what powers the frequent camp platform the core curriculum. Please do yeah, so we are running. React on the front end. We're running known. As the back end were running a tool called loop. which is. An API tool. It essentially turns your rap into an API where all the routes. Can, confess chase on as well they shemale. It's something that's already baked into tools like ruby on rails like with ron rails. You take any euro. You could just put dot Jason at the end of it and get a Jason Representation of that of the data in that route so. Does a lot of that stuff. We ease Mogadishu for database and we have managed cluster. On 'em lab and we're working on moving that over to Mugabe's new atlas tool. Atlas. 'EM! Lab was acquired by Manga to be recently, so they're kind of sunsetting 'em lab. I think so. We're in the process of moving everything over. To have a big sharded system because we have a lot of data. We've got millions of records, and each of those records has these of challenge completions. And a whole lot of other data that they've added to their portfolio and the portfolios themselves were working on growing them, and making them a lot richer in terms of just having a lot more data like you can submit a whole different projects you've built from. Outside of the Free Co curriculum as well if you built your own. Jobs script game for example you could submit that and turn that into a kind of like a Lincoln light four developers, so we're working on that the platform itself in terms of the curriculum. Is. A gatsby APP and you hit that. Euro Free Co Camp Dot org slash learn and the entire curriculum loads. And it stays in your browser. It. Of Challenges, and then when you complete challenges, it will post those to the server, and if you disconnect from the server for some reason, you can keep completing challenges than when you reconnected a push that back up to free Co camp servers, so we're very close to having be fully offline. Functional APP like a progressive

Free Co Jeff Atwood Mogadishu Cocaine Jason Representation Ron Rails Mugabe Founder
Pompeo says Hong Kong is no longer autonomous from China

Rush Limbaugh

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Pompeo says Hong Kong is no longer autonomous from China

"With it secretary of state Pompeo is certified Hong Kong no longer warrant special treatment by the U. S. restore spotted Kylie Atwood we are set here to expect some really drastic changes with how the U. S. treats Hong Kong because of the actions that secretary Pompeii is saying China has undertaken in not allowing Hong Kong to operate how it should in a

Pompeo Hong Kong Kylie Atwood Pompeii China Secretary
Beowulf Sheehan

Photography Radio

07:33 min | 1 year ago

Beowulf Sheehan

"Hello everyone and welcome to frames. My name is Scott Olsen and I am talking today with Beowulf Sheehan. Beowulf is one of the most sought after most successful and I believe most important portrait photographers in New York. These days he has worked in more than fifty countries lectured at New York University and Yale among other places and if you go to his website you will see portrait of people like Oprah Winfrey Twenty Morrison Patti Smith Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewart in Kellyn Paul Simon and dozens and dozens of others. It is a body of work of which I am personally Quite envious good morning. Bill could he's got great to hear Your Voice. I do have a quick thought for you. I've not traveled to fifty countries the photograph I photographed in better than ten by way of commissions however I have photographed people from at least fifty countries and hopefully been able to travel to their worlds in cultures through those experiences. Okay I saw that on your resume and I was impressed and I'm still impressed. So tell me how things are in New York this morning. New York is a beautiful place this morning. The air is cool and crisp outside. I did have a short walk this morning. I am very fortunate that out my window. I have a cemetery so I get to see less trees and I have a great deal of quiet. What sounds I hear. Every morning in this new time of ours is usually One of two things that I hear all either your birdsong or I will hear the sound of a passing ambulance and of course happy to hear the former not to hear the ladder. That is the time in which we live summer mornings in New York. City yes Tell me about portrait photography but let let let's begin where people how in the world could you get into photography? How did you get into the kind of portraiture that you do specifically I into photography being a shy boy and wanting to make friends and prior to the thought of making friends? I wanted to be reacquainted with my father. My parents divorced when I was in elementary school. My father was out in my life for a few years and when he came back the beginning of my high school years he had a Konica thirty five millimeter camera. A Long Lens to go with it and when I arrived at high school which was a high school outside of my neighborhood I went to magnet high school for foreign languages. I was busted very early in the morning to get there. I was in the ethic minority in head a world of new friends to make and when I got to school my classmates were speaking about two things with which I was unfamiliar of the Miami Dolphins. I grew up in Fort Lauderdale and girls and I knew very little about both but I had been working in the summers and not really spend that money on anything beyond books and comic book so I had enough money saved to become the youngest person in the history of the Miami Dolphins the buy season tickets to the Miami Dolphins. That's impressive I go So what I had done was than I began to use my father's camera and I would take a tripod that camera that long lens invite a new acquaintance from high school to eat game. And I believe my mother had driven been to us down To attend these games and no one ever stopped me. The guards were very kind. They recognize me after a few games. I always went through the same gate that sort of thing and was able to watch Dan Marino or the ball around and make pictures and then make Prince of those pictures and share them with classmates over time developing friendships and of course Getting to know my father again. That's a wonderful beginning there. Is I know an extraordinary event. Though in your early connection to reading and that's possible yes but but I'll let you lead that so when you're asking the extraordinary connection is well. Yeah you you are probably the only you are the only person I know who's ever been bitten by an alligator. Oh this is true this this. I don't know all the people in your life of course who you know but but I'm the only person I know who's been bitten by an alligator and that happened to me in the summer of nineteen seventy six in June of that year. I was of course on summer break from school quite small and my brother and I were playing in the backyard of the home of a friend of my mother in southwest Fort Lauderdale where there are canals and those canals in some cases feed than Their Way West to the Florida everglades and of course. That's where alligators hang out. And some of them sometimes get lost. My brother-in-law had been wrestling. This lady's backyard was time to come into the House for lunch. I had asked the Lady of the House. If we could use your host wash our feet persons they were full of dirt from the grass and the young lady had said no actually better just a spicer feed off the dock and then it'll be quicker and I went I. I remember sitting at the dock. Enjoying splash on my feet and looking at my brother and my brother's twenty months younger than me made his eyes get bigger and he looks down on my foot. I looked at my foot and I saw the alligator close. Its mouth around my right foot and I went to some degree of shock. The allegation let go. He caught the outside artery of my ankle and bloodshot out. Allah a bad money iphone sketch. And my my brother then began to grab my body to try to pull my body up and my mother and my mother's friend of course had come out of the house at this time and they were lifting me from the document onto the grass. The allegation had gone back under the dock. And I don't know how much more time passed or how much blood I lost but I then at some point found in the emergency room of a hospital where my brother was born. Only a few blocks away and doctors worked in saved my foot. Save my leg. There was concern for infection loss and I was very lucky to have for the balance of the summer. Have Gone to the hospital every day to get my foot. Epsom salts to save it and that meant of course not being able to play games at not being able to enjoy summer camp not being able to do sports do much of anything involved mobility and that deepened my reading and then with it of course my drawing and my reading and drawing through my childhood in and beyond began with comic books and then onto more challenging books More INTERESTING BOOKS. Maybe more interesting stuff. The right word say because books are wonderful. And they're very very interesting. Otherwise we wouldn't have these films adaptations of stories that now the masses is seen film but the the books of course comic books would come out once a month and it was great to go to seven eleven after school and pick up those books but I would devour them so quickly and then I really wasn't in the mood to wait another month for the next book to come out so I would just draw stories myself. The drawing worked its way over time of course into photography. But that's a longer compensation which I'm happy to have

New York Miami Dolphins Fort Lauderdale New York University Scott Olsen Magnet High School Beowulf Sheehan Oprah Winfrey Bill Dan Marino Wrestling Morrison Patti Smith Florida Everglades Yale Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewar Paul Simon Getting
`Handmaid's Tale,' Harry Potter on challenged books list

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

`Handmaid's Tale,' Harry Potter on challenged books list

"The American library association released its annual list of books that receive the most objections last year at schools and libraries the top two R. Alex Gino's George and Susan Copeland's beyond magenta transgender teens speak out both because of trans gender content number three John Oliver's parody of the children's book by vice president Mike pence's wife a day in the life of Marlon Brando all story is about Marlon Bundo falling in love with another boy rabbit because the potter books are on the list religious groups are critical of sorcery Margaret Atwood's handmaid's tale is mentioned to for Paul Garrity and sexual overtones I'm a Donahue

American Library Association Alex Gino George John Oliver Vice President Mike Pence Marlon Brando Marlon Bundo Margaret Atwood Paul Garrity Donahue Susan Copeland
`Handmaid's Tale,' Harry Potter on challenged books list

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

`Handmaid's Tale,' Harry Potter on challenged books list

"The top two R. Alex Gino's George and Susan Copeland's beyond magenta transgender teens speak out both because of trans gender content number three John Oliver's parody of the children's book by vice president Mike pence's wife a day in the life of Marlon Brando all story is about Marlon Bundo falling in love with another boy rabbit because the potter books are on the list religious groups are critical of sorcery Margaret Atwood's handmaid's tale is mentioned to for Paul Garrity and sexual overtones I'm a Donahue

Alex Gino George John Oliver Vice President Mike Pence Marlon Brando Marlon Bundo Margaret Atwood Paul Garrity Donahue Susan Copeland
Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

VINTAGE Podcast

08:39 min | 1 year ago

Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

"First into younger share with you is mark had author of the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime most recently the porpoise. He's talking about book. We published that. He contributed to stop what you're doing and read this. Which is an excellent but by the way is one of the books already as go as a bookseller in one of the books that made me want to really work vintage books and he talks about how he believes in the power of a good novel. A term he defines as a piece of work is humane and generous. I particularly found comfort in his description of reading as a compensation a reader and a writer sitting opposite each other. In each other's company I can write plays and films and even poems in which some of the characters are genuinely unsympathetic for which you and the reader feel no empathy partly because those forms are spectacle to a certain extent. You you can sit back and watch it from a distance but I think all novels A conversation I I tend to picture a novel as you. The writer and the reader sitting in adjacent chairs talking quietly to each other. You know a novel is never declaimed or acted out or overheard. It's it spoken quietly to the reader and of course a really long conversation and to make the long conversation work you've really got to you with a like the narrator. You're gonNA like the person who's talking to you. They can be taught or scathing satirical. But they've got to have an underlying warm both towards you and and towards the people they're talking about and I think you can see that. All great writers and Dickens in Jane Austen George Eliot in Tolstoy and in fact in Warren Pace. You can see where it doesn't work because when he does start declaim in those separate chapters about his theory of history he can lose you completely and it's one of the great novels in the world where no one reached the last chapter. Because he's just telling you stuff you don't really want to know. I think this is particularly true of Virginia Wolfe It's not just her warmth than her interest in the people she's talking about but the speed the ease with which she seems to flow in and out of different people's minds in and out of different consciousnesses in a very short period of time often around dining table in and out of the minds of people talking with with one another and I think the way in which she does. That makes you very aware of something about your own mind personally. I'm always reading Virginia Woolf and thinking Yes yes yes that's what it's actually like to be a human being not just that stream of consciousness stuff which she does so well the way you flick from memories of Childhood Your plans for dinner to the fear of death all within thirty seconds the way we move from sense of loneliness sudden empathy with people around us the way we feel sort of sealed in one moment and then suddenly we dissolve and we realized that we members of a group of people or we members of a family and a part of verse exists within all those other people in the room at the same time the way we move from our past to our future back into our president. I think there are other right to have a wide range of characters and a wide range of situations. By doting. There is anyone who understands articulates what it is like to be a person from one moment to the next so the other interview. I found interesting was one. The Margaret Atwood gave on stage all those years ago when she'd written novel taxied. If you don't know already exceed is retelling of Shakespeare's tempest in the interview. Margaret Talks about the theme of exile in tempest. And how she explores to have writing the contrast between freedom. I'm confinement. I know a lot of us feel like we're in a very strange very necessary. Exile from our normal lives in big. I'm small ways so I hope like me find this interview. Refreshing or at least a little comforting. Let me start by asking about the genesis of high exceed. Of course it's part of the hogarth Shakespeare series but why the tempest yes. Why the tempest Luckily I was early on the list of people who are asked so I got I got my druthers and that was my brother because I had thought about it quite a bit before. It even written about Prospero before in my book on writing which is called oddly. Enough a writer on writing it used to be called negotiating with the dead but I think the day word was a bridge too far for some people in the publishing industry. They don't like the D. Word. No no not always coming to say it does what it says on the tin it. Does I think what it says on the tin. So it's not about my writing and it's not about how to write about. Who are these writers? What do they think they're doing? And how are they different from other kinds of artists and The chapter in which Prospero of here's is a chapter on diabetes. Magicians because of course writers are dubious. Magicians they create illusions and are those illusions always benevolent. So that's what I what I was writing about in that book and one of the other ones in that chapter is the wizard of Oz. Who has he says is A good man but a bad magician he has no real magic. He's an illusionist. So what you need to ask about any writer probably is. Are they a good man but a bad magician or have bad man but a good magician? Which is often also true or possibly. They're good at both but Prospero in the tempest is very ambiguous. And therefore the he's been open to many different kinds of interpretations. It's also play with a lot of unanswered questions. And it is the one play above all in which Shakespeare is writing a play about what he actually did all his life. He's writing play about a director producer. Putting on a play with the aid of a very good special effects man called aerial. So that is what happens in the book and a director producer puts on a play by means of which he hopes to get revenge on the people who have done him dirt twelve years before them. Light on the setting. Because it's one thing. It seems to me to consider prosper on his magic in an essay. It's another to construct a whole story which you could read perfectly plausibly. I think without even knowing that the tempest existed I think it helps to know that the tempest exists and by the end of it. You're certainly going to know that the tempest exists. Because what they're putting are isn't is the tempest. So how did I come to all of that? The epilogue has always been very intriguing to me which Prospero's steps out of the play addresses the audience. But he's still prospero. He's not saying hello. I'm an actor playing Prospero. He is still prospero and that play is about guilt and forget and forgiveness and and and liberation because the last three words of it are set me free. But it's a bit puzzling in the epilogue of what is Prospero guilty. Why does he feel guilty? And from what is he being freed now that he's outside his own play

Prospero Writer Shakespeare Margaret Atwood Virginia Mark Virginia Woolf Margaret Talks Diabetes Warren Pace Director President Trump Dickens Jane Austen George Eliot Producer Tolstoy
Delta slashes flights by 40% as virus cripples global travel

Bloomberg Law

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Delta slashes flights by 40% as virus cripples global travel

"Airlines have been cutting back on flights as countries restrict travel and consumers decide not to fly for fear of contracting the virus delta airlines is cutting forty percent of its flights says Washington correspondent Kylie Atwood Theo issuing internal memo laying out some drastic cuts that they're going to be taking these are even deeper cuts then they took after nine eleven and he said that is due to a falloff in demand that is something like they have never seen noting that there are more cancellations of flights over the next month then there are reservations for

Washington Kylie Atwood
Trump officials struggle to defend claims of embassy plots

Anderson Cooper 360

06:12 min | 1 year ago

Trump officials struggle to defend claims of embassy plots

"Keeping him on a State Department officials tell C. N. N.'s Kylie Atwood that department personnel involved in embassy. Security were not made aware of any such threats to force specific embassies and they weren't alone. Neither was the secretary of Defense Mark. Asper who spent much of Sunday morning on the Washington talkshows trying to explain the president's it's clan for the president didn't say there was a tangible. He didn't cite a specific piece of evidence. What he says he probably he believes one? I I didn't see one with regard to four embassies so he didn't see a imminent attack on with regard to for embassies that was yesterday today. The president and says it really doesn't matter. The irony is seen in global affairs analyst. Max Boot writes in The Washington Post. There actually are a number of legitimate justifications for killing Sulejmani the president could have turned to you if you weren't so invested in what now appears to be dramatic but increasingly questionable one boot rights what the administration is doing legally and perhaps even strategically justifiable. All trump has to do is come clean with the American people instead. The president seems to be doing the opposite. And when that doesn't work doing this retweeting a doctor photo. The House Speaker and Senate Minority Leader in front of Iranian flag. Big Dresses you see them. Join US now senator. Tim Kaine Democratic. Virginia's introduce the war powers resolution on Iran. Senator Kaine the fact that this ministration when all else fails is trying to come up with an explanation. The Nation has now turned to just insulting Democrats in a way that at the same time. He claims to be standing with the Iranian people. He is draping being. You Know Democrats in in garb that is worn by Iranians and that's an insult according to the president. Well look. He's insulting insulting Democrats but Anderson the real issues. He's insulting all of Congress and the Constitution. The constitution says we shouldn't go to war without deliberation by Congress and when the administration briefers came last week many days after the Sulejmani strike to finally brief us. They were contemptuous of Congress. They acted like we were an annoyance. Rather than we were part of the constitutional framework. The reason that Congress is supposed to declare. War is a so we don't rush into it and be if we're going to order order our best and brightest or risk their lives at risk their health. It should be based upon a debate in full view of the American public. Where we end up saying this is a war? That's in the national interest. The the president wants to insult not just Democrats with stupid juvenile tweets. He's insulting all of Congress by pretending the Congress doesn't doesn't have a role in more making do you. You believe the explanation is coming from the White House specifically the president saying this all the money was targeting four embassies or no no no absolutely not no I think when when the evidence was is presented to us last week in the classified setting. I can't talk about the discussions there but I can tell you this. It added up too far less than an imminent threat. And that's the real key issue. The president can always defend the nation against an imminent attack without seeking anybody's permission. But if he wants to go on offense and wage war against another nation or a group he's got to come to Congress for permission he didn't want to seek permission so they tried to suggest that there was this imminent threat but as you point out it's falling apart. The President President makes up this thing about four embassies. We heard nothing about that. And the State Department itself in the embassies affected were not given notice that they were at risk so money was obviously a you. Know a thug. Killer Rod guy for the deaths of many Americans and many many others what would have been wrong about killing him and and just saying well you know in general he's plots attacks and he plots Actions against US interests. Would that have been okay well. Look here's the situation. It wasn't just the killing. The Sola Mani Anderson it was that they killed him without notifying Congress or seeking congressional national approval when there's never been a declaration of war against Ron and they killed him on Iraqi soil Iraq as an ally of ours and they've objected to the US turning Iraq into a like a coliseum where the US and Iran will wage war to the detriment of Iraqi. So what you've ended up doing is nobody said that souleymane he's gone bad actors. Sure but this president has rushed us to the brink of war where Iran and the United States are now. Inflicting battlefield casualties zero on the other without being a plane with Congress and with the American public we got lied into a war with Iraq in two thousand and two and now everybody realizes is that the administration said there were weapons of mass destruction of the work. The last thing we need to do is to be lied into another war with claims of imminent threats. That didn't exist. The sheer a number of inconsistencies that are routinely coming out of the administration. I mean outright lies whatever you WANNA call it. Are you concerned about the message. It sends sends to both allies and episodes of both I. The allies begged US stick with diplomatic deal against Ron. You curtail their nuclear your program and you've maintained all of your ability to sanction the other behavior so we have we have really messed up our relations with our allies by walking out of a deal that we worked on together with them as well as the president's horrible remarks about so many of our allies. Now we've threatened the relationship with Iraq as you know Anderson this is a relationship shipped the US has earned with blood and treasure sacrificed on behalf of the Iraqis especially in the battle against Isis. And now Iraq is asking the US us to leave the country because we we ignored their objections to doing military strikes on Iraqi soil. So yes we have made our allies mad. We're emboldening our adversaries. Russia Iran and China just a joint naval exercises in the Gulf. These are nations. That don't have a good. The history of relationships with each other but the president's actions are driving our adversaries together and this is exactly why the framers of the Constitution said look war. I should be deliberated about carefully in front of the whole view of the American public because we shouldn't be ordering our troops to risk their lives and health unless Congress is willing to put their thumbprint on it. We don't want this president or any president to take us into an unnecessary war on his

President Trump Congress President President United States Iran Iraq State Department Senator Kaine Anderson Max Boot Washington Secretary Virginia Asper RON Sulejmani Kylie Atwood Global Affairs Gulf Senator
Trump officials struggle to defend claims of embassy plots

Anderson Cooper 360

06:12 min | 1 year ago

Trump officials struggle to defend claims of embassy plots

"Keeping him on a State Department officials tell C. N. N.'s Kylie Atwood that department personnel involved in embassy. Security were not made aware of any such threats to force specific embassies and they weren't alone. Neither was the secretary of Defense Mark. Asper who spent much of Sunday morning on the Washington talkshows trying to explain the president's it's clan for the president didn't say there was a tangible. He didn't cite a specific piece of evidence. What he says he probably he believes one? I I didn't see one with regard to four embassies so he didn't see a imminent attack on with regard to for embassies that was yesterday today. The president and says it really doesn't matter. The irony is seen in global affairs analyst. Max Boot writes in The Washington Post. There actually are a number of legitimate justifications for killing Sulejmani the president could have turned to you if you weren't so invested in what now appears to be dramatic but increasingly questionable one boot rights what the administration is doing legally and perhaps even strategically justifiable. All trump has to do is come clean with the American people instead. The president seems to be doing the opposite. And when that doesn't work doing this retweeting a doctor photo. The House Speaker and Senate Minority Leader in front of Iranian flag. Big Dresses you see them. Join US now senator. Tim Kaine Democratic. Virginia's introduce the war powers resolution on Iran. Senator Kaine the fact that this ministration when all else fails is trying to come up with an explanation. The Nation has now turned to just insulting Democrats in a way that at the same time. He claims to be standing with the Iranian people. He is draping being. You Know Democrats in in garb that is worn by Iranians and that's an insult according to the president. Well look. He's insulting insulting Democrats but Anderson the real issues. He's insulting all of Congress and the Constitution. The constitution says we shouldn't go to war without deliberation by Congress and when the administration briefers came last week many days after the Sulejmani strike to finally brief us. They were contemptuous of Congress. They acted like we were an annoyance. Rather than we were part of the constitutional framework. The reason that Congress is supposed to declare. War is a so we don't rush into it and be if we're going to order order our best and brightest or risk their lives at risk their health. It should be based upon a debate in full view of the American public. Where we end up saying this is a war? That's in the national interest. The the president wants to insult not just Democrats with stupid juvenile tweets. He's insulting all of Congress by pretending the Congress doesn't doesn't have a role in more making do you. You believe the explanation is coming from the White House specifically the president saying this all the money was targeting four embassies or no no no absolutely not no I think when when the evidence was is presented to us last week in the classified setting. I can't talk about the discussions there but I can tell you this. It added up too far less than an imminent threat. And that's the real key issue. The president can always defend the nation against an imminent attack without seeking anybody's permission. But if he wants to go on offense and wage war against another nation or a group he's got to come to Congress for permission he didn't want to seek permission so they tried to suggest that there was this imminent threat but as you point out it's falling apart. The President President makes up this thing about four embassies. We heard nothing about that. And the State Department itself in the embassies affected were not given notice that they were at risk so money was obviously a you. Know a thug. Killer Rod guy for the deaths of many Americans and many many others what would have been wrong about killing him and and just saying well you know in general he's plots attacks and he plots Actions against US interests. Would that have been okay well. Look here's the situation. It wasn't just the killing. The Sola Mani Anderson it was that they killed him without notifying Congress or seeking congressional national approval when there's never been a declaration of war against Ron and they killed him on Iraqi soil Iraq as an ally of ours and they've objected to the US turning Iraq into a like a coliseum where the US and Iran will wage war to the detriment of Iraqi. So what you've ended up doing is nobody said that souleymane he's gone bad actors. Sure but this president has rushed us to the brink of war where Iran and the United States are now. Inflicting battlefield casualties zero on the other without being a plane with Congress and with the American public we got lied into a war with Iraq in two thousand and two and now everybody realizes is that the administration said there were weapons of mass destruction of the work. The last thing we need to do is to be lied into another war with claims of imminent threats. That didn't exist. The sheer a number of inconsistencies that are routinely coming out of the administration. I mean outright lies whatever you WANNA call it. Are you concerned about the message. It sends sends to both allies and episodes of both I. The allies begged US stick with diplomatic deal against Ron. You curtail their nuclear your program and you've maintained all of your ability to sanction the other behavior so we have we have really messed up our relations with our allies by walking out of a deal that we worked on together with them as well as the president's horrible remarks about so many of our allies. Now we've threatened the relationship with Iraq as you know Anderson this is a relationship shipped the US has earned with blood and treasure sacrificed on behalf of the Iraqis especially in the battle against Isis. And now Iraq is asking the US us to leave the country because we we ignored their objections to doing military strikes on Iraqi soil. So yes we have made our allies mad. We're emboldening our adversaries. Russia Iran and China just a joint naval exercises in the Gulf. These are nations. That don't have a good. The history of relationships with each other but the president's actions are driving our adversaries together and this is exactly why the framers of the Constitution said look war. I should be deliberated about carefully in front of the whole view of the American public because we shouldn't be ordering our troops to risk their lives and health unless Congress is willing to put their thumbprint on it. We don't want this president or any president to take us into an unnecessary war on his

"atwood" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

13:42 min | 1 year ago

"atwood" Discussed on Overdue

"Defines testament as a tangible proof or tribute an expression or of conviction an or an act by which a person determines the disposition of his or her property after death or a covenant between God and the Human Race Choose wisely this all very interesting. Can I have the first steph initial again nate tangible proof or tribute slash an expression Russian of conviction or creed yells. Call it that one okay. It's about this. Is that client testament. Tell me more all right. So the testaments let's compared to the handmaid's tale. Great right away shall we. The handmaid's tale was mostly the account. One person it was afraid. She was a handmade who lived in the society called Gilead Elliot. If you're not familiar with the books I can't imagine why you'd still be listening but Gilead is this. It is part of the former United States of America in this society like a fundamentalist Christian sects YEP has blown up congress taking control of the country not all the country but a big chunk of it mostly on the east coast This is in response partly to like a steep decline in the birth rate and and a desire to like increase that but their their desire to increase that just happens to completely disempower all women in and make them essentially like walking wombs like the ones who even still have functioning reproductive organs And of course ourse like the men like there's nothing there's no such thing as a man who is not sterile so if a woman can't get pregnant of course it's all the man's fault because that's that's the way the society yes correct In that so a handmade is sort of at the bottom of this system. They are women who who have already had a kid like before the fall of the US and the establishment of Gilead or they're just like thought to be fertile will And they are assigned to families their given names that are derived from the patriarch of that family so off read his of Fred. Did the commander's name being Fred. And they do this weird ritualistic sex thing where the commanders like wife is there like is his wife in the eyes of God if you if you want to is there but the commanders actually having sex with handmade because that's who skin skinny get pregnant yeah And then also we've talked about the commanders a little bit. We've talked about the wives a little bit. Like wives have a little bit more power and agency than handmaid's but not really inbetween handmaid's and wives are Martha's who were sort of the hired help maids essentially And then you've also got at the at the top of the hierarchy of women in the society are the ants who sort of managed the handmaid's and other like a women's issues so that men don't have to sully their hands doing it And aunts aren't they don't have a ton of power but they are allowed to read read and write which most other minutes in this society are not allowed to do and they do you not to the extent that any women have power in the society and have it. Yes yes The that you run into mainly in the handmaid's tale his aunt Lydia in that book because she is an oppressor figure for offered she is. She is as close to as an anti gay to an. She's as close to an antagonists as that book has I think yes at insofar as Gilead and the society is the NBA and she like finds herself figure like the the various men that Gina Racks with in that book. Nick the commander Dander she never knows who to trust but they all like try to ply her with things. At times and Lydia's is a photo to her the entire story. Yup Yeah Yeah but even even as you saw in the handmaid's tale even as you experienced as oppressive society you also experience Theralac of exceptions being made like Yeah Yeah for the commander's wife Serena joy is her is her name. she so men cannot be sterile like officially but it is widely understood that sometimes when a handmade can't get pregnant. It's because of that and so maybe you just try a few different dudes and just see if you can get one to stick and so there. Yeah there's like a chauffeur of that family nick who who is also having sex with offered in an attempt to impregnate her and of course if if she were to get pregnant it would be the commanders like everybody would say. That was what had happened but It's it's this everybody's lying. Nobody knows who to trust. And it's which is happening everywhere at every layer. Yeah and the way that that book is constructed. Because it's all from her perspective. Whatever information she doesn't have you don't have so like there's a lot of ambiguity that is kind of weaponized at her throughout the book and she kind of has to make her way with limited knowledge at all times? which is a hallmark of the original story? And I think when you were talking earlier about how the epilogue can kind of reshape your feelings about the book. I think that's part of it. Is that like I think. The narrative works very very well within the blinders that offer it as forced to wear literally really in figuratively and taking some of that away at least complicates things on purpose. Atwood's doing it on purpose. Chair so that's I think that's the main like background on handmaid's tale the book and also Gilead the setting that you need to really understand this So the testaments is delivered. The handmaid's don't really factor into it too much at all like you do encounter them. You do see some things but nothing. You don't see in the original book like there's that like ritualistic killing of men that the handmaid's are allowed to do some jurors yeah To just Kinda let their aggression out and give give them a place to put that very like hate or whatever it is yes so that they don't they don't put it out in other places that would cause it's more trouble for Gilead as Zaidi but you get it from you get the testaments from three perspectives. You get you get it from Daisy who is a teenager living in Canada. Outside of Gilead you get it from Agnes who is a young woman who who been raised inside Gilead and then you get it from Aunt Lydia herself. Okay the the Moore who is more who operates like I said more or realized villain of the first book and and this one is presented as a more sympathetic figure. And and you get to know her motivations wins and like the the reasons why she acted the way she did and we can. We can talk about the efficacy like I usually. I don't know like where where do you. Where are you? Help me about each of these three people and like what they're deal is I most if you want to know who I'm most interested in. It's the one who is raised inside Gilead because a big question mark for me of the original book is like they're gonNA. They're planning to raise children in the society and how the children move up through and into the caste system is a big question for me so this this hasn't actually our experience like Suzanne is experienced as a pregnant woman and then as a new mom actually been pretty good but there is sort of a truism about about society and how it treats pregnant. Women is like everybody is very interested in your well being when you are pregnant and then once you are no longer pregnant you are just an annoying woman. Who brought a screaming baby onto a plane becomes the the results of a person being pregnant inspires less Concern and goodwill amongst your fellow humans. I guess okay so it's it's Kinda the same here's a society really wants children to exist. But then once they do and then once they grow up into the people they are just people and they just have to be assimilated into the system somewhere so she as the her name again. Sorry Agnes Is e daughter of. I mean she's she's told she is the daughter of of a wife and a commander like she. She is in one of the upper class families. There's another heard sort of cast in this. Society called the Ikano families. Okay who are people like. They're not economy. ECONOLODGE yourself okay. They're just kinda unlike the lower the lower classes of people that people who make things harder the society run but they are in this official like wife. Fan made whatever system yet. The people there are some mobility between those classes of people but we're we're getting The perspective of somebody who's been raised in sorry the upper class of of Gilead. Okay in in Agnes so she is. You know we get a descriptions of her in school like what the children of commanders and wives and occasionally you'll get like if there is a doctor or somebody who's really ingratiated himself off with the ruling class like occasionally their kids will be allowed into the schools to but of course it'll be understood that they're not as you know they're not as good as yes people from the like the ruling families So her mother the wife who is she is told is her mother passes passes away and another like another woman comes in and their family gets a handmade and they're trying to have another baby because this wife doesn't really see Agnes as her daughter because she somebody else's daughter like literally and like adaptively and so the focus because she's not like wanted in this family and she has no place in this hierarchy is time. You know it's time to marry her off maybe she can can get pregnant. Maybe a handmade whatever but it's important to just get her out of here because we don't really want her in here anymore okay And so she is she is being. I guess shopped around different commanders. They're not really a nicer way to to know and she she while this is happening. She encounters aunt Lydia aunt. Lydia says you know if you wanted to come and join the and so you and have to get married. If one were to want to do this this is kind of who you should talk to. And what you should say and Because the answer the the people who teach these classes like in charge of the stuff is she is agnes allowed to reach. She's not allowed to read. Okay not until she so she she really doesn't want to be married like there's this guy commander Judd who's a huge KRIPO great. I'm who we get a few different perspectives on him like he is he and aunt. Lydia are like work together more or less but he also is this guy who likes to of Mary. Super Young women not always women even And because divorce is not legal in Gilead like many of the wives that he he gets to die mysteriously once they get a little too old of course like you yes oh she is. She is being chopped draft this guy and so she she comes and she does the right things and she gets she becomes an aunt or an aunt and training Okay and and there's a I you don't get a ton of world building stuff for Gilead the I don't think you got in the original handmaid's tale but there are a little touches and one of the touches. Is that new ants in this later phase of Gilead where women who have been brought up totally within the society are being made into aunts. They're allowed to choose from. I'M A pre selected list of names and the list of names is often mike brands like old brands. You could be aunt maybelline God that sucks so hard. That's pretty funny. Well Yeah because like Oh. My Aunt Victoria Korea. Like Victoria's secret Jeez. Well and there's like an insidious quality to like re appropriating capitalist branding into a your theocracy. So that it's it's also like yeah. Well it's like the older aunts also having like a little bit of a Joe. People don't even realize it named after like middle shelf makeup that everybody just saw ads for all the time. That's yeah okay. 'cause there's like would love love to run into like aunt head and shoulders.

Gilead commander Lydia aunt Agnes Gilead Elliot United States nick NBA Fred Canada Martha America Gina Racks Victoria Korea Atwood Victoria Moore Serena joy
Poland's reproductive rights are impacting IVF treatment for single women

Correspondents Report

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Poland's reproductive rights are impacting IVF treatment for single women

"Earlier this month. Thousands of women marched in Wausau on Polish Independence Day claiming the government is out to destroy their reproductive rights for many many Polish women these adopt times new laws that take effect governing abortion contraception sex education and even IVF in Poland a single women who have undergone treatment facing almost unbelievable situation the government can now donate their frozen embryos to a married it couple. It's a law. That many believe is chilling and flat wrong. Europe correspondent bridget. Brennan travelled to Warsaw to talk to a family affected. Good in two thousand and five. New Law came into force in Poland. which was supposed to be a compromise to me? It sounds like something from Margaret Atwood novel. Oh but for women in Poland. It's very stock. Reality now. Single Women in Poland a banned from accessing. IVF and if they've already had embryos we always frozen prior to two thousand fifteen. It's too late in twenty years time. That could be donated to another couple unless that women can find a male partner. amazulu check is an advocate for women seeking IV of treatment in Poland and. She explained to us what happened when the law changed. And how it's impacted you still being faced just before the two thousand fifteen. The I was not related at all. So Dick Fertility clinics were developing Every woman in the country had had access to them and Kuch form embryos and in two thousand fifteen. The government finally decided to regulate fertility fertility rotate cleanings and IVF treatment from two thousand fifteen Single woman who had access to for cleanings before had no more access to to the cleanings but also today are ambience formed before the law was adopted so everything changed and even though they were mutters mutters before they supposed to be mothers. They were in the middle of their treatment. They became From the point of view of the new legislation anonymous donors after twenty years. Women were forced to Give does embryos away. And they could be adopted by another their sexual couples post so in the end. All those embryos formed before two thousand fifteen just became well possible to

Poland. Margaret Atwood Wausau Europe Warsaw Brennan Bridget Partner. Twenty Years
"atwood" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

11:39 min | 1 year ago

"atwood" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Was actually quite a lot of time and space to to do. Those new can write quite well in the Dome Car with your laptop prompt up on your knees and and every once in a while you can have a scenic view and then you can have another scenic view and then you hit the prairies. And it's forty forty hours of some more rapid across the prairies. Yes sorta go quite fast but then you go up the rocky mountains you wind up and up and down down your relationship with technology is just fascinating to me. I you have somewhere in the I. I don't know how many million twitter followers this point but do you remember how how you I embrace that that technology don't think embrace quite the word word of learned about so yes. I was building a website for a novel of mine called Near the flood was just after the big financial meltdown. So I thought what. I think I better do this. Because the publishers are running around screaming and they're they're fewer in number than they they once were so I actually built a website for that book and did a A launch that was a musical and dramatic Nick and Conservation Fund. Raising launch was peculiar But it lends itself to that because of the flood there. There are a number of God's gardeners hymns so we can. We can have a musical note which we did and the people building the website said you need to have a twitter feed and I said what is that and they said Oh. It's this new thing. It's really easy we will show you how to do it so actually had a twitter coach. I called McLean graves. He he is unfortunately no longer with us but he was nearly a twitter user. ne-near quite a lot about it. Any he helped get rid of the for other. They're people who were purporting to be me. There were tweeting. These really saw things that I would never tweet. I mean they weren't being unpleasant but they were being very sugary and so it could not be they had to go. What's the ratio of of sort of positive twitter experiences versus the guy who came on to try and explain the handmaid's tale to you in your replies? I don't consider without a negative experience. I consider it a learning experience for him. The I think his intentions were the best. He just didn't happen to realize that I had written embarrassing up. I think mostly positive for me because it's just don't I've gotten into a few what are called flame wars but not very many. Is there a new generation of leadership that has engaged with you primarily through that medium. I don't know because I because I can't ask each and every one of them How did you come to this book? I think quite frankly a lot of them have have been introduced. It is to my work in in high school because it goes to be taxed. I was kind of horrified. Broke fight by that when I first found out about it because you know this is a pretty rough book in some ways in Shirley these young people it might be too young for it but apparently not and then I think of what I was reading when I was that age. Okay They can read it. I've been handed a car. That simply says Cuna which means that. It's your turn I think what we're going to do. Excuse me I think we're we're going to do and somebody correct me if I'm wrong is we're going to take questions on note cards. So right him hand him out to the ushers who are going to be going down the aisles. I have some here. We'll get some more and we'll get to it quite imbo ready. Got Quite quite a few. These were just the emailed ones. And there's going to be more. What is your favorite Ursula? K League Win Story or novel well acquainted view of them. A I'm quite partial to the earth. Seen trilogy yeah I understand. It's a different kind of book from the left hand of darkness which is pretty keen on. I I I did a An retrospect to peace about her for the New York Review Books Awhile back which like go you through some of these books but also this burst of creativity that she had She she wrote those very close is together. They're quite it's quite amazing. This is signed a young writer. Dear Margaret How do you silence your inner critic Eric. Okay here's how nobody is going to see what you write on your pieces of paper unless you allow them to so just do it. That inner critic should not be in the room with you when you were doing that. Writing the inner critic can come along later when you're revising but when you're first writing it's just issue it's the it's the page it's the ideal raider and a you can always throw it out if you don't like it. This is a question about the future. Tur- Library Project mature involved which is absolutely. It's such a brilliant. Such a brilliant idea. What what is it like to write a novel? That won't be read for one hundred years. Okay so I don't tell you about the Future Library of Norway Project which you can find online future library dot and Oh and it's the brainchild of conceptual artists called Katie Paterson who is Scottish. And she works. Twa Slow time projects so the venture in Library of Norway. A forest has been planted Norway that will grow for a thousand four hundred in years and in each year of that one hundred years a different rider from around the globe in different languages will submit met a secret manuscript two copies only and nobody else gets to read it and it has to be made of words no images so can be a word can be a poem it can be of noble it can be a short story it can be Diarrhea can be a letter. Can Be anything made of words and you're not allowed to tell what it is you can tell the title in the name of the author that's of in the hundred year. The boxes will be opened and enough trees. This will be cut from the forest that will grown to make the paper to print the Future Library of Norway and when we launch this in two thousand fourteen it got a lot of interest because it's such a hopeful project of it assumes there will be a Norway that the trees will have grown. There will be a library. There will be people people will be able to read in. The people will be interested in reading and those just one great big huge ball of hope right there so so what was it like. Yeah I think there are two kinds of writers kind that would say. Are you out of your mind. I'm not gonNA write anything can't publish now and then there's the other it kind. Who has children buried things in jars in the backyard and that would be me just thinking that maybe somebody in the future would get a thrill thrill of digging them up? So I've always been interested in archaeology and I'm quite thrilled whenever somebody discovers the new the something or other that they that they've dug up So I said yes immediately and I said there's something you need to add to this. Mix Awesome that would be our Kabul paper because otherwise they'll open. The box will be just little shreds like my copy of South Pacific right now now completely decayed So so I took it on and what was it like to do it well. Well it's like writing in general. It's just that the interval is somewhat longer so when you're writing anything anything there's always a gap between you writing it and somebody else reading it. That's just the way writing is not like being an opera singer in which the audience and the person doing the art are in the same place at the same time so with writing. You're always in a different place in a different sprint time. So other than that she Katie wanted the whatever whatever you wrote to have something to do with time and something to do with words. That's the only constraint the other constraint was the you have to go to Norway with the with this box go through customs or I was afraid they were going to say. What's the bugs? And then I'd have to say I'm not allowed to tell you that then I would get arrested. I could not think of a better question to end on. What is your favorite bird and place to go birding? Well now my favorite bird is probably either the raven the most intelligent of birds or the or the loon. The most haunting of birds. Sounds you WANNA sample now. Please okay. We'll just do the eerie call. That echoes through the twilight. When one loon is trying to contact another loon.

twitter Norway Future Library of Norway Proje Katie Paterson Future Library of Norway Conservation Fund Library of Norway New York Review Nick Tur- Library Project Diarrhea Cuna Shirley writer Ursula Kabul South Pacific Margaret Eric
"atwood" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

10:56 min | 1 year ago

"atwood" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Earlier. How surreal is that is that moment older you get the less surreal l.? Everything seems because you have seen the definition of normal change. So much that you know I've this is surreal and so is this something else that surreal real. I think the whole the whole period of history in which we live is pretty much surreal ended ended certainly very unusual compared to say nineteen pick a year. Let's pick nineteen ninety five a a nice safe here. I don't think much was going on is up shopping the Cold War was over and his it was the end of history we were informed by. Somebody wasn't thinking very hard and And everybody felt that you know what she war was really the most important thing that has changed. There's this this thing I think William Gibson said about this notion that the future is here but it's just not evenly distributed and he was right about that. Yeah but it's when it arrives in a big surreal lump that you think these are. These are strange times. There's that element of I mean. There's there's in my mind anyway. There's certain books that belong to the Pantheon. One of sort of speculative fiction of kind. There's brave new world nineteen eighty-four there's handmaid's tale that one of the things they all have in common. Is this notion that the warning they give is not heated and that's part of their longevity if people listen to people actually listen to what these books had to say and did something differently only that it would affect the longevity of the book. That's true yeah you write a book like that hoping it will shortly be obsolete. That's what you I hope. Enver while it is known things come and go so for a while I would say we. We used to have a kind of race going on in the race. was which it's going to get here first. Brave new world or nineteen ninety four and now I think we've got a combination of both both of them but for a while. It looked in the nineties. It looked as if brave new world was winning. Yeah but it didn't breath remember where you were when watching election night. Do you remember what the circumstances were now. Which election night are we talking about? The only one that has ever been it. Feels like these November twenty sixteen. We'll I was on a plane. Yeah so I was on a plane. Ain't going to Europe so I I went to bed on the plane thinking that I don't know I- unseen their their their closing speeches on television and Having grown up next door to Marshall McLuhan there's some people have very good television presentation and other people who don't whatever you may say yeah about him. Donald trump has a television manner. Like he looks at because he's had a lot of practice on it so I'm feeling a bit if he but then awoke up in another country in the morning and I and everybody involved in the handmaid's tale series had the same thought and the thought was we are now in a different different show. Not that anything about the show is going to change. The frame head changed and it would be viewed differently Louis and that is what happened. What stage of the process of writing this book where you're at? I was at the conceptual note what making wastebasket stage. How about this no? We'll maybe this now like that. So that goes on quite a bit. I wanted to ask. This is a complete tangent. I Apologize There's a half cents cents in this book that I absolutely loved as describing lunch and then the person talking describes lunch something like a dry sandwich and something ruinous. That had been done to tomatoes and made me think line that I heard you say this in one of your interviews is that there are essentially two types of writers their writers who let their characters eat and their writers who don't let their characters eat and as I'm going through the sensory experience of of reading this book I was thinking about that. I'm just wondering is the process of writing. Is there joy in that or is the joy in having written whereas the most joyous part of the fun whereas the fine. Yeah Okay I would say the fund is is for me. The Fun is is in writing no matter from what the content so so definitely did a book called the WHO is a fund raiser we were raising thing money to start Canadian. Penn Penn being the Writers Rights Organization. Which is International? There's now a very effective American Penn So we needed to money to to start and put together. Something called the. Ken Lit Food Book in which I took scenes from novels and poems in which people aid things and I arranged them according to the meals breakfast coffee lounge he dinner funerals cannibalism. Oh that and I did that myself. Because it was cheaper and then I went went to the authors and recipes from them. Some could cook others could not cook but they gave me recipes. He's anyway so one of them gave me Zipper. Toast and Mike Lynn Dot she. She gave me a recipe for grapefruit to works out and somebody else escape me one which involved a a large frozen fish a chainsaw. I don't even remember what the Hell I was asking you about to begin with this best interview I've ever been a part of. I was going through your website. And there's a couple of really interesting things about it. One one of which being that when you click on awards the first thing the website asks you pick a decade can't possibly fit everything on on one page but there's so many works across such a broad spectrum of the most read Margaret Atwood Book in our houses up in the tree which I have some small children. You would hope so I explain to everybody. You may not have read this dental work and is of voting for very small children which came early on in the history of Canadian publishing there. There weren't there weren't children's books being published in the Seventies. So I I I wrote it. I lettered it because it was cheaper and And I've illustrated it but we could only afford to colors for the printing rather than the customary three so I chose shows the blue and the red which together gave this weird shade of purple and that is why that book is the colors that it is it and this was in the in the seventies was asked by my two year old. Why did they go up in the tree in the first place? Those very a good question. Tell them tell the two year old because they didn't have a real house. I think. Yeah safer from bears. Is there any project that comes along that the initial you'd think this is just far too weird and then you change your mind on. Curiosity gets the better of you constantly. Louis Yeah will you mean that comes into my head so usually what happens with those. Is I think this is too weird. And I'd try to do something more quotes normal which then fails so that is that. Is the unconscious telling you that you have to write the weird thing that would be the handmaid's tale. I started my notes on in Nineteen ninety-one then I thought this. This is Marta. Weird and I sat set out to write this more usual type of novel which went nowhere is there is replace. You keep the ones that go nowhere and you know it's going to stay there. You're not going to go back to it. It's it's called a drawer dryer full or empty or somewhere there. A couple drawers. Yeah so so it's not because My parents went through the depression. You never threw anything out because it might come in handy so big balls of string. It's like the drawer those reading an essay where you talk about the I. I believe the first literary conference. Did you ever went to as a teenager. And a one point you talk about the the first writer. Whoever came to high school? Who is this gentleman who came up on stage recited a few poems about skiing from memory and then imitated a crow have made quite an impression I imagine and then you talk about how you you Never WanNa be in that position in? The line uses something like as soon as I was able I was going to hit Paris and become.

Louis William Gibson Donald trump Penn Penn Margaret Atwood Enver Marshall McLuhan Writers Rights Organization Europe writer Mike Lynn Dot Paris Ken I Ai Marta
"atwood" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

10:19 min | 1 year ago

"atwood" Discussed on The Archive Project

"I'm wondering if when you write something like the handmaid's tale or the testaments and you're drawing drawing on things like decrease seven seven communist Poland. What happened Argentina? These these events that happen to human beings whether you ever come up on a societal title or political version of the same problem that is just so all the time. And what are you all the time. Well you okay okay. So there's there's there's what is readable and the and then there's one happened so anybody who joined Amnesty International in Nineteen Seventy S. I did of that gave you a lot more information than you could ever ever ever is an book and people writing novels about war novels about atrocities that they all have the same problem but but that it's always worse in real life and it's it's worse and more so if you put it all in it would just it would be kind of overwhelming. You've got more of it in history books so I've been reading for some reason why I've been reading quite a bit about Stalingrad and grand recently and I've been reading. Vassily Grossman's two books about stealing Grad. And there's also a history of it which is more like a dog mentality so what was actually going on in. The history is worse than what's in the novel because when you're in a normal year following individual characters so you're not necessarily getting a pile up of of information anyway yeah. I think it's a problem that any novelist dealing with anything outside. Shall we call it a domestic drum. I think they're always going to have that problem there. There's a line in the testaments. Were one of the characters says something to the effect of you never. I think the sky is falling until the chunk of it falls on you and I. I was curious whether you think in this in this moment. Whether you're seeing something something fundamentally new happening or sort of warped extrapolation of something. That's always been there or a little bit of both. I think it's a question of of time and place so I said the handmaid's tale in Cambridge Massachusetts. Because that's the last place you would expect it or was certainly the lies place. They were expecting it then back. They're required annoyed. Harvard was angry at you. They were peed tarver. CARVER doesn't get angry at the beginning. They wrote kind of peeved review like the idea. New bodies hanging on the Herbert Mall would be so convenient. So they've come around but I put it there. I put many things from different times and places and put them there simply only because it annoys me when people say it could never happen here. There's there's no such thing it it whatever it is could always happen have been here. Wherever here is given the circumstances and let us not forget that the Harvard started as a theological seminary in the seventeenth century of when the messages? It's calling me was not a democracy not nor nor did it offer religious freedom. The usual the story you get in school as the puritans came in search of religious freedom. Well that's true for themselves Eh. But they were of quaker angers and I got to say that about them because some of them are my Ryan's esters. Harvard finally come around. Yes they've come round. Yes they've been quite nice of in recent years but but that may change once they read the test. It's just a question of repurposing buildings and you know that if you've traveled and particularly Eastern Europe or even the history of Paris during them German occupation that a lot of buildings were re purposed. So this used to be the axe during the was the Y.. And now it's back to being a hotel world. I mean you know. Harvard also rejected my undergrad applications. So to hell with them. Good on you I having such a hard time wrapping my head around the constraints specific constraints of writing a book. Like this in a moment like this not only the political moment. But you have this TV series. That's going on at the same time that is covering similar similar ground. What is the interaction like? Did you shut everybody else out. Do you collaborate what. How is the process of writing? Okay so they show runner then. Maids needs tells this person. Bruce Miller and Bruce read the handmaid's tale when he was a teenager and vowed that when he grew up he was going to do it and he did because he waited and waited and waited and waited The story of what happened to the TV rights is a little bit like the Hobbit and that so the TV rights were attached to the film contract for the film that was made in eighty nine ninety and Then that film got sold to a distributor a bitter then the distributor went bankrupt than the assets were dispersed different. People bought them and it was laws to track of who actually truly had the so. The ring of power went into the mountain disappeared from view. And nobody. Nobody knew that it was in there. All the time And then somebody opened a drawer and Lo and behold it was. MGM was like surprise brides but main while people have been saying. Can we do something with as an I would say. I don't know who has the rights so once it was discovered covered the MGM had them MGM. Thought that maybe they might do something with it. We're now win the present century and when it when it came up bruce lobbied to be the show runner and he knew the book so thoroughly that he got the job so he introduced himself and burst appearances about this. He would say hi. I'm Chris Miller. I'm the show runner of the HANDMAID's mainstay on I've got one Pena's too many but but but higher Delana women in Ireland of women so I talked with him. I have some sort of title. I'm not sure what it is. It's it's executive something or other which means Something I I read the script. I make notes on them. I have no real power. I have influence. We went influence So I have been fluent so I got home Bruce on the phone and or he gets hold of me and we have conversations nations About the notes that I in Britain on this grips but And he explains there's GonNa be something is GonNa do. It's different. He explains why and what I said to him. In this instance was you may not it. Kill and Lydia was going to be important. WHOA WHOA WHOA? It wasn't going to hands off that baby you so like that. But he didn't actually read them the full thing until it was until he had done series series three because he wanted to concentrate on what he was doing. He has a writing room general. That is a writer's room outside eligible of writers are not. They're not allowed. Nobody is allowed end. They let me and once before they'd written anything on the whiteboards around the rooms. I mean they've let you do they let you do a cameo is let me do. They have sorry they they knew better than to not let you do a cameo to him I was and they offered me a candy so this happens in a in a church gymnasium. I believe where they shoot this thing yet. They actually shot in the cellar of a church. So you're in this seller. There's cameras everywhere. Your job is to essentially walk up and Slap Elizabeth Moss. No I give her a bop up on the back of the head. So they're repeatedly having to reshoot the scene because you're not hitting your heart is correct and they added a sound effect in the. I'm just curious. How often in your life do you look around? And just say how the hell did I get here like. This is such a surreal real moment to go from this novel that you wrote thirty some years earlier to be in this place making a cameo in the new TV series about. What is the best selling the novel in the world?.

HANDMAID Harvard Bruce Miller MGM Vassily Grossman Amnesty International Poland Argentina Elizabeth Moss Herbert Mall Massachusetts tarver CARVER Eastern Europe Ryan Chris Miller Lo Paris Ireland Lydia
"atwood" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"atwood" Discussed on The Archive Project

"We were able to make Portland one of only five stops American publicity tour not only Portland's reputation mutation as a book town key but also Atwood and the late Ursula Kayla Gwynne where longtime friends and so I do. Think the spirit of La- gwen was also so helping us. Margaret Atwood has written over fifty works of fiction nonfiction and poetry starting in the nineteen sixties. She has one more prizes and awards was the night time to enumerate here but perhaps suffice to say Atwood's work has consistently combined urgent engagement with the most pressing issues of our time political social environmental with a level of artistic accomplishment that is singular in the literary world over the span of her incredible fifty plus year. Your career. Her persistent and continued popularity. Speaks to the enduring relevance of her work at it was in conversation with Portland. Writer Omar L. L. A. cod and. There's something special about listening to a conversation between artists who are either ends of their career. In this case Margaret Atwood is one of our grandmasters masters of literary fiction and who at the age of eighty is still producing some of our best work. Omar Al Assad is journalist and writer and was lauded for his first novel American Eric and war which was published just two years ago. Here's Ellicott so al.. We all doing tonight. I think we can work with that. Thank you so much for doing this. My pleasure as always so. Here's here's the new book is doing pretty well. I'm Canadian not bad for those of you. Who Don't know? The testaments recently broke the record for highest first week sales in Canadian history since they started measuring the I was watching. Watch a lot of previous interviews for for this one and there was one from I think early seventies it was TV. Oh the public broadcaster custard on -Tario and there are a number of very jarring things about this interview you're being interviewed on TV. Oh one of which being that in the entirety of the studio was covered covered. Shag carpeting for some reason. I don't know what the Hell is going on in Ontario in the seventies but everything was covered in carpeting and this was terrifying sidewalks alongside covered. Aesthetically irresponsible I think. And this this gentleman interviewing you repeatedly tries to get at this this point of when are you going to write nice women characters why. Where is all this cruelty coming from and finally say something to the effect of like look at what Mordecai Richler is writing? Look at his characters. Has He ever been called cruel and I think one of the things about this incredible career that has spanned quite a long time. The amount of uphill fighting you had to do to get to a place where it was even where the work could be discussed as the work. I'm wondering if you've you've seen changes in that and if so how. How has it changed on a topic? Well people don't review my hair anymore for quite a bit. We're the initial reviews. That'd be like here and has gotten less interesting because maybe they just wouldn't dare call me Medicis snaky haired person anymore. But they did yes. Where would you like to start on that? Maybe with the Time magazine interview of Nineteen Teams Sixty nine in which the Nice reporter who was wearing white songs and loafers and it was December. Send Ed you telling a couple of interesting things. How do you find time to write? What with the housework and all? Aw We're on. I said Look under the Sofa so and then he said do men like you and I said why. Don't you ask them. It was it was a flip of the other question. Question is to get all the time which was do you like men which one I would say depends which ones they're they're individuals also just like people. The there was one review. That was the good old days I was going to say. There was one review. I went back to I went back and looked at the original views of the handmaid's tale and there was one review view that was in my my belief in my pay old paper the globe in Mail and it was one of the most sort of quintessentially Canadian reviews. I think yeah I've ever read by which I mean. It was generally favorable of the book but accused you of reaching too far. I was the strangest is behind of Canadianness of like it was a good book which she should have set her sights lower. which is just mind boggling to me do you remember the the initial schol sort of reception of this book? Well it was different from English. Speaking market to English speaking market so in England you were then had a religious civil war in the seventeenth century and weren't intending at that time to have another one Not what's going on there right now is a religious war but what would you call it So at that time back in the whenever Robert was nineteen eighty five. They said jolly good yarn. What an imagination? So so remember that the Cold War was still going on and Europe was very loathe to think of the United States as anything anything but the best interim freedom openness democracy fairness for all beckoning with open hands hands but until they actually thought of the United States because in contrast to what was going on behind the iron curtain a very shutdown place. I visited it at that time so England was jolly good. Yarn Europe was basically legally. It wouldn't happen and Canada was nervously. Couldn't happen here in addition to don't try so hard. Oh yes be more modest and in the United States it was split it was. It was partly wouldn't ever happen here and on the other hand was. How long have we got? And that was in nineteen ninety-five free. So someone spray painted along the Venice. Beach Wall in California L. Important the handmaid's tale is already here and I did talk. Show in San Francisco just to stir things up. It was the phone inch out of the guys that well of course you're joking aren't you. I mean nothing like that would ever happen here and the switchboard Linda. Charisma's are you insane. Yes till people knew because it was the years of pushback against the seventies ladies that was already happening and I was cutting out clippings one cut out then today one print out but I was cutting them out and people were saying already what they would like to do if they had the power. So you can go raid these clippings clippings for yourself there in the Fisher Rare Books Library in Toronto. I was looking at some of them The Penguin the Penguin Group published some of them I I was thinking a little bit about there was I was watching this short documentary where you were talking to interviewer and you're talking about. I think it was life before man and you're talking about how one of the characters in that book and I don't think you do this very often but it was based on a real person it was based on your friends and and that this and was such a terrible human being that you had to tone down in the book. Doc didn't believe I said to my friend. Can I use your engine my book and she said go ahead. She might as well be his full for something..

Margaret Atwood Portland United States Time magazine Omar Al Assad England Writer Europe La- gwen Mordecai Richler Penguin Group Omar L. L. A. Ursula Kayla Gwynne Ellicott Charisma Linda Ontario San Francisco Canada Doc
Texts show reactions to Trump demands on Ukraine

Erin Burnett OutFront

08:02 min | 2 years ago

Texts show reactions to Trump demands on Ukraine

"Breaking News Trump's quid pro quo so the president's own special envoy to Ukraine who resigned just days ago is providing the text messages to Congress so colonel. I just mentioned this right but he still there on behind in closed doors on capitol. Hill is now in his ninth hour of a deposition. He has handed over encrypted texts that he received and here's here's here's here's the key thing the top US diplomat too you diplomat to Ukraine and one of these texts rights he was very concerned about the president withholding aid money from Ukraine that career State State Department official wrote and he got a quote this. I think it's crazy to withhold security assistance for help with the political campaign so you can't get more clear than that. this is according to multiple reports this evening and the text came in early. September and the reason I want to emphasize that date is because that means that tax was sent before the news broke that there even was a whistleblower so trump's top diplomat in Ukraine believed before any of this public spectacle that the president of the United States withholding security assistance for help on his reelection campaign campaign of course trump has denied time and time again that there was a quid pro quo there was no quid pro quo at all. There was no quid quid pro. Quo You take a look at that. Cole was perfect I didn't do there was no quid pro quo but the top US diplomat and Ukraine obviously obviously believe otherwise and of course the transcript of the president's own phone call shows him asking for a favor from the Ukraine president when that president brought brought up. US military aid and today to make it seem that his actions with Ukraine were okay trump went out publicly and ask another country to interfere in the US election this time it's China a country. The United States is currently negotiating a trade deal with they should investigate the by because how does a company that's newly fully formed and all these companies you look and by the way likewise China started investigation into the by and by the way as I said said much more on that breaking story in just a moment I wanna point out the irony of what the president said there though because it is quite something you know the reason is because here's trump talking about China interfering in American elections just last year. Regrettably we found that China has been attempting to interfere in our upcoming twenty-eight teen election. We learned that they are trying to meddle in our election and we're not going to let that happen unless it's to help him. I mean here's the thing trump may be doubling down on asking foreign countries for help because he knows the facts on Ukraine there in black and white there on a transcript you can't hide bat and it could be from China too so he may want us to think this is all okay despite the hypocrisy that you just heard but president trump also knows that asking can you foreign country publicly for help may have worked before remember this Russia if you listening. I hope you're able to find the thirty thousand emails that are missing. I think you will probably be rewarded. Mightily press he he is talking about Hillary Clinton's emails and his words then might have mattered because the Muller report concluded quote within five hours of trump's remark a Russian intelligence service began targeting targeting email accounts associated with Hillary Clinton for possible hacks talk about speaking publicly and getting private gain so tonight trump asks China to investigate his political rival level publicly and as I said we have some breaking details this hour about what he did privately. The president is doing this. Well aware that the biggest trade deal in history is on on the table. Everything matters with China right now and American consumers are paying higher prices as a result of that trade war. The president may be asking China to investigate instigate Biden maybe to give himself cover for a call that he knows the public may find out about with presidency or pres- cover for the private call with the president of Ukraine because remember the bottom line here. Is this crucial text tonight when the president asked a Ukraine for a favor that favor to bring it home here trump's top diplomat and Ukraine described it by saying quote. I think it's crazy to withhold security assistance for help with the political campaign. That's a quid pro. Quo that tax. I was sent on an encrypted server. Tech that was sent for Americans knew there was a missile blower a text. Nobody ever thought would see the light of day. It is attacks today. Trump on Kurt Volker showed Congress Congress as I said he is still behind closed doors and we're going to get to everything we know about that crucial testimony in just a minute on Capitol Hill with Maharaja first though the breaking developments here on China's China as I have been speaking Kylie Atwood is out front in Washington and Kylie. You have some breaking information about a phone call the president trump had with Chinese President Xi where he talked about Badin a call that was also stored and that's super classified system which I would not fit with protocol. Yeah that's right so over the summer in in June. President trump spoke over the phone with President Xi of China and he did bring up Joe Biden the former vice president who is now his most formidable double democratic opponent leading up to twenty twenty. He also brought up Elizabeth Warren now he brought him up in the sense of their political prospects. Warren was rising in the pull at the time and he talked about them politically he did not at that time according to sources familiar with this call encourage the Chinese to investigate Biden then but that is what he did publicly today and we should note that he came out to reporters and encouraged China to investigate Joe Biden now this phone phone call back in June. It did go into that secret that highly sensitive server that the Ukraine call went into It's a place where the White House stores stores these conversations that they want to keep particularly away from most people's eyes they don't want them to get out the other thing we should mention however is that the Chinese were thrown off guard today I spoke with a Chinese diplomat after these comments made by president trump and they said it was quite chaotic audit they had learned that trump wanted the Chinese to investigate Joe Biden by via the media reports and said that they had no interest the Chinese had no interest in getting cold in the US domestic political process but we'll see how this plays out. We really haven't seen a formal response from the Chinese yet all right. Thank you very much. Kylie obviously significant in light of the president's public requests to China today to investigate Joe Biden. I want to go to to Capitol Hill Right now. In Maharaja with crucial testimony mono as we are speaking still unfolding where you are that that text that that that I was just sharing and you know so much more. What are you learning about? Volcker has been telling Congress today like he's been in there for nine and a half hours and we were told that he actually just left so it appears that it it just finally wrapped up after a full day a marathon testimony behind closed doors getting questions from Republicans and Democrats alike now we've learned some aspects of of what he is told these three committees that are pushing forward on this impeachment inquiry and what he said and the aftermath of that phone call between Presidents Alinsky of Ukraine and President entropy which trump ASA Linski to launch an investigation into the Biden's. We're told that Volcker testified that he actually urged the Ukrainian government not to go forward with it and not to interfere with in US politics and he also made clear that there are questions that have been raised by the Ukrainian government meant repeatedly to him about why military aid have been withheld US military aid that had been approved by the US Congress. Why was that pornography provided to Ukraine. We're told by multiple sources that he had no good answers for that to the Ukrainian officials when he had been asked that was also there was a plan meeting that

President Trump Ukraine Donald Trump China United States Joe Biden President Xi Of China Congress Vice President Kylie Atwood Hill Hillary Clinton Volcker Congress Congress State State Department Elizabeth Warren Official Ukrainian Government
Gov. Gavin Newsom at climate week

Pacifica Evening News

05:44 min | 2 years ago

Gov. Gavin Newsom at climate week

"Governor Gavin Newsom gave opening remarks today at climate week New York City it's an environmental action of it being held along side the United Nations climate summit Scott Barbour has more. California governor Gavin Newsom kicked off climate change NYC with a passionate speech Monday stressing the importance of fighting climate change and criticizing president Donald Trump for his actively anti environmental actions and policies. news and said that there was ample evidence of the dangers of climate change I have a change for us is not an abstract if you still have eight eight percent tell of doubt come the California. after historic wildfires back to back fifteen of the top most destructive wildfires themselves just the last ten years. stay with historic droughts. state with historic floods. mother nature has joined the conversation. I'm in week NYC the convention of panels and showcases for environmental advocates to discuss climate action I think around the United Nations climate summit during his speech Newsome praised his state progress on environmental issues and its position as a global leader in the fight against climate change he said that in California fossil fuels are becoming the out liars not the norm alternative energy into the state of California is fossil fuel energy alternative energy no longer defined by wind and solar and battery technology which are dominant now Connie's growing a fully functioning cap and trade program the most Ignatius low carbon green growth goals in the United States of America there's nothing left for me to sign it's a hundred percent across the board. Kevin Phillips is the director of Sierra Club California she agreed with Newsome that California and they want to be proud of in terms of its track record in fighting for the environment he's right in that we've done a lot in this state and certainly when you compare it to the rest of the country and when you look at some of the timing we've we've done some of these things in California was pushing it should be a call and came up with its first zero emission vehicle regulations back in the nineteen nineties so we have been a leader in many ways historically for the U. S. on various environmental issues. however Phyllis argue that California was still falling short in its self proclaimed role as global environmental leader. while Phillips agreed with news from decision at the state was improving renewable energy production and technology to put out the oil production export are still significant industries in California when it comes to transportation fossil fuel still dominate they will likely dominate unless we become more aggressive and the legislature and the governor becomes more aggressive in laying out a path for reducing production of oil in transitioning are an economy away from one specially in particular regions transitioning our economy in the state away from one that is dependent on oil production. California's only top ten producers of oil in the United States roughly equal in production to Alaska Alexandra navy is the California director with food and water watch an environment and public health nonprofit thank you said that she was disappointed in new sums lack of action to limit oil production not only because of its implications for climate change but also for the safety and health of Californians Gavin Newsom hasn't addressed the fossil fuel crisis in California we have over eighty thousand oil well over a hundred thousand miles of pipelines almost over three hundred gas powered gas fired power plants and this is what's making community sick every day right now families and children are living next to killing in their backyards are gas plants in their in their neighborhoods and this is what we want to see him do is take action to immediately halt the expansion of the fossil fuel industry and make a plan to shut shut it down. environmental advocates including bills Nike and Phillips say that at the very least there should be increased scrutiny and restrictions on where oil rigs can be placed in order to minimize the public health risk. gene see with the energy director and staff attorney at the center for biological diversity. it's an Arizona based environmental nonprofit who was present in New York to protest Newsome refusal to ban oil drilling in the state. in an interview with KPFA is Brian Atwood teacher she said it was not too late for someone to make the difficult but meaningful choices that needed to be made to stop climate change what we're talking about is essentially stopping the capture of our government by fossil fuel companies we see at the U. one year after year that oil and gas corporations are financing the claimants talks around the world very similarly in California they have been very influential on our politicians this is the exact moment where we need someone like Gavin Newsom to break through all of that noise and very clearly say climate emergency equal stopping fossil fuel extraction and I am going to step up and actually do that. Newsome for his part has said that he can make no progress on putting limitations on oil production without the support of the legislature which he's not sure he will receive. but the one climate summit is only scheduled for Monday climate week NYC is planned to run through Sunday September twenty ninth I'm Scott Bala pacifica radio

California Governor Gavin Newsom New York City Newsome United Nations Kevin Phillips United States Director Sierra Club California Donald Trump Scott Barbour Nike President Trump Kpfa
"atwood" Discussed on The View

The View

10:46 min | 2 years ago

"atwood" Discussed on The View

"Topics delivered every afternoon soon and while you're at it rate us and Lee Review Jump Start Your weekend because the view is Li- totally biased. I'm I'm not biased. Why would I have a bias knowing that this kind of conversation that's so rudy was president trump's personal lawyer. Rudy Giuliani's Janis off the rails interview just a distraction from the whistle blower scandal blowing up right now Jan did it K- is how democratic credit candidates are taking the gloves off from Bernie taking a page from trump by bashing biden to brundige hitting back at critics who say he the isn't gay enough. It's the terrifying bestseller that became a binge-watching obsession. So what's the next chapter of the handmaid's Tale L. Author Margaret Atwood's lie on the view. Lens buyer up Friday hot toppings with whoopie. Oh Be Huntsmen Joy Behar Sonny Austin Megan McCain and Ana Navarro now. Let's yes things started and we would like to welcome back the lovely we've and talented out on Aveiro. I miss you when you're not here I do. I Miss You well. I miss you too but you know there's been safaris. There's been hurricanes sharks but a lot of things happening affect seriously though our thoughts are with everyone impacted the flooding in Texas right now. It's a terrible thing somebody died already all right so now this other scandal that's going on which we started to talk about yesterday but it's continuing continuing the whistle. Blower scandal is getting juicier and juicier. The latest reports claimed that the complaint May to intelligence officials involve trump trying into the Ukraine government some some suspect it some speculated to get dirt on Joe Biden and his son hunter. He's the one that is was in some kind of a thing. I don't know what some scandal with a business thing right to help his twenty twenty election. This is what we think. Trump is up to trump's conciliatory. The Fabulous Rudy Giuliani was on CNN last night and Chris Cuomo asked him if he did any digging around watch. Did you ask the Ukraine to investigate Joe. Biden no actually I didn't. ISP Ukraine to investigate the allegations that there was interference in the election of Twenty Johny Sixteen by the Ukrainians for the benefit of Hillary Clinton for wish they were already is a never ending anything about Hunter Biden. You never ask anything about Giovanni thing I asked Doc. Joe Biden is to get to the bottom of how it was that would Sankoh who was appointed right dismissed the case against anti you did ask Ukraine to look into Joe Joe Biden of course I did. I didn't ask them to look into Joe by the allegations that related to my client composer. Impose yourself so you can get your life straight so is everything cleared up now from that no what do you think Oh. What do I think I think it's very reminiscent to what we already know happening 2016 where somebody reached out and said I've got dirt on Hillary Clinton. I also think it tells tells you that they're afraid of Joe Biden. Yes and how are we going to get him off. And how are we going to knock him out using whatever it whatever it takes but also you know. What do you think maybe be Donald. Trump could try to run a campaign and win a campaign without relying on help from a foreign government knows he can't he knows he can already and as far as I know. It's not ethical right for non medical professionals to say that he is nuts but he looked nuts and axe nuts. Well you know maybe he's thrown in there to throw off the whole thing you know every time he pops up they they start talking about judy instead of trump but he actually traveled to the Ukraine. I was that was that was trump was on the phone with the absolute the Ukraine. Maybe I'm wrong but it's it's not like he wasn't involved. It was involved yes he. Did he travel frame so it's not just a distraction direction. This is some sort of an actual -ality right. I gotTa Tell You I'm not surprised that if if true that trump would have have promised aid to the Ukraine in return for dirt on a political opponent right if true but it is illegal I would vache on ethical I would think but it is something that we saw before as you alluded to with the Muller report if you look at page ninety three of the mall report and one hundred ten the report. I hope everybody read it. That was one of my recommendations for ladies who get if you look at those it does talk about that trump tower meeting it does talk about. George Papadopoulos hearing about dirt on Hillary Clinton and the trump campaign wanted that dirt trump junior wanted that dirt they wanted it really badly and the reason that I have often said that impeachment is important here is because that's a congressional powers constitutional duty of Congress to oversee this president and tell him that doing this kind of thing is this to be true that he did in fact try to get the Ukraine krant. Get dirt on on Biden yes. Do you think that a Pelosi will say impeach she should because this is now a pattern right because now you've got information information from Russia. They wanted this movie though from what we know right now which is still not very much. This is what I struggle struggle. We know what my personality does not fit with today's Cable News Environment how it so quick to rush to judgment we don't have all the facts and and so I start. I even struggle being on TV because I would say take a breath. Let's take a few days to figure out what is happening here because they're already been reported. Whistleblower didn't even have direct back to knowledge of the communication that was reported on and so I say you know what if this is true which is true by the way if it's true the president will be impeached. Direct could link with the foreign government. There's no there's no other way that it would be. Here's the thing in the Republicans. Would he do anything right now for him to be impeach him talk about this because we don't know if he was working with Ukraine to trade information yes would cause him to be impeach have no doubt in my mind the other side of that is this is a totally blown up store. We have no facts. There's no rare the black but we talk trump. All the more ammunition isn't even true to say I see. This is what the media thought well. Maybe you and I were struggling with the same thing but this is what I do know we had Pamela Anderson on a week ago to ago and I took her to task about Julian assange and there's a lot of liberals who are okay with Julian assange releasing Hillary's emails okay. He is quote whistle blower. I called him a cyber terrace and now at the same time those same people are screaming screaming bloody murder about this situation right now about this whistle blower. I think all interference from a foreign country in our election all of it is bad and should be condemned and you can't play party politics with this and there's a lot of people on the left who are doing that we in a game ask you a question. I'm mad. There are people on the left that Julian assange is okay that he's that he's some kind of Patriot whistle blower when he did interfere in our election. You can see all the left off it off. While there are many people I was taken to task by many Bernie supporters who think it's okay people who have difference of opinions. I believe you in particular. I want to speak for you because I don't remember exactly but I know that diverged on that issue and I think all of it has to be condemned all the way around and I get frustrated when I do that because I think all interference appearance from foreign adversaries in our country is dangerous and should be illegal. There's a lot of people erupted okay with Julian assange but aren't okay what this is why the whistle blower is a hero in in many ways because he's protecting Julius Raj and emails what Julian Assange and wikileaks released Hillary Clinton's emails which I believe leave and many I think any person could directly impacted the outcome of that presidential yes right. Yes people's lives. Thank you so much and are spies and many people in the military series. If you have a problem with this whistleblower or you think he's a hero then you should have a problem with wikileaks as well. I won't say I have a problem with both but the different he's home but the one what I see the difference though I think that if we don't talk about it and I think that if there is not public pressure they'd like where to go away. I go. They'd like talking about you. I'm talking about the administration that people who are actually impacted by this. The people who sent out are impacted by talking about the administration ministration. I'm talking about sending Rudy Giuliani out to distract us. I'm talking about telling US yesterday that I don't know Stephen. Miller is actually dating a human being. I don't inflatable to distract us the street without humor alternatives out going to impeach the president. That's my sis is insane. Antipolo in the sense that people you're saying Chang Megan the people are against this whistled low out of people who are okay with what Julian assange did who are not okay with what is this. I'm sorry that are okay with what Julian assange did and not okay with what this was lowered her. Here's a lot of people saying Julian assange. There's a lot of people in this country. There's a lot of people on the hard left that defend Julian assange. Let's say the left is that there's a whistle blow. The whistle on trump the less about those what Julian assange did and my mind to email yes resident he charged with doing or people are assuming that he did. It's putting people's lives in danger is putting our national intelligence throwing them completely completed. Maybe maybe maybe I'm typing away Abbey. It was I don't. I don't know what you just said but I don't scream at me. I'm two feet away. I waited. You know what let me read. A trump has denied doing anything and we'll be right back back. The later climate strike millions of school..

trump Julian assange Joe Joe Biden Ukraine Hillary Clinton Rudy Giuliani president trump tower Hunter Biden Bernie Margaret Atwood biden Aveiro Joy Behar Lee Li CNN Megan McCain Texas
"atwood" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"atwood" Discussed on 1A

"Margaret was just a you know someone to guide me through the world but I think you know the the first season. We were very close. Contact Ah you know I think that it basically was that they were things in the book that I feel felt like I was going to have to change in one way or another and he didn't want to do that without talking talking to Margaret and it wasn't that a field t to the the the book it was more out of the fact that it worked as a story and I didn't want to be pulling threads without talking those things through when I think after the first year it became part of my process kind of halfway through the season Margaret and I start talking about the next season and very casual ways and and it's kind of been part of the way that we've done the show I know we have to pause in a moment but there's one other adaptation that comes to mind and that's a song of ice and fire by George R Martin and the challenge just a game of thrones had once they started to write beyond the novels that must have also been a bit of a creative challenge. Oh sure I mean I. I I think you know it's it's difficult enough to be writing the handmaid's tale series you know without you know someone writing another classic to to go on the other side of you but you know it turned out to be at least from my point of view Margaret. Please correct me. You know we were. She was very happy to ask me questions about what I was thinking about it. I was very happy to ask questions about things that I was thinking about and I felt very kind of you know. She opened up her process to me in a very generous way so nothing was very surprising everything we kind of talked through and as a fan of Margaret Atwood that was it was very fun to kind of talk through her while she was writing here out that process what standby one moment Margaret I'd like to get your answer to that as well and we'll continue talking about both Fatih adaptation and the new sequel to the handmaid's tale in a moment sticklers.

Margaret Atwood George R Martin
Amazon apologizes for shipping Margaret Atwood's new novel early

Terry Meiners and Company

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Amazon apologizes for shipping Margaret Atwood's new novel early

"Amazon is apologizing for accidentally shipping Margaret Atwood's new novel ahead of its release date Atwood is the award winning author of the handmaid's tale which is now a popular series on Hulu her new book the testaments is a sequel to the handmaid's tale and was set for release on September tenth Amazon says due to a technical error some customers received their copies of the book ahead of time who in MGM say they are planning to develop the new novel for

Amazon Margaret Atwood Hulu MGM
"atwood" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

Slate's The Audio Book Club

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"atwood" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

"Certainly i think it's interesting there seems to be a disk comfort with the kind of knew the new ways of society um you know yes western society with veon but just like what we would recognize as our society there seems to be some discomfort without that we think of as being traditionally conservative and yet it's in this book that's now kind of being made into a tv show that's kind of heralded as like you know almost the liberal vision of what the conservative world is so it's it there's a complexity there that's quite interesting and then i wasn't expecting to find when i went back to the book yeah i totally agree i mean in the book use you feel a little bit like you're not sure what the answer is to the accusation that a lot of people specifically women suffered in what are our times right like you think will but they had free home it's gonna be better but you're sort of forced to think about the idea that maybe this new command structure is actually onto something and had a reason for destroying the old society yeah and even like characters like janine atwood seems a lot crueler about janine done the show yeah i've just thinking of of various women who come in for harsher treatment on and i suppose serena joy to is that has almost no redeeming characteristics in the book a hard sure to watch hardship wa icon of love to talk about it every week because with you to because it's the have a lot to say about it and i it's it's the whatever its painful it would be his review cathartic to speak with you.

janine atwood
"atwood" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

Slate's The Audio Book Club

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"atwood" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

"When the outside of your life and the inside of your life on are so different when there's no way to sort of bridge what you experience inside your skin verses like what you see our or what other people would see of you on it just has a wave destabilizing everything i'm and i thought the booked at such a good job of like just pushing what happens when someone is so intensely policed that they start doubting their own minds um and you sort of see her devolving into nonsense um and she becomes a more assertive fragmentary a voice in a assertive a harder to grasp entity on the page than she ever is in the in the show and may be that also has to do with the fact that you're you're really confine to offeredd in the book but just by virtue of having a tv show and having a camera like you got to be distinct from her you got to look at what you wanna look at um as opposed to just like being trapped in her nomination totally i mean i think the book you really do get a sense of literally of the it's almost mid literal the idea of being a prisoner in once on skin you know there is something about the existential bizarreness of the situation like how did outage how did i end up here and and also um i think outward some of the most interesting writing is exactly what you're talking about it's where atwood is exploring like what happens to the mind um in these circumstances what happens to language what happens to story what kinds of distortions said in an awful lot of that was very interesting um here i guess it would also argue that the sort of i mean.

atwood
"atwood" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

Slate's The Audio Book Club

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"atwood" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

"I felt like the book was actually more dated than the show i think the efforts to bring the tax truths the situation into the present are successful for the most part and i was really struck when i read the block at how much atwood created a kind of template created a world but very leave really created characters and i think what the tv show is doing is really like picking up on this very chilling scenario which for me is feeling way to relevant right now or way to sort of possible right now and then the show kind of runs with that and i think really deepens the characters i don't agree with every single choice on the show is making but i actually feel like in some ways it's more thoughtprovoking or it's also just getting under my skin whereas on i was reading the book i didn't feel that as much how about the how 'bout you magazines i agree with a lot of were you just said ammonium in the books fuels very much a product of the 1980s and it feels very much a product of the 1980s as a decade proximate to the 1970s um by which i mean that there's a lot of really weird an kind of to me quite fascinating um you kind of response in the book to 1970s radical feminism um which i'm hoping we can talk a little bit about which is not present in the show in the book that really comes in the form of a off read or june's um.

atwood
"atwood" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"atwood" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"At the women's march in washington the day after the inauguration there was one widely photographed sign that said make margaret atwood fiction again the hand made tale was published in nineteen eighty five and there's a new television adaptation coming from hulu this month margaret atwood a seventy seven and she spoke recently with the new yorkers rebecca meet the you know i'd love it if he were to reads a passage for us from early on in the hand mates tale now this is a moment when off read the central character is walking down the street and we're learning about her world from what she has come out and what he says is this the sidewalks harris amount like a child i avoid stepping on the cracks i'm remembering my feet on the inside walks in the time before and what i used to wear on them sometimes it wishes for running with cushion souls and breathing holes and stars of fluorescent fabric that reflected light in the darkness though i never ran at night and in the daytime only beside well frequented roads women were not protected than i remember the rules rules that were never spelled out but then every woman new don't open your door to a stranger even if he says he is the police make him sliders id under the door don't stop on the road help a motorist pretending to be in trouble keep the locks on and keep going if anyone whistles don't turn to look don't go into a laundromat by yourself at night.

hulu margaret atwood new yorkers washington