29 Burst results for "Attempted Assassination"

Why Has the US Sanctioned Russian Officials but Not the Saudis?

All In with Chris Hayes

02:52 min | Last month

Why Has the US Sanctioned Russian Officials but Not the Saudis?

"The. Us treasury department sanctioning russian officials in response to the poisoning the attempted assassination of a russian political leader and dissident alexi navalny ni With novacek. Do you think this is a good idea. I do i do i. It was just unacceptable for the united states to be silent in the wake of russia's most important opposition leader being intentionally poisoned now in prison by putin's government. I mean if we don't lead the global fight to protect democracy and stand up for pro democratic movements in places like russia no one will and what we see is that the forces of despotism are on the march democrat democracies that we took for granted just ten years ago are now slowly sliding away from self determination even in and on the edges of europe and so by standing up to one of the world's most brutal bullies vladimir putin We are also. I think sending a signal to nascent democracy movements and fragile democracies that america is back on the democracy promotion stage so speaking of that. There's a there. Of course. Also the release of the previously classified report about the intelligence communities findings about bin hamad bin salman that he had greenlighted at the very least the operation to capture or kill but those are the words. They're a jamal khashoggi. Newspaper columnist the washington post. The biden administration not doing anything personally. Mohammed bin salman not revoking visa. Travel rights were personal sanctions. Saying the emas recalibration not a rupture. We've been very clear with a saudi. This is an historic partnership. It's lasted for seventy five years. What do you think of that. I mean i think you can sort of connect these two conversations. There's no question that vladimir putin ordered the poisoning of alexei navalny but we didn't announce sanctions on putin today largely because We tend to not levy sanctions on the leaders of countries And i think that is probably part of the rationale for why m b. s. was spared sanctions but i would make this argument on saudi arabia. I frankly think that Nbs weapons matter much more to him than his visa. And so what i would argue is that we should recalibrate. Our security partnership with the saudis. I if they're going to be in the business of chopping up dissidents or targeting them all around the world and we shouldn't be selling them weapons and so. I think the administration is right now. Having debate about what our security partnership looks like and if we make changes to that well. It looked like a personal sanction on. Mvs you'll have a big impact on him and his priorities. Senator chris murphy. Thanks for making time tonight.

Us Treasury Department Alexi Navalny Novacek Russia Bin Hamad Bin Salman Putin Vladimir Putin Jamal Khashoggi Biden Administration Mohammed Bin Salman United States Alexei Navalny The Washington Post Europe NBS Travel Saudi Arabia Senator Chris Murphy
Is something shifting in Russia?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:48 min | 2 months ago

Is something shifting in Russia?

"It is no small thing for a russian citizen to challenge russia's government prominent critics risk of exile imprisonment own murder. Everyone else takes their chances with the tender mercies of russia's riot police but the challenges keep coming in recent weeks in particular. Large protests have been inspired by the latest persecutions of opposition figurehead alexei navalny. He's attempted assassination via poisoned underwear. He's medical evacuation to germany his return to russia and removal to a penal colony. This week navalny has been back in the dock in moscow on arcane charges of insulting a war veteran as is usually the case in such circumstances the very absurdity of the accusation is part of the lesson being taught which is that the powers that be can come for anybody for any reason this weekend. More protests are nevertheless scheduled a significant number of russians appear to have reached a perilous point for any authoritarian regime that of being passed caring about the consequences of dissent. These are not the first protests against president vladimir putin. But are they different. Are we on the verge of something seismic shifting in russia. This is the foreign desk. We have reached a point of no return and they felt that taken to the street was the only way to express their unhappiness with how things are going not just with aleksey navales jailing but also with the kremlin's foreign policy and declining living standards and declining incomes because this is not a genuine democracy. That doesn't mean that anything will change. Imminently the security forces at present a loyal the risks in coming out against the regime are just so vastly greater than anything to be gained but we are talking about the slow shabby decline rather than i would suggest at the moment. Any kind of dramatic cracking. It's only bolts the struggle between modernization and archaic way of life and put is a symbol of this archaic understanding of the universe and as we see as a socialist demonstrates that new generations are supporting navan the or not simply in the violence but he's way of understanding of the world. Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew miller on joint. First of all by natalya vasilyeva moscow correspondent for the daily telegraph natalia. First of all. Let's talk about this weekend. As i understand at the weather forecast is very very very much not encouraging for large-scale public protests. So what actually is planned. Hi andrew thank you for having me. Yes we're in the middle of a massive snowstorm bought. It's supposed to be over by sunday lunchtime. Which is when the protests are planned. The main opposition protests. This weekend's will be a sunday. Flash mob as the organizers called it they're asking on russians to come out of the houses and to stand yards for something as little as ten minutes and flash the torch on their phones. There's also going to be a couple of smaller. I would think rallies on sunday afternoon including a solas chain by women who want to express their support for the wife of alexey navalny. But that's pretty much all we have at the moment but you know i should also say that the two weekends of protests were also held pretty adverse weather conditions. As is you know it was cold and snowy so. I shouldn't think that the weather should be in the way on sunday. And it's not hard to discern the strategic thinking behind these decentralized protests. You can't very well send out riot. Police against people standing in their own front yards all over a city. The size of moscow wilson petersburg or any other russian city in fact. So do we have any idea how the authorities are likely to react to a protest of this sort. Well it's interesting that you ask because we did hear statements from the police and even prosecutors warning people against showing up for something that does not constitute a public assembly let alone a illegal public assembly. Obviously i don't expect right police to show up at every person's front door but if we see any source of flash mobs around town any gatherings and on central locations i think that might be a police response but i definitely don't expect anything as big violent as we saw two weeks ago. What's been your sense over. The past few weeks of where people are finding against the reserves of courage to participate in any demonstration against the russian state. Because it's not a small undertaking. Everybody who makes any kind of protesting. Russia will be aware of the risk. They are taking. What is it about this moment. That has led so many people to be able to get past that fear. It's interesting because when i interviewed people at the two rallies. I went to at the end of january. A lot of people i met were first-time protesters who had never been at any sort of political rallies. Even at the time when take into to the street didn't entail any physical or legal risks. A lot of those people told me that they have reached a point of no return and felt that take into the street was the only way to express their unhappiness with how things are

Russia Alexei Navalny Navalny President Vladimir Putin Moscow Natalya Vasilyeva Aleksey Alexey Navalny Kremlin Andrew Miller Germany Daily Telegraph Natalia Andrew Petersburg Wilson
New details emerge about suspect in terror attack in France

Pacifica Evening News

01:18 min | 5 months ago

New details emerge about suspect in terror attack in France

"Taken a second suspect into custody in the investigation of the gruesome attack by a young Tunisian man who killed three people in a French church in the city of Neath. Authorities say the second suspect is the 47 year old man believed to have been in contact with the assailant the night before the knife attack at the Notredame Basilica in the city. The attacker was wounded by police and hospitalized in life threatening condition. France's anti terrorism prosecutors said the suspect reached the Italian island of Lampedusa aqui landing point for migrants crossing it buzz from North Africa on September 20th. He had received an Italian order that he was being expelled from the country. It's not clear when he arrived in Neath more given the nature of these X committed against people targeted for the sole reason that there were prison in the church at the time, also the procedure employed and in particular the nature of the injuries inflicted on certain victims. The national anti terrorism prosecution open an investigation on the following charges, attempted assassination and assassination in connection with terror. Enterprise and Criminal Association with a view to committing crimes of a terrorist nature to

Attempted Assassination Neath Notredame Basilica Enterprise And Criminal Associ France North Africa
As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:18 min | 5 months ago

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

"Tons Anita went to the polls yesterday to vote in an election overshadowed by opposition complaints of irregularities such as ballot box, stuffing President John Maga. Fully who is accused of stifling democracy seeks a second term in office alongside fourteen other candidates talk to Dan. Padgett is electoral politics at the university. Of Aberdeen, he specializes in political communication through mass rallies and populist and nationalist ideologies in Tanzania and joins me on the line. Now Don Tanzania's long been thought of in the West is a a haven of stability within east Africa but I mean this isn't necessarily the case and I. I wonder if you could sketch out the political dynamic there, the ruling party's been in power since nineteen sixty one. Yes that's right. It's is the longest ruling party in sub. Saharan Africa. The political dynamic in Tanzania has been one of the ruling Kanzi, CCM's decline over the last fifteen years. Reaching a low point in two thousand fifteen where it where the margin of victory was. The fittest is ever been. Since then President Michel, Foodie, it came to kyle and that's election has led Tanzania. Very shot an increasingly extreme offered Harry. Intern. And we weren't sure how just how? Radical that authoritarian agenda would be and the election this we're just getting results from now suggests that it is as bad as any of us feared as so the opposition allegations of vote rigging, etc do stand up. Well. So. Of course, normally I would turn to international election observers. Attorney to arbitrate these claims to decide which to give credence in which not to give credence. Unfortunately, we can't almost no international election observers. Were invited and those that were invited were. Invited at our so Given that and given the advantage of the opportunity that this creates the ruling party the elections it's hard not to give at least prima facie credence to these opposition claims especially given the the wide range of anecdote to. Video and photographic evidence that I've seen an which which I've been collecting these last twenty four hours, and of course, zipping a social media crackdown various restrictions on the press. Has Been, a crackdown all over and and for the last five years. So in many ways, the the rigging receipt which we've been seeing apparently seeing of the next twenty four hours. Is. Really just the icing on the authoritarian cake. There's extreme. Media Censorship rallies have been banned and consider route the rally. The most important means of communication tends to emotional time about seventy percent of people attend local meetings on a regular basis and attend election campaign rallies they were they were abandoned twenty sixteen and indeed the opposition at large have. Hottest. Struggle underneath. Almost constance. Of States and extra state harassment in includes trumped up court cases but also extrajudicial. So extra state attacks. Unknown assailants that have arrested some abductors killed. And in fact, one of the main challenges has recently returned to the country after recovering from gunshot wounds. That's right. So tenderly series is. Presidential. Candidate is the largest opposition party in Tanzania. and. So that's Experience of being of surviving attempted assassination attempt has has given. US already in very impressive political figure a sort of a sparkle. Some people referred to him as a living miracle. But of course, we don't know the results. Yes. But we all seeing violence particularly in Zanzibar. Zanzibar the autonomous. ARCHEPELAGO's Zanzibar, which is a federally devote area of 'em. Into UK. Has has often seen electoral violence. We saw it in ninety five and two, thousand and thirteen, thousand, five and twenty fifteen and actions by varying degrees. So in in some ways, this is a return to form It's not. The recurrence of violence is is. Seems to be because the opposition has probably one in sensabaugh almost every time. But they've never officially one out one means or another has always been used to not in the that's the that's the the scholarly consensus on. Politics what's different? This time I think is that there's violence on the mainland as well. So this is no longer an issue of contained physical violence in Zanzibar. There have been a series of incidents including. What appears to be an attempt to a to attack the chairman of the leading opposition party on the eve of the elections. So that's one difference the other is considered. No money there is. A. Sporadic protests violence and in return state brutality, police army heavy-handedness in putting down those protests that the protests have often been. Constrained and sporadic because they have not been condoned led. By, by the leaders of the opposition there, there are indications that this could be different this time one of the reasons for that is. The, the rhetoric is different. The leader of the opposition in Zanzibar say amount has been say had has been saying that in the past he's held his supporters back. He's been of restraint, and at this time he he won't urge restraint to newly sue has said that he will. Bring people out onto the streets and consider the state of the opposition behind because it seems like this might be the last stand in a sense that vikings they can make, and so they they don't have that say incentive to hold back this time and say the keep up how to drive the next time. Just finally before we go, do you think that this is part of something that we're seeing across parts of Africa there is a younger demographic. They were all born after independence that not prepared to accept authoritarian rule the just coming to the age where they are protesting we're seeing it in Nigeria within saws and in various other places could this be the the Africans spring. My sense is if there is African spring to come, it will come off and an Wiki will extend. Mexico an authoritarian winter. The trend on that strikes me is that a number of leaders are emerging in an intense Aena in Zambia. In other parts of the consonant, which bear a striking resemblance to this sort of authoritarian. Developmental. Nationalists of is so The there's a young population I are angry. But in fact, I think the trend seems to go the other way. And results. When can we expect those? So the first also are already dripping in and they show. That a series of opposition strongholds, there's places that you would never expect or or at least likely. To expect to go to a to the ruling party are being won by then by margins of three to one, which suggests that the the the rigging. Being worried about maybe taking place typically a Tanzanian election result takes three or four days that was related end and announced especially with the presidential elections but. So far. This is actually has been crisis already.

Tanzania Zanzibar Don Tanzania Saharan Africa East Africa Padgett DAN Aberdeen Anita President Trump John Maga Africa Aena President Michel United States Intern Harry
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 9 months ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. 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This is bowes I'm a podcast or By, I, a Gamer Five G. is changing the gaming world in really unexpected exciting ways with the help of Samsung Five G. I'm getting a peek at how gaming is getting faster smoother and can even improve our lives well. Let's dish some secrets about the future gaming. Dr Jean Mechanical Direct Route Game Research and development at the Institute of the future. She's also a bestselling author game inventor. She's optimistic about gaming impact on us and our minds. The biggest thing that we've seen in research is that. We need to be able to game in the moment wherever we are. So, what happens when when you're playing when your favorite games is that it fires up than her logical pathways, it's kind of like having a of caffeine and a pet dog from your favorite coach, and you've just meditated for an hour. This emotional neurological power up is called the game transfer effect, and that effect is heightened when using five. Five G. The game transfer fact requires you to be totally immersed in the game, so you want to have the most amazing graphics and the most immersive audio and with five G. to do that anywhere anytime, be one of the first to harness the game transfer effect with Samsung Galaxy Five G. now available on Galaxy, S Twenty-five g and a seventy one five G. feels good to be I with Samsung. I love to play the game of like. Imagine the meeting and imagine that the one set of meeting which is like the actual hackers finding the vulnerabilities figuring out how to jump from Windows, eight computer to some sort of physical hardware controller that actually runs like that. That's a very hard problem in and of itself, and then the other meeting. They're like what we're GONNA do is claim to be a guy called Gucci for two point, Oh and like those are. Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
Academy postpones 2021 Oscars, will announce new diversity rules

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:24 min | 10 months ago

Academy postpones 2021 Oscars, will announce new diversity rules

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown Twenty Years Matt Bellamy my usual Banter Buddy on the business and Matt the Ninety Third Academy Awards ceremony has been pushed from February twenty eighth to April twenty fifth for. Obvious reasons. The eligibility period for films which normally would end on December thirty first. It's been extended to February twenty eighth twenty twenty, one. Because of you know. These films have not had opportunity to play or necessarily get the kind of attention. They would normally get. That's the argument now. The Oscars has been pushed before in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight, due to La Flooding, and then in sixty eight because of the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King and again in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one, because of the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan so I. Think it's fair to conclude that. When they pushed the Oscar ceremony something very very bad is happening as it is now, but this was necessary. However, if you're ABC, just from a business point of view, this is bad news. Also yeah I mean there's A. A couple ramifications here one is for ABC I mean this is their super bowl. They count on a ton of AD revenues about hundred forty hundred fifty million dollars in ad revenue last year that they can usually count on in February that is now pushed out of q one into cue to if the Oscars take place as planned which are that's a big question mark. Will we have big scale events with celebrities walking a red carpet even in April of next year? We don't know the second is the impact on the film released calendar because. Because assuming at some point that movies do comeback and we start to get movies released in theaters again these big year end movies that everybody sees every year and you know come out around Christmas time and get a lot of the awards attention and go on to win Oscars that window is now going to shift into the January February march window, which is going to change a lot of strategies for these film companies because you don't now have to crowd. You're movie into that year end corridor in order to make an impact with Oscar voters. Voters, you can give it a little bit more time and that February. March time period is usually a dumping ground where you don't put your best movies now. Maybe you're going to put your best movies there because you know, you can get Oscar attention as well as some box office. Yeah, and what's really still very unclear win theaters will open theaters, clinging to to July, as is as our Warner Brothers with Christopher Nolan's ten and a couple of Disney with Milan they push tenant two weeks i. don't really get how that solves anything but. It makes us so they're not I now Milan will be I will be the Guinea pig, so to speak and then Warner. Brothers we'll have tended after that, so they won't be the Guinea Pig the other thing that is. Speaking of Guinea Pigs. The academy is going to try to do require going forward diversity as a criterion for eligibility for Oscar and they haven't specified what that means I I would certainly not argue with the goal Hollywood has been very very stuck for a very long time in terms of diversity goals, but you know it's something where they have to be very careful. You can't just mandate something like that without really choosing how it works, you know and and again. I want to stress how I totally support that goal, but you're sort of a strange territory telling creative people you must do X. and we don't know what xs yet, but you know. This is something where I think. There's a swimming Zaidi that it will end up being like the most popular picture category that ultimately just sort of went away. This should work, but the question is how yeah! It's a big question because you know for years and years, the academy has always said that the diversity problem is not the academy's problem. It is Hollywood's problem, and it's just at the Oscars are reflection of what the industry is doing, so you shouldn't blame the academy for the diversity problems of Hollywood. This is a flip of that. They're saying we are taking this on. On as an organization and saying that you will not be able to be eligible for an Oscar unless you adhere to some basic diversity principles, and they have yet to articulate what those are, so they just WanNa. See what the logistics are going to

Oscar Warner Brothers Hollywood Ninety Third Academy Matt Bellamy Milan ABC Attempted Assassination Kim Masters Dr Martin Luther King Ronald Reagan La Flooding Zaidi Wanna Disney Warner Christopher Nolan
Suspect in NYPD 'assassination' incidents was on parole

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Suspect in NYPD 'assassination' incidents was on parole

"In New York City back to back shootings in the Bronx by the same gun minute left two police officers wounded authorities say the suspect shot an officer and a police van last night and then today opened fire inside a precinct building wounding another both are expected to fully recover mayor bill de Blasio is calling it an attempted assassination these officers handled such a horrific situation with heroism with extraordinary skill thank god that each and everyone of them will be okay the gunman is in custody police commissioner urge Dermot Shea says the gunman was paroled in twenty seventeen after serving more than a decade in prison on an attempted murder

New York City Bronx Dermot Shea Officer Bill De Blasio Attempted Assassination
Why has Pakistan sentenced a former president to death?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:16 min | 1 year ago

Why has Pakistan sentenced a former president to death?

"Pakistan was founded in nineteen forty seven. It has not proved an easy country to lead indeed indeed. It's something of a Wanda anyone tries. In those seven. Short decades of its existence Pakistan has seen two presidents or the equivalent overthrown in coups. WHO's to forced into resignation to quitting to avoid impeachment one hanged one killed in an arguably suspicious plane crash one chased into exile one one dying from illness in office of Pakistan's prime ministers four have being sacked three unloaded by their own parties. One chased into exile one on assassinated one chased into exile and then assassinated upon their return and these are an incomplete assessment of the hazards attendant upon high office in Pakistan. We've only got about five minutes and at any rate to say. Nothing of uncountable. Attempted assassinations failed. Coups d'etat and sundry abortive altuve plots any occupant of Pakistan's presidential palace or prime ministerial residence nose to sleep with one eye open and a pistol beneath a pillow pillow so it is possible that Pervez Musharraf who was president of Pakistan between two thousand and one and two thousand eight has responded philosophically to the death sentence passed upon him this week by a court in Islamabad which convicted him of high treason. Musharraf cannot claim that he didn't know what he was getting himself into to inaction at. This moment is suicide for Pakistan and I cannot allow this country to commit suicide. I had to take this action in order to preserve the democratic transition then rick I initiated Massara also enjoys the constellation that the sentence is unlikely ever to be enacted he received news of the verdict in Dubai. Are you where he has lived since two thousand sixteen having prudently contracted around then a mysterious ailment. That could not possibly have been treated. In any of Pakistan's many perfectly serviceable hospitals certain reprehensible cynics have further suggested that the United Arab Emirates lack of an extradition treaty with Pakistan may have been as much a factor in sheriff's choice of destination as the healthcare in assessing the reasons for what has befallen Musharraf. It is worth recapping how he gained power in Pakistan and how he lost it. Musharraf was a career army officer and by one thousand nine hundred nine join held the rank of general and the title of Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Pakistan's senior most military role that year tensions between Musharaff Graf and then Prime Minister Sharif climaxed in a coup d'etat in which Musharaff seized power. I would like to please do not expect your level of democracy which you learned over a number of centuries all trying to learn and we are doing well the last time Musharraf held office surviving at least a two assassination attempts until two thousand eight when he resigned amid chaos and turbulence encroaching from a number of fronts. He left for London and returned to Pakistan in two thousand thirteen hoping to campaign for office again but found himself under house arrest. Prominent among a lengthy list of accusations against him was involvement in the assassination of former prime minister and former Philo exile Benazir Bhutto. who was murdered shortly after her return to Pakistan in two thousand and seven tourist allies and we are prepared to risk the liberty but we are not prepared to surrender our great nation the militants? This is not what Musharraf has been convicted of however however the high treason charge relates to his unsuccessful last-ditch attempt to prolong his presidency in two thousand and seven. He declared a state of emergency see and suspended. The constitution pulled the plugs on TV. Channels sacked the chief justice of the Supreme Court and had several opposition figures placed under house. Arrest I including current Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan Musharraf may be reflecting that some of his former foes have long memories but so Doodoo who do some of his former comrades Pakistan's military has always taken a flexible view of the convention of submission to Civilian Command and one of the more more brow arching responses to the death sentence against Musharraf has come from the Pakistani military's media department which said that the sentence had been received and with a lot of pain and anguish by the rank and file of Pakistan's armed forces. It also suggested in an unmistakable tone of airy menace that June legal. Google process seems to have been ignored and that an officer of Musharraf's statue could surely never be a traitor. Nice little independent judiciary dish area. You have here wouldn't want anything to happen to. If one sets aside any squeamishness about capital punishment with the conviction of Michelle off is arguably a step forward for Pakistan's always fraught and fragile constitutional democracy a robust assertion of the rule of law against a rogue officer who took power by force and tried to keep it by the same means however nobody in Pakistan needs reminding of the tendency of Pakistan's military to assert itself right back Woah never done in China because children deal outside Pete as we go to Air Musharaff's legal team claimed their client intends to challenge the guilty verdict and the death sentence in Pakistan's Supreme Court. It would be better for his country and himself if he did so from a distance

Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan Mush Joint Chiefs Of Staff Pakistan Supreme Court Officer Prime Minister Wanda Google Prime Minister Sharif Islamabad United Arab Emirates Dubai Musharaff Graf Michelle Air Musharaff China Rick I
Explosive drones detonate in 'assassination attempt' on Venezuelan president

Programming

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Explosive drones detonate in 'assassination attempt' on Venezuelan president

"McHugh Venezuela's. President was unharmed in an attempted assassination Saturday. The White House says don't, blame the US President. Nicolas Maduro was delivering a speech in. Caracas when drones aren't with, explosives went off around him he was. Not harmed national security, adviser John Bolton told Fox News Sunday Medeiros on government. Could. Be responsible, I can say unequivocally there is no US government. Involvement in this at all bull Knossos said all Americans in. Venezuela are believed to be safe FOX's Rachel Sutherland the president says, he'll shut down the government if congress fails. To fund the building of a southern border wall this congressman says. That would be very bad move, concern is that we shut down the government. Before the election Republicans will get blamed for it and we'll end up with a democratic house and the first thing they're going to do is try. To move to impeach the pros GOP Representative Peter..

United States President Trump Mchugh Venezuela Nicolas Maduro Attempted Assassination Caracas Fox News White House Rachel Sutherland FOX GOP John Bolton Medeiros Congressman Congress Representative
Hamas kills man wanted in attack on Palestinian PM

BBC Newshour

01:42 min | 3 years ago

Hamas kills man wanted in attack on Palestinian PM

"Camara sabi today as the uk government tries to get an e you wide show of support in its row with russia the british foreign secretaries comparison of president putin and adolf hitler strikes a raw nerve in moscow nobody has the right to insult the russian people who defeated not season and lost more than twenty five million people by comparing our country to nazi germany we'll have the latest on a deepening diplomatic rift also a year after the westminster terror attack the british empire you tried to save the life of a policeman they're already couple of offices trying to stop the blood globe huge loss of blood and i said can i can i help our meditate train and they said tell us what to do and syrian rebel fighters begin leaving a besieged area near damascus all of that after the news hello i'm jerry smith with the bbc news syrian rebel fighters and their families have begun leaving the town of harass sta in eastern gouta as part of an evacuation deal thirteen government soldiers were exchanged for five rebel fighters as the first step syrian state television says that twenty seven fighters are among two hundred people to have left the town so far martin patience has more details this russian broker dealers the first evacuation of rebels from eastern goethe the fighters belong to the group of sham i'm wearing control of the town of harare star but after being surrounded and bombarded by the syrian regime they agree to deal guaranteeing their safe passage similar agreements have andy fighting elsewhere in syria negotiations are believed to be underway with the two main ramble groups still operating in the besieged area yeah one of ukraine's most famous legislators has been arrested after being accused by prosecutors have planning an armed attack on parliament and supporting a coup legislators were shown secretly film video said to show knowledge searching code discussing an attack ms savchenko is seen by many as a war hero she was captured fighting separatist rebels in eastern ukraine and held for nearly two years in a russian jail the group hamas says demanded suspects in the attempted assassination of the palestinian prime minister has died of his wounds yala now reports from jerusalem hamas which controls gaza heard earlier released a photograph and the name of that chief suspect offering a reward for information on his whereabouts they then put up checkpoints.

Russia Jerusalem Syria Andy Harare BBC Damascus Germany Moscow Adolf Hitler President Trump Putin UK Camara Sabi Gaza Prime Minister Attempted Assassination Hamas Ukraine Gouta
"attempted assassination" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Is the only vote that madison indication like russia is putin's world so you were right showing kim voting for himself and that's it you're right saying that the turnout is the only challenge it's apathy because he was scared to show up and to demonstrate that disapprove policies then increasingly aggressive in the west obviously this is attempted assassination in i king will he become even more brazen absolutely has no other choice it's this in this company you could see that if if something goes wrong so then then the president just going off the press of the political points blading someone if you're in power for eighteen years there's no one to blame so you need enemies outside of russia so that's why putting meets the free world america europe as enemies to justify your hold on power and if you think that he's meddling in american election was bad imagine what he doesn't russia he also seems to become something of a model for other leaders around the world we're seeing president xi now do away with term limits as well you have venezuela the philippines you said something interesting it's not so much cities inspiring he's return leaders is giving permission to them it's also dates combination of instruction and also it's the story of success what what these leaders like the chinese leader others authoritarian leaders they saw in putin is that he kept defying west actually doing things like poisoning and killing the dissidents and defectors and former spy agents who found asylum elsewhere and nothing happened so he was succeeded in having trouble in the white house so the definitely walked much trump's election his own sanctions week belated and it's just it's always small fish now i thought we had strong words from the from the uk i wish we see the action but don't forget footing billion pounds money laundering according to official reports coming through england you clearly think this is a serious threat what's the most important thing we in the west should be doing to counter putin that we're not doing right now.

russia putin president trump uk england madison kim attempted assassination venezuela official billion pounds eighteen years
 First vehicles pulled from wreckage of collapsed Florida bridge

Investing Sense

02:20 min | 3 years ago

First vehicles pulled from wreckage of collapsed Florida bridge

"The next rockies game today at two on koa newsradio an iheartradio station from abc news on daria albinger deputy fbi director andrew mccabe was about to retire instead for abc next rockies game today at two on koa newsradio an iheartradio station from abc news on daria albinger deputy fbi director andrew mccabe was about to retire instead late last night he was fired accused of making an improper statement to a reporter about the clinton email investigation abc's aaron katersky fbi rank and file is particularly interested in truth telling and andy mccabe was found by justice department investigators to have misled them about matters associated with the two thousand sixteen election on the other hand mccabe was at the fbi for more than twenty years and his firing just two days before his retirement date took effect could certainly be questioned and criticized by some fbi officials president trump tweeted about the firing calling it a great day for the men and women of the fbi at any moment we could get the latest information on the recovery effort in the bridge collapse at florida international university abc's victor oquendo in miami says two vehicles were pulled from the rubble this morning is worked through the night they will be here all day the ntsb says they plan on being on the ground for about a week but they can't say if that reported crack or if the tightening of those cables had anything to do with the collapse but they could serve as clues and the school says an engineer warned of cracks in the span a few days before it came down russia is expelling twentythree british diplomats british prime minister theresa may says she isn't surprises response doesn't change the fact of the matter the attempted assassination of two people on british soil for which there is no alternative conclusion other than the russian state was culpable moscow's move in response to the uk doing the same thing over the poisoning of a former russian spy and his daughter in england federal safety regulators looking into certain hyundai and kia models with airbags that may fail.

UK KIA England Theresa Prime Minister Florida International Universi President Trump Justice Department Andy Mccabe Aaron Katersky Andrew Mccabe ABC Hyundai Director Moscow Attempted Assassination Russia Engineer Ntsb Miami
Workers injured in liquid chemical plant explosion in Texas

The Steve Dahl Show

02:03 min | 3 years ago

Workers injured in liquid chemical plant explosion in Texas

"Was nearby in randa help after the span fallon trapped several vehicles underneath drive ran over there i saw two trucks actually completely crushed and then there were a few in the back on the other side of the grids that i couldn't or we couldn't get to that some other people had to help the nine hundred fifty tonnes fan was installed on saturday the main part of the span had been assembled by the side of the road while support towers were built at either end and then they used machinery to get it into place and official says an explosion at a rural texas chemical plant injured to workers and that a third is missing fire crews being kept away from the blaze because of toxic fumes and fears of another explosion there try cam industries mixes chemicals that are primarily used by the oil and gas industry investigators believe the fire was sparked when a worker dragged his foot along the floor of the plant while chemicals were being mixed static electricity possible to blame the worker caught fire from his way stop airlifted with critical burns to a hospital in dallas russia the target of condemnation at an emergency meeting of the un security council yesterday correspondent steve kastenbaum reports the country's ambassador had to face the music after great britain explained how russia was responsible for an attempted assassination in britain called for the emergency meeting the uk's ambassador jon allen weapon so horrific that it is banned from use in wool was used in a peaceful city in my country us ambassador nikki haley slammed russia we take no pleasure and having to constantly criticise russia but we need russia to stop giving us so many reasons to do so she said they use chemical weapons to assassinate their enemies and provide that same lethal material to syria russia's un ambassador speaking through an interpreter responded by saying we demand material he's cool steve kastenbaum new york in a very competitive race.

Attempted Assassination UN Syria Jon Allen Texas Nikki Haley UK Fallon Russia Britain Steve Kastenbaum Un Security Council Cam Industries Official Nine Hundred Fifty Tonnes
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"People quiet life to remarkable preceding but it's a little bit complicated because when people testify in court i mean video testimony certainly isn't unheard of but these are people on foreign soil a can they be made for instance to swear an oath to tell the truth does that stick if you're testifying from village in rural pakistan things that that everyone had discussed in court is what do you do about an oath in the united states there couple of things that we do in order to try to ensure that witnesses are telling the truth one is that the proceedings are held in a courtroom or an official building with the idea that it's you're in a formal setting you will realize the importance of telling the truth and the other is just wear an oath to swear they're going to tell the truth and so what do you do if you're testifying in a country where you know if these witnesses lied in pakistan if they swore an oath for an american court and they committed perjury it's highly unlikely they would be brought to the us to be you know to face perjury charges and so that's a question that the judge did ask the lawyers and that i'm imagining they're going to be debating when they filed their briefings you know in the next couple of months has this kind of thing happened before with overseas testimony is there any precedent there's definitely been overseas testimony of witnesses for the prosecution in those sorts of cases as the prosecutor talked about an homage case the prosecutors have a lot of support typically in finding courts where they can take the testimony and support from local prosecutors in local judges this is much more rare situation i can't say that it's never happened before but i've i've been looking to try to find you know other cases where the sort of thing has happened and i haven't been able to to find other cases the defense lawyer in this case called it unprecedented appeal is in front of the judge now what's next for how many todd so his lawyers have been trying to get his conviction overturned the.

united states american court perjury prosecutor todd pakistan official
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Hot is he's from lodi california he's an american citizen and back in two thousand five the fbi accused him of material support to terrorism for going to a jihadi training camp in pakistan at jury convicted him judge sentenced him to twenty four years in federal prison and that's where he is right now why did yacht he was in pakistan because he says the government has it all wrong so how meet hiatt his his family has deep roots in pakistan and for most of his childhood he sort of lived in both worlds he's gone back and forth between a rural village in pakistan and california and he says that in two thousand three he went back to pakistan in order to find a bride to find a local woman to marry and that he did do that that he married in his home village and remained there for two years and till may two thousand five when he headed back to california with his family has an appeal before a federal judge now and he says his lawyer say that there were all kinds of problems all kinds of shortcomings that led up to his conviction talk about some of those and most importantly let's start with access to classified evidence because we've heard this theme time and time again in in terrorism cases people being tried based on evidence that secret yes so in his case at the trial his trial lawyer it was her first criminal case she did not seek a security clearance so that man that the governments of any evidence they had those classified she was not able to see it or to participate in hearings about it and so the prosecutors in the judge you know they could look at that evidence and talk about it but she couldn't participate and so in his appeal that's a really big point that honeyed is making is that he was never able to fully participate on to understand and see the evidence that the government was using against him so abba here's where it gets interesting a little bit problematic a lot of the corroboration for his side of the story essentially an alibi it's not here in the united states where he's being held its its overseas it's in pakistan right that's right so it's not in dispute that honeyed went to pakistan.

lodi pakistan united states california fbi hiatt twenty four years two years
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Hot is he's from lodi california he's an american citizen and back in two thousand five the fbi accused him of material support to terrorism for going to a jihadi training camp in pakistan at jury convicted him judge sentenced him to twenty four years in federal prison and that's where he is right now why did yacht he was in pakistan because he says the government has it all wrong so how meet hiatt his his family has deep roots in pakistan and for most of his childhood he sort of lived in both worlds he's gone back and forth between a rural village in pakistan and california and he says that in two thousand three he went back to pakistan in order to find a bride to find a local woman to marry and that he did do that that he married in his home village and remained there for two years and till may two thousand five when he headed back to california with his family has an appeal before a federal judge now and he says his lawyer say that there were all kinds of problems all kinds of shortcomings that led up to his conviction talk about some of those and most importantly let's start with access to classified evidence because we've heard this theme time and time again in in terrorism cases people being tried based on evidence that secret yes so in his case at the trial his trial lawyer it was her first criminal case she did not seek a security clearance so that man that the governments of any evidence they had those classified she was not able to see it or to participate in hearings about it and so the prosecutors in the judge you know they could look at that evidence and talk about it but she couldn't participate and so in his appeal that's a really big point that honeyed is making is that he was never able to fully participate on to understand and see the evidence that the government was using against him so abba here's where it gets interesting a little bit problematic a lot of the corroboration for his side of the story essentially an alibi it's not here in the united states where he's being held its its overseas it's in pakistan right that's right so it's not in dispute that honeyed went to pakistan.

lodi pakistan united states california fbi hiatt twenty four years two years
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Chrissy calling foot in end to corruption calling for having a more say in their lives and it was so unfamiliar to see these people on the streets in syria was there any response from the government at the time even if it was lip service to say yes we can talk about some of these grievances just go back to your homes and we'll have a conversation did anything like that go on at i well you know it's it's with syria there's always two narratives if you talk to the opposition that will save the government just crossed the initial protest and that what led to armed conflict and if you talk to people who are more supportive of the government they would say the government was engaging and that they promised some changes but it was not enough because regional powers over meddling with syria and there were other drivers and people were being paid to do this but i have to say at that first week at those first two weeks people still had hopes that the syrian president would stand actually by that that the would actually meet their demands and that's why most of the slogans we would heating then were not directed against him as much as as the people around him the security leads they had hopes the with these protests they will be able to bring change to syria and people in the streets it seems to me ruler might have looked as you said to tunisia they might have looked to cairo they might have looked to other places around the arab world and thought that their president bashar alassad might want to respond because there was tension all over the region yes people have very high hopes than and that's why it's very sad when you talk to people now you can see the sat turn in how the hopes were dashed in how the expectations now have turned into just daily struggle to make ends meet to put food on the table for their children to to give the other children in education on average less than fifty percent of syrian refugee children are at school now so you can see where the shift is in people's expectations on.

Chrissy syria government president tunisia bashar alassad cairo fifty percent two weeks
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Chrissy calling foot in end to corruption calling for having a more say in their lives and it was so unfamiliar to see these people on the streets in syria was there any response from the government at the time even if it was lip service to say yes we can talk about some of these grievances just go back to your homes and we'll have a conversation did anything like that go on at i well you know it's it's with syria there's always two narratives if you talk to the opposition that will save the government just crossed the initial protest and that what led to armed conflict and if you talk to people who are more supportive of the government they would say the government was engaging and that they promised some changes but it was not enough because regional powers over meddling with syria and there were other drivers and people were being paid to do this but i have to say at that first week at those first two weeks people still had hopes that the syrian president would stand actually by that that the would actually meet their demands and that's why most of the slogans we would heating then were not directed against him as much as as the people around him the security leads they had hopes the with these protests they will be able to bring change to syria and people in the streets it seems to me ruler might have looked as you said to tunisia they might have looked to cairo they might have looked to other places around the arab world and thought that their president bashar alassad might want to respond because there was tension all over the region yes people have very high hopes than and that's why it's very sad when you talk to people now you can see the sat turn in how the hopes were dashed in how the expectations now have turned into just daily struggle to make ends meet to put food on the table for their children to to give the other children in education on average less than fifty percent of syrian refugee children are at school now so you can see where the shift is in people's expectations on.

Chrissy syria government president tunisia bashar alassad cairo fifty percent two weeks
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The small town of dera in southern syria seven years ago today people took to the streets the winds of the arab spring were blowing across the middle east and people in dera wanted their rights there was hope and even some joy in those days as people were intimidating change we know now what the syrian conflict has become a civil war that's killed an estimated five hundred thousand people and displaced eleven million but it didn't start that way unless she been this than have movie and hydrology it wasn't really a war it started out as the demonstrations just to improve the standard of living nobody wanted to war they were just demonstrating in the street to hopefully improve things in syria they turned it into a war muna is from damascus she left with her family after leaving through a year of the fighting they arrived in the united states last january and ask that we not use their last name to protect their family members who are still in syria when muna says they turned it into a war for she's referring to the regime of president bashar alassad an ophthalmologist whose father ruled syria for nearly three decades until two thousand well it does get the whole war started with children wrote on the wall you're turn doctor the secret service arrested them and he'd beat them up and that's how the whole thing started that's moon is husband hussein talking about what many syrians consider the start of the civil war a group of teenagers in the city of darrow wrote pro revolution graffiti on some concrete walls but on the seventh anniversary of those protests in syria we wanted to tell the story of those early days before demonstration turned to bloodshed it's a time that rula amine remembers well today i mean is a senior spokesperson at the un refugee agency for the middle east and north africa in two thousand eleven she was working as a journalist in beirut and she traveled to damascus antidote era right as the first protests got started it was a very unfamiliar scene in syria because you had these thousands of people on the streets very defiant very empowered calling for freedom's calling.

dera syria middle east damascus united states muna hussein beirut president bashar alassad darrow un north africa three decades seven years
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The small town of dera in southern syria seven years ago today people took to the streets the winds of the arab spring were blowing across the middle east and people in dera wanted their rights there was hope and even some joy in those days as people were intimidating change we know now what the syrian conflict has become a civil war that's killed an estimated five hundred thousand people and displaced eleven million but it didn't start that way unless she been this than have movie and hydrology it wasn't really a war it started out as the demonstrations just to improve the standard of living nobody wanted to war they were just demonstrating in the street to hopefully improve things in syria they turned it into a war muna is from damascus she left with her family after leaving through a year of the fighting they arrived in the united states last january and ask that we not use their last name to protect their family members who are still in syria when muna says they turned it into a war for she's referring to the regime of president bashar alassad an ophthalmologist whose father ruled syria for nearly three decades until two thousand well it does get the whole war started with children wrote on the wall you're turn doctor the secret service arrested them and he'd beat them up and that's how the whole thing started that's moon is husband hussein talking about what many syrians consider the start of the civil war a group of teenagers in the city of darrow wrote pro revolution graffiti on some concrete walls but on the seventh anniversary of those protests in syria we wanted to tell the story of those early days before demonstration turned to bloodshed it's a time that rula amine remembers well today i mean is a senior spokesperson at the un refugee agency for the middle east and north africa in two thousand eleven she was working as a journalist in beirut and she traveled to damascus antidote era right as the first protests got started it was a very unfamiliar scene in syria because you had these thousands of people on the streets very defiant very empowered calling for freedom's calling.

dera syria middle east damascus united states muna hussein beirut president bashar alassad darrow un north africa three decades seven years
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"World that it has been i mean this is that would be really going counter to what london has been for the last one hundred twenty five years in the second thing is maybe there are some people that think that you know actually just because they have money and they're from russia doesn't mean we should punish them even if we believe as clearly the british government does that the kremlin was behind this attack that that isn't necessarily the most effective way to deal with this in other words is the prime minister herself said you know maybe they shouldn't all all russians or people as she said of russian extraction shouldn't be tarred with with the same brush so talk a little bit more about what you think the lesson learned is here for vladimir putin and the russians assuming that they are behind this attack as as the brits think they are what's the message for vladimir putin right now while the message you know that's obviously being sent to vladimir putin from the uk and at least rhetorically from the rest of the west is that you won't get away with this but the action is in quite commensurate with the threat so i think he will say all right we get that but if you look at here for example even in the uk as the prime minister announced the expulsion of these twenty three russian diplomats you then heard the leader of the opposition in this country effectively questioning why she was doing that without giving russia more time then his his spokesman questioning the veracity of the evidence you know sort of saying well you know our weapons investigators our intelligence services don't always get it right when it comes to chemical weapons take a look at what happened with iraq and you know we thought there was wmd there well this kind of division that has been created by this you know this incident in salisbury this poisoning you know the the fact that it's already divisive within british politics as we saw with the story of russian meddling in the united states well that's not contrary to.

london russia british government kremlin prime minister vladimir putin uk iraq salisbury united states one hundred twenty five years
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"World that it has been i mean this is that would be really going counter to what london has been for the last one hundred twenty five years in the second thing is maybe there are some people that think that you know actually just because they have money and they're from russia doesn't mean we should punish them even if we believe as clearly the british government does that the kremlin was behind this attack that that isn't necessarily the most effective way to deal with this in other words is the prime minister herself said you know maybe they shouldn't all all russians or people as she said of russian extraction shouldn't be tarred with with the same brush so talk a little bit more about what you think the lesson learned is here for vladimir putin and the russians assuming that they are behind this attack as as the brits think they are what's the message for vladimir putin right now while the message you know that's obviously being sent to vladimir putin from the uk and at least rhetorically from the rest of the west is that you won't get away with this but the action is in quite commensurate with the threat so i think he will say all right we get that but if you look at here for example even in the uk as the prime minister announced the expulsion of these twenty three russian diplomats you then heard the leader of the opposition in this country effectively questioning why she was doing that without giving russia more time then his his spokesman questioning the veracity of the evidence you know sort of saying well you know our weapons investigators our intelligence services don't always get it right when it comes to chemical weapons take a look at what happened with iraq and you know we thought there was wmd there well this kind of division that has been created by this you know this incident in salisbury this poisoning you know the the fact that it's already divisive within british politics as we saw with the story of russian meddling in the united states well that's not contrary to.

london russia british government kremlin prime minister vladimir putin uk iraq salisbury united states one hundred twenty five years
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Like to an core maybe not receiving them and at this point actually the fires had also burnt down along with homes the fires had burnt down cellphone towers and cable so some people's landlines weren't even operable well you and your colleagues in this report is you said listened to thousands of nine one one calls and other emergency calls from those fires and for all of the shortcomings and all of the confusion sukey i'm sure that you also found some examples of heroism or or first responders who save lives absolutely like the the kind of critique in the look back at a lot of this is is to look at systems and where they failed and how they could be improved and i think what we found time and time again is that individuals acted completely heroically went above and beyond to save their neighbors you know first responders did absolutely put their lives at risk to save other people and one of those people that we talked to was california highway patrol helicopter pilot pete gavitt who flew to this place called atlas peak that's this peak in the hills above the city of napa with this one road in and one road out where a lot of people got trapped when the atlas peak fire broke out we were both both just sick because we'll hear you know family four trapped here or people trying to survive and their we've heard people climbing into their water tanks.

pete gavitt atlas peak napa california
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I want to go to apply it was it'd be one we'll send you so at least people calling in electrical fires all around the area communication between the fire department and emergency responders chasing electrical fires also trying to respond to the massive big fires these big issues out there then there's also the issue of evacuation getting people out of neighborhoods homes that might be threatened what did you find yeah solely found was that there were delays between when first responders on the ground we're seeing these fires and asking for evacuation orders and those evacuation orders really reaching people there's actually a couple of problems to unpack here so one of the first problems is you know what we saw several times there was an hour delay like i said between a firefighter seeing that fire and actually these evacuation orders going out and one reason that that was happening is because like sukey said there is this kind of big clogging of the machinery because in this case on that night what was happening is that actually firefighters were kind of calling their chief then their chief was calling nine one one operators because the dispatch is actually the same place so those calls all are going to the same place whether you're trapped by the fire your fire chief trying to order an evacuation it's all going to the same dispatch center so in one case we actually even heard a fire chief put on hold for a period of time who's trying to say hey we have to send out mandatory evacuations right now people's lives are in danger and what we also saw is that counties have to decide how to send out these emergency alerts right so they have a couple of options they can send out what's called wireless emergency alerts and those are those amber alerts that set off your cell phone and everyone is really familiar with and in sonoma's county they actually had the capability to do that and chose not to because they were afraid of mass panic would a lot of counties ended up doing instead sending out these kind of texts and emails for optin systems that you have to kind of know about beforehand and these fires were really building in the middle of the night and so you have know tex going out to people.

fire department sukey sonoma
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I want to go to apply it was it'd be one we'll send you so at least people calling in electrical fires all around the area communication between the fire department and emergency responders chasing electrical fires also trying to respond to the massive big fires these big issues out there then there's also the issue of evacuation getting people out of neighborhoods homes that might be threatened what did you find yeah solely found was that there were delays between when first responders on the ground we're seeing these fires and asking for evacuation orders and those evacuation orders really reaching people there's actually a couple of problems to unpack here so one of the first problems is you know what we saw several times there was an hour delay like i said between a firefighter seeing that fire and actually these evacuation orders going out and one reason that that was happening is because like sukey said there is this kind of big clogging of the machinery because in this case on that night what was happening is that actually firefighters were kind of calling their chief then their chief was calling nine one one operators because the dispatch is actually the same place so those calls all are going to the same place whether you're trapped by the fire your fire chief trying to order an evacuation it's all going to the same dispatch center so in one case we actually even heard a fire chief put on hold for a period of time who's trying to say hey we have to send out mandatory evacuations right now people's lives are in danger and what we also saw is that counties have to decide how to send out these emergency alerts right so they have a couple of options they can send out what's called wireless emergency alerts and those are those amber alerts that set off your cell phone and everyone is really familiar with and in sonoma's county they actually had the capability to do that and chose not to because they were afraid of mass panic would a lot of counties ended up doing instead sending out these kind of texts and emails for optin systems that you have to kind of know about beforehand and these fires were really building in the middle of the night and so you have know tex going out to people.

fire department sukey sonoma
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Air what's on fire it was on fire all around me i immediately thought we were going to die and that was it we had waited too long twenty three twenty outlets because her pants truck in the garage just north robin elderly couple the health trust on october eighth of last year massive wildfires broke out across northern california forty four people died twenty twentyone thousand structures were damaged or destroyed in the fires burned an area the size of maryland and delaware combined even today it's unknown what sparked the fires in the first place this is the takeaway i'm todd's willik and the scale of those fires in northern california was huge but even while the fires still burned it was clear that emergency services were simply overwhelmed sukey lewis is a reporter for k q e d news in san francisco and she and lisa pickoff white data reporter for qa we immediately started investigating what went wrong with california's response to the fires and they did it in partnership with reveal from the center for investigative reporting so on the first day of the fire sukey started actually going out in the field to report while another coworker and i recently log oh started filing public record requests for nine one one calls and also starting to listen to dispatch that kind of radio chatter between first responders and the reason we were doing that as we were hearing already from community members that there were these big delays evacuation orders going out we're also really curious about what had caused the fires i mean we knew that there was this big warning actually from the national weather service that the conditions were very ripe for fire but we had heard from people that there are all of these electrical incidents also going on and one of our first big revelations from those tapes as they started coming in.

california maryland todd sukey lewis reporter san francisco qa delaware lisa pickoff
"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Air what's on fire it was on fire all around me i immediately thought we were going to die and that was it we had waited too long twenty three twenty outlets because her pants truck in the garage just north robin elderly couple the health trust on october eighth of last year massive wildfires broke out across northern california forty four people died twenty twentyone thousand structures were damaged or destroyed in the fires burned an area the size of maryland and delaware combined even today it's unknown what sparked the fires in the first place this is the takeaway i'm todd's willik and the scale of those fires in northern california was huge but even while the fires still burned it was clear that emergency services were simply overwhelmed sukey lewis is a reporter for k q e d news in san francisco and she and lisa pickoff white data reporter for qa we immediately started investigating what went wrong with california's response to the fires and they did it in partnership with reveal from the center for investigative reporting so on the first day of the fire sukey started actually going out in the field to report while another coworker and i recently log oh started filing public record requests for nine one one calls and also starting to listen to dispatch that kind of radio chatter between first responders and the reason we were doing that as we were hearing already from community members that there were these big delays evacuation orders going out we're also really curious about what had caused the fires i mean we knew that there was this big warning actually from the national weather service that the conditions were very ripe for fire but we had heard from people that there are all of these electrical incidents also going on and one of our first big revelations from those tapes as they started coming in.

california maryland todd sukey lewis reporter san francisco qa delaware lisa pickoff
"attempted assassination" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Attempted assassination of ronald reagan the reason the guy attempted to kill a president was that he wanted to impress jodie foster an actress and we all accept that because the guy's still alive and all of that had waddell reagan died that day as a result of those bullets i guarantee you no one would by the story that a president was killed so somebody could impress of actress and we will have conspiracy theories all over the place but here's the thing some things are just cleared and they happen so i wasn't expecting that the president was going to die today dallas so somehow i lost is brain these things happen i think that the reagan things just proves that there's no way that everybody who believe that it's true that oh yeah what you kill the president because you want the oppressive actress and right tell me another one tell me at all are you pick two three r redid the headlines you told me which one you want to hear about donald trump's face spotted on mars definitely want to hear about that dinosaurs helped build the pyramids who or cheesy is a time travelling vampire i one of the few people out he doesn't care about jay z so with that went off i i like the other two so i'd like there so the dinosaurs helped build the pair eggs are all go that music tells me can't hear about this i guess we'll hear about this if we get back our i also want to hear about donald trump's face bars i like that with the.

Attempted assassination president jodie waddell reagan dallas donald trump ronald reagan reagan jay z
"attempted assassination" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:30 min | 4 years ago

"attempted assassination" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Breaking news and more bold inspired solutions for america before beginning today i'd like to take a moment to again send our thoughts and prayers to my friend and a friend of most of us in this germ steve scalise and his great family has he continues his very brave fight spend much more difficult than people even thought at the time it's been he's in some trouble is a great fighter and he's going to be okay we hope i visited steven his family the hospital last night and i reassured them that the entire country is pulling and for them praying for them and that we are here for them every single step of the way america's hearts and we made this in the truest sense sends its love fill out of hearts in this country great hearts and they're all sending their love as supported the scalise family and stephen his own way may have brought some unity to our long divided country we've had a very very divided country for many years and i have a feeling that steve has made a great sacrifice but there could be some unity being brought to our country let's i hope so let's hope so our two sean hannity show not as confident perhaps as the president in the light of even after lewis washington post just literally just starts up right again they've been beaten on the russia collusion story and the obstruction so now they come up with more unnamed sources well now the special council is doing this aid it is breathless hysterical black helicopter theory conspiracy theory reporting day in and day out nobody takes the breath they don't dipped obviously oblivious to the magnitude of an attempted assassination of multiple republicans yesterday and we're going to be broadcasting tonight from the game whether republicans do play the the democrats and by the way it's where the nationals play done eight here in washington dc our good friend senator rand paul sadly was a witness to all of this and and he was at this frightening scene in alexandria where we did the tv show from last night shots landing near aides who had taken cover and senator paul i'm sorry you had to live through that yesterday also with your your background and in medicine i on the other hand i'm i'm so glad you were there and i heard you are a big help.

steve scalise america president attempted assassination democrats senator rand paul alexandria sean hannity lewis washington russia washington