11 Burst results for "Atpa"

"atpa" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

04:13 min | 10 months ago

"atpa" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Jaber along these lines. Can you help us. Define hibernation versus stunning. How does that it help us with that. Thank you so. The concept of my hibernation came a long time ago with paper of single patient. Paper reported in cirque by Rehmatullah from ucla and they took a patient. Who had a depressed ejection. Fraction coronary artery disease. And it's interesting to look at that cartoon so they took this patient basically assistant jackson fraction by invasive angiography. Lv graham and then they patient and then they did lv graham down the road and they showed that this objection fraction has improved so he introduced with this concept of myocardial hibernation so my nation in contrast to stunning very simply stunning is repetitive. Or single time. Drop my the blood flow. Leading to sudden cessation of contractor function which is A reversible once. You take that away before you have an infant. Hibernation is a mortar for chronic process. You know this is my card that has been exposed to chronic and sustained reduction in myocardial blood flow and over time. Hibernation is not fixed point hibernation is a dynamic points so we start sometimes was stunning. If you don't stop blood flow you start with losing contract tile function. Then you start over time with using some of the contract elements of the cell and then ultimately the cell will die so this is a spectrum of disease. And that's what makes it very hard to prove and click of trials that stabbed combustible to hibernating. Myocardium helps because not all these female typic- expressions of hibernation by. Let's say nuclear or w echo or an artist same so take that one step further when you deploy nuclear technology that such a spec if the g. all you're trying to establish whether the cell still using glucose or not so cells alive because it's using glucose if you're using thallium for example you're establishing the cell membrane is still intact allowed sodium potassium atpa's to function and when using adobe demean echo. You're trying to establish whether the contract pile elements of the cell are still there by flagging it with some beata mean to make a contract law those so that's why we have these discrepancies. In establishing what hibernation is by different imaging modalities besides the disease itself is a wide spectrum.

Rehmatullah Jaber single time single patient one step adobe demean time echo ucla
"atpa" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"atpa" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Remember what we presented with our patient. Even though it's not classic atrial attack your enemies with av block. The last thing to remember we've mentioned a couple of times including the first. Ekg we got or ecg. With this patient is this abnormal. S t you segment or t wave. Which kind of looks like a hockey stick or a mustache. And just if you see that your radar should go up for. Hey maybe i should think about digital as toxicology pretty. That's a great summary of the visitations the discharge city especially this patient who we know is starting to have a war critical presentation so the next step that i'm thinking about is how do we treat it perfect in. I think that's a great question. And i'm going to go back in just spread the love here in mary. You know we had talked about this before. How would you treat this case. And how would you treat suspect digital as well brownian an expert phil but i think should stop the source of the digital is a second. You should try to reduce the levels of the free utilities with the jackson specific antibody. That is the mainstay for therapy. So you can start an appearance dose of ten miles every the patients for clinical improvement that you should see after ten to twenty minutes and the huda have erased pony. You can give another a dose of specific. Antibodies the whole idea of mechanism of the teach. A specific antibody is to find the freezer clayton engage and that will also allow dissociation or the beach from the sodium potassium. Atpa's what these might cause initial increase in the ditch level and. That's the reason that we actually follower patients clinically as if they prove to measure as a at the treatment successful and disappoint ottawa. Mary was saying they're given the ditch fragments to essentially reverse the digitalisation based on the level itself but the clinical manifestations that this patient was demonstrating. So i'm excited to hear more about the managing here. But i think it's a really great case that you guys have all built here that it wasn't just based on a level but the clinical scenario that the patient had absolutely and what we'll get to that in a second. The one other thing that i'd like to add is these patients really often present with hyper k. Lamia and like as an internist. You just have a gut reaction to try and treat that hyper lamia. But you know when. I'm thinking back to like medical school in internal medicine and even into this case. There's this caveat with hyperglycemia in digitalis toxicity. And calvin remind me exactly what we need to worry about with hyper killing me a treatment. That's very impressive. You're able to remember that. All the way dramatical brody one of the complications as you mentioned and it comes back to the patient as well with her hybrid. Kelly mea is how you manage hypoc yulia mia in digital city..

hockey phil clayton jackson ottawa Lamia Mary hyperglycemia calvin Kelly mea yulia mia
"atpa" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

13:11 min | 2 years ago

"atpa" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Hello you lovely were nerds. I appreciate you joining me on this wonderful episode We are almost in the year. Twenty twenty I think this is ridiculous. Yes I don't know I just WanNa say that the first word for this episode is asking me a T. o. m. y.. This is a noun from fifteen ninety one. One eight tiny particle. That's it that's what an academy is And we have these synonyms Adam and might mit okay. Hey next is a tonal. We have thrown away the world of the atoms and we are moving on to another world. ATONAL AT O.. N. A. L.. This is an adjective from nineteen twenty two marked by avoidance of traditional musical tonality especially organized without reference to key or tonal center and using the tones of the chromatic scale impartially. ATONAL ISM is a Noun atonal list is a noun own again and eight. Not An eight tonality is also announced and a totally is an adverb. Lots of various forms Ormes Let's see this is just a a plus tonal So if something is tonal That is you know it's got tones normal tones the to our ears and then we add a and it makes it the opposite So this is interesting I'M GONNA try not to talk so much but Yeah normally the in music. There's a scale there's a major scale a minor scale and it could be it could be mixed Lydian or I can't even remember all the different ones but there are all these various various major and minor scales and in America. It's very regular there half tones and whole tones but in other countries Or when people are trying to be a little bit more experimental or abstract or something they might use That I guess they would. Would they be considered quarter tones. in you know halfway between a half tone their CNC sharp but there's halfway in between there in the frequency frequency of those two. There's a another tone. Maybe that's a quarter tone and so those are things that in America here. We're not really used to hearing but Tones like that are are used often in I know Indian music and other other cultures And so we would call that a tunnel. I don't know I don't know if they would call that atonal that's just normal to them But it's kind of interesting use of music and frequencies and things all right next we have atoned A. T. O. N. E.. This is a verb. From fifteen seventy four the transitive definitions are first number. One is obsolete and we have these synonym reconcile number number two to supply satisfaction. Four and a synonym is expiate. And the in-transit definition says to make amends as in eight atone for sins Let's see the this is from middle English to become reconciled and that is from from at on which is wait at on. Well if we look at a couple of episodes no that was ad no nevermind at on which means in harmony any and that is from at plus on which means one Oh no sorry at on. Looks like it's two separate words it's But it's a thing that people say it's not in here as its own thing. I don't know I'm a little confused by that If you couldn't tell our next word is atonement. And as somebody described me as described to me One way that you can sort of say it is at one mint. That's how it's spelled at one mint And it looks like that is actually where the word comes from All right so this is a noun from fifteen thirteen number. One is obsolete again and it has the synonym reconciliation number two the reconciliation of God and humankind through these sacrificial death of Jesus. Christ Jesus Christ superstar our number three reparation for an offense offense or no offense or injury. Synonym is satisfaction. Number four is in the world of Christian science the exemplify line of Human Oneness with God. We are going to move onto a tonic. It's like the word tonic with an A. It is an adjective. From seventeen ninety to one characterized by attorney At which is the next word but I just wanted a double check the pronunciation. Yes it is any number two for a tonic uttered without accent or stress. So there's no tonic. Involved evolved like a GIN and tonic. Ah Gin tonic. I WanNa make a drink called a gin and tonic. Next we have attorney this is a a noun from sixteen ninety three lack of physiological tone especially of a contract tile organ. What's contract tile organ one that contracts? Okay this is from Latin tonia which is from Greek Tonos which means without tone is not like tone own of muscle. The muscle has tone. I don't know That is from a plus Tonos which means tone. It's kind of what we just read a right next. We have a top. It's the first form warm. It is an adverb or an adjective from sixteen fifty on two or at the top number. Two are sorry second form of a top it is a preposition preposition from sixteen fifty. Five on top of on top of old smoky yet. They couldn't use atop. Because because that didn't have enough syllables. Next we have at a p eight t o p y this is a noun from nineteen. twenty-three a probably probably hereditary allergy characterized by symptoms as asthma hay fever or hives produced upon exposure especially by inhalation to the exciting environmental antigen that was a mouthful Asked this is from the Greek Topa which means uncommon nece and that is from a topos which means out of the way or uncommon and that is from a plus topos which means place and a topic is is an adjective There you go next we have a suffix it is eight. Zero are This is it means the one that does we have an example totalism torture totalism later. What a terrible example? I'm sorry sorry I've said that before. But what is that word. Wouldn't you want to use a common word in the example. Sorry I'm bitching about all right next. We have a an interesting word. A tour vis staten a- tour of staten. I think that's right This this is a Spelled A. T. O. R. V. A. S. T. A. T. I n.. This is a noun from Nineteen ninety-four a staten administered Mr Orally in the form of its hydrated calcium salt To Lower Lipid levels in the blood and I skipped apart. I skipped the the The chemical compound letters and numbers which is First of all there's a part in parentheses C thirty three H thirty four F. N. Two two oh five and that part in parentheses has a two so there's two of those and then see a three H. Two O. H.. Two lows water. I know that All right we are going to move onto a T. p. all caps. This is a noun from nineteen thirty nine and sorry. I just looked at my record or to make sure it was recording and it is and then I lost my place. A phosphor related nucleoside Seton H sixteen and five thirteen P.. Three composed of Edina sign and three phosphate groups that supplies energy for many biochemical Google cellular processes by undergoing enzymatic hydrolysis especially to ADP and it is called also Edina sign triphosphate next we have at pays no ATPA's ATPA's yeah so the eight. I was confused because the ATP is is all caps just like in the last one but they've added as a se at the end. This is a noun from nineteen forty six an enzyme that hydrolysed. ATP especially one that hydros ATP TO ADP and Inorganic Phosphate next. We have attribute days attribute. Atra Billy's ATRA BILIOUS ATRA bilious. I figured it out. At R. A. B. I. L. I O U S Atra Bilious. This is an adjective from sixteen fifty one one given to or marked by melancholy. Synonym is the word gloomy number. Two we have these synonyms ill natured. And peevish and ATTR- ATRA billion snus is a noun. This is Latin Atra Bill to separate words which means Black Bile Fun next. We have atrazine. This is a noun from nineteen sixty to a photosynthesis inhibiting persistent urbicide. C Eight H fourteen. C Z L and five used especially to kill annual weeds and quack grass. I've never heard of quack grass Do they quack like the duck right next. We have a tremble. This is an adjective from eighteen. Sixty two shaking involuntarily synonym is trembling and as in he was white as death and all a trimble and that is a quote from Robert. Cover C. O. V. E. R.. Next we have a TRICIA EIGHTY R E S. I A this is a noun from circa eighteen of seven one absence since or closure of a natural passage of the body to absence or disappearance of an anatomical part as an ovarian follicle the by degeneration a Tricia next we have a wait. There's some etymology. This is from a plus the Greek word treatise which means perforation and that is from Tech Dry Nin Which means to pierce and there's more at the word throw next? We have atrios. atrios capital A. T. R. E. U. S. this is a noun from the fifteenth century. A king of mycenae and and father of Agamemnon and Menelaus mycenae is m. y. c. e. n. a. e.. I think I pronounced correctly agamemnon. That's easy and Menelaus is M. E. N. E. L. A. U. S. next we have atrial natural natural uric nattery year. Wait no naturally theoretic natural. Peptide atrial naturally your natural a year. rettig peptide lots of vowels in that spot. This is a noun from nineteen eighty-four a peptide hormone secreted by the cardiac atrial that has pharmacological logical that in firm logical doses promote salt and water excretion and lowers blood pressure called also atrial naturally rettig factor and the last word for this episode is a trio Ventura Ca ventricular eighty R. O. V. E. N. T. The R. I C. U. L. A. R. Atrial ventricular. This is an adjective from circa eighteen. Sixty of relating to or located between in an atrium and ventricle of the heart. Now is the time that I have to pick a word of the episode What what what? What what I I probably should have been thinking about this beforehand but I didn't We are going to go with atonal as the word of the episode Ah Let's see instagram. Oh maybe I'll put a link of Something in on Youtube or somewhere I'll put a link in the episode description seeking. Go listen to an example of atonal music. Thank you very much for listening. Yeah thirteen minutes or so is much more reasonable time than twenty. Thank you for listening until next time. This is Spencer reading the dictionary goodbye..

staten ADP attorney America Edina Menelaus N. A. L Adam Ormes ovarian follicle Spencer Ventura Ca A. T. O. R. V. A. S. T. A. T. Billy Google R. A. B. Robert Agamemnon
"atpa" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

NutriMedical Report

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"atpa" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

"And in the neutral immune twenty-six y and look for one of the top things being how is your energy starting to do because if that is changing it's not luck it means you're immune the people they don't realize that every day you fractionally clone yourself new body I go to sleep your stem cells come under the story juries in your body your bone marrow rolling your fat cells and other tissue and then they get activated by specific frequencies aren't the base of the brain cells connective tissue nerves and tell them hey that can have lots of bad side effects but now the good effects cannon let's give you a meal replacement and so he McNeil one of those steer people to when it comes to how do you dead in the oxidative stress in the future about to eat because you can use this year because a as a full on meal replacement just two scoops but if you want US basically preempt to the meals you're about to eat and ingredients that are in there from the pattern forms of cinema and burn and that's where he introduced Kito Power Born and Sports Energy Light and some of these other yeah I get requests lots of people say well I have some budget control problems look everyone who's hypertensive is a pre diabetic aren't they they've got sodium potassium ATPA's problems with singled out action radical that's why things I neutral trial and Kerosene D. League will help tremendously reducing that they need help if you WANNA protect their kidneys if they're pre diabetic because that's I mean we'll get rid of singled auction back we also h two flex hydrogen you don't get rid of that single radical if deterrence to it's called hydro proxy radical it was the most persistent free radical conventionally change to Nitro Peroxy Netra proxies extremely toxic to the walls into your central for full nervous system so you know these are big problems and they are often picked up by the doctor because they don't even test ability so it's up to it's up it's up to us that's why I guess you know you you'd say hey a plot everybody listening because you're trying to find figure out the ways that you can better you know uh-huh hack or look for those all options that you know you might not be getting for mainstream medicine they're just waiting for people to have a disease states be categorized and write the script or perform the service do whatever that is but when it comes to wellness optimize a man there's a lot of things to to mess with and to to play with it you can get some great results and I know Dr Bill offers it you know the testing and the the consultations which if you're one of those lost people out there that are really frustrated with the system you got to either getting heard you to do that I'm so you don't keep spinning your wheels and wasting money and resources when you're not getting down to the brass tacks what's really going on in your body people out out there listening it's like they wanna find tune maybe there's nothing overtly wrong and like you're saying Dr Bill having these options like here's another another one that people read is to anti-inflammatories like to control pain and inflammation but they don't know like the damaging effects that they may not necessarily be causing the body worth delaying and healing process so something like a cell depends plus he's a really good formulation to make people aware of and why is it different it's not only a curcumin extract relation as the most published research of any other cartoons out there but it's actually more complete version because it has the essential more with Ryan our expert and if you have any questions eight one eight eight eight six four zero one on attrition are used looking for that one iodine that you can really trust a medical doctor endorse product that is backed by honest research and true integral science then search no further astle activated monitoring plasma in the world optimizes myocardial function generation of new might oh Qendra from totally neutralizing the tower for healing formula there is Chhaya Dine clears the body of all known pathogens restores it to an alkaline state and even promote stem cell regeneration quarter doctor bills new today at triple eight to one to anyone or visit US online at neutral medical dot com inch at all.

"atpa" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

NutriMedical Report

14:08 min | 2 years ago

"atpa" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

"And more interested in nutraceutical shows and so and in fact after the segment that our number two today I'll be doing one and I also have a host of travel show we're GonNa talk about nutritional therapies you need to take your travel travelling is a very dangerous thing you've done apple to memory you told me a few years ago how you travel to Haiti and you had nutraceutical with you that everybody else's crazy living because when you got there everybody got massive explosive diarrhea well you know it was interesting we got exposed to lettuce which was wondering what's one of the greatest carriers you know as far as foods go lettuce can be obviously one of these really tough things because the water that drink except during when it's being grown can reside in there so there was any at Brown water right getting put on those crops that can be so lesson learned you know watch out you you you only WanNa consume lettuce or something like tomato or something like that if you know where exactly where it's coming from but we weren't really aware at the time but there was a big group of us we were down there doing a mission trip and so there was a big group and I brought quite a bit of stuff because this is important to travel to be ready to go but certainly it was really important that ahead like neutral twenty six why and then living pro drug where two huge ones so I was able to you know I knew something was going wrong and I was able to start cranking up those dose levels and really mitigate it so I could continue on and function and stuff where other people were literally laid up for days and so I had stuff that I could share with people and those people would recover faster but if you're gonNA travel and obviously not if anywhere's is as dangerous as one location or another with regards to food quality but the fact is I even in the US you get exposed to all kinds of stuff and if you're a person in what they weaker we'll just call it the constitution right a weaker constitution immune system you're more fragile you're more likely to get sick when you go to your mother-in-law's w you know maybe she's trying to new maybe be not having the problem is a lot of food is contaminated I mean average American gets food poisoning which is basically food with bacteria six times a year and it may not be completely ego I was afraid I don't feel I mean it it ruins a couple today's your life is what it does and of course something more serious given example of you take antibiotics and knuckle normal probiotic bacteria and you got risk of cancer for three and a half years because the contradicting bacteria will the conjugate toxins your liver conjugates that should go back to your pancreas brain here over his women and your tessies men and if you re conjugate delves in the lower gotten bios you're reading the risk of cancer for up to three ears are more interesting the the fact that you you only have to take an insult on from one time and leisure exposed to you know diligent it's affects for years on end a they deal with children they've done studies like that where they've shown that if they got exposed to a proton pump inhibitor or an HSE blocker antibiotic and the six months of life and then follow him the time they get to twelve years old they got the astronomically to three times higher full for allergenic reactions to foods and different things and it's because they disrupted that Gut microbiome like you're talking about and now you get these downstream effects that you're like what happened well we're all doing this and the reason that a- and doing this by I mean creating BIOS in our guys and let me just list some of these things you can exclude you can stop listening if you don't have these things going on stress consuming alcohol taking an antibiotic in the last couple years high consumption of sugar Those are just the for those for those it'd be great one or if you take an acid inhibiting type products or something like that I or something like that guess what if that's you any of those five things YOU'RE GONNA end up downstream having this despite Osa tissues unless you basically help the body to recover right the crunch that we were talking about it what is it you're like well meeting wholesome organic food eating fermented foods great but you can also take things like living probiotic ultra and really bring in these troops and let let me give you an example Undone as long as a study that was done one of the key ingredients one of the key probiotics that's found in living probiotic ultra fascinating so we were talking about food borne pathogens like Salmonella for example one of the studies done with mice with this particular probiotic was fascinating is they pre-treated for basically five days the living probiotic top strain that you'll find in there and or they did placebo then it day five they expose the animals lethal level exposure to Salmonella and in this case the animals that got placebo seven percent survival rate without taking the attic ever again after those first days the animals that then got exposed to the San Manila but had those probiotics in their system the survival rate was eighty three percent now ask you this how many people are listening taking a probiotic know anything about the science of their probiotic probably virtually nobody's there like I I don't know anything I've never heard of anything like that well this is again separating like why Dr Bill does what he does is the research behind how the products are built that that that they have the science behind them so that you can we'll have a much greater confidence that you can really work on some of these deeper issues and so we know this formulation is very powerful we know it lasts somewhere around seven days and the body for full potential after that you really have to take it on a consistent basis otherwise you lose it's beneficial effect but the beauty is it's a very high potency formulation you don't have to take it every single day a lot of people find that taking it twice a week long term then give them a multi-month formulation for a very good price point and so the probiotic culture really is one of the best deals in the marketplace for the science behind it the potency behind it and actually the efficacious how much you have to take consistently it's really great take probiotics and they go hey I think helping my but I'm not over the hump like I still don't feel right my energy's now outright I don't feel as good as I think I should the immunoglobulins are fascinating side to things so our immunoglobulins we produce some static body but then we produce what's known a Secretary Iga for the intestinal track at about five grams a day but unfortunately if you have a lot of inflammation or illness that you've been exposed to what happens is overtime you produce less and less meaning it's like trying to send the national guard the border but you don't have any more troops to spare you're using mall internally and so your body just doesn't have the defense mechanism and what's neat about the these you know if you will be soldiers these immunoglobulins what they're doing is they neutralize bacteria viruses environmental challenges food based challenges before they basically trigger your immune system and so these people that are lacking energy or feel like they can't get out of this kind of DYSFUNC- and in the neutral immune twenty-six y and look for one of the top things being how is your energy starting to do because if that is changing it's not luck it means you're immune from shifting from always being activated to being calmed down and it's a big win and then all of a sudden the body can relax it's not feeling like under assault all the time even when you're eating healthy if you have a despotic gut you don't have adequate immunoglobulins even your healthy food can can basically trigger an immune response right we know that to be more of the League he got scenario and WE WANNA make sure that you've got these immunoglobulins in there And and you can turn the cycle around so living probiotic ultra and neutral mu twenty six liar huge options to for people yeah they're making a huge difference solely now the we're looking at the general health the people they don't realize that every day you fractionally clone yourself new body I go to sleep your stem cells come under the story juries in your body your bone marrow are on your fat cells and other tissue and then they get activated by specific frequencies aren't the base of the brain cells connective tissue your nerves and tell them hey this is how you rebuild kidneys is I rebuilt hands and feet and what people don't understand is when you do that your body says hey I can do this but you have to have the building lots and that's where things like read your velvet comes in and optimizing waiting vitamin mineral Max don't make us supreme pro waiting things like co Q.. Ten Supreme Invest your current team we need to have all the because a lot of disease as a whole bevy of cited Kearns and free radical single auction medical hydro proxy radical and Nitro proxy radical and we have the best interests knocking those out the problem is people aren't aware that you don't just get ready birthright Israel lupus or inflamed joints in alone. There's often a stealth pathogen behind the scene which is why we use things like Allison and in our as investing with Neutrogena Cetera and why you have to actually use things to reduce inflammation like self defense plus which seven hundred percent more than any other cocoon in the world let's talk about this say the cannon reduction fee racket reduction a lot of people are not aware you can't do that with drugs drugs very effective with this taking steroids has a very indirect effect that can have lots of bad side effects but now the good effects cannon Yeah we're being assaulted constantly even the healthiest of of people in an we've gotta get stuck controlled So they the inflammatory processes that goes in our bodies Dr Bill some of the big ones come from blood sugar regulation so when we are foods we get this oxidative stress onslaught and that can be very damaging over time again and again so I I mentioned earlier I like using the shakes because they have this opportunity to cover a lot more ground because a as a full on meal replacement just two scoops but if you want US basically preempt to the meals you're about to eat and ingredients that are in there from the pattern forms of cinema and green tea Alpha acid but it's got unique enzymes in there that slowdown Barbara hydrogen which is really profound in what it can do to blunt the kind of oxidative and free radical stress that consuming foods causes and doing that a half servant just one scoop before you're about to eat your meal can have a huge difference league your body responds as we've talked about in the past flipping switch from say storage to burn we WANNA stay on burn and that's where he introduced Kito Power born and Sports Energy Light and some of these other yeah I get requests lots of people say well I have some budget control problems look everyone who's hypertensive is a pre diabetic aren't they they've got sodium potassium ATPA's problems with singled out so it's up to it's up it's up to us that's why I guess you know you you'd say hey a plot everybody listening because you're trying to find figure out the ways that you can better you know uh-huh hack or look for those all options that you know you might not be getting for mainstream medicine they're just waiting for people to have a disease states be categorized and write the script or perform the service do whatever that is but when it comes to wellness optimize a man there's a lot of things to to mess with and to to play with it you can get some great results and I know Dr Bill I'm so you don't keep spinning your wheels and wasting money and resources when you're not getting down to the brass tacks what's really going on in your body is to anti-inflammatories like to control pain and inflammation but they don't know like the damaging effects that they may necessarily be causing the body worth delaying and healing process so something like a cell depends plus is a really good formulation to make people aware of and why is it different it's not only a curcumin extract relation as the most published research of any other cartoons out there but it's actually more complete version because it has the essential more with Ryan our expert and if you have any questions eight one eight eight eight six four zero one on attrition are used looking for that one iodine that you can really trust a medical doctor endorse product that.

Haiti apple Kearns Neutrogena Cetera Israel Allison seven hundred percent eighty three percent seven percent twelve years five grams seven days six months five days
"atpa" Discussed on Remove the Guesswork: Health, Fitness and Wellbeing for Busy Professionals

Remove the Guesswork: Health, Fitness and Wellbeing for Busy Professionals

20:50 min | 2 years ago

"atpa" Discussed on Remove the Guesswork: Health, Fitness and Wellbeing for Busy Professionals

"What we have which allows us to see trends, which is our greatest tool of survival. And again, the Neo cortex. It is like the prefrontal cortex. It is the thing that distinguishes humans from all other animals on earth, and particularly are most common recent ancestor apes and chimpanzees and the way we have all this new cortex was through an ample supply of seafood in the environment magnetic flux coming from the earth and some light. And so this is why my mentor Dr Cruz always comes back to three fundamental tenets that Dr life on earth, and especially advancing evolution lie. Water and magnetism because light powers life water is sort of the thing that holds the charge of life and magnetism is basically the force. That's present in the earth. That is in additional benefactor to how well are ATPA's worse. How well our my dicamba can generate energy. So our goal in. The light diet is to optimize light water in magnetism. So getting into the steps with light. What does this really mean? And that's my term be it was when I started this journey. There was really no proper way to explain this. It was just this mega genius, Dr cruise and all these other researchers put all this together, basically explaining how life works, and and it was just like, okay. Well, I meet someone on a daily basis, and they say, well, so what do you do when I say, I do this. And they said, well, how'd you get into that? Well, because of this this and this, oh, that's cool. Well, what's it called? How do I do it? What do I look for on Google? I'm like, well, sorry, there's really nothing kinda takes five years of of deep research. So that's that's why I'm working on a book, actually, you've reinspired. Equals if needed a kick to get back into that. Because I kind of paused since my travels, but I know how it goes a step one of the light diet if we won't wanna get his how about do. We have time to go maybe ten minutes just roll through these things about eight eight nine minutes. Okay. That's perfect. So so so the key thing is that people have the knowledge they need, and I have a course that I can want people to if they want to learn more. But essentially what you have to do as a human being. Okay. I'm willing to let on the shied act. Yeah. Absolutely. So what what we need to do is human being on earth. Is we need to be getting up every morning to wash the sunrise, and this is might seem almost excessive absurd. But the reason this is so important is because when we wake up at first light when the light is just going from night today, this triggers this process in our brain, which basically starts all of our biologic functions by starting the master clock, which drives all of the peripheral clocks are other organs. What that really means is when we see the early morning light. This is what triggers everything to turn on and function properly. This is what tunes our circadian rhythm for the day. And so if we miss this initial morning light than our body is sort of in a perpetual state of not knowing where it is existing. So this is really important to be getting up first thing in the morning to drive. Our circadian rhythm in this way, are hormonal secretions everything throughout the day is driven in time. By the sun's light like when we wake up we have a spy I can resolve that gets us going and started for the day wakes us up when we go into darkness in the evening, which is what's happening here now from Indonesia as you can see the sun has just set about ten minutes ago. And now it's dark, but it's rainy anyway. So it's been getting dark for a while. But that allows the brain to start secreting melatonin, these processes are all timed, and they're driven by the sun's light throughout the day at certain periods in the night. We have maximum secretions of growth hormone pro. Lacked in these molecules at help us to heal during the afternoon, we have optimal protein, synthesis, a full circadian or the people can even look up Google picture of this. And there's a clock that shows, you know, first thing in the morning, we're designed to half parasols ejection of our bowels, which if a great way to know, if you have a disrupted circadian rhythm is if you don't have a natural bowel movement every morning, but if you if you have a functional circadian to them, you would have this. And again, this might seem like a big deal. But this is a symptom of a deeper disruption that's going on in the body. So that's a real that is the key way to start a circadian rhythm. Again, someone asks the question, what is it? Okay. If I just go out eight or nine and in the morning, once I've woken up naturally and other stuff, and I would say based on what I've learned I did that when I started the light diet, and I had tremendous improvement just by getting more. Sunlight don't get me wrong. However, getting up at first light has been an even bigger boost to my my biologic function because I've been able to actually optimize my circadian rhythm. But again any improvement. Anyone makes in this direction? Getting more some. Light will lead to an improvement in their biology, but I want I want to tell people the way to go full on and all the way because it's most important that people don't leave with a half truth thinking that they're doing the full truth. If they're only going halfway, at least rather people know that they're only going halfway, which was me throughout this whole process. I knew if I was going halfway I knew it, you know, or if if I wasn't going the full way, I knew it. Right. So that's really important. That's step. One of light died is waking up in Washington. Sunrise and pretty much waking up at first light the second step this really beneficial. And this is actually part two of step one is exposing yourself to sunlight during the day. So just getting more sunlight as a rule of thumb is, very simple sunscreen. No sunglasses. No contact lenses during this process. The reason why is because they block tra- violet light, which is actually the key. If you remember from we mentioned earlier for programming a lot of these hormones in biologic processes, creating vitamin d that alone should be an indicator that the sun, isn't this evil thing if we have this molecule, that's. Actually synthesized with the exposure ultraviolet light that has been proven to reduce the risk the risk of all diseases. And the interesting thing is if you take vitamin d orally it does not have the same effect. It's really about having vitamin d that's made the proper way because it's about the light programming vitamin d and making properly and all the other benefits afforded by sunlight, not the vitamin d coming from a dropper or pill bottle, it might have some effects in some tests under very tightly controlled conditions. But generally, it won't be long term. It could even be a risk based on the research. Dr Seuss's laid out step two. We are dimension. This eat a lot of seafood because this is what allowed the human brain to evolve. And for people who are really concerned about mercury. I know my friend, Tim who you interviewed is very concerned about mercury. I have come to learn the people who have high Reebok's, which is how while MIT Conrail are able to carry out this reaction of life that we spent so much time discussing reductions potential reduction oxidation reactions is what we carry out simplified to redux and redux potential is basically how much charged we haven't ourselves to. To carry out these reactions in this is built by having lots of some late exposure and having good quality water in ourselves, which is part two of step to drinking din quality water. We want to eat loads of seafood rank quality water. And the key thing. High Reebok's means you can detox very effectively make mercury and things like this not a huge issue. So people can avoid predator fish, tuna swordfish shark, and that kind of thing if they are concerned about mercury eat sardines, salmon and things like that. And if you're concerned about, you know, farm, fishing toxins in that. Which again, I'm not tremendously concerned about if you have a high Reebok's than you can eat wild fish. If you're concerned about it. That's that's fine source until it why would you avoid participation because everything lots of other fish that F. Listen accumulation of xactly, the smaller fish in krill and stuff like that on the rats. Yes. Yeah. Okay. Anyone who's concerned about the risk of mercury will definitely be the first to tell you that the worst you could theoretically eat his tuna, and Tim Gray. My good friend would say that the tune is really bad. And he's probably gonna listen to this. But again, he has a reason for believing what he does because the research indicates that if someone's totally sick and toxic are just isn't able to detox well than this murky is gonna call the huge issue. But I don't know if it is then I'll find out in a few years, but I'm feeling fantastic. Eating something like this is regular food staple anyhow continuing on from this. It is critical step three to avoid man-made electro-magnetic radiation. Which is not what I'm doing right now with ear buds in my ears. A microphone in front of my face surrounded and WI fi for connection. Yeah. Right. We're surrounded, but but things like not holding your phone to your head easy step like the three things I tell people don't hold your phone up to head. When you're calling use speakerphone heap your phone on airplane mode, when it's on your body, and I've been meeting a lot of conscious people in Bali over here. More than I expected who are aware of this risk. And it's it's actually kind of surprising. If you're at your house, use Ethernet when you're on your computer hookup to Ethernet, your your outer and turn off the WI fi on your. Outer by going into your router settings. I've YouTube video on that on my channel that you can link on how to go on your outer settings any computer any route or in the world, I've done it in in Indonesia in a foreign language in Mexico and turn off the the WI fi the broadcasting, but leaving the router on for your hardwired connection minimize your exposure -pletely huge win. And most importantly, turn that thing off when you sleep the wifi router. That's what we do. We have time goes off at eleven. It comes back on seven. And that's why I say that right now wearing a new bring American apple watch econ sit. But on where to continue blockades, Melissa. So it was a little I want it. I'm turning off my wifi. Yeah. No. I I'll go to this stuff on me. But to be fat that goes on bizarre. That's just turned off. That goes on flight mos- comes off at night that doesn't, but my that studies all on on the continuing pluck leykis monitors thirty to experiment. Yeah. I know make no in the army naval to that. Yeah. Yeah. Be aware that it is a big risk, and it can even. Yeah. Funny thing about the bluetooth. Blood glucose, monitor is there's research showing that this is by woman named Nora Voelkel. And it was previously done by Alan fry if I'm not mistaken that shows that non native EMF it can alter the AM PK pathways in our biology, basically causing spikes in blood glucose without any changes to anything else in our diet environment or anything else. Well, so that just as a sign showing that again, you know, one would have to maybe wanna go read those papers themselves. I've read them and gotten experts sort of analysis of them from others. But it's basically indicating that you know, you think you're doing coal experiment with the blood glucose monitor. But maybe it's even creating artifacts that you wouldn't be aware of because not being researched. In other words, people think they're wearing a Fitbit or the wearing a apple watch. And they're wearing ordering and it's making them healthier the or ring actually kudos to them. I believe you can't turn it on airplane mode from uconn. Yeah. You kind of have to benefit and so these are things to be aware of that step three of the light in the final. Of that step is if you live in a major massive city in especially if they're willing out five technology, which they are in all of the western world United States in Europe, especially the aware of the risks that you are being experimented on. And there's a book called going somewhere truth about a life in science of going somewhere truth about a life and science sounds. It's amazing. It's it's about the first researcher or it is written by the first researcher on the health effects of nonnative electromagnetic radiation back in the sixty seventies. And what happened when he went to court against the power companies? And also about the stories where the navy hired him in his mentor. Dr Robert O Becker who many people may know if they're interested in energy medicine because he wrote a book called the body electric. This is his protege. Andrew Marino who wrote the book going somewhere. And this outlines exactly how it happened that the government United States, which then spread to the rest of the world allowed non-native electromagnetic radiation in the radio and microwave range to be utilized abroad -ly for across all applications that. Industries desired on the public without the public say. And even when it was brought to court upon risks. How the evidence was basically distorted and hidden based on a really flawed old legal precedent, which basically states that because a bunch of people agree that something is true. It must be true that was the standard that was live in the United States. So all these power companies, hire all the research. They could pay anyone who need an extra dime, and they paid a lot of times. Trust me, lots of money to basically all testify that this one guy who is the only person doing the non industry funded research was a total crack, and because he didn't have the general consensus the his evidence wouldn't be admitted in the court of law, and he always lost. So that was the standard governing science at the time. And really the telecom companies are still campaigning for the same standard to be used in the ongoing, massive amounts of legal cases against them. And it was also the navy who needed all of the soldiers or people in av to believe that all the radar the being exposed to. Wasn't a risk because this was going on during the Cold War. So would have been a massive threat to let's say national security, quote, quote, if all of the radar and military men in navy men all of a sudden were concerned about getting cancer and cataracts, which is what the research showed that these radars caused the really strong ones, which is way stronger than technology. We're using today acutely. However, we're all exposed to way more of it on a much more regular basis. So it's actually very interesting. So that stuff is die Couve war. I'll just kind of walk through these quickly. And we'll just kinda maybe close up at four people know about women Hof the iceman get Nicole, bath, take a cold, shower expose yourself to the elements. Don't wear your coat as often as you normally would in lighter layers. This is basically good rules of thumb because in the way this improves, the mitochondria is by forcing them to work a little bit harder to generate more energy and release a certain portion of it. As heat also known as infrared light, this affects the water structure around the mighty Qendra causing everything to be much more. For tight and together. Which is essentially how we want these respiratory proteins to be. So again, if we structure this water around the mighty Congres in ourselves than in. This is something we're not gonna get into right now. But basically, there's a researcher named Gerald Pollack. He wrote a book called the fourth phase of water, which basically is a landmark book for how waterworks in living organisms because it reveals that the water in ourselves is not like water in a glass that it's actually in a structured form. And the the thing that causes it to go into structured form is when it's against a hydrophobic water loving surface and infrared light, which is also known as he is shined onto it. And so our body constantly generates infrared white in this process of energy generation in other words, heat because it's not a fully efficient process. We basically capture energy that would would otherwise be wasting. But when we go into cold freezing water or even just cold air, but cold water's much, more effective. Anyone who's been in a cold? Bath knows how much it just sharpens you up the reason why because forces the mighty congre to massively increase their energy, Janet. Or some people will say to increase your metabolism mitochondrial energy production might have Conrail energy production to anyone who didn't get this in the beginning. Which might not have is a quivalent metabolism. So when people say you have a fast metabolism, it's because your mitochondria work. Well, as you age, you're might economy is slowly work, less and less. Well, meaning we have a slow metabolism. Which means you know, we gain weight more easily because we don't burn things as well. Because our might a condo as well. So cold water exposure, huge benefit is say if you can take an ice bath or cold plunge every day at you know, between twelve and fifteen degrees celsius is plenty good. And I've a spot there's all kinds of bath houses that have this huge benefit it'll change your life. I can tell you that. All right. So that's full. Yes. That four and there's two more. So step five is washing the sunset, or at least being outdoors, and as we've discussed living in outdoor lifestyles part of step one getting ample sunlight exposure, unfiltered through glass windows, sunglasses, clothing. And so on. In. The course I explained more how people who are really pale especially people in UK might have this issue, but how they can build a solar Callus, which is like a tan. I was those person I ever knew growing up. And now, I'm one of the tennis people, I know generals becoming for a white Irish guy because I'm like my grandmother's from Dublin. That's for my skin comes from. Yeah. So very clearly driven, but you wanna watch the sunset, and the key thing is in the modern world. Like what I'm doing right now, you can see out of these blue walkers on this is a key part of white guy at this is why I started a company because one we're exposed to artificial light at night. It does the opposite of what that sunrise does for us. It disrupts are melatonin secretion because it the light like I said the beginning of the first episode it tricks our brain into thinking that it's day when it's not. And so we no longer make melatonin, and then melatonin is the chemo or I should say we no longer secrete the melatonin which was programmed by the sun's light during the day. We no longer is secreted at the right time early enough in our sleeping period. So we no longer get all the benefits of like, the pro lack. Surge later on in the evening, the human growth hormone surge later on in the evening. We don't get these because our circadian rhythm are biologic lock is disrupted by this. Artificial light exposure at night. So you could go live in a cave in only use or you could just use red lights or candles at your house at night. Great hack, no lights on before bed and so on right? If you're living in the normal world, blue light-blocking losses are a key hack. And that's why they work really well, and the I made them more attractive. That's basically what rob success? So instead of six anyone who's listening to this just you make yourself your first priority? That is the most important thing. That's step. Number six. You have to be the highest value in your own life. You have to be your own end. And you can't be the means to anyone else's end. Or the means to anything else of than your own existence your own existence, justifies your life, and it justifies everything you do. And you don't have to do anything necessarily to justify your existence just being is justification of your own existence now to stay alive. You have to do things to say. Alive. But there's this philosophy taken over the world, which is that every man should live for others, which again as long as I believe that it was like a life sucker out of me. Because no matter how much I did to enjoy my life in appreciate myself and enjoy myself and being ball stuff. I just realized this for as as well as I could yesterday for the first time, but I was never satisfied because I felt like I had to suffer more. I had to struggle more. Otherwise, I didn't deserve. What was that? I had worked for that. I had earned so people need to make sure men my mentor. Dr crews says it like if you aren't good for yourself who you're good for that's his way of putting it. But my way of putting it is that you are the most valuable thing in your life. And you have to treat yourself like that. And then you be of the most value to others. I think it's a strong closing message because too many people denigrate themselves, they don't put themselves. I they think selfish do so. But I think you the engine if you live you vision, the Connie. Appropriate ninety found of my value university said he makes sure that he's done a workout done meditation. Nissan, half throw of the things before he turns his attention to family business. A completely indo-soviet. It's not a selfish view. It's it makes a lot of sense. Matt. Thank you have given us a ton of information already. Appreciate that the listeners. What is well you've touched on you'll cools for the light die where can people will link to its ensure nice where can people access that? Correct. That would be on my YouTube channel. Now it actually hasn't been put live yet. But maybe when you won't release this podcast. It will be the up, but it live within about two weeks or less. So okay. So that might coincide. Okay. So we'll link it will be gentle. Okay. Cool. We've got a discount code for the glosses which is boaty shots, which will get listeners. Ten percent off on your own running a promotion for the launch. So they're going to end up with something like about thirty five percent off, which is fantastic. So people can meet you personally at Instagram at the light dot you'll website. Is Matt Murray Kogas MA, oh, UCI dot com. Murray Cohen cheap. Just well, they'll find that coolest but will link to it on the business rob ticks, which is the blue light brooking Goss's super cool fashionable trend date that's at raw on the scope ticks on Instagram and the website is WWW dot raw optics. Don't come rats. And if someone wants to reach me, you know, you can send me a message on Instagram Instagram might be a possible way. That would be good. You can Email support it rob Dick's if you have increased rate relates to rob Dick's, and we'll get back to you there. And yeah. And I'll get back to you through Instagram at a certain point. I have a lot of messages coming any questions because people love this message. But I'll get back to a certain point. We'll get you some information very code, Matt. Thanks very much. Thank you so much. I really appreciate you coming on the show. Interested in finding out what you'll helpful Q? It's jumping out website WWW dot body shots performance dot com and click on take the test. It'll take you to a short two three minutes test. And at the end of that, you'll get a school called and a free thirty nine patriot pool based on I six signals sleep, mental health, energy, body, composition, digestion, and fitness. And if even joy this episode, please think of someone you could really benefit from the content and hit not Chevron and send it across to them. And of course, tickets subscribe and Nevis a rating and review. Thank you very much for listening.

melatonin Reebok Google United States Matt Murray Kogas MA researcher Indonesia YouTube growth hormone WI Dr Cruz ATPA apple Dr Seuss Tim
"atpa" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"atpa" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Stairs and I to just adopt. kind of You stayed could. interested If you in could. ever since I in eleven years But because the thing so is that they have surveillance for those video. people They who see him at hear like eleven us talk forty about nine it PM or they've heard walking about across the podcast or they've heard about this plaza the in downtown limited Pittsburgh. series And on he's television, fine. He's or not staggering. whatever. He's not. Sum Straight up, line the the when story Shelley in when its she most picked him credible up. He wasn't drunk. version He didn't seem inebriated as you've interfaced anything. with it He wasn't over slurring the years. I mean, terrified what they say is texting that there or doing is, you something know, with and his they phone used the just term walking serial across killers what they say, and there's he a seems there's a fine. gang of organized And then killers he just that walks had these down. semi-autonomous This alley cells I guess the in last shot of them. in They got cities across was he the kinda country, lead against Wofford and second. that they target And then specific the cameras at types the other of end people of the alley have to water kill in and they couldn't as catch part of him, either a gang and then initiation either could've gone left and then ritual, gone right over the Roberto or Clemente as bridge part to go of home, but just, the you cameras know, didn't capture him the doing guys that. make a lot You of just them finished. for a long while You where these know, the college there's age another piece white there men too on three point in ATPA's your story athletes where tall good he looking told strong, her that like he had the pithy on the of initial like the case perfect when guy, he called her scared and the people that they aren't I said guess, come pick and me up disoriented and but more recently where he was like with he the Dakota said James that he case had already they've been spoken targeting to a a gay police male officer in the cockpit blown them from off. what I understand Yeah. there's That's what been he said. some He said, I've tried to women have the thrown cops into the cops the next won't help in me. the last few years. And you know, I They. tried to ask all these questions. I That did that ask that's all these what questions they say. And of the they Pittsburgh said they operate cops they the communicate DA's office on Emmys the dark office, web. they And were very at one rude. point Very they dismissive. were actually given And you've got our answer. the URL You can keep asking for questions their site all you want. on But the dark you've got web, our answer. and they went to it. And then They treat a a reporter video like camera that. I can like imagine turned how badly on them they treat when they the were families supposed to put in a password, on March and they just sixth didn't have the two password thousand someone seventeen that's Anthony you're forty Allen. days They kinda. after Dakota James But disappeared. you know, I think we know Roughly very, I know very little of what nine they know. weeks I think after there's a lot. They know the that they original haven't said call to his friend smiley a face woman aspect. walking her dog I was saw that his the smiley body faces floating happy in the Ohio scenes, but river it's not ten just miles a smiley face. It's from these twelve where he other was last symbols seen that downtown. are specific this gang Another and thirty one of feet the people offshore on their team which is a isn't nationally that far renowned gang expert, ruled who's a college an accidental professor. drowning. So there's like three That's retired what they ruled New York it. Even City. though Detectives there's no his investigating body had traveled this and ten miles down that river. a criminal And Justice there's a steel professor and concrete in Minnesota, who's a nationally renowned Dan gang there expert. that it would have had to So go these are just like you over know, underneath citizen there's no damage Joe to the body out whatsoever. there trying to investigate it on around. And These there's. are some people with some really strong credentials when the story It's I started the same type breaking. of thing. There Wasn't was a decomposed lot of pushback enough to from have been in the water for that mainstream long. law And enforcement the sources the mother saying also, oh,.

Roberto Dakota James Shelley Pittsburgh. Dakota Pittsburgh Wofford New York professor reporter ATPA Ohio Dan Joe professor. officer Minnesota Anthony Clemente Allen.
"atpa" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

11:45 min | 3 years ago

"atpa" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Coal weisensee Egan is a writer for the Daily Beast at one time, she was writing also for people magazine. That's the first time. I encountered her work. She joins us here on coast to coast AM, and I wanted to get here right away. Nikki I hear it. Nikki is okay. Okay. I wanna get you right away. Because first of all we share a little history on this story of the smiley face killers. Because I was in the twin cities back in two thousand six seven and eight when the story was kind of getting traction originally and I worked with Christie peel who is the reporter for channel five at Hubbard broadcasting. We were in the same building. And she was the one who kinda got the story a little bit more blown open a nationwide. But I also had a chance to go back and retrace the steps of some of the people even one of them, whom you mentioned in your in your article, and and talk to the some of the families that were involved in the disappearances of these young men in what has become known as this smiley face killer case tell the tell me how you first came upon it when you first started to write about it over a decade ago. Sure it was right before Kevin Gannon. Anthony Duarte were having their press conference in New York City that was like Monday, April twenty eighth I think it was in Christie had just run her story. So she like broke the story, and then they were following up with this national press conference because you know, they wanted to get some national attention to it. They've been investigating this all on their own and low on funds, I want everything traveling all across the country and they wanted to get some publicity. And I remember when my editor assigned me to I was sort of like, oh, come on, really. You know? And and then, but then the more we started looking into it. You know, then we found out the Minneapolis police chief wasn't discrediting it that. In fact, one of these cases have been turned into a homicide, and I went to that press conference that Monday, and then I went to heaven and all of them out to dinner that night on people to get better that night as sources 'cause I figured this is not going away. You know, there's something like this. This is just the tip of the iceberg. And and I just kind of stayed interested in ever since I in eleven years because so for those people who hear us talk about it or they've heard about the podcast or they've heard about the limited series on television, or whatever. Sum up, the the story in its most credible version as you've interfaced with it over the years. I mean, what they say is that there is, you know, and they used the term serial killers what they say, there's a there's a gang of organized killers that had these semi-autonomous cells in in cities across the country, and that they target specific types of people to kill as part of either a gang initiation, a ritual, or as part of just, you know. Guys, make a lot of them for a long while where these college age white men on three point ATPA's athletes, talk good, look, strong, like the piffle of like the perfect guy, and the people that they aren't I guess, and and but more recently like with the Dakota James case they've been targeting a gay male someone I understand there's been some women thrown into the mix in the last few years. They. That that's what they say. And they said they operate they communicate on the dark web. And at one point they were actually given the URL for their site on the dark web, and they went to it. And then a video camera turned on them when they were supposed to put in a password, and they just didn't have the password. Someone that's Anthony. You are Allen. They kinda. But you know, I think we know very very little of what they know. I think there's a lot. They know that they haven't said the smiley face aspect. I was that the smiley faces at the seams. But it's not just the smiley face. It's these twelve other symbols that are specific to this gang and one of the people on their team is a nationally renowned gang expert, who's a college professor. So there's like three retired New York City. Detectives investigating this and a criminal Justice professor in Minnesota, whose a nationally renowned gang expert. These aren't just you know, citizen Joe out there trying to investigate it on their own. These are some people with some really strong credentials when the story I started breaking. There was a lot of pushback from mainstream law enforcement sources saying the public is making too much out of a coincidental occurrences of these popular good looking generally regarded as high. Forming a college age students who were victims of a drunken accident that they were this. The the reason why they were found around rivers is because in these college towns, they left bars, they went down to an area where they were gonna urinate, and or whatever and they or or skinny dip or whatever and they fell into the river, and because they were so drunk. They drowned, and this was in fact, this is the story that they had even told about several cases in in in the twin cities area when I was there. And I went back and retraced the steps of these students and tried to figure out whether there was anything to that, including one case from Saint Thomas student, Saint Thomas university in Saint Paul who the who the police claim had fallen off a rather large embankment and rolled down into the Mississippi. It was absolutely impossible to do that. Because there were just nothing, but trees, and stumps all the way down be. Would have been like the most improbable case of pachinko for this guy to a fall in all the way down in between all these trees and ended up in the river. And yet they stuck to that story until as you pointed out the Minneapolis police chief recanted. The, you know, the regretfully said that they had not done their proper due diligence and even apologize to the family of one of the victims and said, clearly he was the victim of a homicide, but these were not admissions fast, incoming and as you point out in your article in the Daily Beast, most still an overwhelming number of cases, the police are unwilling to say that these victims, though, they all share a similar profile are are the victims of a homicide. Well, I know it's exactly I mean, no one wants to no one wants to it onus. And when you look at it, collectively, you, you know, you can say, okay. Maybe maybe it was, you know, all these guys getting drunk, but when you start looking at each of these cases individually and do what you did and start going to the scenes and these. Detectives dead. You can see the they all start to fall apart. And that's what you know, the FBI did a review of in two thousand eight and all they did was look at the reports from what I understand they didn't even have all documents on each of the cases and decided to concur with the police, but they never did any of their own investigating. They never talked to detectives. They never did anything that. These guys have done. They've traveled all over the country and gone to AVI scenes, and then the center for HAMAs I research debunked this. That's what everybody say right now. Oh, this was debunked in two thousand ten by the center for homicide research. Well, I went and actually read that report, which I'm sure very journalists have done, right. All they did was read a bunch of news clippings and come to a conclusion and the guy who -cluded this is not even a veteran investigator himself. He was a firefighter for twenty two years yet. He is he hasn't gone to any of these scenes. I'm sure he did this analysis sitting at his desk in Minnesota actually go to any of these and himself or look at any of the autopsy reports or even. You know, four years later he could have read the textbook the textbook that Kevin. And professor Gilbertson did on fourteen cases case studies in drowning forensics which give incredible detail and each of these cases, and there's a lot in there buried in there about this group 'cause I've been rereading it recently right about that same time that you were you heard you were doing, you know, you leading the way on this Christie peel was still actively involved in the case before she retired from daily journalism in and I think became a mom and less time. I talked to her it was very happy not to be covering. This case is totally creeped her out. A lot of male shouldn't want to deal with them. But the, but I covered on the air lot. We kept having people on just like many of the people you have mentioned, and I even just coincidentally I reached out after having heard the the FBI kinda rebuffed the whole thing prima facie just kind of at the beginning. Just as saying that there's something to this. I contacted a guy who had been on recently on coast to coast, and this is under timing us on the show a lot more regularly. And I I asked him as a favor whether he would look at this case and his response. He was a profiler and he'd written a book, and he did it reluctantly, but as a favor, and then I did a follow up call with him. And I swear to you Nikki he was almost mad at me. I will always remember that feeling of like he was annoyed that I had brought this to him. And he said there's nothing to this. I don't know why you're talking about this. This is you know. People are looking they're seeing ships in clouds. There's nothing here. And he wouldn't even go on the air to have a conversation about it. He said, I don't want anything to do with this case. This is dumb. And that was it. He wouldn't do. It wouldn't go any further. And like I said if they like the case that got having Gannon on this. He was a missing persons detective in New York City that assigned to this missing college student Patrick McNeill who was last seen leaving a bar ninety nine street or something. And but they had whip first of all they had witnesses who saw these people and she no longer in a car following him as he stumbled out of there and walked in any turn left on second in the car. Followed them second supposedly, he yeah. He drunkenly went to p and the river while he walked all up and down there. You can't even get to the river very easily. That's consultant January. Why are you going to go all the way right tucked in an alley? Yeah. I mean, I'm a guy there's twenty places to P long before you go to a river in if you're not working night in the winter winter, it's not July. And at that hour that night. It's not even really a very private act in a college town. You might even be have to wait in line in an alley. And that's where it is. Just as you say. But yet, what do you think the FBI has been so reluctant to use its resources to coordinate? These disparate police departments around the country into a more fulsome investigation because ever since nine eleven while they care about is terrorism. That is that is the that is the bulk of what they do and that's their priority. And they have to be invited into these cases. That's another reason. And they you know von doesn't like the contradict other law enforcement that's all from heaven, and those guys are running up against these are these are smaller, whatever police department, it is non wants to admit they might have a serial killings in their midst, nor do they want to put the resources into the money and the time into finding. Doing this. It's easier to talk them up his drownings. And if you think about it, it's sort of a devil's, advocate, what better way to disguise a murder than a drowning as I was talking to somebody surrounding experts that have been involved with the case, you know, the first whatever they find a body in body water..

Christie peel FBI Kevin Gannon New York City Nikki Minneapolis Anthony Duarte Minnesota people magazine professor Hubbard broadcasting weisensee Egan smiley writer HAMAs reporter editor ATPA
"atpa" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:39 min | 3 years ago

"atpa" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And ninety four one FM. Nicole weisensee Egan is a writer for the Daily Beast at one time she was writing also for people magazine. That's the first time. I encountered her work. She joins us here. Coast to coast AM, and I wanted to get to you right away. Nikki I hear Nikki is okay. Okay. I want to get to you right away. Because first of all we share a little history on this story of the smiley face killers. Because I was in the twin cities back in two thousand six seven and eight when the story was kinda getting traction originally and I worked with Christie peel who is the reporter for channel five at Hubbard broadcasting. We were in the same building. And and she was the one who kind of got the story a little bit more blown open nationwide. But I also had a chance to go back and retrace the steps of some of the people even one of them, whom you mentioned in your in your article, and the and talk to the some of the families that were involved in the disappearances of these young men in what has become known as the smiley face killer case tell the tell me how you first came upon it. When you first started to write about it over a decade ago. Sure it was right before Kevin Gannon. Anthony were having their press conference in New York City that was like Monday, April twenty eighth I think it was in Christie had just run her story. So she like broke the story, and then they were following up with this national press conference because they wanted to get some national attention to it. They've been investigating this all on their own and low on funds, I want everything traveling all across the country and they wanted to get some publicity. And I still remember when my editor assigned me to I was sort of like, oh come on. Really, you know, and then, but then the more we started looking into it. You know, then we found out the Minneapolis police chief wasn't discrediting at that. In fact, one of these cases have been turned into a homicide, and I went to that press conference that Monday, and then I went to heaven and all of them out to dinner that night on people to get better that night as sources because I figured this is not going away. You know, there's something like this. This is just the tip of the iceberg. And and I just kind of stayed interested in ever since I in eleven years because so for those people who hear us talk about it or they've heard about the podcast or they've heard about the limited series on television, or whatever. Sum up, the the story in its most credible version as you've interfaced with it over the years. I mean, what they say is that there is you know, and they use the term serial killers. What they say there's a there's a gang of organized killers that had these semi-autonomous cells in in cities across the country, and that they target specific types of people to kill as part of either a gang initiation ritual, or as part of just, you know. A lot of them for a long while where these college age white men on three point ATPA's athletes, talk good, look, strong, like the pithy of like the perfect guy, and the people that they aren't I guess, and and but more recently like with the Dakota James case they've been targeting gay male from what I understand there's been some women thrown into the next in the last few years. They. That that that's what they say. And they said they operate they communicate on the dark web. And at one point they were actually given the URL for their site on the dark web, and they went to it. And then a video camera like turned on them when they were supposed to put in a password, and they just didn't have the password. Someone that's Anthony. You are Allen. They kinda. But you know, I think we know very, I know very little of what they know. I think there's a lot. They know that they haven't said the smiley face aspect. I was that the smiley faces at these scenes, but it's not just the smiley face. It's these twelve other symbols that are specific to this gang and one of the people on their team, a nationally renowned gang expert, who's a college professor. So there's a lot there's like three retired New York City. Detectives investigating this and a criminal Justice professor in Minnesota who's a national chain gang expert. So these aren't just you know, citizen Joe out there trying to get it on their own. These are some people with some really strong credentials when the story I started breaking. There was a lot of pushback from mainstream law enforcement sources saying the public is making too much out of a coincidental occurrences of these popular good, looking generally regarded as high performing college age students who were victims of a drunken accident that they were this. The the the reason why they were found around rivers is because in these college towns, they left bars, they went down to an area where they were gonna urinate, and or whatever, and they th- or or skinny dip or whatever and they fell into the river, and because they were so drunk. They drowned, and this was in fact, this is the story that they had even told about several cases in in in the twin cities area when I was there. And I went back and retraced the steps of the students. And tried to figure out whether there was anything to that, including one case from Saint Thomas student, Saint Thomas university in Saint Paul who the who the police claimed had fallen off a rather large embankment and rolled down into the Mississippi. It was absolutely impossible to do that. Because there were just nothing, but trees and stumps all the way down it would have been like the most improbable case of pachinko for this guy to fall in all the way down in between all these trees and ended up in the river. And yet they stuck to that story until as you pointed out the Minneapolis police chief recanted. The, you know, the regretfully said that they had not done their proper due diligence and even apologized to the family of one of the victims said clearly he was a victim of a homicide, but these were not admissions fast in coming in as you point out in your article in the Daily Beast, most still an overwhelming number of cases, the police are unwilling to say that these victims, though, they all share. Similar profile are are the victims of a homicide. Well, I know it's exactly I mean, no one wants to no.

Minneapolis Christie New York City Anthony people magazine Nikki professor Nicole weisensee Egan smiley Hubbard broadcasting Kevin Gannon writer ATPA editor Saint Thomas university Saint Thomas reporter Allen Saint Paul
"atpa" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

14:19 min | 3 years ago

"atpa" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Risk free offer. Nicole weisensee Egan is a writer for the Daily Beast at one time she was writing also for people magazine. That's the first time. I encountered her work. She joins us here on coast to coast AM, and I wanted to get to you right away. Nikki I hear Nikki is okay. Okay. I want to get to you right away. Because first of all we share a little history on this story of the smiley face killers. Because I was in the twin cities back in two thousand six seven and eight when the story was kinda getting traction originally, and I worked with Christy peel who is the reporter for channel five at Hubbard broadcasting. We were in the same building. And and she was the one who kinda got the story a little bit more blown open nationwide. But I also had a chance to go back and retrace the steps of some of the people even one of them, whom you mentioned in your in your article and talk to the some of the families that were involved in the disappearances of these young men in what has become known as the smiley face killer case tell the tell me how you first came upon it when you first started to write about it over a decade ago. Sure it was right before Kevin Gannon, Anthony Duarte. We're having their press conference in New York City that it was like Monday, April twenty eighth. I think it lies in Christie had just run her story. So she like broke the story, and then they were following up with this national press conference because you know, they wanted to get some national attention to it. They've been investigating this all on their own and melon funds. My want everything traveling all across the country, and they wanted to get some complexity, and I I still remember when my editor signed me to I was sort of like, oh, come on, really. You know? And and then, but then the more we started looking into it. You know, then we found out Minneapolis police chief wasn't discrediting said. In fact, one of these cases have been turned into a homicide, and I went to that press conference that Monday, and then I went to heaven and all of them out to dinner that night on people to get them better that night as sources because I think this is not going away. You know, there's something like this. This is just the tip of the iceberg. And and I just kind of stayed interested in ever since I in eleven years because through those people who hear us talk about it or they've heard about the podcast or they've heard about the limited series on television, or whatever. Sum up, the the story in its most credible version as you've interfaced with it over the years. I mean, what they say is that there is you know, and they use the term serial killers. What they say there's a there's a gang of organized killers that have these semi autonomous cells in in cities across the country. And that they target specific types of people to kill as part of either a gang initiation ritual, or as part of just, you know, the guys like a lot of them for a long while where these college age white men three point ATPA's athletes tall good looking strong like the epitome of like the perfect guy, and the people that they aren't I guess, and and but more recently like with the Dakota James case, they've been targeted a gay male from what I understand there's been some women turn into the mix in last year's they. That that that's what they say. And they said they operate they communicate on the dark web. And at one point they were actually given the URL for their site on the dark web, and they went to it. And then a video camera like turned on them when they were supposed to put in a password, and they just didn't have the password someone you're they kinda. But you know, I think we know very I know very little of what they now. I think there's a lot. They know that they haven't said the smiley face aspect, though, is that the smiley faces at these. But it's not just a smiley face. It's these twelve other symbols that are specific gang and one of the people on their team is a nationally renowned gang expert, who's a college professor. So there's a lot there's like three retired New York City. Detectives investigating this and a criminal Justice professor in Minnesota, whose a nationally gang expert. These are just you know, citizen Joe out there trying to get it on their own. These are some people with some really strong credential. When the story I started breaking. There was a lot of pushback from mainstream law enforcement sources saying the public is making too much out of coincidental occurrences of these popular good looking generally regarded as. High performing college age students who were victims of a drunken accident that they were this. The reason why they were found around rivers is because in these college towns, they left bars, they went down to an area where they were going to urinate, and or whatever and they or or skinny dip or whatever and they fell into the river, and because they were so drunk, they drown. And this was in fact, this is the story that they hadn't even told about several cases in in in the twin cities area when I was there. And I went back and retraced the steps of these students and tried to figure out whether there was anything to that, including one case from Saint Thomas student Saint Thomas university in Saint Paul who the who the police claimed had fallen off a rather large embankment enrolled down into the Mississippi. It was absolutely impossible to do that. Because there were just nothing, but trees, and stumps all the way. It would have been like the most improbable case of pachinko for this guy to a fall in all the way down in between all of these trees and ended up in the river. And yet they stuck to that story until as you pointed out the Minneapolis police chief recanted. The regretfully said that they had not done their proper due diligence and even apologize to the family of one of the victims and said, clearly he was a victim of homicide, but these were not admissions fast in coming, and as you point out in your article in the Daily Beast, most still overwhelming number of cases, the police are unwilling to say that these victims, though, they all share a similar profile are are the victims of a homicide. Well, I know it's exactly I mean, no one wants to no one wants to own this. And when you look at it, collectively, you, you know, you can say, okay. Maybe maybe it was, you know, all these guys getting drunk, but when you start looking at each of these cases individually, and do what you did and start going to the scene and these detectives dead, you can see the they all start to fall apart. And that's what you know, the FBI did a review of in two thousand eight and all they did was look at the reports from what I understand they didn't even have all documents on each of the cases and decided to come with the police, but they never did any of their own investigating. They never talked to detectives they never did anything. These guys have done. They've traveled all over the country and gone to all these scenes and then the center for homicide research debunked this. That's what everybody say right now. Oh, this was debunked in two thousand ten by the center for homicide research while I went and actually read that report, which I'm sure very few. Journalists have done all they did was read a bunch of news clippings and come to a. Inclusion and the guy who concluded this is not even a veteran investigator himself. He was a firefighter for twenty two years yet. He is he hasn't gone to any of these scenes. I'm sure he did this analysis sitting at his desk in Minnesota. Actually, go to any of these scenes himself or look at any of the autopsy reports or even four years later, he could have read the textbook the textbook pick heaven and professor Gilbertson dead on fourteen cases case studies in drowning forensics, but give incredible detail. And he said he's cases, and there's a lot in there buried in there about this group 'cause I've been rereading it recently, right? About that same time that you were you heard you were doing, you know, you leading the way on this Christie peel was still actively involved in the case before she retired from daily journalism. And and I think became a mom and less time. I talked to her was very happy not to be covering this case because it totally creeped her out. She's getting a lot of male should want to deal with. But the, but I covered it on the air lot. We kept having people on just like many of the people you have mentioned, and I even just in coincidentally, I reached out after having heard the FBI kinda rebuffed the whole thing prima facie just kind of at the beginning. Just as there's something to this. I contacted a guy who had been on recently on coast to coast, and this is at a time when I was on the show a lot more regularly. And I I asked him as a favor whether he would look at this case and his response profiler, and he'd written a book, and he did it reluctantly, but as a favor, and then I did a follow up call with him. And I swear to you Nikki he was almost mad at me. I will always remember that feeling of like he was a noise that I had brought this to and he said there's nothing to this. I don't know why you're talking about this. This is. You know, people are looking they're seeing ships and clouds, there's nothing here. And he wouldn't even go on the air or to have a conversation about it. He said, I don't want anything to do with this case. This is dumb. And that was it. He wouldn't do. It wouldn't go any further. And like I said if they like the case that got having and on this. He was a missing persons detective in New York City that assigned to this missing college student Patrick McNeill who was last seen leaving a bar. I think was ninety ninety street or something. And but they had first of all the witnesses who saw these people inching along in a car following him. Right as he stumbled out of there and walk in any turn left on second in the car. Followed them second supposedly, he yeah. He drunkenly went to pay and the river while he walked all up and down there. You can't even get to the river very easily from. That's consultant angry. Why are you going to go all the way right tucked in an alley? There was I mean, I'm a guy there's twenty places to P long before you go to a river. If you're not working. In the winter winter it's not a lie at that hour that night. It's not even really a very private act in a college town, you might even be having to wait in line in an alley. And that's where it's just as you say. But yet, what do you think the FBI has been so reluctant to use its resources to coordinate? These disparate police departments around the country into a more fulsome investigation because ever since nine eleven while they care about is terrorism. That is that is the that is the bulk of what they do and that's their priority. And they have to be invited into these cases. That's another reason, and they you know, law enforcement doesn't like to contradict other law enforcement. That's awesome. Having an guys are running up against these are these are smaller, whatever police department, it is non wants to admit they might have a serial killings in their nets, nor do they wanna. Put the resources into the money and a time into finding he's doing this. It's easier to talk them up his drownings. And if you think about it as sort of a devil's, advocate what better way to disguise the murder than a drowning. As I was talking to somebody surrounding experts that have been involved with the case, you know, the first whatever they find a body in a body water. First conclusion is oh they drowned. Right. Preserve the scene. They don't, you know, try to do anything. They just you know, oh, they drown. And there's so many weird things about these drownings. I mean, the one kid was found standing straight up in water. Okay. I don't know how that happened other kid Joshua. Now be called his friend saying he was scared and being pursued by people he didn't know, and then he was found dead. There's the survivor you remember him Colin forty the survivor the one who was out with his friends drinking at one o'clock in the morning. And the next thing, you know, it's five thirty in the morning. He's swimming in the middle of the river. And doesn't know how in the hell we got. There doesn't remember the last four hours. So we took himself to an emergency room and got treated, but yeah, he's one of the survivors of these guys. You know, this is we're talking with Nikki Egan, she with this. Great piece yesterday in the Daily Beast, and you can link up to it through coast to coast AM dot com. Do you still right for people occasionally, by the way? No, I left there a couple of years ago. And I just I I just wanted to buck. That's coming out. And now we're going to talk about the kospi book that that's what I've been doing mostly for the last year. But I still like to freelance stories that I sure am care about. So when I had an opportunity to write about this again, I pitched it to the east. I have a friend Casey Baker who writes for people sometimes. Casey. Okay. Good. I said hi if you talk to her so this is where enter dead to who's a super nice guy. So the this is this is where the smiley face story kind of lives though, is in between, and I not elevating myself to your position, but kind of in between people like us, and the podcast and other people who can end the callers and everybody who's continues to be interested in trying to find Justice for these young men who seemingly suspected something that was going on that night, in many cases, not just one we're telling people that they felt like they were being followed or that they were a Radic in their behavior that night, which none of their friends could account for why they were acting that way. And there's and and and this idea of vans that were appearing and townspeople saw..

Nikki Egan New York City FBI Minneapolis Christie peel people magazine Minnesota professor Nicole weisensee Egan Casey Baker Hubbard broadcasting Christy peel Kevin Gannon writer reporter editor Saint Thomas student Saint Tho
"atpa" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

11:38 min | 3 years ago

"atpa" Discussed on WTVN

"Nicole weisensee Egan is a writer for the Daily Beast at one time she was writing also for people magazine. That's the first time. I encountered her work. She joins us here on coast to coast AM, and I wanted to get here right away. Nikki I hear Nikki is okay. Okay. I want to get to you right away. Because first of all we share a little history on this story of the smiley face killers. Because I was in the twin cities back in two thousand six seven and eight when the story was kinda getting traction originally, and I worked with Christy peel who is the reporter for channel five at Hubbard broadcasting. We were in the same building. And and she was the one who kinda got the story a little bit more blown open a nationwide. But I also had a chance to go back and retrace the steps of some of the people even one of them, whom you mentioned in your in your article, and and talk to the some of the families that were involved in the disappearances of these young men in what has become known as the smiley face killer. Case tell tell me how you first came upon it. When you first started to write about it over a decade ago. Sure, it was right before Kevin Gannon and Duarte were having their press conference in New York City that it was like Monday, April twenty eighth I think it was in Christie had just run her story. So she like broke the story, and then they were following up with this national press conference because you know, they wanted to get some national attention to it. They've been investigating this all on their own and low on funds, my want everything traveling all across the country, and they wanted to get some city. And I I still remember when my editor assigned me to it. I was sort of like oh come on. Really, you know. And and then, but then the more we started looking into it. You know, then we found out the Minneapolis police chief wasn't discrediting it that. In fact, one of these cases have been turned into a homicide, and I went to that press conference that Monday, and then I went to heaven and all of them out to dinner that night on people to get them better that night as sources because I think this is not going away. You know, there's something like this. This is just the tip of the iceberg. And and I've just kind of stayed interested in ever since I in eleven years because so for those people who hear us talk about it or they've heard about the podcast or they've heard about the limited series on television, or whatever. Sum up, the the story in its most credible version as you've interfaced with it over the years. I mean, what they say is that there is you know, and they use the term serial killers. What they say there's a there's a gang of organized killers that had these semi autonomous cells in in cities across the country. And that they target specific types of people to kill as part of either a gang initiation a ritual or as part of just the thrill killing. The guys a lot of them for a long while where these college age white men on three point ATPA's athletes tall good, looking strong, like the epitome of like the perfect guy, and the people that they aren't I guess, and and but more recently like with coated James case they've been targeting a gay male from what I understand there's been some women thrown into the mix in the last few years. They. That that that's what they say. And they operate they communicate on the dark web. And at one point they were actually given the U R L for their site on the dark web, and they went to it. And then a video camera like turned on them when they were supposed to put in a password, and they just they didn't have the password. Someone sent they kind kinda. But you know, I think we know very very little of what they know. I think there's a lot. They know that they haven't said the smiley face aspect. I was that the smiley faces happy scenes, but it's not just the smiley face. It's these twelve other symbols that are specific to this gang and one of the people on their team is nationally renowned gang expert, who's a college professor. So there's a lot there's like three retired New York City. Detectives investigating this and a criminal Justice professor in Minnesota, who's a nationally renowned gang expert. So these are just you know, citizen Joe out there trying to investigate it on their own. These are some people with some really strong credentials when the story I started breaking. There was a lot of pushback from mainstream law enforcement sources saying the public is making too much out of a coincidental occurrences of these popular good looking generally regarded as high. Forming a college age students who were victims of a drunken accident that they were this. The the reason why they were found around rivers is because in these college towns, they left bars, they went down to an area where they were going to urinate, and or whatever, and they th- or or skinny dip or whatever and they fell into the river because they were so drunk. They drowned, and this was in fact, this is the story that they had even told about several cases in in in the twin cities area when I was there. And I went back and retraced the steps of these students and tried to figure out whether there was anything to that, including one case from the Saint Thomas student Saint Thomas university in Saint Paul who the who the police claim had fallen off a rather large embankment and rolled down into the Mississippi. It was absolutely impossible to do that. Because there were just nothing, but trees and stumps all the way down it would have been. Unlike the most improbable case of pachinko for this guy to a fall in all the way down in between all these trees and ended up in the river. And yet they stuck to that story until as you pointed out the Minneapolis police chief recanted. The, you know, the regretfully said that they had not done their proper due diligence and even apologize to the family of one of the victims and said, clearly he was a victim of a homicide, but these were not admissions fast in and as you point out in your article in the Daily Beast, most still an overwhelming number of cases, the police are unwilling to say that these victims, though, they all share a similar profile are are the victims of a homicide. Well, I know it's exactly I mean, no one wants to no one wants to it onus. And when you look at it, collectively, you, you know, you can say, okay. Maybe maybe it was, you know, all these guys getting drunk, but when you start looking at each of these cases individually, and do what you did and start going to the scene and these detectives. Did you can see the they all start to fall apart? And that's what you know, the FBI did a review of in two thousand eight and all they did was look at the reports from what I understand they didn't even have all documents. I to the cases and decided to come car with the police, but they never did any of their own investigating. They never talked to detectives. They never did anything that. These guys have done. They've traveled all over the country and gone to all be seems and then the center for homicide research debunked this. That's what everybody say right now. Oh, this was debunked in two thousand ten by the center for homicide research while I went and actually read that report, which I'm sure very few. Journalists have done all they did was read a bunch of news clippings and come to a conclusion and the guy who -cluded this is not even a veteran investigator himself. He was a firefighter for twenty two years yet. He is he hasn't gone to any of these scenes. I'm sure he did this analysis sitting at his desk in Minnesota, actually, go to any of these scenes and self or look at any of the autopsy reports or even four years. Later. He could have read the textbook the textbook Kevin and professor Gilbertson dead on fourteen cases case study in drowning which give incredible detail and each of these cases, and there's a lot in there buried in there about this group 'cause I've been reading it recently, right? About that same time that you were you heard you were doing, you know, you leading the way on this Christie peel was still actively involved in the case before she retired from daily journalism. And and I think became a mom and last time I talked to her was very happy not to be covering this case, totally creeped her out. A lot of male should want to deal with. But the, but I covered it on the air lot. We kept having people on just like many of the people you have mentioned, and I even just coincidentally I reached out after having heard this the FBI kinda rebuffed the whole thing prima facie just kind of at the beginning. Just as there's something to this. I contacted a guy who had been on recently on coast to coast. And this is the timing us on the show a lot more regularly. And I asked him as a favor whether he would look at this case and his response. He was a profiler and he'd written a book, and he did it reluctantly, but as a favor, and I did a follow up call with him. And I swear to you Nikki he was almost mad at me. I will always remember that feeling of like he was annoyed that I had brought this to him. And he said there's nothing to this. I don't know why you're talking about this. This is you know. People are looking they're seeing ships and clouds, there's nothing here. And he wouldn't even go on the air or to have a conversation about he said, I don't want anything to do with this case. This is dumb. And that was it. He wouldn't do. It wouldn't go any further. Like, I said if they like like the case that got having and on this. He was missing persons detective in New York City that assigned to this missing college student Patrick McNeill who was last seen leaving a bar. I think was ninety ninety street or something and that they had first of all they have witnesses who saw these people inching along longer car following him as he stumbled out of there and walk in any turn left on second in the car. Followed them second supposedly, he yeah. He drunkenly went to pee in the river. While he walked all up and down there. You can't even get to the river very easily from. That's consultant January. Why are you going to go all the way you can in an alley? Yeah. I mean, I'm a guy there's twenty places to P long before you go to a river in if you're not working. In the winter winter, it's not it's July. This is study at that hour that night. It's not even really a very private act in a college town there, you might even be have to wait in line in an alley. And that's where his just as you say. But yet, what do you think the FBI has been so reluctant to use its resources to coordinate? These disparate police departments around the country into a more fulsome investigation because ever since nine eleven while they care about is terrorism. That is that is the that is the bulk of what they do and that's their priority. And they have to be invited into these cases. That's another reason, and they you know, law enforcement doesn't like to contradict other law enforcement. That's awesome. Heaven guys are running up against these are these are smaller, whatever police department. It is non wants to admit they might have a serial killings in their midst, nor do they want to put the resources into the money and the time into finding. He's doing this. It's easier to talk him up his drownings. And if you think about it, it's sort of a devil's, advocate what better way to disguise the murder than a drowning..

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