33 Burst results for "Atrial Fibrillation"

Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

Cardionerds

03:07 min | 2 months ago

Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

"Thought we could start by discussing some of your major contributions to the management of atrial fibrillation even since my medical school days. It seems like the emphasis. On lifestyle management for diseases such as atrial fibrillation has increased exponentially as we learn more about arrhythmia mechanisms and now we specifically screen patients for sleep apnea diet alcohol use et cetera. So from all of the landmark clinical research that you've conducted over your career. That's far could you. Maybe summarize for us. What you feel are the biggest takeaways whether in eighth hundred prevention or in any of your other areas that sudden cardiac death. Thank you when i started doing. Research on the epidemiology of heart rhythm disorders really wasn't an emphasis as you say on. Risk factors for h. fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. And then you know a group of us not just myself but amelia benjamin in the premium study and patrick eleanor. We all started to get interested in looking at atrial fibrillation as you would cardiovascular disease and some of the major findings are really related to lifestyle and how it can impact each relation including body mass index. And wait and wait reduction. We've done several studies. One who first authors tetreault who's also electro physiologist at brigham women's hospital and she published a very important study in jack. Where we showed in bunks women. Even being slightly overweight had elevated to risk of fibrillation. And then if you lost weight you lower that risk. And in addition some of the other research we did was around. Exercise and showing that exercise is beneficial to atrial fibrillation. But as we all know too much. Exercise can actually have an adverse effect and this again was a study that was done by tony acer who was also an electro physiologist and his now at nyu worked with me for a while. So both of those manuscripts were very important. With regards management of atrial fibrillation. In addition we also published one of the first studies looking at alcohol intake and h fibrillation. Now there have been multiple multiple studies showing that alcohol is related to atrial fibrillation. And as you know a randomized trial now that shows that if you abstained from alcohol you lower your risk of atrial fibrillation so all of these studies are not just by myself but multiple. Investigators have really changed the practice where we as clinicians think about lowering. Risk factors as electra physiologists event and approach sanders. Work in australia really took it to another level by actually doing clinical trial in showing that reduction of weight and modifying risk factors lowers incidence of atrial fibrillation. So now it's really one of our pillars of treatment and it is rewarding to see something go from observational research to clinical trials in actually to

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiac Death Amelia Benjamin Patrick Eleanor Tetreault Brigham Women's Hospital Apnea Tony Acer Cardiovascular Disease NYU Sanders Australia
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:30 min | 4 months ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"Because the area in which i work the area of bioethics. We've we've had these questions All the time they revolve around would call triage ethics. So think of the battlefield. You have limited resources you have you have Soldiers who are coming in from the battlefield. limited personnel to care for them. You have limited Medicines and and other other things to care for them who stare. I and in those cases triage ethics the people who get the care. I are the people who are who are most likely to die if they don't get the care a as quickly And who And then others who are less acute Get the the care necks. And so you have this queue this this lineup of people Who with the sickest verse of getting getting the treatment scientist group with our organ transplantation system. If you get on the transplant list As you're really sick and the sickest get the sickest meeting those who are most likely to die more quickly They get the organ. i This is this is triage ethics. That happens all the time in emergency rooms around the country but what we've said is I first of all we have to protect the care. Givers the the healthcare workers. And it's not gonna do anybody any good if we don't have healthcare workers to to care for them so we give them the vaccine first and then we look at those. Most vulnerable populations populations that are going to die of covid quicker and in more numbers than If we if we didn't vaccinate them and so you know you get People in nursing homes and the work in nursing homes You used lovely term That i i always find so so i just find it. Sort of british understatement. Biddies we give those who have the most co morbidity the next the next shot literally a co morbidity is meaning you have multiple serious health problems heart problems copd atrial fibrillation All kinds of all kinds of things so so we want to give you the so..

copd atrial fibrillation
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

09:52 min | 1 year ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Cardionerds

"But I do think if you step back and look at the aggregate evidence. There is fairly convincing evidence. Now that restoring sinus rhythm again in select patients with half rough really does lead to improved outcomes. I think that's a very exciting development that specialists and heart failure specialists should be celebrating together absolutely to dive in more on the practical approach that I think that's great that you've highlighted that data when you do encounter the patients in your clinic with a heart. Failure who keeps having recurrent symptoms whether that's from their atrial fibrillation or heart failure hospitalizations. What is your practical approach to the tools? They use to get them back in sinus rhythm. So is it cardioversion without drug and then cardioversion with drug. When does ablation come in the mix? So what is the order of operations that you sort of using manage? Yeah some people say well anyone with heart failure if they have a fits symptomatic there and I agree but disagree with that so I do think it's true again. Eighth of is not beneficial in heart failure but surely there are some patients that we see the minute. They go on a They're admitted with D. compensated. Heart failure and there are others who you know. Their exercise. Performance really doesn't appear to be different when they're Nathan versus sinus rhythm so before we even try and figure out what treatment we always want to look at again. Fortunately we're blessed that they often have an implantable device so we can correlate when they're having a fit with when their heart fires the compensating so if it does look like they have symptoms and they feel better in in Lommel rhythm than we pursue them control and a white rhythm control eventually choose is really dependent upon the natural history of their atrial fibrillation. So if they've never had a fit before and no one has started them on a Beta average of blocking agent. Then probably just getting a Beta blocker and Cardi averting them and educating them. They may need an answer. Rhythmic drug downstream is probably the best way to go on the other hand if they've had four hospitalizations for a fifth despite amiodarone on and they're left atrial volume is still compatible with a high degree of success with ablation. Then that's a patient where I think. Ablation should definitively be discussed sooner rather than later. We'll give you another insight that we've been struggling with so we thought there are scores that predict response Catheter. Ablation is so we hypothesized that implementing those ablation scores like apple and other scores might help heart failure and electro physiologist clinicians identify patients who benefit end. What we saw actually is that. If you're interested in how likely they were to have recur nature for relation. The scores worked okay. But if you just wanted to know who's functional status improved and who had better quality of life the patients benefited regardless of. What they're a ablation score was so again. A lot of the answer is on who should get what treatment and how we got. Patient selection may very. Well depend on what outcome we're trying to achieve so that improving someone. Survival may be very different from helping them feel better and make sense. Does your approach to management of fibrillation. Change when patients have heart failure with preserved ejection. Fraction versus with reduced ejection fraction. Do any of these data that you mentioned translate into that feel that we're we're increasingly recognizing. Yeah so I think we all need to be very humble when we talk about half path. I'm always leery of people who tell me that. They understand how well they cause heart fighter. Clinicians that I know the best you know. Tell us. It's extremely heterogeneous. We don't understand it well in a word. I don't treat those patients differently than treat my half patients but I think it's an ongoing investigation. I'll share two things. The audience may find interesting. I the heart failure group here and at other institutions has looked at the guidelines heart failure and it looks like in patients with half there may be a survival advantage with rhythm control again observational data. Here a duke in our eighth ablation database. We just wanted to know the patients with half pack at the same benefits as the patients with HEF REF and we didn't see any significant difference ARENA HERRANZ RATES. We did not see any significant difference in improvement in nyj classification or quality of life. Scores between the patients with reduced and preserved ejection fractions. And that's why barring additional evidence I generally approached the two sets of heart failure the same way interesting. Very interesting insights. I also wanted to get your thoughts on a management another special heart failure population those patients with cardiac re synchronisation therapy as we know many heart failure patients have as we know. These patients tend to benefit with higher by intrigued. Pacing percentages in atrial fibrillation with its irregular. Are Intervals can preclude effective pacing So how do you approach eighth in these patients and is it any different than other heart? Failure patients so rule. I was at a meeting last week. In a cardiologist who I respect a great deal I was one of my formative teachers. Were talking about this very thing. And he said you know it makes no sense to me that CRT's only beneficial at ninety five to one hundred percent. Five hundred or pacing and below that. The patient derives no benefit and the data. Don't show that right. They showed that there is a benefit but the benefit you can see it decrease in magnitude the further you are from per patient percentage of one hundred percent now there are some investigators who advocate that everyone with atrial fibrillation who has by should get a navy notable. Asian to make sure that they're one hundred percent by the pace. I think that is somewhat unreasonable for a few reasons. A lot of those patients also have very frequent polymorphic. Pbc's and so if you can do a navy notably action if that patient stars a PVC burden of thirty percent. They're not going to get great reset. Crans Asian so I take a holistic approach. So if I've a patient in my clinic they get a by. The objection fracture improves ten percent. Now they can climb the stairs and exercise again and they come to see me and thereby ventricular pacing percentage is ninety three percent and they feel great or even eighty nine percent and they feel great than we really don't change management but if they had experienced response when they come back and thereby V payment percentages down and they're having VR and. We can't fix that with medical therapy than yes. We consider additional inventions. And probably a of ablation before Av node ablation acas. I think for many of us who do lead extraction and admit patients with infections who are device dependent patients to sit in the hospital for a whole month. We usually do everything we can to avoid a blading note. That makes sense thank you. There's also rapid improvement in other device innovation in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation. So getting to some of that. Can you briefly discuss your approach to the left? Atrial appendage inclusion devices when they should be used in patients with atrial fibrillation and specifically those with Eighth Aban heart failure. Yeah I mean there is an amazing evolution of devices and medical therapy writes. Something we haven't talked about is you know what will the SGL two inhibitors? What security trump all-star Tan due to the natural history CHARLEENA's in patients with heart failure? And those questions are being answered. And you're right. There's a ton of devices and left Seclusion devices are just one of twenty devices. We can talk about but I think it's a great question I think if you look at the aggregate evidence there's no question at draft acting oral. Anna Craig. Is the best treatment. Prevent Strokes Rachel for relation. We know the ten percent of thromboembolic events in patients Joe for relation come from locations other than the appendage so systematic therapy make sense but we also know that one in eight patients can't tolerate. A LONG-TERM ORLANDO CRAIG. And for those patients I think left atrial appendage. Collusion is a really really valuable intervention and for patients who have multiple bleeding events while the appendage inclusion devices may not provide as good stroke protection as a direct acting Orlando quite. They certainly provide a very good deal of protection. And so here a Duke. We believe that left Appendage closure therapy is a very viable treatment option for patients who can't tolerate law Orlando Craig Ocean including patients who are fire. Great that makes sense. Dr Pechiney thanks so much. This has been extremely useful information. Both for the cardiologists and the Non Cardiologists who've been listening before we finish the cardio urge likely to a special segment at the end of their recordings. So have one last question for you. And that is what makes your heart flutter about caring for patients with atrial fibrillation Voting cardiologists out. There there are going to be some experiences in your career. That you remember. Almost as if they're a photograph and when I was a house officer at Johns Hopkins and Iran my outpatient clinic. I just felt there was no better feeling than taking care of someone's atrial fibrillation and they would come back in sinus rhythm and they would tell you. Well now I can walk with my granddaughter and I can exercise again and just the ability to get someone back in sinus rhythm and get them feeling better again. That had a tremendous impact on me and my intern clinic is and so. I would heartily implore anyone who's interested in arrhythmias and interested in heart failure You get a treat a lot. Heart failure isn't electro physiologist rates. It's very satisfying fantastic. Always back to the patient and with that everyone will include our segment. Thank you so much. Dr Pechiney for this excellent overview of the management of atrial fibrillation heart failure. It's been a pleasure talking to you today in learning from you over the past years and I'm glad our audience got to see some portion of that today. We'll thanks so much is at the lights. Add to be able to have this conversation.

Dr Pechiney Lommel amiodarone Anna Craig Orlando Craig Ocean apple Nathan Pbc Non Cardiologists Johns Hopkins intern Orlando Iran officer Rachel
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

12:31 min | 1 year ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Clinical trials program he also serves on the clinical working group of the American heart. Association's get with the Guidelines Atrial Fibrillation Registry Program serves on the editorial board of Heart Rhythm the European Heart Journal and the Journal of Cardiac electrophysiology and has countless peer reviewed publications most importantly however Dr Cheese in excellent clinician educator and extremely supported mentor. He has helped numerous fells residents with their clinical training. Research Projects in publications and his efforts have been recognized. Many times with fellow nominated awards. Dr Pechiney thanks so much for taking the time to be with us today or who looks great to be here. Please call me John. And it's also great to talk to the fellow. Our House officer awesome. Ra Dr Pechiney. Let's get started with our first question. I'm going to focus our earlier questions. Around the acute management of aged four we go on to discussing the chronic management of these patients so I one of the hardest clinical scenarios that I find to manage as as a fellow in the. Icu is managing the patient with D. compensated. Heart failure with concrete Nathan with army are these patients have high advertising drive in need their heart to maintain cardiac output when in shocker. Perry shock but their heart rate is often too high to maintain efficient stroke volume and cardiac output and oftentimes. I found that. Their eighth Refractory even to cardioversion when we attempt it. What is your strategy to manage these patients and does it differ by the type of heart failure? They have for example. Rv FAILURE VERSUS LV failure. I think you highlighted a bunch of really important points in you mentioned cardioversion and I think a lot of times. When cardiovascular teams are admitting very critically ill patients with atrial fibrillation we often forget that if the patients in shock or is not prof using her hypertensive that emerging cardioversion is the best treatment available to us. Now if the patient gets cardio voted and they immediately go back into atrial fibrillation. So-called early recurrence of atrial fibrillation or immediate recurrence of atrial fibrillation. Recurs within seconds of being cardio voted. That's a big problem. Typically the best treatment in those situations is going to be intravenous amiodarone. Ns very aggressive attempts to restore the physiology such that. Whatever trigger is provoking Relation be you know Cardia genyk shock or in other cases in intensive care environments critical illness such as Sepsis that those triggering features are corrected. There's often a lot of reticence over giving I v M Yoder on in these situations. You know clinicians really need to be careful with the rate of infusion because the solutions in which amiodarone made Aquarius have song. Compounds like tweeting. That can cause hypertension so making sure. It's not given to quickly as very important. But amiodarone is very good. Medication for acute management of atrial fibrillation. And it's a very bad medication. In many instances for chronic management but a lot of times we forget that it's a very effective tool acutely one that we should use the other point you bring up is does acute management of atrial fibrillation differ by the underlying ideology of heart failure. And for the most part the answer to that is now now. Anecdotally people observed that atrial fibrillation in the context of severe binocular failure or atrial fibrillation context of heart failure complicated by severe. Rv dysfunction is harder to tree just as is a trophy relation extreme restrictive cardiomyopathy. He's the management is generally the same we do want to control the rate and then restore sinus rhythm to give the patient back there atrial transport function with regard specifically to the use of M. Yoder on that you mentioned. I know sometimes house officers are clinicians. Shy Away from this. In the patient with new onset. Heart failure who hasn't been properly anti coagulated prior presentation given this risk of potential chemical cardioversion. That can occur with use of amiodarone. How real do you think that risk is an? Is it justified in certain scenario? Still use it. Yeah so you know. Everything in medicine is is risk benefits and of course if someone isn't properly antiquated they are at increased risk for thromboembolism and we know that heart failure patients have an elevated risk of thromboembolism above those of their peers. Who HAVE A true relation? No heart failure so yes. There is some risk but of course if a patient is Encarta genyk shock and can't maintain their blood pressure then cardio voting them or giving 'em yoder which may Cardi avert them. Downstream is reasonable to assume for that patient. What I think is really interesting. Is that a lot of times. The stroke risk is over emphasized in the inpatient setting which isn't essay stroke. Risk isn't a big deal. It's a very very big deal but the problem is there have been lots of announces that a shrine that up to half of patients with a heart failure in the outpatient setting. Aren't getting Anna quite so you know. We have to do what we need to do. To improve patients humidity AMEX and stabilize them in the acute critical illness setting. But it is interesting. How a lot of times in the outpatient clinic stroke prevention just falls off everyone's radar while it specifically doesn't pertain to heart failure patients. I do WANNA take a small detour year to discuss your approach to nuance at A. Fib In critical illness in general as you mentioned oftentimes in the throes of a critical even outside of Cardi genyk shock whether it's Sepsis or trauma. Patients may develop transient atrial fibrillation than we treat their underlying driver of atrial fibrillation. And we see that this. Iryna resolves what is your approach. Jaffer discharge these patients to outpatient management. Anti coagulation these patients. Yeah well let me take wants a backward. The approach the new onset. A critically ill patient does kind of mirror the outpatient evaluation. So what do you want to do in the outpatient evaluation? While you WANNA make sure there's no easily reversible cause of the for relation you want to make sure the patient is in thorough toxic. We also usually obtain echocardiogram to get an assessment of the left Atrium in the entire heart and so treating acute atrial fibrillation in someone who has enrollment. Sized Atrium may be very different than someone who hasn't enlarged daydream with concrete. And Severe Mitral Austin. Oh since that hasn't yet been discovered so there are some differences but I think the core principles are very similar to one another and then you know heart. Failure is a risk factors for thromboembolism impatience patients with a drill ferber relation so If the patient can be antiquated safely acutely than that Certainly is something we need to do. And then with respect to your question about outpatient antiquated relation you know. The heart failure guidelines used to say that all patients with heart failure age row for relationship to be antiquated. And I think that's what the best evidence supports and then while we're on the topic of Anti coagulation I wanted to also discuss your approach to anti coagulation for transient atrial fibrillation. So as you mentioned what we've previously relied on the CHADS. Two vascular description of the patient level patient characteristics that can for a risk for thromboembolism in anti coagulation Galatian. I think there are some newer data showing that not only do these patient level risk factors matter of time in atrial fibrillation actually matters and now that many of our patients have wearable devices and apple watches. I think clinicians are going to be increasingly encountered with patients who say oh. I had three seconds of what my watch was atrial fibrillation yesterday. How do you approach that How you for time in atrial fibrillation in your hand strength decisions. Yeah no it's a critically important point. And everyone kind of has a sense in their gut that twenty minutes of atrial fibrillation. Some of Chad's vast score of one is probably very different than twenty minutes of atrial fibrillation in someone with an injection fraction of thirty five percent askew McCarthy in a chance vast score of five. They're even now been some very nice descriptive. Reports showing that that it's an interaction between the amount of atrial fibrillation and the underlying risks. What we don't have great tools is how to translate that data on a minute to minute. A. Fib Chad's vast score type of basis. I don't think it's going to be too long before we do. Have that figure it out. There's some really important clinical trials looking at the dose of atrial fibrillation and using that to guide Anna creation decisions in patients with implanted cardiac devices. And as you well know lots of those patients have heart failure so there's going to be prospect of clinical trial data and there's going to be very valuable observational data soothed. Give your audience a sneak peek of some things we've been working on. We've now linked data from remote monitoring databases to Medicare and so one of the analysis. Were looking at right now. In fact we just reviewed the data. This morning is understanding. What risk of a fifth burden translates into what likelihood of heart shot your hospitalization or the development of new onset heart failure and the answer is is that there is very much a relationship and so I think future studies describing? The magnitude of that risk will be very valuable to clinicians fantastic. Look forward to hearing those results in more detail. So Dr Pechiney now I wanNA switch to more. Chronic management of atrial fibrillation heart failure. I fondly remember learning as an intern on rounds The Dogma that rate and rhythm control were equivalent effectively for the management of atrial fibrillation even patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction as demonstrated by some of the older trials. Afc Jeff and subgroup analysis from the affirm trial but the more in fellowship that I've dived down into the data the more. I've learned that this relationship is more complicated especially now in light with some of these data from ablation trials like castle AF Cabana what is your interpretation of the data and what are your overall thoughts on rate versus rhythm management in atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure. Yes Oh you always learn those things during training and then you get out in the practice and you realize things are a little bit different and actually I was a fellow and I was looking at the results from AFC H F. Which I think was really well done trial and I went back and did some digging into the very early literature and there's actually a paper from the Journal of Clinical Investigation authored by Joseph. Greenville Dr Joe Greenfield. Who is the chair of medicine here for many years and a legendary investigator and if you go back to the original work from Dr Greenfield Slab? It's very clearly described that lack of transport function intact cardia impatience with a drift. Relation are physiologically maladaptive. So I don't think any heart failure expert would ever say that being in a true relation is beneficial now the hypothesis that putting the patient back in Sinus rhythm will improve outcomes was not proven correct by a FCA traffic and of course the question is well. Is that because we had lousy tools or is it that sinus rhythm in Atrium that actually contracts and facilitates. Cardiac output is not beneficial. I think most of us think that the tools we had were not great so now our Catheter. Ablation which again is not a perfect therapy. It has risks and limitations. Just like any other therapy and now we have not one not two but several clinical trials that have compared medical therapy either with anti arrhythmic drugs or control to Catheter. Ablation and those trials are very consistent. Now I think it's important knowledge that any one of those trials there are specific limitations that need to be discussed. But it's very nice to see that when you line those clinical trials up. They speak the same message. Which is there is a reduction in hospitalization for cardiovascular causes and there appears to be some survival benefit so I think that in certain patients with heart failure reduced ejection fraction. There is evidence that restoring Sonesta them with Catheter. Ablation does lead to improve outcomes. So the key question is who exactly. Are Those patients actually And I think the answer to that is for now. It's patients that look like the patients enrolled in those trials so patients who have tacky myopathy patients who have a drill for relation accompanied by Hartford reduced ejection fraction who continue to have symptoms despite medical therapy. I don't think anyone is suggesting that patients with severe pulmonary hypertension or severe vibrant trickier failure with an ejection fraction less than five percent on Detroit's who would benefit from a flip ablation..

amiodarone thromboembolism Dr Pechiney critical illness European Heart Journal M. Yoder officer Sepsis Anna A. Fib Chad Icu restrictive cardiomyopathy John House Dr Cheese Journal of Clinical Investigat editorial board left Atrium
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Else practices and pursues perfection in medicine. That is welcome to the show. Thanks so much for having me. Thanks for that Warm introduction when I heard that you guys were releasing this podcast. I was absolutely thrilled. I don't think both of you know how much of an impact you had on my learning following you guys around in the in the ice US and other rotations that we had in residency so to be able to continue that from hundreds of miles away via podcasts has been really refreshing in congratulations on all your success with the so far. No thank you so much. I'll let me so much to have got so night and everybody. We are so very excited to share news. That Ronald became a dad. Just last month there is nothing that gives life meaning quite like bringing life into the world. So Ralph thank you for letting us bar you away from your family for just these movements and a very special congratulations to you. Your wife Lena Baby Aria in the rest of your family. Thanks so much. Ma'am Yeah. Congratulations thanks buddy. So Roll what is in store for us today. This should be an absolutely fantastic episode I had the privilege of talking today to Dr John Pechiney. Who is one of our faculty in Electrophysiology here at Duke? And I'll give him a proper introduction in a little bit but we will be discussing atrial fibrillation management in heart failure patients. Dr Bikinis a tremendous educator. And I'm really excited that all of your listeners will get a chance to learn from him today friends just a reminder. This podcast is not meant to be used for medical advice. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the or policies of our employers. The goal is simply to enjoy learning more about cardiology directly from expert cards. Hello to our listeners. My name is Rahul and gone in the third year cardiology fellow at Duke University Medical Center and in planning on pursuing a career in advanced heart failure. I'm extremely excited today to discuss a topic which I think every physician taking care of heart. Failure patients should be aware of the management of atrial fibrillation. In this special population. I think of atrial fibrillation both as a cause of worsening heart failure in certain scenarios but also is a marker of the severity of cardiomyopathy or is a sign of compensation others. There's a dynamic pathophysiology interplay between these conditions and the management of them requires nuance in clinical expertise. Therefore I can think of no better person suited to discuss the topic than our expert discussing today. Dr Jonathan Pechiney Dr Pechiney is a graduate of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency in the oeser medical training program at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He then came to Duke University for his General Cardiology Fellowship while here he completed a fellowship in clinical research. The Do Clinical Research Institute earned masters of Health Science before completing his training in cardiac electrophysiology. Dr Pechiney currently serves as the director of Cardiac electrophysiology section in Dukes division of Cardiology and spearheaded..

Dr Pechiney Dr John Pechiney Dr Jonathan Pechiney director of Cardiac electrophy US Dr Bikinis Duke University internship and residency Northwestern University Feinbe Duke University Medical Center Ronald cardiology fellow Do Clinical Research Institute Rahul Johns Hopkins Hospital Ralph cardiomyopathy
Apple, J&J to study if Apple Watch can help reduce stroke risk

Murph and Mac

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Apple, J&J to study if Apple Watch can help reduce stroke risk

"Apple continues to stretch out into the health world as the Cupertino based tech giant has teamed up with Johnson and Johnson in a new study called hardline the purpose of the research is to find out if the apple watch can help reduce the risk of stroke in detecting atrial fibrillation early the study will last three years two years of active engagement followed by one year of research open enrollment for the study starts today apple watch owners interested need to be sixty five years or older live in the U. S. and own an iPhone six or

Apple Cupertino Johnson
Cutting out alcohol may reduce atrial fibrillation episodes

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Cutting out alcohol may reduce atrial fibrillation episodes

"Alcohol consumption is strongly embedded in the food and societal title culture of Australia as well. As other Westernized countries everything in moderation is a common adage used in discussions of risk factor modification occasion with patients. Who have atrial fibrillation? However the current study presents a compelling argument for alcohol abstinence as part of the successful management Schmidt of atrial fibrillation nevertheless the sobering reality is that for many persons with atrial fibrillation total abstinence from alcohol? Alcohol may be a difficult goal to achieve

Schmidt Australia
NYU doctor sues Apple over Apple Watch’s ability to detect atrial fibrillation

Sean Hannity

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

NYU doctor sues Apple over Apple Watch’s ability to detect atrial fibrillation

"Will tech giant apple is being sued by a doctor over the apple watch's atrial fibrillation detection feature in NY you doctor filed the suit in the Eastern District of New York Dr Scott weasel said he invented a method and device for detecting a fit back in two thousand six and was granted a patent lawsuit also alleges that apple failed to pay him royalties and refused to negotiate in good faith the lawsuit is asking that apple pay him royalties for infringing the patents and he also wants a permanent injunction to be

Apple NY Dr Scott Weasel New York
Heart doctor sues for patent infringement over lifesaving Apple Watch feature

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Heart doctor sues for patent infringement over lifesaving Apple Watch feature

"Under your cardiologists to suing apple for patent infringement to doctor Joseph was al was awarded a patent in two thousand six for a technique detecting atrial fibrillation a type of irregular heart beat he says it's the same method used by the apple watch and that he contacted apple about it in twenty

Apple Doctor Joseph
Apple reaches first deal to subsidize Apple Watch costs through private Medicare plans

Heart Talk

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Apple reaches first deal to subsidize Apple Watch costs through private Medicare plans

"Down a major step in apple's push to market its apple watch as it's a health and fitness device devoted health is a private Medicare insurer is now subsidizing the cost of the watch this is one thing that I was really interested in when this was going to start happening it probably never will be to wear your health insurance to cover the cost of a watch because the the apple watch is not FDA regulated or MP approved yet because of how it falls in the regulation but being able to apply a wellness box towards the cost of this right I think it's a good idea I'm you know as we've discussed before I'm in favor of wearables that give patient information to utilize in a proactive healthy way it's interesting how the insurers must to come up with this though because he would have to figure out the number of patients that would have to wear one to pick up one there to pick up at atrial fibrillation which is what you're really looking for here to then be able to discern did that for that to be treated to prevent a stroke which is really the high cost item for the

Apple FDA
Brushing your teeth could be good for your heart

Purity Products

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Brushing your teeth could be good for your heart

"There was this report that people who brush your teeth frequently I nobody's going to do this very few people going to do this they cut their risk of an early death but pretty substantially pretty substantial now would you gum disease there's a lot of bacteria involved there's a lot of bacteria swimming around in your gums some of these bacteria could be pretty nasty connected up certain gum disease bacteria to SO facial cancer pancreatic cancer heart disease respiratory problems why because the bacteria don't stay put two things happen first of all the bacteria to my great all around the body so they found the ship certain strains of few so bacterium commonly found in disease comes in people come disease fusa back term if it makes it to the pancreas is involved with pancreatic cancer center finding a connection between oral health and really bad things poor oral health we should check what about your like I said don't stay put that's one thing plus they're inflaming the gum stare triggering the immune system to act inappropriately and inflaming the gums and that inflammation spread throughout the body and that's probably the connection between gum disease and heart attacks and heart disease so if you have more friendly bacteria you help maintain national health this is true I mean I the first of the ice storm that was in the nineteen eighties there was a dentist up at Columbia University and he found people will come to Jesus they have a lot of thickening of blood vessels in their neck because the information from the gum disease was invading the blood vessels on this study they found that people who brush your teeth four times a day it was preventing heart failure and it was preventing atrial fibrillation thank you for relation out some pretty calm about three million Americans have that the heart is the top part of the heart are kind of shaky and they're they're pumping too quickly and the heart can't pump enough blood to the rest of the body posture triggers blood clots to come into the Brandon trigger strokes that's a troll for pollution and in heart failure the heart is kinda weekend and stiffened an enlarged and I can't pump enough blood for the body's need soda these people are fatigue they have trouble breathing their week so this was a study of people between forty to seventy nine with no history of heart disease or atrial fibrillation I feel if they if people brush their teeth three or four times a day they protected themselves from heart failure and atrial fibrillation so there really is a connection between bad bacteria on these issues no nobody's going to brush their teeth four times a day I'm certainly not are you kidding me is your mom unlike a one armed paper hanger in somebody putting up wallpaper what one on that's what I'm like I'm not busy so there's no way I'm going to do it I burst my teeth twice a day morning and before but I know but I do eat healthy food and that always generates a lot of good

Apple Watch detects irregular heartbeats in U.S. study

Atlanta's Morning News

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Apple Watch detects irregular heartbeats in U.S. study

"And apple watch consistently detects an irregular heart beat according to the study at Stanford funded by apple the apple watch reliably detect atrial fibrillation a fifth can lead to blood clots strokes even heart failure ABC's will Kerr says this research concludes the apple watch a fib alerts are eighty four

Stanford Apple ABC Kerr
Apple, Thirty Four Percent And Sixty Five Years discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

01:32 min | 2 years ago

Apple, Thirty Four Percent And Sixty Five Years discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Study sponsored by apple assessing whether the pulse sensor on apple watch series. One two and three can pick up rhythm regularities found only thirty four percent of participants received an alert of an irregular pulse on their watch. And then went onto heavy confirmed case of atrial fibrillation, but the study preceded apple series four watch which includes an electric cardiograph and features monitoring heart activity, the study monitored almost four hundred twenty thousand people. So it's pretty big emphasize twenty five thousand of whom were sixty five years old or older generally the highest risk of age groups, the watches prompted users to set up a telemedicine consultation with a doctor that was involved in the study if something was detective, and then the notified users could then get a separate E C S patched record their hearts electrical rhythms for comparison with watch data. This. This is there's a little bit of debate over whether the thirty four percent is good or bad. Detecting, a sign of atrial fibrillation fibrillation because it is so intermittent doesn't mean you would necessarily find it again the next week. So that's not a big deal. Some folks are saying, you know, what for a wearable watch that also is meant for listening to your podcasts. Not bad other. Doctors are saying yeah, not bad. But if you don't you don't want people relying on this and having a bunch of false positives and flooding your doctor's office with people who are anxious and upset, and then it turns out to be

Apple Thirty Four Percent Sixty Five Years
Stanford University And Apple discussed on America's Truckin' Network

America's Truckin' Network

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Stanford University And Apple discussed on America's Truckin' Network

"The apple watch is being studied for a possible heart health benefit huge study by Stanford University suggests the apple watch can detect a worrisome irregular heartbeat at least sometimes but experts say more work is needed to tell if using wearable technology to screen for heart problems really helps more than four hundred nineteen thousand apple watch users signed up for the unusual study making it the largest ever to explore screening seemingly healthy people for atrial fibrillation over two thousand people received an alert to see their

Stanford University Apple
Apple Watch detects irregular heart beat in large U.S. study

Perspective

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Apple Watch detects irregular heart beat in large U.S. study

"Washington. The apple watch is being studied for possible heart health benefit, a huge study by Stanford University suggests the apple watch can detect a worrisome irregular heartbeat at least sometimes but experts say more work is needed to tell if using wearable technology to screen for heart problems really helps more than four hundred nineteen thousand apple watch users signed up for the unusual study making it the largest ever to explore screening seemingly healthy people for atrial fibrillation over two thousand people receive an

Stanford University Washington. Apple
Apple Watch detects irregular heart beat in large U.S. study

WBZ Midday News

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Apple Watch detects irregular heart beat in large U.S. study

"News. A massive study using apple watches helps users identify potential heart issues, some four hundred nineteen thousand apple watch user, signed up for the study an app alerts them if the watch spots a heart rate problem that might signal atrial fibrillation or a fib a condition that can trigger strokes. Stanford researchers reported early results today at a cardiology conference a small percentage of the users in the study received irregular pulse. Notifications and some of them after being checked with EKG monitoring did have a fib. The study could help pave the way for more research into how modern digital tools can possibly

Apple Stanford
Study: Low-carbohydrate diet linked to heart rhythm disorder

News, Traffic and Weather

01:41 min | 2 years ago

Study: Low-carbohydrate diet linked to heart rhythm disorder

"The new study links the Kito died with heart rhythm disorders, Dr Jennifer Ashton explains. The findings to ABC's George Stephanopoulos. I the caveat. This is a classic example of what we talk about all the. Time association not causing the let me tell you about this study. They looked at almost fourteen thousand people followed them for an average of twenty two years, then had them fill out a food questionnaire about what they eat. And then followed them for how many developed a heart rhythm disorder, very common called atrial fibrillation. And what they found is that the people on the low carb diets were eighteen percent more likely to develop a fifth than those on a moderate, carb diet. Interestingly a lot of data has shown what we call you shaped mortality curve to to low carb diets meeting people who very very very low carb and people who eat very very very high carb have higher risks. Well, that's the interesting thing. So two things I want to do a deeper dive on low carb for this study was less than forty four percent of your daily calorie intake from carbohydrates, which is not that low. That's almost half our calories coming from carbs. But we'll talk about atrial fibrillation. What I want people to understand because you hear about it. You see commercials about it with this is if you look at the anatomy of the heart the upper two chambers of the heart. They get dilated they beat irregularly, and then they get filled with blood a blood clot conform there and that can become dislodged. And then cause a stroke it affects about two point seven million Americans. So again, not cause an effect but an association, and it's a tradeoff George because we talk about low carb if that's effective in losing weight, and therefore reducing risk of Nari heart disease that might be worth it. If you have to trade a little for the risk of

George Stephanopoulos Dr Jennifer Ashton ABC Forty Four Percent Eighteen Percent Twenty Two Years
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"W F L A. Hey. Specifically about your host. Calling because mentioned something earlier, and you mention it twice before in the last few months, but I haven't been able to get on. And I haven't been able to get on Dr Wallich was on. But she talks about. Causes of atrial fibrillation. But I don't have atrial fibrillation. You said you had it. I've had it after I had a drinking binge and that's normal. Well. Let me tell you a short story, which is why this might help you. Ten years ago. I had done. A week later. I got pericarditis, which is inflammation of the heart set that supposedly went away after being in the hospital for day and taking IB program for a few days. Wow. And I had a toothache three weeks ago four weeks ago. Okay. So wow. Three years ago. In september. I was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. The following January four months later. Now pulled out. For three years prior to that. I also had sleep apnea grinding of peace. Well, pulled out at two pm. I went to school. I came out of class at nine pm. Atrial fibrillation was gone. That was fears. Go hasn't returned since. And I also noticed over the next few days that may sleep apnea and by grinding of teeth also went away. We'll see I brought up the the tooth problem that I had because I said, you know, two weeks ago, I had a really bad abscessed tooth, and I took amoxicillin to get rid of it. And I was and I was wondering if that would have had any contribution to what was going on with me. And they said, well, it could you know, but you know, we want to look into the injury we want to know why you while your body's showing an elevated level of d- dime. Whatever the level is they're looking at and they couldn't find a reason. But it was enough to admit me to the hospitals. They can monitor me, and then I went home, and I was fine. And I've been feeling good. Actually, I've been feeling good the past few days, the back pain's gone the neck pains gone being. And I mean to be honest. I think you know, it's because I changed my pillow. And that's giving me support. But and then my wife notices the bruises, and you know, she's like going this is kind of weird you should look into, you know, maybe during your sleep you're having some sort of sleep paralysis or something. So I've been you know, investigating this stuff and the next would lead to from haggen counters or what they call the hag the hag factor. There's also, you know, people who've said that they've been visited in the middle of the night by either a demon or some sort of alien or whatever and that got me into talking about alien abduction. And then that led me to the article in psychology today about how they're no longer just discrediting people who've had these experiences because they're so they've been so ingrained in our culture that. Yes, people are having them. And yes, we should not discredit them. Just as.

Dr Wallich toothache pericarditis amoxicillin Three years four months three weeks three years four weeks Ten years two weeks
Jeff Williamson Johnson, Apple And Johnson discussed on Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Jeff Williamson Johnson, Apple And Johnson discussed on Rush Limbaugh

"Apple and Johnson and Johnson are teaming up on a study to determine whether the latest apple watch in conjunction with the app from the pharmaceutical company Johnson and Johnson can accelerate the diagnosis of a leading cause of stroke. Their study will start later this year, and it's focused on US adults over the age of sixty five where the apple watch series, four two companies are working together to test. Whether atrial fibrillation can be detected Abe also known as atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat or rhythm that can lead to heart attack or stroke. We want a deeper understanding. About the outcomes in preventions associated with early detection said Apple's chief operating officer. Jeff Williamson Johnson and Johnson's vice president Dr Paul Burton. Who's also a cardiologist said the study has the potential to show that there's a lot more about FM out there in the real world and older people than we ever imagined. And if you use the tool like an apple watch

Jeff Williamson Johnson Apple Johnson United States Chief Operating Officer Dr Paul Burton ABE Vice President
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

Sex is Not For Sissies

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

"You just need to, you know, get some stress management you need anti anxiety pill, and so many times women will take this complaint to their doctors and be sent home with a medication to manage their anxiety. When what they really need is to be diagnosed with H Roe fibrillation. So since atrial fibrillation can come and go women may not. Beat in it when they go see their doctor. And as a result, the doctor may run a test and say, I don't see anything wrong with your heart. It looks fine. And it just may take a while to catch it sometimes doctors will say, well, you know, I'm not seeing anything, but you're having these episodes quite frequently. Let's put you on a whole monitor. In other words, the kind of like an e g but it records for a day or two days or even a week or more and you wear that walking around your normal activities. And it captures what's going on with your heart. And that may be a way for capturing it, but often doctors won't do that until the woman has complained in number of times about it in that how can end up taking so long for some women to get diagnosed. Now is it likely that with a fear that you will get to the point where you do actually collapse pass out have that other kind of terrible feeling that you just can't control was going on with you? I know you talked about impending doom. But even before that in is there a way physically to for women who are listening to just say. Yeah, I really want you to check me a little bit more thoroughly. Right. So some women of very small percentage in a small percentage of minutes. Well may pass out have fainting attack. What's called? But that's not that common with atrial fibrillation. And because we're not having out doctors may not take it as seriously, you know, that you know, because of that is well, no many. Times. It's how we describe it to the doctor if the doctor here's you saying, well, my heart feels like it's fluttering feels like it's being really hard. Or you know, I feel like I have a fish flopping around in my chest or an unbalanced watching machine in my chest. Those are some of the ways that the doctor may say, oh, I think I know what may be going on. So a lot of it is in how we describe it to the doctor if we say, well, I'm just anxious and and talk about it in terms of anxiety. The doctor may jump to that conclusion. Instead. By bribing it by what is happening with the heart. That's a much better way to get the attention of the doctor and to help communicate in a way that the doctor will understand what's happening and how to figure out if you have atrial fibrillation in just as an aside. They're atrial fibrillation is the most common irregular heartbeat and after the age of forty we have a one in four chance of developing it. But there are a lot of other heart irregularities as well. They may be there called a rhythm as they may be an irregular heartbeat. They may be a regular heartbeat. Dispatced regular heartbeat that slow or maybe it's swings between fast and slow. So there are a lot of conditions that go along with the upper chambers of the heart, and it may be one of those other. Conditions as well. It could be just a fast heartbeat called tacky cardia could be a slow party. Call Brady cardia or it could be an irregular heartbeat such as atrial fibrillation is more common that it will be atrial fibrillation. But there are a number of other heart irregularities as well. Okay. Let's just make sure everybody knows what a regular rate is at least as you talked about many things that can happen with the heart..

Brady cardia two days
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

Sex is Not For Sissies

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

"To the brain. But what a woman know what it feels like is there a way like we have this preconceived notion that heart attack or anything going on with the heart is going to be extremely obvious that you're either going to have some severe pain or maybe have light headedness. So we know that though symptoms that we expect to have or not necessarily only symptoms. But is there something specific the atrial fib that women could look out for? Absolutely. And that is such a great question. Women tend to have a lot of stress and sometimes when you have stress you'll feel like you're having a panic attack. It is a panic attack. But maybe it's not in fact, many women are told by their doctors. It's just a panic attack. When what they actually have is atrial fibrillation. What it feels like is it can be palpitations, or, you know, basically, the heart feeling like it's pumping harder beating ordered than it normally might it can also feel like your heart. Skip the beat and then took off racing. It may feel like something's just not quite right with my heart. But I don't know what it is. And some people even just have a sense of impending doom, but don't really feel anything differently with their heartbeat about one third of those who have atrial fibrillation don't feel it at all. But they may feel like maybe they're a little bit short of breath. Maybe they're walking up sayers. And it's a little bit harder than it used to be. To do that or takes longer to catch their breath. When they get to the top of the stairs. They be, you know, lugging things in from the grocery store, you feel like you know, that load was really heavy. I just you know, it seems like it was worse than usual. That might be an indication that there's something not quite right with your heart. Because atrial fibrillation will cause you to have a shortage of, you know, shortage breath, your shortness of breath may also manifest into just being tired. All the time. Maybe you're gradually more tired, or maybe it just comes on all of a sudden. And you just feel like you've been hit with a ton of bricks tiredness fatigue, shortness of breath, one of the same kinds of symptoms that you might have for heart attack can also be an indication that you might have atrial fibrillation. So I want people to under. Stand. What it can feel like to be an actual fibrillation kind of concealed. Like, you're running a marathon and your heart rate's elevated, and you can't quite catch your breath. And you feel like you never can catch your breath. People can be all the time, and it impacts the ways I sleep in impacts their work. If you feel like you just can't catch your breath that could be an indication as well that you might have atrial fibrillation. Well, what's really important here that I'm hearing is to one know yourself in not be just poo pooing things. S one big problem with women. We have so much going on that we think. Oh, well, of course, I'm tired because it's the holidays are, of course, I'm tired because I had to watch my baby you're grandbaby or check on relative. Or course tired because I have a lot going work, but is more than that. It's that knowledge that we tend to ignore our bodies are trying to say helpless, please helpless in having a great relationship with a primary. Care provider is an excellent place to scart because you won't feel. So embarrassed about saying, I'm rusher was going on with something isn't right, right? Do you find that? I know you work with a lot of people who very involved in in a Trump liberation care treatment in research. Now, you say it takes two to three years to diagnosis is that because the women are slower to really talk about make symptoms or is it because the medical community is still not really nearing in on women's hearts. I think someone of it may be the former, but a lot really is the ladder when a woman goes in to the doctor expresses the symptoms that she's had especially if it's a younger woman typically anyone, you know, sixty five or younger you consider to not be at risk for this condition. So doctors tend to jump to well is just a panic attack and attack you're over stress..

sayers three years
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

Sex is Not For Sissies

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

"Police there. Yeah. I'm I'm here. Rolling over you at cough, graining beeping in did you did you get everything I said or did? You said the last thing you had was when you talked about the fact that it might take two to three years to be diagnosed we can pick up there tonight us a good spot. From that point. Ready? Here we go going in three to one. Not only does it. Take longer for women to get diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. But typically men will have atrial fibrillation. More commonly up to about the age of sixty five. But after about sixty five we see it more prevalent in women women actually will predominate in over sixty five group when it comes to atrial fibrillation and women also have a greater stroke risk than men, especially women pastics five. So it's a very serious condition for women and something that we're really trying to raise awareness of we want women to know about this condition. So that they discuss it with their doctors. If they think that they might have it and make sure that they're getting the treatment that they need because. Women often will get less aggressive treatment than men will when they have atrial fibrillation. Okay. Well, let's take a step back for seconds. So we know what it is. We know that the heart is beating irregularly in blood is perhaps not moving out of the chambers are not moving out the way, it is should be which can end up creating issues where you can get cladding in those class condole.

cough three years
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

Sex is Not For Sissies

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

"Designation from the national speakers association. He's a graduate of leadership Texas has received numerous advocacy award. So let's get right to talking to. Melanie, Nonni is such a pleasure. I do know of your work in at Meyer you so much. So welcome to giving us an idea about how women can understand atrial fibrillation and take care of their health regarding it. Thank you. It's such an honor and the privilege to be here with us today and to share with your audience what they should need to know about atrial fibrillation. Well, let's start with a definition of atrial fibrillation. I know that the atrium is a part of the heart. But I don't know how many more people know too much about that. Right. Well with your nursing background. You certainly understand about the heart and what atrial fibrillation is. But for those who don't know about atrial fibrillation, the heart has multiple chambers. It has upper portion called the atrium and the lower portion called the ventricle and this happens in the top chambers of the heart the ventricles the bottom chambers where you can have sudden cardiac arrest and heart attacks, upper chambers. A trio are where you can experience. Atrial fibrillation and other kinds of heartbeat irregularities or fast heart faith. Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat. Sometimes it's fast. Sometimes it's slow sometimes it's normal speed. But it's an irregular heartbeat. And what it does is by not beating rhythmically, and allowing and basically pushing the blood from the upper chamber's into the lower chamber. So it can be distributed out to the body and brain since it's not pumping smoothly. It actually allows clots to form in the top of the heart. You know, it's kind of like upon that. You know, not is basically still and allows stuff to kind of collect around the outside of the pond, but we call pond scum will kind of the scum of the heart is clots form in the upper chamber and actually go to the brain as a stroke. Well, for sure we don't want any scummy stuff running around inside our hearts, we have enough difficulties with just getting through the day and heartbreaking heart ache. So we don't want any. Some as well because. Women's specifically. I imagined. Might be at a lot of risk for atrial fibrillation in especially as relates to the back that some caregivers care providers. Rather are not as tuned into women's heart issues as they might be. Absolutely. And we know that I with with heart attacks where women are diagnosed as frequently as men are. It's eight real fibrillation. Women are.

Nonni national speakers association Texas Melanie Meyer
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on KTOK

"Dr Chris is I don't know. Can you have some insight on physical condition, which is atrial fibrillation? And this is the backstory is I went in for a colonoscopy in March of twenty seventeen perfectly healthy came out in atrial fibrillation and have been in ever since I've had one operation called in cardiac ablation, and it has been mildly successful. What do you think? Yes. Well, thank you for asking your question. I and welcome to the show. So I think atrial fibrillation is something that is actually a common and that can be triggered by different things. So it's true that it's a little area into high that is stimulated as an abnormal electrical activity, and why did you do that at that specific time? And that's a good question. So I what I love about your question is that you have your symptom, which is fibrillation, and you have the trigger. 'cause this is always with us is what happened just before that started. And you're telling me I had a colonoscopy and you saying that before the colonoscopy. You had no atrial fibrillation is that right? That is correct. Okay. Okay. And how old are you? If I may ask I'm sixty two. So I was sixty one okay. I work in the health field on a CNA nursing assistance. So I worked long shifts and I work nights. So a lotta times I take my caffeine drinks or a five hour, energy drinks. And I wondered if that was part of the problem stimulant, but why won't it go away? Yeah. So you have a lot of different factors that can explain this like do the long hours at work that can be hard. They're hard on the height. Also the night what can be hard on the height of the energy drinks. Usually, they'll also very difficult on the high end, especially they contain a lot of caffeine, which would stimulate this little parts of the height, especially in that chamber that that is acting up. So I would recommend not using energy. I I'm not in favor of energy drinks, because they sometimes they have way too much caffeine, and we've seen a lot of problems with those if they're used to much a little bit is, okay. But but on on a regular basis, it's a I I don't like those too much because of the amount of caffeine. But also, so. Sorry. So combination of the color when you have a colonoscopy stressor on your body also. Although it's needed I recommend everybody should have a colonoscopy on a regular basis and just real quick for time reasons, can you tell her maybe what she can do really quick. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Okay. You know? I completely forget about time. When I'm with a patient. That's my problem. Right. Well, you got about thirty seconds. Can you give her an idea of what she should do? Okay. So what she should do is just us. Relax sation and maybe meditation to calm, the height it down. And so use less energy drinks, just an and more meditation vaccination. And a dialogue with your heart. If your heart had a voice, which would say, what does he need an it would need. Probably I we need to give you a voice your heart. Avoid. Listening to right now. The NewsRadio one thousand K T O K. We'll be right back with more of Dr Chris Gilbert here.

caffeine Dr Chris Dr Chris Gilbert stimulant NewsRadio K T O one thousand K thirty seconds five hour
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on KTRH

"Chris is I don't know. Can you have some insight on physical condition, which is atrial fibrillation? And this is the backstory is I went in for a colonoscopy in March of twenty seventeen perfectly healthy came out in atrial fibrillation and have been in ever since I've had one operation called and cardiac ablation, and it has been mildly successful. What do you think? Yes. Well, thank you for asking your questions. I and welcome to the show. So I think atrial fibrillation is something that is actually a common and that can be triggered by different things. So it's true that it's a little area in the high that is simulated this as an abnormal electrical activity, and why did you do that at that specific time? And that's a good question. So I what I love about your question is that you have your symptom, which is atrial fibrillation, and you have the trigger 'cause this is always with us. I what happened just before that started. And you're telling me I had a colonoscopy and you're saying that before the colonoscopy. You had no atrial fibrillation is that right? That is correct..

Chris
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"You could have atrial fibrillation one of the leading causes of stroke. Find out before it's too late with cardia mobile. The FDA cleared personal EKG device. That's just ninety nine dollars to order. Visit cardia dot com. That's K A R D. I A dot com. Cardio mobile fits in your pocket. So you can take an KT anytime anywhere, right? When you feel. Cardi mobile delivers a medical greedy cagey right to your smartphone. And just thirty seconds. You'll know if your heart rate is normal atrial fibrillation as detecting to a cardio mobile today for just ninety nine dollars. Visit cardia dot com. That's K A R D dot com. Take unlimited EKG's morning, noon or night. So you can always know how your heart is doing cardio mobile. Peace of mind in your pocket for only ninety nine dollars. Forty yours today. Visit Cardi dot com. That's K A R D. I A dot com in our house. Bedtime is complicated. My wife is always freezing. And when she layers up the bed. I get way too hot. Hi, I'm Scott Tannen, founder of bollandbranch makers of the world's most comfortable seats loved by three US presidents. If you're like us, you'll love our flannel bedding back for a limited time at bollandbranch dot com. They're unbelievably soft, warm and breathable. So Missy stays warm, and I don't overheat. It's like magic we let you sleep with them for thirty nights. If you're not impressed, send them back for a full refund. Our flannel sheets coming fourteenth, stunning patterns and colors. You're guaranteed to find the style you love. But don't wait last year. They sold out in just a few weeks. Go to bollandbranch dot com today for fifty dollars off your first set of sheets, plus free shipping with promo code rush. That's fifty dollars off plus free shipping right now at bollandbranch dot com. Promo code rush. Rush. Bollandbranch dot com, spelled B O L L, andbranch dot com. Promo code rush..

Cardi mobile FDA Scott Tannen KT US Missy founder ninety nine dollars fifty dollars thirty seconds
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the next news hour remembering World War One hundred years after the war to end all wars ended that's Friday on the PBS NewsHour. Hear the story and other developing news later this afternoon on the PBS news hour at three o'clock this afternoon on Kikuchi d. This is science Friday. And I'm flora Lichtman. My guest is send Cindy jar author of the new book heart a history. He writes about some of the great clinical mysteries of the heart today and the daring discoveries made by early cardiologists one thing that struck me when I was reading your book is how hard the heart works for us every day every second of the day. It's really amazing. It's probably the most amazing machine that has the nature as volved. So typical human heart beats about three billion times in a lifetime. It pumps blood through more than one hundred thousand miles of blood vessels and typical human heart works so hard that it can empty a swimming pool in a week. So so it's really one of the hardest working organs in the body. And it's. It's constantly toiling. And in an it's amazing in that, you know itself sustaining. So so the heart doesn't just pump blood to the rest of the body it pumps blood to its self. So the heart has to pump in order to pump. So it has this sort of self sustaining self referential quality, the northern Oregon house. And so for all those reasons just been fascinated by what how long do heart cells live. Visit this are they the same cells pumping over your entire life. Yeah. We we think that the heart cells are probably terminally differentiated that they they don't divide. You know, there's there's a lot of controversy right now about that. Whether whether cardiac stem cells can regenerate Oregon's, but. Heart cells can be cultured in a Petri dish and last for many, many months with nutrient proper nutrient broth and was interesting is that when the cells recovered, they tend to aggregate and start beating so the heart cells really just really really wanna be. They wanna do. Yeah. That's what they're designed to do. They that we have special cells inside or hearts that that that start to to beat spontaneously. They don't require any external stimulus. Let's go to the phones. Let's go to Larry in Wyoming. Hi, larry. Good afternoon. What's your question? I felt about a dozen years ago. And I've noticed several of my friends have also developed it. Now, I was just wondering what the latest science on it is and I'll take you down. So if favors atrial fibrillation, it's the when the upper chamber start to pump erratically, it's a very common arrhythmia to have. It's the most common with me in in older people and people usually can tolerate pretty well. We have really amazing new techniques to actually trim hatred for Belay shin by actually burning out the cells that seemed to subserve it those recalled ablation techniques. We also have drugs that we can use to control not just the atrial fibrillation. But then the response to the atrial fibrillation. So it's a very fertile area. Sunday Pugh said that. For for much of your life. This idea that the heart could snuff you out even though you were healthy haunted. You did the check did writing the book change your thoughts on the heart or your feelings on the heart. Well, you know, I've been fascinated by the heart for many, many reasons he knows of the family history. And and and the fascinating history of discovery. And then. A few years back. I learned that I myself have coronary disease, the the beginnings of coronary disease, and that was like a ton of bricks those two small kids, and and I thought it was living pretty healthy life. And so I I made some changes. But that fear of sudden death really preoccupied my thinking, I would say that today. I, you know, several years after I learned this. My mother died of a heart attack, and she had Parkinson's disease and end up. She was deteriorating. And I remember my brother once said, I hope mom goes quickly. And I remember just pink so angry that he said that that I warn my mom to live for as long as possible. But when she died, suddenly. I just realized I appreciate what a merciful death. It was. And so I think it's just important that you know, we have so many great technologies and cardiology today that prevents sudden-death sudden death is sort of a paradox. It's it's the the most desirable way to die. But it's also the most feared, and I just think that a lot of the technologies we've developed like implantable defibrillators do prevent sudden death. But you know, for some people they take away the sudden death option and the sudden-death option is not such a bad option for some people. So, you know, it's important for us as cardiologists to talk about this with our patients is not a very easy conversation to have. It was it. Your book is wonderful heart a history, we've run out of time. But I want to thank you for joining us today. Thank you for sending Behar's cardiologists and New York Times, contributing opinion writer, and author of the new book heart a history, you can find an excerpt at science Friday dot com slash iheart. If.

coronary disease Oregon Larry flora Lichtman Kikuchi d Cindy PBS Belay shin New York Times Pugh Behar Parkinson writer Wyoming One hundred years
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"You might get something bigger the size of a modern day Petri dish. Okay. Okay. So how do you as you're talking about all these different complicated systems as are are all of these in one single tissue chip or are they connected and simulating them individually. So that's a great question. So the tissue chip field has really evolved and exploded over the past few years. And as a result of that. There's this massive diversity in the systems that we have. So you might have one single chip this quite straightforward. It is just modeling say one single tissue. And there might be other chips that modal other single tissues. And then there's ways to link those physically through pumps and through micro fluid channels or you might get systems that on one single plate have multiple different sort of pots feel different kinds of tissues, and then you can profusely with what we would call a universal, medium or blood Mimetic. So you can get multiple different kinds of tissues within one system. And so there's really a broad range of of everything from single tissues to multiple linked tissues, the links. Tissues is harder is much more complicated for number of reasons. But it definitely starts off with one single tissue. And then you can build from that. Okay. So how does how does it work when I when you say tissue chip what I'm imagining is like a heart in like something that's like a chip. But I don't think that's what it is say the chips word comes from the idea that the original chips were made often with silicon plastics, much like computer chips processor chips. So that's where that idea came. From the idea of this, micro embossing and microflora Dick's and micro technology is where that kind of concept of computer chips to tissue chips came from. But nowadays, there's such a like, I said this huge broad diversity in these different kinds of systems that really the the key concept of what a tissue chip is is this space. This pot this bio reactor where you can Chuck in a bunch of different cells from a number of different sources, and we can talk a bit more about some of the challenges faced with cell sourcing, for example. But essentially, you throw these cells together, you provide them with the nutrients, they need they buzzer long, and they do their thing and they Chit chat to each other. And then what you get is a functional unit of what human tissues alike in vitro is the key thing is outside of your body. So it's literally like taking a little bit of you and putting it into a pot letting the cells chat to each other looking at how they respond to different stressors different drugs, different genetics. And then seeing what they do in vitro to predict what your body's doing. Fever. Okay. So it's it's not necessarily a tiny heart in the chip. It's all the components of the hard working together getting the nutrients it needs. And then you do what to it to say to understand how it reacts? Are you putting on drugs in there, you what are you doing it? Exactly. So let's look at the heart as an example. So your heart isn't just one amorphous blob. It might look like it from the outside, but it's incredibly complicated. You have different kinds of cardiac Myocytes, so how cells in the atrium as you do in the ventricles. And so the the cardio Myocytes that make up that blob of tissue that you're working to make the tissue. Chip are going to be slightly different. So it might be that some research has decided to focus on the atrium. So they'll look at atrial cardia Myocytes, they might decide to look at atrial fibrillation. So they might be able to take some kinds of skin cells, for example, fibre blasts from patients with atrial fibrillation. They can do what's called or use stem cell technology and create a induced pluripotent stem cells. Derived cells from these people skin cells and create small blobs of atrial tissue. That is derived from that person who's go atrial fibrillation in this in vivo in vitro system, then they can start looking at the effects of different drugs. They can start looking at the effects of different stresses different coven dioxide levels, all kinds of different things they can stop. If they wanted to get ready fancy is they can start looking at the effect of gene editing techniques on these tissues to see how they'll then respond in vitro to be able to predict what human responses would be..

Myocytes Fever Dick Chuck
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Relation i'm sorry atrial fibrillation i do have atrial fibrillation and causing the tacky cardi and here's the deal seventy seventy okay good age now i i wanted to tell you i take a lot of i take co q ten i take take the coke complement vitamins and i take 'em to merrick i can't remember it's gonna help you for this problem as you've learned magnesium doc well maybe but here's the deal i have to ask you a couple more questions have you shrunk indian height no i haven't i've been taking kelsey what does that got to do with the doc okay what's happening here is she has general just as ease her districts shrinking her vertebrae or getting closer and closer together they're smashing the roots of the nerves between thrash vertebrae one two three and four t one two three and four so she's got an electrical issue and so what's happening is when when the vertebrae or smashing the roots to those spinal nerves that control the rate and rhythm of the heart is causing the heart to run fast so we need to rebuild a disc push the push the vertebrae apart take the load off of the nerves he's founders tacky cardio stop dockers keep looking for an electrical problem in the heart is not there is not a heart problem it's a back problem connected to your spinal cord that's correct now how how much you again dear i'm sorry how much leeway hundred and twenty nine okay i'm glad that three okay so what i would do get rid of all the bad foods no fried foods processed meats and also gluten get rid of all the inflammation and then you.

kelsey
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Part of experience when you're eighty five but you know it's hard to tell whether this represents a serious problem or where it's gonna go to i mean worst case scenario you develop heart problems that are gonna lead to atrial fibrillation that may eventually occur if it happens you can be treated with medication you could also get an ablation which is successful even older individuals in patients mitral valve prolapse sometimes the valve is leaky valve has to be repaired they now have really excellent techniques for repairing valves without crack in your chest and doing open heart surgery they just passed a little catheter through a mutually your wrist or your federal artery in the groin to the heart and they can actually do a repair that way if necessary i mean i don't want to give you all these alarming prospects when you know you can happily live to one hundred ten without experiencing any of these things and just you know have the nuisance of bothersome palpitations which are the nine and won't cause a problem so that kind of busy the range of what possibly can happen without seeing you that's about as much as i can say that help been wonderful you painted a portrait of me with all these things that can happen for decades and decades and get a lot of exposure.

mitral valve
"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"atrial fibrillation" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"The condition known as atrial fibrillation and saids include widely used medications like ibuprofen naproxen researchers in taiwan studied more than fifty seven thousand people fortyfive and older the scientists found that people who used end saids showed an eighteen percent higher rate of irregular heartbeat researchers say the study is aimed at warning doctors against prescribing end sets for people who might be most at risk for an irregular heartbeat after being delayed by a week for a week by democrats the iowa senate approved the appointment of jerry fox open to the iowa department of human services but not without some hiccups i cannot imagine very many iowans would wants the nearly impossible job of serving as director of d h s in a department that is grossly underfunded in a department that is grossly understaffed in a department with a medicaid privatization mass let's democratic state senator janet peterson who blames governor reynolds for the mess the state's medicaid programs currently experiencing two thirds of the iowa senate did approve fox hogan's nomination on tuesday and president trump says former vice president joe biden could not beat him up earlier this week biden said if he'd been in high school with trump and trump disrespected women he'd taken out behind the gym and beat him up trump tweeted this morning it would actually be biden who would go down fast and hard crying all the way get breaking news and severe weather on facebook click like on the who radio facebook page at seven oh five what's happening in traffic jim brown's here to answer that from the whol radio traffic accident working on.

ibuprofen whol facebook vice president iowa senator iowa department of human servi fortyfive taiwan naproxen iowa senate jim brown joe biden trump president fox hogan governor reynolds janet peterson director jerry fox
Prescription NSAID pain relievers increase risk of irregular heartbeat, study shows

All News, Traffic and Weather

02:05 min | 3 years ago

Prescription NSAID pain relievers increase risk of irregular heartbeat, study shows

"With her suit to get out of a confidentiality deal with the parent company of the national enquirer she knew that they were buying her story and she knew that the national enquirer is not going to publish it but she had no idea that she wasn't going to be able to respond to to press inquiries now am i takes the position that she can but the reality is their private position is very different mcdougal a former playboy playmate god one hundred fifty thousand dollars from am i bought the enquirer never printed her claim of an affair with donald trump steve kaethe and cbs news new research is adding to concerns about some common painkillers cbs news medical contributor dr tarun rula says it comes from the british journal of clinical pharmacology in this study researchers did is they looked at about fifty thousand middleage taiwanese individuals who reported using prescription doses of says and they look to see if there was an increased risk of atrial fibrillation which is an irregular heart rhythm and he didn't feed find an association now if it means the top chambers of the heartbeat chaotically that can increase your risk of stroke and heart failure the thinking is that possibly a changes blood flow to the kidneys raises the blood pressure causes imbalances and potassium stretches the top chambers of the heart and that can trigger the atrial fibrillation earlier studies have suggested a link between over the counter and sets and a greater risk of heart attack and stroke two men are facing animal cruelty charges in connection with the rescue of more than two dozen bulldogs from a home in rhode island police in smithfield say the two are charged with unnecessary cruelty to animals and one of them does face drug drug charges as well hundreds of snakes rats and other reptiles were also taken from the home wbz news time to twenty two this is kim tunnicliffe in this month wbz cares is taking a look at strong water farm therapeutic equestrian center on i wanna key as a senior at essex technical high school she's interning at strong water spending every other week volunteering at the barn she says the horses help relax her never experience a feeling like that it's almost indescribable i just love being around them if i have a stressful day i just come.

National Enquirer Painkillers Dr Tarun Rula Smithfield Kim Tunnicliffe Donald Trump Steve Kaethe CBS British Journal Of Clinical Ph Rhode Island Essex Technical High School One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dol
NSAIDs may increase risk of irregular heartbeat, study says

All News, Traffic and Weather

02:07 min | 3 years ago

NSAIDs may increase risk of irregular heartbeat, study says

"Regional trains will run airports eight thirty percent of flights to and from paris will be cancelled air france plans to maintain longhaul flights but warns of disruptions on european and domestic flights some schools will also be closed new research adding to concerns about some common pain killers cbs news medical contributor dr tara narula says the findings are in the british journal of clinical pharmacology in this study what researchers did is they looked at about fifty thousand middleage taiwanese individuals who reported using prescription doses of says and they look to see if there was an increased risk of atrial oh fibrillation which is an irregular heart rhythm and he didn't feed find an association now eighth means the top chambers of the heartbeat chaotically that can increase your risk of stroke and heart failure the thinking is that possibly a changes blood flow to the kidneys raises the blood pressure causes imbalances and potassium stretches the top chambers of the heart and that can trigger the atrial fibrillation studies have suggested a link between over the counter and said and a greater risk of heart attack and stroke the pope is heading to wireline to the summer abc's tom rivers with his itinerary i'm august pope francis will visit the one staunchly catholic country that's been devastated by the church's sex abuse crisis the last pope to go there john paul the second back in seventy nine the ireland today very different in recent years it's legalized gay marriage over the church's objections and this spring it's due to hold a referendum on overturning a constitutional ban on abortion wbz news time one fifty one net flicks is taking some heat for showing too much smoking on screen as mark mayfield reports the criticism comes from the anti tobacco group truth initiative the group looked at the fourteen most popular shows from the streaming service among people ages fifteen to twenty four it found three hundred nineteen incidents of tobacco use more than twice as many shows on other platforms stranger things set in the nineteen eighties had the most with one hundred and eighty scenes with cigarettes other shows at the top of the list included orange is the new black house of cards and.

Paris France Dr Tara Narula Pope Francis Ireland Mark Mayfield British Journal Of Clinical Ph Eight Thirty Percent