29 Burst results for "Attica"

Alarming Number of Babies, Children Dying of COVID-19 in Brazil

BBC Newshour

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Alarming Number of Babies, Children Dying of COVID-19 in Brazil

"More than a year into the pandemic. The number of covert related deaths in Brazil is now as high as it's ever. Bean nearly 3000 people every day at the moment. But even more shocking is the number of babies who have died since the start of the outbreak. 1300 babies under the age of one Being recorded is dying from Cove in 19. BBC. Brazil's Natalia Pasadena is being given access to one pediatric intensive care unit in the northeast of the country. And then Dr Syn, Attica, NATO gently lays her hands on the defense head. Cradles her tiny frame, rubs her belly and tickles her toes. With no visits allowed due to the fear of infection. It's the doctors and nurses who offer comfort to these critically ill Children. All of whom are fighting covert 19. There's civil Mason is off you, Pamela. It's been an immense challenge working in the ICU without any parents being able to visit. It's just words exchanged over the phone. It's so hard for them to understand how their child's case could have become critical. And in some cases, unfortunately, the child might die. Doctors in Attica NATO is a pediatrician at Albert Saving Hospital in the northeast of Brazil. Together with her colleagues, she was determined to help families maintain some form of contact with their Children. The explosive you project been able to connect these families by a video the staff got together. Brought tablets and phones. Then we started to make video calls from inside of the ICU so as to allow at least some contact with the Children. Lucas was just one when he contracted the virus. After showing signs of a fever and breathing difficulties. Jessica his mom took him to the

Natalia Pasadena Brazil Dr Syn Attica Nato Bean Albert Saving Hospital BBC Pamela Mason ICU Lucas Fever Jessica
Episode 88: Prisons, Punishment, Policing--and Guns

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

05:28 min | 7 months ago

Episode 88: Prisons, Punishment, Policing--and Guns

"And and I must confess that I myself didn't know much more than that and it turned out that the the Journey of writing that book really changed my life fundamentally change because that story about what had happened in that prison was so much more than a civil rights story, which it also was but it was a it was a window on to talk so much about the journey that this country had taken since nineteen seventy one a journey from a heady moment of civil rights law. Jim ISM that we could do things really differently and more humanely in this country and you know treat people even those who are serving time Behind Bars better and yet somehow we had taken this really Draconian turn after about seventy one and began to lock up everybody and treat every social problem via the justice system. And so the writing of that book became a kind of a journey of figuring out how did we end up with mass incarceration today and so in that sucks really changed my life when I figured out what that story was about which which in some took thirteen years to do because no one knew about Attica because it turned out the state officials didn't want us to talk about it. A lot of really terrible things that happen there that they would have preferred remained remain covered up and I'll have a link to your book, of course obviously in description of this podcast cuz I do think yep. One should go it immediately, you know, pause the podcast Now read it come back if you haven't because what what struck me in many places was almost the unfortunate timelessness of it and and what I mean by that is there are portions where you're reading about, you know, it might being fed for less than a dollar a day while participating in forced prison labor, you know fundamentally not being able even to wear clothes that are appropriate for for the weather and you think well this has Gotta Be You know something from the eighteen-hundreds this has gotta be a historical deep memory and then you start reading about how you know, it only happened a few decades ago and then it continues to happen this way today and I think I think one of the the hardest things to get your head around with you when you learn more about Attica is that not only is it in our in our lifetime and meaning that it only happened, you know five decades ago. It'll be wage. Via the anniversary next year, but but it is also a story about real people and people some of whom are still alive by the grace of God incidentally Thursday and by people whose children still suffer the trauma of what their parents went through and that's not just the folks that were inside who were imprisoned. That's also true of the guards inside of that was true of so many people who were scared by this this event and the event was nothing less than an uprising for basic Factory basic human rights, you know people were simply asking to be treated as human beings while they served their time and that cry for basic human rights rather than having been addressed as we know has been utterly ignored and in fact if we look in this moment right now and we look at the covid-19 birth. In the way people have been treated or how many elderly people are behind bars now or how many children are behind bars or frankly. Just how many people are now Behind Bars, you know up 800% from what they were even in nineteen seventy one. We understand that something went terribly wrong that rather than get the message from Attica that people no matter what they may have done and no matter what might have brought them to prison. They are still human beings somehow rather than that being the message we took from that moment. We got it. So wrong and come to find jobs doing this book that one of the key reasons when we got it so wrong was because we were lied to actively we were told that the prisoners were the animals behind bars that they were the ones that had caused this event to go so terribly terribly wrong and it turns out that that's not at all what had happened. It turns out that the horrible violence down. Ended this prison protest was at the hot was was all down to law enforcement. And that is as you say why it also resonates today cuz this is a story not just about prisons. This is a story about police shooting. This is a story of a hundred and twenty eight people unarmed people incidentally people who had no guns guards and prisoners alike in that in that yard who were gunned down in 15 minutes a hundred and twenty eight people shot six and seven times and not a single member of law enforcement who was in that yard that day doing that was ever held accountable. And so that's why as you say this story still Rings true and if you read it it it just it's a little hard to not kind of, you know, it takes a minute to process it

Heather Ann Thompson Brady Pulitzer Prize Attica Police Blood In The Water Mass Incarceration Prison Gun Violence Gun Violence Prevention Jim Ism
"attica" Discussed on 2020 in Review

2020 in Review

02:37 min | 7 months ago

"attica" Discussed on 2020 in Review

"In

Kelly mayor Heather Ann Thompson Brady Pulitzer prize Thompson Detroit Salon Navy Yard
The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

Casefile True Crime

04:51 min | 9 months ago

The Yosemite Sightseer Murders

"In December nineteen, ninety-eight, Sylvana, Polo left her home city of Cordova Argentina banned for the United States. The, sixteen year old had inherited her mother's spirit for travel and had signed up to bay a Foreign Exchange Juden. For the next three months, Silvana would be living with the six member to family in the northern Californian port city, of Eureka. The pelos Os and sons were longtime friends through mother's Ricco and Cairo. The two women met in the seventies when Carol traveled to Argentina has an exchange student herself. Carol Ray visited the country used laid off with her two year old daughter Juliana better known as Julie. But this stage the Palacios had two daughters with Sylvana the younger of the Pan. Into Julie Juliane to a similar in age but opposite in personality. Sylvana was an introvert unlock Julie more outgoing. Despite that differences, the girls formed a lifelong friendship of their own. Silvino was Jud to return home from the US in light. March nineteen ninety nine. As she was very interested in American culture, the sons had endeavoured to give her a memorable experience of their homeland. They had taken Sylvana old across the state to visit landmarks such as Disneyland Tint Fisherman's wharf. The Grand Canyon in Arizona was next on the list as was Yosemite. National Park. It took Cairo son a month to meticulously planned the perfect to road trip to Yosemite. Carol schedule was typically fool with family work and other commitments. So she made the most of every minute of her vacations. They Yosemite troop revolved around one of Julie's leading competitions and would be taking place over four days that encompassed the long weekend. Only carroo Julie, and Sylvana would be going. It was set to bay a you naked fanshawe as winter had brought snow to the region. The trip began on Friday February twelve. Carol Julie and Seven A- flew to San Francisco. From there they ha- Attica, and of two hours northeast to Stockton. City was home to the University of the Pacific where Julie's cheerleading competition took place on Saturday February. Thirteen. Julie was impressed by the campus and considered enrolling their after graduating high school. She had ambitions to become either a chef for an architect while maintaining her. For Violin and piano. Julie Caroline Sylvana, organized to return to the university for a proper tool in three days time. From Stockton the trio drove to the small farming town of Moore said known as the gateway to Yosemite. They spent the nod at the Ramada Rin before continuing on to Yosemite National. Park on the Sunday. Selena was particularly excited to see Yosemite granite cliffs waterfalls, lakes, meadows, and mountains. Shay was inactive person by nature who enjoyed our skating skiing and roller skating. She'll say loved the outdoors and hoped to study in the environmental field in the future. Carol. Julie and Venus spent death first day at Yosemite exploring pod of the pox seven hundred and fifty thousand acres of. Rugged. Wilderness. Before and they drove through the dense and far raging forests along highway one forty to the nearby town of. El Porto. There they checked in at the Saito Lodge. An affordable hotel on the banks of the mess said reveal. On the evening of Monday February fifteen, yen sund received a phone call from his wife Carol. Shea. Happily spoke of her time away with the Julie and Silvy Narine Yosemite. They had spent the previous two days exploring the park and was settling in for their phone or gnawed at the hotel.

Sylvana Julie Carol Ray Juliana Better Julie Juliane Argentina Silvino Carol Cairo Disneyland Tint Fisherman's Wh Silvana Carroo Julie Yosemite Cordova Palacios Carol Julie JUD Eureka
Breonna's Law: Why we need police reform

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

06:02 min | 10 months ago

Breonna's Law: Why we need police reform

"And. I'm really excited talk today's and gas. We know that one of the things that's going to be on the ballot this election season is criminal justice reform and we think about criminal justice reform. We really don't think about all the ways all offices where we vote for people and they have an impact, and today we're going to be speaking to two women in elected office who had been leading on criminal justice. Reform issues. We have state's attorney I-I've brave boy from Maryland in Kentucky State representative. Avocado. Scott in true fashion I we have to start with having you tell us what you're you into politics and we'll start with you state's attorney. Well, that's a great question. Actually I, had no intentions in getting into politics really it was my father who want to work on a campaign. He knows sometimes you have the your parents even as adults. That's. Asked. Me I was going to be a lawyer told him down and. Then, he told me I think I like you to work on his campaign I. Think you need to get politically as like now they're not. WanNa do that. But that the person who? Wanted. To work for happen to have graduate from the same law school that I will. The Howard University School of law. I'm did okay. Another in help bison out. Ever since V. I love how Howard alums Y'all always get an issue it can do no. Just regular conversation. How are you today? Oh I went to Howard. Thank you. Scott. Tell us whether you into politics. Definitely, you know state's attorney brave boy our fathers I mean you know it's their fault. So. I was born in. My Dad gave me my name Attica I'm named after the prison in upstate New York born a few months after the uprisings there in. So I didn't have a choice Ashanti really didn't in. So early on I got involved in a right out of college classmates run for city also in Knoxville Tennessee because I went away to ABC you is well, it's our on his campaign and then my full time job was at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and director was a county commissioner who became the first woman mayor of Maciel Tennessee and I came back home and I was involved with organized Labor at jobs with justice in ended up having. To me that I needed to run for office in. So because my friends mostly black and Brown women encouraged me to run for office. That's how I. Got Involved I love it in Y'all Attica is my emerge sister she went through emerged Kentucky and I remember the first time. I. Got to email her for something and I was so excited because I finally get to work with Atacan. Something is your pie vaccine my email she said, hey, queen and I almost died unlike y'all Attica call me queen because that's the way I, feel about her so you are just so fabulous and I wanNA start with having. US. Talk about retailers case because I think there's so much here particularly with you wrap Scott you just had an op Ed in the Washington Post after the verdict you are out protesting with your daughter named Ashanti another reason why Atacan I are meant to be best friends and you were arrested in. You've been dealing with the aftermath of that. You've sponsored Brianna Law for Kentucky. You're the only black woman currently in the Kentucky State House. So let's let's dissect this case in state's attorney boy I. Know You have a lot to add is the fact that there were no knock warrants how they handle just paperwork body cameras the grand jury I know that something that has really piece Pete People's interests about this grand jury in Oh what does this attorney general deal? So Rep Scott First let's talk about your op-ed why you felt you had to write it in a cave really personal place you said, this is personal to me. Sean in and I'm on this podcast with Queens. Come on State Attorney Ray boy This is power in so. Yes I happy that Opportunity Washington Post invited me to write a piece just from the perspective whatever that was on things going on here in Louisville Kentucky, and so that's exactly what I did I poured my heart into it as a mother of two black children. Masan is the same age as Taylor Madonna's nineteen. She wanted to be an emt in them. Brianna Taylor was murdered and she said to me Ma that didn't protect her from police violence I'm not sure this. So this is really pulling on us in shanty the people relieving leading the Front Lines here in Louisville for justice for Taylor are mostly women is so we're feeling this heavily. So yes, we've back to now to grandeur WANNA speak out. So that says to me that the Attorney General for Kentucky was so inept that in such a failure that you have rand jurors who want the right to speak out to say, he did not give us all of the options in front of us. There was no one there to speak for Briana Taylor in that this whole process was a sham that's where we all right now that says something about the continued. Kushner justice for Taylor in that's why we won't give up and that's why this movement is sustained

Attorney Kentucky Brianna Taylor Scott Queens Taylor Madonna Kentucky State House Ashanti Howard University School Of La Pete People Atacan State Representative Howard United States Knoxville Ray Boy Louisville Maryland Brianna Law
Interview with Jules von Hep

The Emma Guns Show

06:37 min | 10 months ago

Interview with Jules von Hep

"Jews. On Hat. Welcome back to the PODCAST. How are you? Is So nice to be here. I feel like BMX gun show is like comfy lounge with the company. So a lovely wolves and the hold. Sherry every time I'm on this because I just feel great. That's exactly how I want you to fail. The cushions nicely. Or can fluff occasion very well. I had a moment on Sunday evening I was lying down watching TV and I thought note not having it and I just decided that the Sofa looked a bit flat. So I the cushions off had to stamp on some of them had to beat some of them are I'm talking about. The SOFA cushions as well as my beat the crap out of. I don't look great afterwards. I should say on the floor. Staring at it lovingly. His still no since. I don't to beat the air out of it with my behind. Thirty seconds in. I've never I've never served Sherry they maybe. I. Should have a buffet in the just in case you come around. I'm all about sheds all Chaz yet. Love it overlooked. Is it? It's sweet. Isn't it? Sweet uncle you get them dry is good. All Year round at. Huge says. It's really As a warm up, I liked him as a warrior shopping A. Well or even just a lunge before coming out just a little parents got this show of the rhetoric quick shares off the air. Do you mix it with anything. We just need room temperature chilled. Babak. If I'm lucky with the bear bikes but. I haven't had a drink in six weeks and then six maybe even longer and then the other night I decided to have a cafe patrol. Because I ended up my friends that's. My friend the next day always feel that good. This morning I had some cafe patrol last night and he said how many and I said two and a half shots. And went, oh, that's and I said well five technically to with double. I'm enjoying the hall. I know it was like. Over, do it. I'll just have a half of the last one, but it was very nice and I watched the Oprah. Mariah Carey interview I was sipping. What does seem a whole? Just described on your perfectly fluff safer. I know exactly but you are joining me before we go off on a major you joining me for an episode of Feel Good Habits, which is the franchise or the series only Magan show where I quiz my guess about the tips, strategies and techniques, they use to stop bad data heading into a bad week. Stop getting out of the bed the wrong side turning into ruining every day as whether your own those sorts of things and also. Let's face it. It can be a bit deeper and you are. Pure, joy. As a friend but also as somebody that I am lucky enough and I know lots of people lucky enough to engage with on the Internet viral instagram you just put out nothing but good thoughts. And feelings kid thank you. You know about I just I like living each day plus Ignited your knife is GonNa, come to a close I. Know that's so grim but I, liked to enjoy life and I think it's really important to try and use my platforms to spread joy and just biftek WanNa because life is tough it's hard work and actually it's just remember the beauty of life and it's to half feel-good smile and Laugh Day. That needs to be a t-shirt gills. I know I do actually need a PA to just stay with me at all times taking votes. That's a Hashtag. If you're available send Jesse. Rhonda she'd be. Efficient. I reckon would work in a chip here the weekends and I wouldn't have a problem with it. Oh, I actually. I had a craving fish and chips last night. How funny that you say that? It's the universe telling me to go up the road and get myself. Some cutting chip's GonNa have to talk source in the right. You gotTa have everything right to go with it. You can't just Have to prepare. I, think. Oh listen. This is a banal chippy Attica. Different show. All you need to know is plenty of salt plenty of vinegar and don't mess with them scraps. That's how it goes. Yes. Yeah. True. So I'm guessing you've got some flipping excellent feel good habits. So I think the first one I actually want to put down. It's not something that I've written but you jogged my memory now is a good habit is. When you get out of bed in the morning I, really truly believe that how you start your day will massively impact the rest of your day and I know that that's this very common Skill. If you make the bed those who make the bed, we'll have a more productive day on. It's something that I really try and disciplined myself in the moment I wake up I'll wake up and I'll stay on instagram and go through my DM's which for me is compartmentalized as an hour. Before out bed so then I have an hour after that and I make empty the dishwasher maybe claim a kitchen before dressed might do a little bit of a workout with something and then I, started my day right now what that does is it puts me on a really Positive, productive mental state of mind if I don't do one of those if I lie in bed if I mess Abou-. Than sometimes my diet can unravel and then it got straits with myself, and then I know that I I know that I can stop being mean and it's just not worth it. So feel good habit number wall I think his start your day rhines and from the moment you get up start doing nice things. So I'll combine actually with this other one I've written down is exercise has feel good habit.

Sherry Mariah Carey Chaz Wanna Rhonda Jesse
Radha Blank Finds Her Voice Again In Netflix's 'The 40-Year-Old Version'

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:30 sec | 10 months ago

Radha Blank Finds Her Voice Again In Netflix's 'The 40-Year-Old Version'

"On her luck. Playwright Radha is looking for reinvention. After grieving the loss of her mother, and in the Netflix film, the 40 year old version, she literally finds her voice again. Rapping about her artistic and personal struggles is a middle aged black artists in New York City. You were my damn house keys while my lower legs hurt Saw Attica lot legs like Attica. Word Blank wrote, directed and leads the 40 year old version on screen. And the funny biting satire is based on her own experiences. She joins us Now. Welcome.

Radha New York City Netflix
"attica" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:10 min | 11 months ago

"attica" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Y'All eve's here. Today's episode contains not just one but two nuggets of history these are coming from the. Vault so you'll also hear to host considerate a double feature enjoy the show. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com, and from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast I'm Tracy v Wilson and September ninth. The Attica prison uprising started on this day in nineteen seventy one an immediate precursor to this uprising was the killing of activist and author George Jackson. He was incarcerated at San Quentin prison in California and he was killed on August twenty first of Nineteen seventy-one. This was during an alleged escape attempt but there are still a lot of unanswered questions and controversies around his death but the consensus among the men who were incarcerated at Attica was that he had been framed and murdered by the guards. This certainty combined with ongoing issues of racism and just dehumanizing conditions at the prison put everyone on edge from the incarcerated men to the staff everyone. Less than three weeks after Jackson was killed Leroy doer was in a play fight with another man in the cell block exercise yard. This was horse play they weren't actually fighting with each other. An officer yelled for him to stop but also mistook him for another man and called him by the wrong name. So we're doers didn't stop. He didn't know he was the person that was being spoken to. It was his first day back in the exercise yard after being keep locked or combined completely threw his cell for a week. When another officer came down into the yard to break up this horse play doer hit him in the chest and said that he wouldn't be keep locked again. This was not a hunch was more of a tap or a shove. A crowd started to gather around them and the situation became incredibly tense with a lot of incarcerated men defending doer and the officers becoming increasingly concerned about the situation they finally decided to drop it and resolve later. Resolving it later taking doer and one of the men who had come to his defense out of their cells after lockup and taking them to solitary confinement. This was something that the other incarcerated men were sure was a sign that something terrible was about to happen to them as the men were being taken to breakfast the next morning somebody in company five took advantage of an unintended lock box to let somebody who was supposed to be in keep lock out of a cell. The officers realized what was going on and they started to contain everyone in company five in one of the access tunnels in the prison. When they realized they were trapped. This led the band to panic and some of them jumped to with the officers and took their keys. Almost. Immediately, the officers lost control of a lot of Attica incarcerated men started breaking down security gates and making improvised weapons. The prison staff was absolutely unprepared for something like this the facility itself had been built all of these security gates and other features that were supposed to prevent exactly this kind of an uprising and with the gates broken down, they didn't really have a plan. The uprising continued for days in the incarcerated men took hostages a group of men in D. Yard in the prison commandeer typewriter and drafted a list of demands but negotiations about those demands kept running into roadblocks but on. September. Eleventh. Nineteen seventy-one officer William Quinn. who had been struck in the head during the initial. Of Part of the prison. died of his injuries on September thirteenth Lon decided to retake the prison by force when they did in the span of about fifteen minutes thirty eight people were shot to death and eighty more were wounded one of whom later died of his injuries. A quarter of those killed were hostages not incarcerated men. The building itself was also heavily damaged, and during the effort to restore normalcy many of the incarcerated men were beaten humiliated and addressed with racist slurs. There were some reforms that followed this riot, some of them. Were related to the demands that the men had typed up during the uprising. Some of them addressed some of the conditions that had primed the men to you stage an uprising in the first place. But a lot of the dehumanizing conditions at the prison persisted there's a whole lot more to the story from the conditions at Attica before the uprising to the uprisings aftermath, and you can learn more about it in the November fourteenth and Sixteenth two, thousand, sixteen episodes of Steffi missed in history class..

officer Attica Leroy doer George Jackson eve D. Yard San Quentin Tracy California Lon Steffi Wilson William Quinn.
The Ice Shelf Garden

National Trust Podcast

04:52 min | 1 year ago

The Ice Shelf Garden

"Job seats working in life support systems that may eventually support astronauts on missions to the Moon and Mars. These are places where poor is unlikely to see who were in action, but in Twenty Fifteen Paul was given the opportunity to join a crew on a mission where be in charge of testing a life support system that would help subsist. Subsist an isolated crew in one of the furthest flung frontiers, not humans pull was going to Antarctica the continent often tactic half is next best place you can garbage very similar to living and working on the mood to wasn't quite the Moon Amas. It wasn't even the job pool was expecting. The official title was systems engineer about the most commonly used as laws on Octagon A- die, I was doing gardening and growing vegetables and OCTA. Pool was going to be part of a team that would be tasked with building and Transport Espace. Greenhouse called even I s to Attica Bay on the eskimo Ice Shelf in eastern Antarctica. The I S S would be stationed at a research base where poor and the crew would spend twelve months, but for nine of these months that'd be is elated from the outside world and poor would be solely responsible for the cruise supply of fresh fruit. There's just one problem garden in wasn't pose particular forte. I've done some some gardening. A child in the garden I would say I had not much experience with that. So in just a few weeks had to master the scientific gardening art of Arrow, politics. So. Soil normally already has all the nutrients the plans need, and when you water, the soil, water dilutes the nutrients and make them available for the roots of the plants can use the nutrients to grow, but with their opponents things were differently. The roots are basically hanging free in the air and are sprayed with water and nutrients every two minutes, so it turns out Paul. Skills as an engineer were perfectly suited to the task of Space Garden. We have a very technical greenhouse, the control the climate, the temperature immediately you the CO two level all systems that keep the plants alive so that they can produce food for the crew. So after months of preparation, it was finally time for poor to make his way to Antarctica. Even the first leg of this adventure could be an epic seven day journey. Surfer cool. It was faster flight from his home town of Bremen to meeting. From unique to Cape Town. Then, a native of three days for his Antarctic bound flight. From south. Africa is still nieve about six hours flights. And Star this just felt like another routine flight. Bomblet flight number to go to a normal check in desk. Instead of auditing, the normal flights, your flight, one doctor. Then you sit in this APP plane of people from different to countries. They'll really excited. Enter the aircraft with some cloves. The crudes cooling down the path. That everybody is changing. All, clothing governor nerves. I'm boss for plunk him. I'm a professional social psychology to University of boss ambassadors, main area of research is into the psychology of habit or people don't realize how many have is we have? And that comes to the to the fore when you are the want to change behavior or have to change behavior I often have an overestimation of how easy or how good we are in changing. What's what we usually do, so we? We overestimate our willpower, says one of the most effective times to get the better of your habits is at a time of drastic change so when you're devoid of all the routine and triggers that allow your old habits to prevail. Happy sign not triggered by your patient or your willpower, your intentions, but trick triggered by cues in the environment. The Eight o'clock cure for instance is trigger to to go to work or certain moments in the day you to to take snack. They have not think that you decide. It's not willpower. It's it's environment. That's that's cues. The TRICO sits so pause lockdown Antarctica an hour lockdowns in our. Our homes would create these almost blank canvases for creating new

Antarctica Pool Paul Attica Bay Trico Systems Engineer Africa Engineer Space Garden Cape Town Transport Espace Official University Of Boss Bremen
Los Angeles: Artist Says His Portraits Of Day Laborers Are Paintings — Not Statements

Morning Edition

04:13 min | 1 year ago

Los Angeles: Artist Says His Portraits Of Day Laborers Are Paintings — Not Statements

"A Los Angeles art show called cowboy stories has no horse or any towels the campus is show Latino men in worn out jeans boots and cowboy hats staring at viewers and here's Susan Stamberg went to meet the artist and a few of his models you think this looks like you say yes I don't nine I got a I got a menu to ease my eyes his many famous Isola clearly that the Honduran model is Francisco Milka the interpreter another model is Gabrielle Barak has from Mexico your cheeks are bigger and softer you look older there then you look in real life well as I guess he is a may we the LA times says the artist Johnson sini from New York quote may be the greatest portrait painter in the country but sensing he says he's not making portraits he's out to capture the presence of the person he's painting I find that the presence of the sitter frees me up in a mysterious sort of way it loosens his brush strokes in confidence dashes of oil paint the men come alive on his canvases years ago since any found inspiration in LA's Koreatown day laborers hoping for work sun sini thought to paint a few of them and felt he had found his subject here's what we look for in a man he approach someone who's got a dynamic physical presence doesn't mean the person's necessarily attractive or not although I think my attitude is I've never painted anyone I didn't think was beautiful they look uneasy though in the pictures is if they're not used to posing for photographs let alone paintings some of the workers were puzzled when sensing the ask them to model for him this professorial looking Italian American with the salt and pepper beard wanting to paint them Gabrielle Berossus who started as a model and became the artist's long time partner says a few of the men didn't quite understand they always feeling that they are going to paint a house nope different kind of painting and the money was good John told them he would pay thirty dollars an hour five hours a day five days a week and they had to commit to five weeks of work beats putting up drywall or holding tranche Barak has was on scene he's only model for five years he loved it very excited and so but I sent into me ease was made the team the little something into it arts in their twenty four years together over I has has introduced sense any to many models some have become friends like Francisco Melgar sensing his painted him some twenty five times he is the one with the ram face in real life slimmer on the campus Melgaard considers posing a job but it does take its toll he was complaining that he feels he Attica pains heal one sciatica in his legs from standing in one position for so long on the other hand he's been immortalized hung on the walls of collectors and museums that doesn't seem so important to Mel car I asked about how his friends react to his modeling they feel very happy by the mall seeing that he's making with money painter John sensing he's not doing badly either at the veil matter gallery in LA his large canvases costs seventy five thousand dollars ten thousand for the smaller ones in the current climate people sometimes see themes of immigration migration in his work man leaving home toiling for money to send back to their families separation for sustenance sun seeming denies it his art he says is not political I definitely am not trying to make statements how do you see it then what are you doing making paintings making paintings in Los Angeles I'm Susan Stamberg

Los Angeles
"attica" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"attica" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"We have seen it and we think it's a suicide so I've been reviewing all the record since Attica as to when the suicide occurs we have in it that can New York state prison scene that chiropractors number one number two maybe our our room wow this is a different but this certainly suggest that it could be a homicide wool we're not done so there's more and more and we you know out of all of those things that they've done and they've seen right reviewing all the records this just I mean it doesn't make sense right it doesn't it doesn't add up they continued on CBS this morning Oprah's best friend with the he right you ready for this one you're ready for this one year ago so aside findings you're being paid by the existing family isn't in your best interest to go along with what they believe having that happen they want to know what happened that Mister the the brother or the state would just as soon have this to be a suicide because the there's no advantage to them to be a homicide marketing is now concerned about a homicide if his brother was killed because he knew too much is he also at university of Akron jeopardy so this so they don't panic at their brother was murdered well because the autopsy findings they they feel it but brother may have been murdered sack but as a medical examiner when I was chief medical examiner in New York City just because I would find that the jails suicide doesn't mean that I was on the side of the city of the state we have to call it the way we see it so it doesn't matter when being paid by the New York City over even paid by the family now what I want to know is it seems pretty damn obvious that the city medical examiner rush through this to say that there was a suicide and they're having more more independent people look at this and say no no no or more times no no no this this is not a suicide looks like a homicide what can be done about this I mean I'm not an expert in this aspect wicked can somebody reopen this can somebody demand that be can bill you just have to go all in is a New York thing this is good but can the Attorney General all of a sudden say Hey you know what all this evidence here were taken over this investigation we're gonna look into this ourselves can that happen to me I this is probably never happened before right but there's more weight here we go we continue we don't know the position of abstains body when he was found dead that's correct and that's a crucial that's crazy because the marks on the neck is not at all typical for a hanging suicide it was I ninety percent of the time there's no fractures maybe ten percent fifteen percent there could be a highway or a tyrant fragments you don't have three fractious with it with the weight of the body on the literature you have to have students a lot more pressure by eighty literature by hands to get those factors you also say now that the the wounds on have schemes mac and we have pictures of those with as we caution you these are things that make stuff do not match the news that was found in a cell that's right our number of things in the news the news is a very narrow news and there's a little imprint on the one that uses of a pressure of a mark that could not have come from the smooth neck not not yeah that's attached what part of the news and the bad the it's on the neck Jason done the skin that looks more like an imprint from a rope rather than from a dentition mood bed sheets and there's nothing on the bed sheet that blood or that would indicate it was around his neck and there is the FBI or the medical examiner would have guns swabs for DNA on the ligature whose DNA is on it was it ever seen about.

Attica
"attica" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

22:48 min | 1 year ago

"attica" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in Philadelphia. I'm terry gross with fresh air weekend today Elton John his new memoir is pretty good I'm just wanting to play music has music nothing and to buy a coffin it sounds like a lot of your childhood years weren't weren't great you're Marta down the tactile father to them and loving he just you know I've done so much therapy on on Rehab and I just looked back in that and me it's in part about how addictions to alcohol and cocaine affected his personal and professional life and how he got sober Howard you introduced to cocaine I was in a recording studio in Colorado Cabbie Raunch on I sold my manager John Reid sniffing something now it's very naive up to one I didn't even know what marijuana was didn't know my band smoke marijuana I'd never smoke marijuana I I don't know what maybe what is happening and he was he was quite embarrassed because it's cocaine I said what does it do it makes you feel good all ago why I said I'd I don't know anyway I had a line of cocaine and I threw up immediately afterwards because I made me feel nauseous and sick and it was horrible and then I off dry throat it can have another one now why on earth would anyone who needs sane who is complemented would want another line of cocaine after it made you throw it but I did on the thing we cocaine's very speedy so it made me talk I was quite a shy person so I thought this is the drug that can open me up and make me feel relaxed and be able to talk to be well out of course it was fooled gold on that was the start of a love hate relationship with for sixteen years basically did you think that it would make you more creative in your music either in writing or performing no but it was an aphrodisiac for me but on the other and it's the Aphrodisiac couldn't perform so you know this was a drug that made me feel horny but I couldn't do anything about it is that what you're describing office having become something of a Voyeur yes kind of setting up scenes in watering became the full Federico Fellini Sex I yes I would I'd like to watch say that in the book so yeah I think that's probably why I didn't get HIV and I didn't get AIDS in the nineteen hundred because I didn't participate as much as what that's really interesting so in some ways it saved her life you did cocaine kill me but it saved me as well because I like to watch on it fulfilled my fantasy so I didn't really participate much sex and before you even knew about HIV yeah and then of course it happens so quickly the Tarot Bill and then you know the New York Times stories and John Reid postal assistant Neil Carter died of AIDS very quickly people started to lie news dying on it was terrifying did you ever fear the cocaine and alcohol were turning you into like the stereotype of the spoiled entitled Rockstar. yes of course and that's what made it even worse I mean when rhyme white because in INDIANAP- his time for that week which I was there for I'm just to refresh people's Memories Right Ryan White was Oh boy who had hemophilia and got aids through a blood transfusion and you became aware of him friend was the founder and for the last week of his life alone with a lot of other people who were friends of the family I was in Indianapolis at the hospital kind of being Jeannie wipe his mother's secretary but I used to come home to the hotel on the same about drugs IOS wouldn't house for help because I knew how to problem anew might behavior was reprehensible and I came home to the hotel in Indianapolis on I would be so ashamed that these people who had been through hell include Ryan himself who never complained about his family who've been treated or ostracized by people in that community for gave the people I mean the forgiveness and the Christianity voted the actions no hatred no it was unbelievable I came home I complain here but I don't want the wallpaper I don't like the furniture in a passion have I become I've become the most despicable horrible person I complain about everything in my life I'm so blessed in my life these people have lost this donald losing their son who has never complained about being the most unfortunate man in the world by contracting HIV through a blood transfusion and here my looking at everything complaining about it and I said I really despise myself and six months softer run I was Soba just thinking about the disconnect I'm thinking about the disconnect routine being on stage and having like thousands of people like screaming for you stadium tens of thousands of people screaming for you and then being offstage in having to contend with your own problems are the things that you don't know how to do your own insecurities and your own failing things in your own your own ex- extremes and everything it it it seems like that must be really hard to connect like the famous person who so beloved in wonderful on stage with a flawed person who's offstage a nuts why you escape into drugs or alcohol and you just block it out you block it out until the problem of the thing you're facing become such a monumental thing that you explode with rage and that's the way I handle confrontation I just blocked it out didn't do with it until I had to do with and then I was very very uncomfortable and painful procedure all the time and I kept doing it time and time again so yeah it was I hated my diction I hated the well behaved I hated how I treat people I hated what I become but I'm grateful that I had it because then I learned how to become who I am now on proud of who I am now I like who I am I you know I'm I'm I'm twenty nine years old because I I started to be a good person or start to try and be a good person or to behave properly when I was twenty three on I I know I was always a nice kind person but you know drugs bring out the darkness in you the recovery wasn't when I was on drugs that was horrible it was when I was off drugs and now the comedown from it alcohol is a major depressant on obvious drinking a bottle of Johnny Scott Black Johnnie Walker Scotch Johnny Walker Black Scott Every day neat and so no one drivers angry no wonder I was you know alcohol is a huge depressant how could you write songs that way don't know I the only thing that was the constant terry was throughout all this I still wrote songs music was again saved my life I love touring I love writing songs I love recording and sometimes not in the best circumstances and not in the fitness I should have been in the right state of mind but say my life if I'd have been the drug addict that it was an eye just become a recluse and done nothing I wouldn't be I'd be I'd have oh deed but because also I loved and I didn't take drugs constantly with Tom that'd be stopped for nine months but one of you go back to something you love like cocaine it gets worse every time you relapse and You take more so you know the the fact that I love the music because I also helps touring making the record I just still loved the music so it would remind me of how great my life was without the drug and I said I will get well we'll get well and then you know the madness of this while I was thinking that I'd be taking yet another line of cocaine I will get well here's another one I would have seizures in the middle of the night I would have seizures and people would find me on the floor I'm put me to bed at twenty minutes later up doing cocaine again I was blue from sieges on I put me into bed and say we got a call the doctor said no no I'll be fine but they got out the door I got the cocaine out again I saw doing again these seizures horrible they will really distressing and that's how mad and how dangerous my addiction was and I looked back share horror and well thank goodness even sober all these years I've twenty nine years is been wonderful on of lunch so much so you're married you have two children now how long ago did you know you wanted to be a father because I'm thinking having the parents that you had wasn't the the greatest role models sometimes like if you don't have great parents it doesn't speak well for the nuclear family and you might not want one I never wanted to be a father I never they'd have children until I went to the Ukraine on a visit for the Elton John H Hyundai's mcdavid to an orphanage in Ukraine and Yom Boyd who is eighteen months old could live levitated boozman literally he just jumped into my arms and I carry them around for an hour and a half at the orphanage she would not leave my side he had a brother they're code automous who was HIV positive We stayed in the orphanage on we will give him not often engine supporting them I did a press conference and one of the question was this little boy seems to be who is now sitting on David Lap while I'm on the question This little boy seemed to be attracted to you would you ever think of adopting him I went you know what I've never ever thought of adopting anybody really this kid is stolen my heart I would love to adopt him well in the Ukraine I was too old to adopt I was gay that was another strike against me Ukrainian laws was you know Prost ex-soviet laws which will so in a so anti-gay and everything like that we tried we you know the even the adoption was in Britain off wasn't great we tried for about a year and a half to adopt this boy on his brother I the end of the day became an national press thing where the press would go out and go to find out who's mother wasn't his father was on it it became a fast David sat down and said listen the thing is become more important to get these boys out of the we we have to get them out because after some time if you don't have tactile love you know it it leaves a scar on you I said we gotta get these boys out she had a grandmother we got them out to the grandmother Internet Tsk where they came from and we SUPP- Cherish Sarp tissues dilute after them David then said to me well what do you think this boy was turning you..

Elton John whyy Philadelphia Marta twenty nine years eighteen months twenty minutes sixteen years nine months six months
"attica" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"attica" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Coming about family addiction and sexuality and so as our conversation he didn't realize he was gay until after he asked a woman to marry him I've never had a sexually an personally Elton John Husband now have two children also we hear from writer etiquette lock her new novel is about a Black Texas ranger investigating the criminal activities of the Aryan Brotherhood.

Elton John Husband Aryan Brotherhood writer Texas
"attica" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

14:17 min | 1 year ago

"attica" Discussed on Fresh Air

"That's the subject of the new novel Heaven My Home Today we talked with the author Attica Locke Who's also written for the TV series empire and when they see US she writes crime stories set in East Texas where she grew up stories were the crimes are often racially motivated us today the screenwriter director and Co Star of Joe Joe Rabbit a new satirical movie set in Nazi Germany about a ten year old boy in the Hitler Youth Movement over Schmaltz young boys had your blind society we talk with filmmaker Tyco y t t who was talked into playing Hitler despite the fact he's from New Zealand and half Jewish and half indigenous Maori a novelist Attica Locke writes quote my bloodline runs along highway fifty nine in East Texas Unquote Highway fifty nine North South route many African Americans traveled during the great migration seeking opportunity in northern cities but Attica locks family stayed so the family of Darren Matthews the main character of her last two novels the latest one is called Heaven my home Darren Matthews is a black Texas ranger investigating the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas set during the first weeks of the trump presidency. The novel is about the tangled and complicated relationships black and white families in East Texas dating back to Slavery in Heaven My Home Darren Matthews essent a Keto Lake an immense body of water to help investigate the disappearance of child the missing nine year old is the son of an Aryan Brotherhood captain his doing twenty years on drug charges Matthews is conflicted about what it will mean to help find this boy willie turn out to be like his father edeka locks first highway fifty nine novel Blueberry Bluebird won the Edgar Award for best novel in Two Thousand Eighteen She's written three other novels and has been a screenwriter and producer on the TV show Empire and the Netflix miniseries when they see us she spoke with fresh air producer Sam brigger article welcome to fresh Air I thank you for having me really loved the new book I'd like you to read if you will a passage from your new book heaven my home and if you could just set it up for us please well sure this is a scene with our main character from this book in the First Book Bluebird Bluebird Dan Mathews Texas Range Her it is December twenty sixteen he's been going a lot of stuff with his wife he's had a drinking problem in the last book and we find him now having been pulled off the road and being desk bound as concession to his wife so that their marriage kind of levels out and then also we find him at this point in the story sitting around with a bunch of other rangers of color talking about what has been going on since Donald Trump was elected one by one the each acknowledged that something had shifted in the past for weeks not just in the world large but on the job too they were dealing with things they'd never seen in their lifetimes stores they only heard from the older men in the Department church burnings the defacement of asking Brian Black and Brown kids shoved in lunchroom's spit on Gym Class A Mexican woman currently in critical condition after she was attacked in front of her husband and Three Kids Buddy spoke a hotbed of trouble near Jefferson in Marion county he might have even mentioned a missing kit out that way but Darren might have remembered it wrong things got a little fuzzy after that he managed to go an hour before switching from beer to whiskey but the slide was fast it made wax of his spine the liquor did made everything goes soft at the edges melting away all the departmental talk all their tales from the field of which Darren had none he was landlocked in Houston at the office these days board and the way he was scared to admit to himself afraid the word hit a deeper truth as blue as the record that was playing Darren was depressed sick with the rage that was easy being him from the inside daily he marveled with befuddled angry at what a handful of scared white people could do to a nation he never again wanted to hear them question the point of rioting in Ferguson or Baltimore or Watts or Detroit for that matter hear them wonder why black folks with torch their own neighborhoods because in enact a blind very white voters had just lit a match to the very country they claimed to love simply because they were being asked to share it and that's the bit that stung the hurt that cut bone deep after years of being lulled into believing that the universe bent towards justice he saw how little his friends and neighbors thought of his life of his right to this country after Obama it was forgiveness portrayed so what inspired you to create the character dairy Matthews's African American Texas Ranger working in East Texas he's investigating the area and brotherhood of Texas right around the election of Donald trump this whole book series for me was about highway fifty nine he was about place before it was about a character before it was even about stories I come from both sides of my family my Mom's side my dad's side all come from little towns along highway fifty nine in East Texas and I grew up riding up and down this highway to visit family my whole life and there's a sense of this highway being kind of in my bones and I really wanted to tell a story or a series of stories about this party Texas that people don't always think of they think of a big sky country in the West in the southwest they don't always think of the the craggy East Texas piney woods and that's what I wanted to write about so I had the idea for a book series of new stories every book would be a different story in towns along this anyway but he was presented to me by an editor by my book agent well that's great but you know kinda the trip the genre is readers are going to want to that was somebody for a while so what's a character that's going to kind of take you into all of these stories and I had to think for myself who is a character that can move along on highway fifty nine which goes from Laredo to Texarkana who is that you and it became quite obvious it had to be a Texas ranger because their jobs literally to range they have freedom of movement and then what I had to do was confront the parts of myself that were very ambivalent slash Confident not sure I wanted to do right anything about a cop I don't quite see the world through the eyes of the establishment I typically see the world through the eyes of outsiders so it was a conundrum for me to figure out how to write this character and I kind of found my way I read a book uncalled ghetto side by Jovi and it was a pivotal read for me in a pivotal read in terms of what it meant to write a black law enforcement officer and Ghetto Cy predates language like black lives matter but there is a black cop in that book who sang that Yes we all talk about the over policing of black lab life but the other story of the founding of this country is the under policing of crimes against black life and I'm going to wear a badge and stand up for for black folks so that they are protected and crimes against them are prosecuted fully so darren sent to Caddo Lake to investigate the disappearance of this nine year old boy Levi who's the son of a captain of the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas skies serving twenty years in prison for drug related charges but but not for the murder of black man who was a father of two and Darren has some real conflict about how he feels about this boy he's thinks to himself you know what's going to happen if I saved this boy like is he going to grow up to be like his father will I see him in ten years with area and tattoos on his neck or is there a chance that his life could turn out differently well that's the the fundamental question I think I was asking myself that on the other side of trump's election you know I'm forty five and the basically the course of my life has looked very particular way every I live on the other side the civil rights movement all of my understanding of everything and Raisin America is post civil rights movement so it is always kind of looked like this slow march each difficult struggle sometimes violent sometimes heartbreaking but a march toward justice and equality for the most part over the course of my life it is looked like we were living king stream and Obama seemed to be a kind of culmination of that not the end point but a beginning of of seeing a really different way AH this country deals with race the election of Donald Trump so fundamentally shifted that narrative for me that I just felt kind of lost in a lot of ways and sorta realizing I had been walking around thinking that essentially racist we're all GonNa Kinda die out it but I realized oh no they might be regenerating it's possible that this is being passed long into other generations and I started asking myself this question of whether or not that process could be stopped in so finding this missing called in this book becomes a metaphor for Ken the child literally be saved but can he be saved from the racist thinking that is around him and so did Darren when he's thinking about this this white boy leave is also thinking about himself and what he was like nine and he also didn't grow up with his father he was actually very distant from his mother and was and grew up with some very supportive uncles and he kinda wanders you know what his life would have been like with without them yes he's able to feel compassion for this child at the same time as a kind of fear that what if I get this wrong and I ended up leaving this kid only for because we find out that this child is starting to act out the stuffy singer around at his mom is living with this one be airing brotherhood guy and the kid is starting to do things like spray paint epithets on walls and you know not be kind to black neighbors and there's a set finish this book before a realized where this child came from my psyche around the election my daughter my daughter's twelve nine Auburn Twenty sixteen my daughter goes through Super Super Super Progressive Southern California school and there was a white kid there that called a black kid the inward and I was simply stunned that I had fallen into this kind of lull that I was in southern California I was in the progressive state I was in this progressive school with my child how did this word find its way into her life and art my reaction to versus daughter's reaction to it were completely different my daughter will let me start with my reaction I was furious I was hurt I was enraged I was like I don't want to have anything to do with this kid I don't I don't want to have anything to do with this kid's parents I don't want them to sit next to me at back to school night I don't know what to do with this whereas my daughter's reaction because relationship to the word is different she knows it's wrong but she also was able to see that child in a larger context was stuff going on in his home she said Mommy I kind of feel argh from I don't know what's going on or where that came from but I feel sorry for him but I was not willing to forgive and I was very uncomfortable that I the adult was not willing to forgive this child in it's taken we probably had twenty twenty-five dinner table conversations about this and I knew that the child ultimately felt agreed deal for Moore's any up to me to be the bigger person and to potentially forgive this child for this and to not not put on what he did what that word means to me and what it means to me when I was call that word at that age I was called the N. Word at about nine and shot with a BB gun so for me the the word is connected with violence it's connected with such ugliness and I don't know why that kids that we did but I was feeling that it wasn't quite fair for me to put my hire history of that word going back into the seventies on this child today it was just all of that was roiling in my mind and that's where a lot of this came from this and is it safe to forgive folks or are we is that there's something dangerous in forgiveness we'll get to forgiveness in a little bit but you were shot with a BB. gum I was I was about nine years old I was living in the suburbs in Houston and I was really good friends with his way kid named Blake we used to play four together because this was a suburb that started empty lots they were still building new houses and we would play and built forts in these empty lots and we were just buddies and one day I came on was hiding in the bushes then popped out and pointed a rifle at me and shot and I was stunned it broke skin I bled so I didn't Understand I was a bb gun I thought I had been shot and I stumbled home bleeding and my parents went crazy they were so so angry and it was very similar feeling I mean that I just described about my child but it was Texas in the eighties they had marched they had done all these things how would they lived in this suburban community only for their child to be called the inward and I believe that the police were called on this child I have vivid memory of sitting in the car when my mother.

Darren Matthews Texas East Texas Attica Locke Hitler Youth Movement New Zealand Germany Tyco Joe Joe Rabbit director Schmaltz Hitler Maori Keto Lake twenty years nine year nine years ten years ten year
BBC reverses decision on journalist race complaint'.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

06:11 min | 1 year ago

BBC reverses decision on journalist race complaint'.

"Coming up on the news BBC reverses this decision on Ackerman Chetty race complaint. US President Impeachment Whistle blowing endangered by trump criticism mm-hmm and three hundred fifteen billion tonne iceberg breaks off Antarctica. It's Monday September ten thirty. I'm Anthony Davis the BBC's director Director General Lord Hall has reversed a decision to partially uphold the Complaint Against Breakfast TV presenter Nag Amon Chetty. He told staff that munchies words were not sufficient to merit a partial uphold of the complaints against her she had criticized the US presidents motives after he said four four female politicians of color should go back to places from which they came. Mr Hall said he personally reviewed the decision of the complaints unit he he reiterated that racism is racism and the BBC is not impartial on the topic. The corporation said the complaint was originally partially upheld because it's aditorial guidelines do not allow for journalists to give their opinions about the individual making the remarks all them motives for doing so in this case Donald trump it comes off to dozens of black actors and broadcasters called on the BBC to overturn its decision to uphold the complaint against against Mon- chetty in an email to BBC staff. Mr Hall said many of you asked that I personally reviewed the decision of the Ecu I have done so I have looked carefully at all the arguments that have been made and assessed all the materials in this instance. I don't think naggus words were sufficient to merit a partial uphold of the complaint around the comments she made there was never any sanction against Negga. I hope this step makes that absolutely clear. He added that she he is an exceptional journalist and he is asked editorial and leadership teams to discuss how we manage live exchanges on air around these topics in in the future a change. Dot Org online petition in support of Nag Amon Chetty had this morning reached almost sixty thousand signatures the lawyers for a whistle blower whose complaint triggered the US presidential impeachment inquiry say Donald Trump's words words are endangering their client since the transcript of his call with the president of Ukraine was revealed. Mr Trump has called for the anonymous whistleblower to be unmasked asked Democrats say the whistle blower will testify to Congress soon once steps taken to protect their identity. Mr Trump has suggested his opponents could be arrested for treason the letter from the whistle blowers legal team in which the law is called attention to Mr Trump's language was sent to acting director of National Intelligence since Joseph Maguire on Saturday and made public on Sunday. The events of the past week of heightened out concerns that our clients identity will be disclosed publicly and that as a result our clients will be put in harm's way wrote the lawyer it quotes. Mr Trump is saying I want to know who's the person that gave the whistle blower the information because that's close to a spy you know what we used to do in the old days when we were smart right with spies and treason right. We used to handle them a little differently than we do now. The letter also references a fifty thousand dollar bounty that too conservative trump's supporters have offered offered as a reward for information about the whistle blower last night. Mr Trump re tweeted a Fox news guest who warned that if Mr Trump is removed from office office it will spark a civil war-like fracture in this nation from winchell country will never heal Illinois Republican Congressman Adam Kim Zinger condemned Mr Trump's tweet as repugnant Amery ice shelf in Antarctica Attica has just produced his biggest iceberg in more than fifty years. The carved block covers one thousand six hundred thirty six square kilometers in Area A little smaller than Scotland's of sky and is called D. twenty-eight the scale of the Burgh means it will have to be monitored and tracked because it could pose who's a future hazard to shipping not since the early nineteen sixties. Ameri carved bigger iceberg that was a whopping nine thousand square kilometers in Area Ameri is the third largest ice shelf in Antarctica and is a key drainage channel for the east of the continent. The Shelf is essentially the floating extension a number of glasses that flow off the land into the sea losing Bergh's to the ocean is how these ice streams maintain equilibrium balancing using the input of snow upstream de twenty-eight is calculated to be about two hundred ten meters thick and contain some three hundred fifteen billion tons device the name comes from classification system run by the US National Ice Center which divides the Antarctic into quadrants Michaud assure currents and winds who carry e twenty-eight Westwood's. It's likely to take several years for it to break apart and melt completely you can subscribe to the news with your favorite podcast. APP Oscar Smart Speaker or enable the news as your you're Amazon Alexa Flash briefing skill follow us on twitter at the news underscore podcast. The news is an independent production covering politics takes inequality health and climate delivering honest verified and truthful World News daily.

Donald Trump BBC Mr Trump Mr Hall United States Antarctica Ackerman Chetty Nag Amon Chetty President Trump Mon- Chetty Us National Ice Center Twitter Lord Hall World News Negga Anthony Davis Congress Joseph Maguire Bergh
"attica" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

07:50 min | 2 years ago

"attica" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"Day we flip back the calendar to this date years ago and recount one event from True Crime History today. We're going back to September ninth. Nineteen seventy one the day radicalized prisoners at Attica correctional facility rebelled against their guards and took control of their prison. The riot and it's appalling aftermath became a touchstone in the prison reform movement but not before forty the three men were killed will begin on the walk back from the prison breakfast room shortly before the structures of power at Attica or up appended. It was around dawn in New York on September ninth. Nineteen seventy one the men had all heard the whispers the night before one of the prisoners hit a guard that didn't bode well for them. Retaliation waited around one of these dark cement corners. Any of the inmates could take the heat for that hit all of them probably they muttered softly to one another. They were afraid but the men were also seething after months or years of deprivation vacation they were hungry. They're unwashed skin was sticky with sweat and many of them were coming off. Sixty days of solitary they'd been found with copies of the Attica liberation factions letter demanding improved conditions. Suddenly the door slammed slammed shut on either end of the long passageway. The men looked at each other. They're already tense. Bodies clenching like springs ready the to burst the guards leading them through the hall stopped short. The men demanded an explanation nation. They were sitting ducks in here. What was happening. They jostled against one another trying to see the door. The guards were up to something. That door should be unlocked. This was it retaliation for that one hit here in a tunnel a massacre in a tunnel tension filled the heavy humid air like a wild storm about to break the men were starting to panic pushing each other backing up or shoving forward the guards to looked panicked responding to the men's yells the L.'s with strained shouts of their own and then one of the prisoners did it. He glanced to his left his right. His is is blurred by sweat dripping down his forehead. If someone was going to die today it wasn't going to be him and then he launched his body at a guard that was all it took. The men seized keys and nightsticks off the guards. They exploded out out of the hallway and spread throughout the prison like a vengeful fire breaking down doors unlocking cell doors and burning down on the chapel. They beat guards. They threw one William Quinn out a window. They killed three of their own Attica. Atika belonged to the prisoners. Now power had switched hands. More than a thousand men were rioting and the guards cards were at the mercy of their charges but this new order didn't last within hours state troopers flooded the prison with tear gas and cowed the prisoners into cells with submachine guns by ten thirty. AM The prison was quiet except for yard. D It was a large open exercise yard surrounded by gun towers and thirty five foot foot walls standing in the middle of it was a tight circle of more than thirty blindfolded guards they were surrounded by prisoners armed with knives and clubs hundreds of state troopers and law enforcement officers from around. New York surrounded the yard as the prisoners or prison keepers now conferred at its centre Elliott James L. D. Barclay. A young smart radical with only three days left to serve at Attica made his way to the front of the crowd of inmates. He said his piece the Attica Liberation Faction in had tried to change Attica peacefully earlier that summer they had demanded basic necessities like toilet paper and tried to explain that the prison guards no longer consider or respect us as human beings. They'd gotten solitary for their trouble today. September ninth nineteen seventy one was their chance they had the state's attention they had leverage those guards their their oppressors. They had finally some power and a voice. They had to use it. They had to stick it to their guns. The men agreed Barkley would explain their position to law enforcement and so the negotiations began Barclay issued a statement we are men we are not beasts and we do not intend to be beaten or driven ribbon as such the entire prison populace that means each and every one of us here have set forth to change forever the ruthless brutalization and disregard for the lives of the prisoners here and throughout the United States what has happened here is but the sound before the fury of those who are oppressed. We will not compromise on any terms accept those terms that are agreeable to us. We've called upon all the conscientious citizens of America to assist us in putting an end to this situation that threatens the lives of not only us but of each and every one of you as well. Barkley was confident in the powers of his oration but he and the other prisoner negotiators leaders knew better than to trust the state to listen to them. They didn't trust law enforcement as far as a stone's throw under normal circumstances and they they knew that now for claiming their own power they were marked men. They needed a civilian to serve as their witness to hold the government accountable a journalist someone who could help them negotiate bring in national press make sure is were on them they asked for Tom. Wicker a New York Times journalist and one of the NSA's prominent left-wing Sir Valence targets in the infamous minaret operation he they hoped would get them out of this alive. At the end of September Timber Ninth Nineteen seventy one that still seemed possible justice was in the air. The men whispered huddling in their yard. As the autumn kill fell they went to bed shivering but there were nervous hopeful grins on their faces.

Attica Attica correctional facility New York Barkley Elliott James L. D. Barclay True Crime History New York Times William Quinn Atika Tom NSA Sir Valence America United States thirty five foot Sixty days three days
"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Two two. Fucking god. But. I'll be. Doesn't Attica some. So. Online lead in sacks. Good. I cave as. That show. Hey. Has. Can. So. Perfect. Can you? Sorry that much. But can't move on. If we're so. Is wrong. The strings. Good. Sure. No. Hey. Nothing. Can have you can. That's not. So. Kid. Can you? And some of get you. Nothing. Cash you. But. Can have. Two two. Bafokeng. Can have on air Ryan Seacrest? This is the moment when your spouse is most likely.

air attica
"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

06:25 min | 2 years ago

"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Warning on this radio station we call kiss FM Cam. Cantering. Thank you. Two two. Can you on? Oh, God biz. But as be. You know doesn't Attica some so spending on the inside. I'm good. I cave. That's show the sea. No. Hey. He means no fee has you can. So. I can. K. Yes. So. Can you? I'm so sorry that much. But I can't believe on if we're still. Is wrong. Good. Sure. No. Hey. Have you? Not. So. Kim. Kim. Let's get you. But. Nothing. Cashier. But. Can. Champ. Two. Bafokeng. Louis. Nothing. Can you? So I'm taking picking. Begin figuring on Levin. But we. Yes, we. Who tries it? We. We've. The we. We. they find out the the to employ Hey, we..

attica
"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Mornings on one or two point seven kiss. FM. Every night. Kim. Sure. Be doesn't Attica some. So. Tax. I'm good at cave. Hey. Nothing fucking. Hey. Q. Sorry that much sign off. But I can't move on, if we're still. Good. Sure. No. You. Can you? Let's get you. But I. Nothing. Kiss you but. Two. Fokin. Management. Point seven kiss. FM L, as number one hit music station. It's oriented 'Grande. Thank you. Done. Everyone at Sam Smith..

attica
"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Pretty alone. He said she. I don't see what you see. So maybe somewhere dot com. Yes. That's not. Bantering. Sued. Can you? And. But. Hotel doesn't Attica, some so. Tax. Good. That show. Hey. Kim. Kim. I'm so sorry that much sign but I can't move on, if we're still. Wrong. Good. Sure. No. Fucking. Kim. Some forget you. Cashier. But I. Fucking. Oh. Two. Fokin. Kim. Don't.

attica
"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Shawn Mendez one or two point seven kiss. FM. That's not bad. Two two. That. You. And this. Be doesn't Attica some. So. Tax. I'm good at cave. This show. Hey. Fucking has. Can you? Sorry that my son. But I can't believe on if we're still. Wrong. The strings. I'm good. No. Two. Kidding. That's not. Kid. Kim. Have you? It's over forget you. But. Kiss you. But I. Have. Two two. Fokin. Can have. Just music for ninety minutes point seven. So she needed need. Everybody need a decoy. Yes. Really? I'll be granted. On me. Got saying. Go Black Watch. When Utah snow in the front. Dumbo..

attica
"attica" Discussed on Z104

Z104

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"attica" Discussed on Z104

"Think it is too. Kin hugh. On this. But. As well. Be so good doesn't Attica some. So. Insects. I'm good at cave is. This show the fee. No. Hey. That's nuts. Is to. Two. Kin q. Are sorry that much son off, but I can't move on, if we're so. Wrong. John. This. Good. Is. The feeling. No. To you. That's. It is. Kim. Management kin have Hugh. Some move of get you. But. Nothing. Kiss you but. Kim. That's not a bad kids. Two two. Dad management than kid. Kin have q. One. Oh, four. So she. Twenty years plays. Nobody fucking need a decoy. Do. Seven twenty. Really? Did you see? On invisible. What? Only got them saying. Go on a black motumbo. Utah snow trunk in the front Dumbo..

attica
"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"We found. I ju. Okay. Filing food. You. You once I claim to so. Route. I. Close. Two. I almost. I guess I was. I do. Hugh music on L number one hit music station, one or two point seven kiss. FM. If I can't have you can. It's not. Cantering. Get to that. Kim. I'm sure on this but. Be in. Doesn't Attica some so spending. Reading tax. I'm good at cave. That show. Hey. No fucking has you can. That's not bad. Sued. Okay. Qin q. I'm sorry, that my son, but I can't on if we're still. Is wrong. On this. Good. Sure the fee. Two. If you can. Not. So. Kim. Kim have q. Some get you. But. Nothing. Something. The cashier. But. Kim. Please. Info can for. Kim. Gel on the radio point seven. Seven forty seven forty tickets for our sold out his way Tango, which of course, you know, Taylor. Shona. Stummer said hall Z's performing, and there is a mess hall. She's going to be here. Tonight like nine o'clock Paul tonight, nine o'clock kiss at them for them for her and tickets. Coming up. Okay. Just that out. Hello. You saw what you see on the freeway what happened. Parking lot. Sitting there, naked checking car. Nothing.

attica
"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"attica" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Have you by Shawn Mendez, what's your name? Then you gotta run, what is kiss? FM. Can. Cantering. The. Two. And. But. Hotel doesn't Attica, some so. Tax. Good. Can you sorry that my son? But I can't move on, if we're so. Wrong. Good. Sure. Two. Fracking. Can you? Forget you. But I. Two. Focus. Kim. Sold out Wanguo Tango, featuring five seconds of summer. College classes today dot EDU. Though. Everything because you made me believe. Junk about roots. Being. No stranger. Giving you. Given..

attica
Inside Aaron Sorkin's 'Mockingbird' story

The Frame

07:22 min | 2 years ago

Inside Aaron Sorkin's 'Mockingbird' story

"Playwright and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin says he was eager to adapt. Harper Lee's to kill a Mockingbird for Broadway. But he still had some serious. Reservations about the job. I said yes, knowing really it was a suicide mission because people have a very special relationship to the novel. And it's a great book. What could I do but make it less than than what it was? And the acting future of Jesse smollet is still unknown. But his character on empire just made TV history all that up on the frame. Welcome to the frame. I'm John horn when Tony nominations are revealed next week to kill a Mockingbird will likely get a lot of attention almost certainly for Jeff Daniels who plays Atticus Finch, but the adaptation by earned Sorkin was far from easy. Scott Rudin secured, the rights to the patient and got Harper Lee's personal approval of Sorkin. It's the playwright. But then things started to go awry following Lee's death three years ago the estate eventually sued to stop the production. We'll get to the lawsuit in a bit. But when I spoke with Sorkin about to kill a Mockingbird. He I told me why his first draft didn't work. I simply try to do. No harm. I I took the most essential scenes that you need to tell the story, and I stood them up and dramatize them and the whole thing felt like a greatest hits album done by tribute band. And I turned it in and Scott who usually at that point. Would meet with me for days and ended up with hundreds of notes to go back and do the second draft with he met with me for less than thirty minutes and gave me two notes. And the second note was the one that changed everything. What Scott said was that Atticus can't be advocates from the beginning of the play to the end of the play. He's got a change. That's what protagonist does a protagonist has a flaw protagonist put through something and changes as a result. And I thought well, of course, Scott's right? That has to be what happens in a play. I wonder how Harper Lee got away with an Abacus who's the same. At the beginning of the book is at the end of the book, how Horton Foote got away with an Atticus in the movie who's the same at the beginning of the movie is the is at the end of the movie. And that's when I realized that advocates isn't the protagonist in the novel or the movie scout is she's the one who changes her flaws that she's young and the changes that she loses someone for innocence. And while I wanted scout. And dill to remain protagonists in the play. I wanted advocates to be the central protagonist. I wanted him to be put through something. I wanted him to have a flaw on. I wanted him to change is a result. And what happened in that moment was that? I simply stopped thinking about the word adaptation that it. No longer was my goal to gently swallow the novel in bubble wrap and transfer it to a Broadway stage that I was going to write a new play taking the circumstances that Harper Lee put on the table. And that's when things started to take off. So I'm gonna ask you this. Obviously, it's a period piece. But I'm gonna talk about it's modern relevance of which there is a tremendous amount. What was happening in the world as you were adapting or reimagining, but ever we're gonna do whatever verb are gonna use to describe what you were doing with harp. Elise novel to make it a play. Yeah. Well, what was happening in the world. Was Trump was elected president Charlottesville was happening. Charlottesville became an important touchdown in this. And I'll tell you why Atticus in the in the novel. This was in thinking about what flaw can Atticus half. Does he go from being a bad lawyer to a good lawyer, a bad father to a loving father a racist believing injustice in a quality, and obviously no on all three? What I realized was that Atticus already had a flaw. Harper Lee gave him one. It's just that. When we were learning the book, we were taught that it was a virtue advocates says throughout the book that there's goodness in every single chicks, go get along better with all kinds of folks never really understand it until you consider things from his point of view. Climates out of his skin woke rounding he excuses. Bob, Buell's racism by saying the man just losses WPA job. You know, it's he excuses. Mrs Dubose is racism by she recently stopped taking her medicine or morphine. He excuses. The town's racism. This is the deep south things happen slower here, you know, give gift people time and thinking about all that at the same time at Charlottesville happened in it started. What Atticus was saying was starting to sound to me like there were fine people on both sides. Right. And that's when the bells rang, and and I was really able to kind of go from a walk to a gallop. We're talking with earned Sorkin about his ad obtain of Harper Lee's novel to kill a Mockingbird. I wanna play a scene between Atticus Finch and Tom Robinson who's been accused of raping a white woman. And the story can't tell you how to plead, but I can't. And I must give you my best advice. You won't be my lawyer. Very less thing. I won't the world be your lawyer right now negro man, what teenage girl wouldn't be going in with a win hands. But I'm compelled to defend us an officer of the court, and in that capacity of taken Salamo to give him a best council, which is that you cannot and you must not lead guilty and go to jail for a crime that you did not could not commit. So how do you figure out a way to dramatize what Atticus is going through? And how he's changing the way that he sees an excuses behavior through the play. What tricks? What are the things that you are able to do with the text and through new dialogue and putting dialogue and other characters mouse, they get you to that place where he can evolve for me, a big part of Attica ses journey in this play is going from someone who says, I know these people these are our, friends and neighbors sure some of them may be stuck in the old ways. But there are none of them that are so far gone. They would send an obviously innocent man to the electric chair, and he discovers that he doesn't know his friends and neighbors that to me does a really good job of of reflecting. I think how a lot of us no matter where you are on the political or ideological spectrum the way, a lot of us have felt these last few years that we thought we knew our fellow Americans. But we didn't we were wrong about our friends and neighbors, and that's one of the reasons why this play based on a book that sixty years old that takes place ninety years ago feels so much like today.

Atticus Finch Harper Lee Aaron Sorkin Scott Rudin Charlottesville Jesse Smollet Horton Foote Dill Jeff Daniels Elise Officer Mrs Dubose Salamo John Horn Donald Trump Morphine President Trump BOB Tom Robinson Tony
Steve Bannon dropped from New Yorker Festival after swift backlash

Morning Edition

01:56 min | 3 years ago

Steve Bannon dropped from New Yorker Festival after swift backlash

"Pro Bono lawyer paid for by the city or state ice detainees in New Jersey, though likely fight without an attorney making deportation far more likely so in July governor, Phil Murphy, budgeted two point one million. Dollars to hire lawyers for detained immigrants, but so far not a dime has been spent the process for dispersing, those state funds to legal nonprofits only began last week advocates say after WNYC began asking questions in the meantime, immigration advocates say they've been frustrated and countless immigrants may have already been deported. The ongoing nationwide prison strike is entering its final. Week ahead of the forty-seven anniversary of the Attica prison uprising in New York inmates across the US have been protesting for weeks. Calling for better living conditions and fair wages for prison jobs among other policy changes but Janos Martin of the ACLU's campaign for smart Justice, says the facilities often go into lockdown at the first sign of protest making it difficult to know what's going on. Inside. Phone lines are shutdown visiting access is restricted, and we often have to wait until stale mail comes through to really know what happens at least three New York prisons are reportedly involved in the ongoing. The protest Steve Bannon is no longer headlining the two thousand eighteen New Yorker festival. The ex-chairman of Breitbart and former aide to President Trump was announced as part of the festival's lineup yesterday. The news sparked an immediate and intense backlash several high profile festival guests, including Judd appetite. John Mullany Jim Carey and Jimmy Fallon all said, they would pull out of the festival in a statement yesterday evening editor David rim. Knicks said he had rescinded the invitation remnant says any future plans to interview Bannon would be in a quote, more traditionally journalistic setting we've got hazy hot and humid conditions today with sunny skies and a high around ninety three degrees right now. Seventy eight degrees, sunny skies in New York City..

New York City Steve Bannon New Jersey Knicks Wnyc David Rim Phil Murphy John Mullany Jim Carey Janos Martin Aclu Jimmy Fallon United States Breitbart President Trump Attorney Judd Access Editor
Bobby Seale, Bill Ayers & Bernardine Dohrn on Police Repression, Fred Hampton Murder & Prison Strike

Democracy Now! Audio

27:28 min | 3 years ago

Bobby Seale, Bill Ayers & Bernardine Dohrn on Police Repression, Fred Hampton Murder & Prison Strike

"Sir. This is democracy. Now democracy now or the warrant piece report. I'm Amy Goodman with one gun solace with part two of today's edition of fifty years ago that right fifty years ago this week, the nineteen sixty eight democratic national convention in Chicago became a national spectacle as a major political event turned into chaos that culminated with a police riot, much of it unfolding on live national television. While Hubert Humphrey was nominated as the democratic candidate in nineteen sixty eight inside despite the fact he didn't run in any primaries outside was where the news was where police were clubbing teargassing thousands of protesters. For more. We continue our interviews with Bobby Seale founding chairman, Black Panther party was in the protests at the beginning in Chicago. Bill Ayers was arrested on August twenty seven fifty years ago and Bernardine Dohrn both Bernardine and Bill longtime activists for peace and racial Justice, former SDS that students for a democratic society and whether underground members. I mean, he Goodman with Juan Gonzalez one? Yes. Yes. With Bobby Seale again to follow up a Bobby on the conversation. We were having that the end of our previous segment when you were talking about how once Richard Nixon was elected president, he ordered. His aides to begin immediate eradication of the Black Panther party. One of the interesting things that most people are not aware of is that years later report came out in the New York Times that the f. b. i. had conducted a CPR secret poll among black Americans and found that more than twenty five percent of African Americans were supporters of the Black Panther party felt that the Black Panther party was fighting. Their interest is significant portion of the America of the African American population of this country was supportive of of your revolutionary organization. And yet as you were saying Nixon immediately ordered that you be crushed, could you talk about what happened in that first few years of the Nixon administration to the panther party. Exactly the year of nineteen sixty nine is the year. Now, remember I said he had a meeting with j. Edgar Hoover and Jade ago who were in the December the first week of December stated nationally on television that we were threat to the internal, the blackout, the party is a threat to the internal security of America. Come come. What was February seventeenth seventeenth. John a buddy Carter and John Huggins will murdered at UCLA. They were the leaders of the black path to party and loss Angeles California now. But she Carter really had gotten out of his gang group. 'cause he, he ran a three thousand member gang and he created a political organization call wretched of the earth delay to become and he later became rub. They headed up to southern California chapter the black part in the Los Angeles community. Eric, the what I'm trying to say here is that. That was the first attack on the part of the power structure using the us organization, etcetera. In a conflict situation to kill and murder. The leaders of the Los Angeles chapter, the blackout, the party do that process in the next three or four months. They attack more than twenty two offices I'm talking about in Indiana. I'm talking about the, they blew up the office and demands. I will literally got the crew Clinton of blew up that blow up that building. And I'm telling you. In San Diego brother. Bell was opening up to San Diego office at eight AM in the morning, and the police and FBI came jumped out of cars and came into place and shot him dead killing murdering. So I'm just says that period of tacking by the end of that year with the murder of Fred Hampton and then the shootout in Los Angeles, four days later after that cetera I have in my organization, I had twenty eight dead blackout to party members sixty nine wounded and defending ourselves. We defended ourselves and many of these attacks. By the end of that year, fourteen police were kill because we shot back when they came in shooting in us. We did not play. We shot back

Bobby Seale Black Panther Party Chicago Oakland Bill Ayers Senator John Mccain Angela Davis United States California Panthers Attica Prison Retha Franklin Barack Obama National Association Of Black Elvin Howard Bernardine Dohrn Sammy Davis Illinois Bill Bill
"attica" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"attica" Discussed on KQED Radio

"New york's state prison forty five years ago inmates they're revolted taking the facility and forty staff members hostage by the end of the four day standoff at least forty people were done boorda insurrection new york's attica state prison came to a tragic end this morning go she gave way to force making this the bloodiest prison incident the country has seen in four decades this was but the memory of attica lives on today onto the best of our knowledge we're asking a simple question how do you create a more humane prison and we're starting with this is a story told about people who had no power who were at the mercy of their captors nevertheless fought for human dignity heather ann thompson is a historian and author of the pulitzer prize winning account of the attica uprising called blood in the water it took her thirteen years to research coming through thousands of public archives of court documents and what she found is evidence of police negligence and tortured during the prisons retaking and of a government cover up she tells steve paulson that a lot of what we think we know about attica isn't true including the image of marauding rioters exactly i think the prisoner is very clearly understood that the world was watching and that this was an opportunity to finally shine some light behind prison walls so they each cellblock elected a representative to speak for them those people in turn organized medical tent they organized a food tent they made sure that everyone was out in the open because they felt that that would be a safer and a pre factions in the prison put aside a lot of their differences and said look we need to come up with a coherent list of demands perhaps the most important thing they did though was that they asked for a body of observers to come to attica to essentially oversee these negotiations with the state and to make sure that the state negotiated in good faith saying that during during the this whole period where the prisoners were in charge are actually negotiators from the state watching the process absolutely they had a list of folks they wanted to come in and some of them were quite notable folks and so there were cameras rolling.

New york york attica state prison heather ann thompson pulitzer prize steve paulson attica representative forty five years thirteen years four decades four day
"attica" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"attica" Discussed on WCTC

"You don't throw a rock salt up on your roof or anything along those lines and you just let that slowly work at dissolving that ice and people all types of owed can i put heat up there can i run cables yet you can't but there's a really good chance you're you're spend your money on the wrong thing need really worry about the same thing we talk about many times on this show and that is insulate and finally and a lot of times people in yesterday was a classic case it kept saying say what kind of insulation should i use bubble butcher use of salo show used fiberglass i'm here to tell use one of them okay i think if you took all the types of vanhala of installations this is a pretty strong statement i'm gonna make if you took all the different types of i insulate it yet you're cellulose you got your a rock wool you got your fiberglass and if pick one just get it up to the our values supposed to have on attic floor if you're looking for a superior one foam it do a total encapsulation make that attica conditioned airspace and that foam is just like creating a thermos bottles for your house and if you're looking at a really really really insulate use that but if you're gonna do some yourself you buy enough insulation a lot of times a the big box stores give your blower blow it in don't cover up to soften venting but blow that inflation in their hit that up where it needs to be in terms of thickness.

attica