25 Burst results for "Atmospheric Scientist"

Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

Data Skeptic

02:10 min | 10 months ago

Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

"My name is elizabeth. Barnes i go by libby an associate professor in the department about miss science here at colorado state university. You told me a little bit. Broadly speaking about your interest research wise and things like that. I guess in broad terms. I'm a climate scientists. I've been studying. Climate dynamics that includes climate change but also the earth's climate as it is today as it wasn't in the past and really probably on this podcast but also might broad interest are in the data science side. So how do we use. Data and analysis tools be at statistics mathematics modeling to understand the system and all of the interacting pieces. Could you go into little depth about the data. You're interested in even what's available as most listeners. Do some data science. Maybe they're used to working on the internet where it's as easy as just tracking something but the earth has been leaving us clues for a while. What do you have access to to study specifically the part of atmospheric science i study. I'd like to say we actually really have data coming out our ears. We have so much data. That's not all good data but one of the reasons. I'm so excited about eight science machine. Learning techniques is how can we utilize the data that we have even when some of it. Maybe isn't perfect. For example we have in science in climate science. We have paleo record so ice cores that tell us what the climate looked like hundreds of thousands of years ago today satellites that are constantly there orbiting the earth or sitting still and staring at one place over and over again and they're pouring data in all of the time sometimes it's hard to just get data and process it once we have it than you know so we can do fun stuff just getting it into a processed form is a lot of work. We have climate model data so we have these big climate models that are being run on supercomputers all over the world to try to help us understand the climate system and they are out putting a lot of data in people need to look at it to try to answer and ask interesting questions about the our system and we have people here my department. I don't do this. Atmospheric scientists say with a weather balloon or radar and actually measuring thinking about the weather and the climate state. Right where you are.

Colorado State University Libby Barnes Elizabeth
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Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 1 year ago

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"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So, Claire, This is a podcast about how change happens. And the big question I'm wondering is How does your generation think about your relationship to the planet? So how would you rank the problem of ecological collapse? I definitely think it is the most important problem facing our generation, because if we don't fix it, all of the other problems become Relevant. Right if people don't have enough food if there aren't any more animals. If people don't have like access to medicine, it touches on everything. It will cause economic collapse. And so it's longer term, So it's easy to put off, but I think it is. The single most important Problem that our generation will have to fix. And how does it affect your behavior? Like what do you do differently Because you're worried about the planet. The biggest thing is that I don't eat meat and everything else. I have very little power over cause I'm only 17. So I can't control the house I live in. I can't control how much my family travels. I can't control whether or not we have solar panels because I'm a kid, But I definitely think that living in a smaller house. Ideally, solar powered on a, you know, relatively plant based diet is going to be how I want to live my life, you know, have fast fashion has such a Terrible impact on the environment. Do you buy fewer closed? You buy second hand clothes? I do. Try to shop mainly at thrift stores, or, you know, steal clothes from my mom and sister. Do you ever feel angry at my generation or your grandparent's generation for letting it get this bad? In a way I feel angry at the people in those older generations who are in positions of power, specifically political power and are unwilling to make change. But at the same time, I don't think that anger is a very helpful emotion. It can help people get involved, but it's more pleasant for me to be solution oriented. And it makes my message of we need to save the environment more pleasant to listen to, that's for sure. So tell me three things. Speaking of pleasant to listen to tell me 234 things that you think dad and I should do. To be more in line with what the planet needs. I think that we need Todt me once a week. Kind of at the most. Okay. I think we should get solar panels. E think we should only drive the electric car. I think we should buy fewer things and buy fewer new things. Like what? We just did a remodel on her house that felt pretty unnecessary to me, and we just thought it was a used car. So I guess it wasn't new, but it's the gas car. So I would prefer if we had gone the electric route. What's your rating your rating on your parents as ecologically minded people. So in school, we have to do this thing called the ecological footprint, which is basically just a calculator of how much damage You do to the Earth on DSA, So it's calculated in how many Earths worth of resource is you use and so If everyone lived like me each year. We would use 3.9 Earth's worth of resource is okay, So let me ask you what did the inputs They're like square footage for Persson's water Square footage. How much you drive and what you drive Flying. Flying is a big one. What type of house you have, If it's an apartment, versus like a Stand alone house What Your house is made out of money of solar panels. Yeah. How so? Let me ask you this finally. How typical are you in terms of your passion and your understanding of what the problems are? I would say I'm increasingly typical, um But to be honest, I don't know I have lived in one town my whole life. I'm in a bit of a bubble, and I don't like know what people in Nebraska thing versus people in Angola, Ghana versus people and you know Beijing. Can I ask you when you're with your friends? Does it come up a lot? Well, so definitely recently. We've been talking a lot more about racial justice and covet because there's have been a little bit more top of mind. But I definitely think that if I were to start a conversation about the environment there wouldn't be, uh, negative reaction. Everyone be willing to talk about it. Yeah. Hey, thanks for doing this flavor. Of course. Any time, all right? We'll be better. I promise. All right. It's hard to get anyone to care about anything you can't see or touch so flat Earthers had a good run germ theory was a tough sell. Like the prevailing explanation of evil spirits was easier to believe. And people thought or possibly still think that the moon walk was a hoax. It's equally tough to gin up interest in a problem that won't become undeniably a parent for some number of decades now for me and everyone in the path of wildfires. And hurricanes. If we do connect those events to rising temperatures than you could say, the day has come for us when the abstract has become palpable when we can see and touch global warming or global warming can see and touch us. So I've been wondering how change happens across the globe and in the lives of individuals, So this week we're looking at the biggest change. There is the way the planet works and specifically how we think about it. Katharine Hayhoe is neither a Republican or a Democrat. She's a Canadian. She's an atmospheric scientist who studies climate change of fact, she does not take on faith. She's a data cruncher, a modeler type who was certain the planet is warming and humans are responsible. So, Catherine, thank you so much for coming to Kelly Corrigan wonders. Thank you for having me. You really hit the nail on the head there because the issue you brought up is something that this called psychological distance. And when it comes to climate change, That's the biggest problem we have. We often think our biggest problem is people who reject the science. But most of us know that we could say I don't believe in gravity. But if we step off the cliff, we still go down, no matter what. But with with climate change, we view it as distant in time, So we agree it would affect future generations. But not us. We view it is distant in space. It affects people over there. But not here. We view it as distance in terms of relevance. It affects people who care about having trees and saving whales. But not me. If that's not what I care about. And you hit the last one on the head, which is It's abstract, and we care about concrete things so you can see air pollution. You can see wildfire smoke with the apocalyptic orange skies. But you can't see the invisible heat trapping gasses that are causing this problem. So psychological distance really is the biggest problem that we have. So it's totally understandable that people would have distance from this and we have it from lots of things like we Don't necessarily see how the science around sugar effects are. Wait. Because there's a distance between the action in the outcome. It's hard for us, too. Keep president our mind when we're making a decision about whether we want another cookie or not. What are you learning about the way people think and how they absorb hard information that's going to force them to change their behaviors from other disciplines. Mm. Well, I read a lot of psychology of social science, even a little bit of neuroscience to try to figure out how our brains work because we've known since the 18 hundreds Digging up in burning coal, and then later, oil and natural gas are wrapping an extra blanket around the planet, causing it to warm. Can I ask you when you look at the history of our understanding of the planet?.

Claire Todt Beijing Persson Katharine Hayhoe Kelly Corrigan president Earthers Nebraska atmospheric scientist Angola Catherine
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Well sunny and warm today again. A little bit of feedback here. If you can adjust that thank you. I appreciate that eight fifty one now. Thank you. Mike thirteen ten. Kfi thirteen ten k. f. k. a. dot com northern colorado's voice mornings with gail the the auto collision studios. But it's going to be a warm on today and what will the weekend ahead hold for us. joined this morning by Matt mickens janelle to pinpoint weather meteorologists and atmospheric scientists and to use a technical meteorological term match. Will it be interesting. Well you're in the north central mountains. You have an interesting weekend ahead do there's another out of still that's gonna come through It's not doors man. Mostly salt lake this morning and it will be moving into the central mountain late today. we'll have the win. Come with this storm and a little. Bit cloud cover It's gonna drop some decent snowfall on the buyer areas and Medicine bow range park range They'll have quite a bit of snowfall there. Travelers saturday and sunday morning. Anybody trying to go through the high country. Mostly i seventy i eighty would be a little better of a route When beer up there but in either case you're going to have an impact because of the storm moving through you know it's incredible just reflecting back on the fires. Of course the cameron peak fire the east troublesome fire and thank heaven that mother nature finally ponied up. We got some significant snowfall in those areas. But where do we stand. I mean as far as well. We're gonna have some high winds right. That goes high wind advisory. I believe or alert goes into effect. Tomorrow right it will. We'll have the wind increasing tonight and then we will have areas strong wind. That continue tomorrow So expected to ramp up today in be with us tomorrow so The worst of it would be likely tomorrow. Yes well that's still have an impact on the fires. Yes but i think somewhat minimal right Consider the temperature's which will be warm. Tomorrow are semi warm today ahead of the storm. factor in the wind increasing. There will be some rapid melt areas That that obviously has an impact. But due to the recent cold the recent moisture it will be a minimal impact but the fire aries. The big ones do still have hot spots so Something to watch out for but generally speaking so much better situation in this wind storm event than what we had been through just weeks ago. And what do we have to look forward to the week ahead. We will have a slight slight little chance of some rain or snow tomorrow. Then that would come with the same system but expected to be mostly dry From today's fifties will be lower fifties. Tomorrow still windy. Sunday lower fifties clearing off calming down next week. Not the best outlook for a fire. However they'll be doused in some snowfall But we'll be war. We'll have sunshine all of next week. Dry conditions until friday saturday and temperatures warm Close to seventy at times especially by wednesday ourselves. A warm dry week ahead. I know how you love. The word unprecedented. So we won't use it here. But this is this weather pattern unusual for this time of year. If you look at all years. It's it's quite warm yes however it's very fitting to a l- anaemia pattern which brings a lot of window. Vents a lot of heat events And usually spreads it snowfall just on the mountains and usually the northern one. So it fits alanine pattern quite well. But you know if you factor in all years neutral or el nino than it then. It becomes unusual but for lending. It's a little more classic town to pinpoint weather meteorologist. atmospheric scientist and that may contain friday the thirteenth. Are you superstitious well. I'm not leaving the bedroom curtains drawn locked and my kids. They can fend for themselves lack cat or not. They're on their own out for those ladders. That can up from time to time and yes take good care. Yeah thanks so much matt. Eight fifty five now. Thirteen ten kfi. Dan patrick the whole show in colin coward or on northern colorado's voice thirteen ten kfi k. Catch inside the bears then presented by chris. Musa agency allstate insurance tuesday nights northern colorado's voice thirteen ten. Kfi am well. Cdc added game-playing covid roulette justin its guidance on masking up. Cdc now says wearing a mask protects you from coronavirus to not just the people around you work for a piece by tammy. Matassa at komonews health officials Have been saying this for quite some time but now. Cdc is making it officials doctors that it will convince all of us who still have. Lingering doubts that mass save lives at first. Cdc's said the main benefit of wearing masks was to prevent remember infected people from spreading the virus. Well now cdc's has wearing one protects you from kobe. Nineteen to because mass provide a filtration for personal protection by blocking incoming virus droplets. You remember when the epidemiologist and chief of the nation dr anthony penalties. That i don't need to wear a mask and then later came out and said to us no. I lied because we were concerned about a shortage of ppe. No wonder they're having so much trouble with because we keep getting just a broad variety of guidelines and rules and restrictions changing but yeah see citing studies showing mass reduce the risk of transmitting or catching the virus by more than seventy percent. Go have yourself a weekend. Don't be superstitious because twenty twenty has been scary enough roosevelt at northridge high school. Football tonight. pre-game at six thirty products football basketball baseball and talk or northern colorado's voice thirteen ten. Kfi really leveling amount fort collins abc news. I'm jim ryan. Us corona virus cases are now growing faster than at any time during the pandemic over one hundred fifty thousand new cases thursday in washington. State this plea from governor jay inslee. Who's not have thanksgiving gatherings unless you're positive that everyone there has quarantined successfully for fourteen days. President elect joe biden has increased his lead over president. Trump biden is now projected to win arizona and its eleven electoral votes for a total of two hundred ninety versus president. Trump's two hundred seventeen counties across georgia are starting a hand audit of all ballots in the no code. Now weekdays at four on northern colorado's voice. Thirteen ten kfi k..

colorado Cdc Kfi Trump biden president Matt mickens salt lake Mike Us jay inslee gail cameron peak atmospheric scientist jim ryan washington
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"This is mornings with Kale and northern Colorado's voice thirteen. Ten KFI AM. Cold Front in northern. Colorado with cloudy skies. Cooler. Weather and the chance for precipitation helping firefighters battled some of the wildfires in the state. Now, yesterday's cold front impacted the Cameron Peak Callwood and left Hand Canyon Fires Warm Windy, and dry conditions will persist over grand summit and Park counties They did it did persist on Thursday keeping fire danger elevated in those areas which includes. That east troublesome fire, which absolutely exploded Wednesday and Thursday question is with that cold front expected to arrive on Sunday. Will it assists the firefighters in their battle eight Oh eight now thirteen ten, kfi thirteen, ten KFI. K. A. DOT COM northern Colorado's voice mornings with Gail via the auto collision specialist studios joined this morning by channel to pinpoint weather meteorologists atmospheric scientist Matt Nickens. Good Morning. I'll tell you what it was absolutely terrifying yesterday and I don't mean to launch into personally and certainly I'm not under the danger that others are looking at hundreds that have had to evacuate from Grand Lake areas like Estes Park. But by two o'clock, it looked like dusk the skies were black. There was black ash falling from the skies and I am watching a steady stream of traffic as they're evacuating on a thirty four West East question is, is the weather going to cooperate? It it is to an extent es What we saw yesterday was the fire got up to the divide started to try to work its way downhill into Rocky Mountain National Park, or well the rest of Rocky Mountain National Park toward, Estes Park it is encountered a lot of that fog and low cloud coverage humidity and it really stalled up there due to the humidity. So to an extent, the system did help, but the system will be clearing out today and we'll have about a twenty four hour period where we'll have. Drier conditions stronger wind again. Once we hit tomorrow. That's when we'll have our big system arriving and then heavy snowfall should fall. and. We would love it. If that you know Mother Nature if we would get the heavy snowfall that would put the fires out but that's kind of a pipe dream and. It seems to be. In you could use camera as an example in early September covered by a lot of snow rain and then a lot of snow and then look what happened. You know it came right back now some of the smaller spotty fires that came under great control yesterday cow would left hand Perhaps this'll be enough snow to help them but I think the troublesome that hotspot is just far too large in far too hot now to think that one snow event will put it out. We would need frequent events. So we'll have fingers crossed the next few weeks we can keep even smaller snows just we just need the additional moisture to count. The intensity of these fires particularly, the East troublesome fire that we want to explode Wednesday into Thursday, burning six thousand acres and our. At last count burning one hundred and seventy, thousand, one, hundred, sixty, three acres now second largest fire in Colorado history second only beyond the cameron, a peak fire not talked about this before that phenomenon where fire creates its own weather are we seeing that now that one for sure in that happened several days ago when we started to see those really. Powerful towering pyro Cumulus Clouds there was quite a bit lightning detected within that plume also cameron peak a few days ago. So they were creating their own environment again that he just fueled itself and then you through unjust that right amount of wind, well terrible in our perspective, but right for the fire for it to spread. So quickly, the other day it was just tremendous. But Yeh, it created its own, its own fuel.

Colorado KFI Cold Front Estes Park Rocky Mountain National Park cameron peak cameron Cameron Peak Callwood Grand Lake Yeh atmospheric scientist Matt Nickens Gail Hand Canyon
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on The Topical

The Topical

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on The Topical

"The moon landing the fall of the Roman Empire Operation Desert Storm. That's all news that happened in the past. But this news it's much more recent. Here's what else you need to know today and alarm a new Gallup poll out today is found that a growing number of Americans don't believe in climate change scientists despite increasing evidence that climatologists meteorologist and Atmospheric scientist do walk among more than 46% of Americans do not believe in their existence and at least 28% of those polled don't believe these scientists are man-made and some good news today if you're waiting for an Amazon delivery because you'll probably won't need to wait much longer. The online retail giant has announced they'll now be encouraging their drivers to deliver packages even faster by strapping cinder blocks to their trucks accelerator. The increase delivery speed is set to begin tomorrow Nationwide and Amazon execs are confident that the total amount of fatality should be minimal and finally game 2 of the NBA Finals gets underway tonight where the Los Angeles Was Lakers will take on the Miami Heat from the bubble in Orlando? But despite the neutral-site the Lakers may have a slight home-court advantage in the series the NBA announced prior to game one that they would be Pub in the smell of Jack Nicholson to more accurately replicate the atmosphere at the Staples Center and the musty stench of cologne and overwhelming cigar smoke was so successful that the NBA will continue pumping it directly down to the court and benches of both teams for game two before switching over to small doses of coronavirus to replicate the threat of disease that has become synonymous with Miami Beach for games three and four wage and that's it for the topical today. I'm Leslie Price. I don't much care for having to beg you people to support my livelihood. But here I am yet again asking you to please like And subscribe to the topical where you get your podcast, but just so you know, I could also make it just fine on my own if it ever came to that and don't forget to visit the onion.com for more on all the day's top stories because unlike me websites need all dead. Can get we'll see you tomorrow..

Lakers NBA Amazon Atmospheric scientist Jack Nicholson Miami Leslie Price Miami Beach Los Angeles Orlando Staples Center
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Proven to be true. So your your heart efforts will be well paid for this time. I will be rewarded. Yes. Let's talk a little bit about this storm because you know it's funny. It's like you ask yourself I opened with the song twilight zone by golden earring this morning, and it's like we're living in the twilight zone in twenty twenty. But actually, this is a happy event. This moisture coming through the state as those wildfires continue to burn. Yes, and from that perspective, the cold great to is even the cold alone would do a lot of progress for fired but there is a huge sluggish. So that is moving over not all the fire areas in the state But most in cameron peak, it's it's going to be really doused during the course of the day today heavy snowfall. There is such great news because it just exploded over the long Labor Day weekend. It sure did We watched that using satellite technology could watch for hot spots and they feel like bright lights on a map in Saturday afternoon that thing just roared in exploded in and split into two complexes is just devastating obviously in this cold front I wish it would sped up to prevent all the new evacuations and things but at least it's here now so. So that is the good news silver lining to help those firefighters on the front line south. All right. So I'm seeing that we might see and you know don't you I mean this story has gone national. I was watching CNN and Msnbc Fox over the weekend and they're like what's going on in Colorado so we can see the biggest temperature drop in one hundred and forty eight to one hundred, fifty years. Depending on your time line that you WANNA use twenty, four, forty, eight hours single day It will fall in their in most of those lists within the top couple four, September. It will not likely reach the top list for all time We've had some tremendously huge one and two day temperature swings and including last October on the tenth of two. Thousand Nineteen we had seventy degree drop in one day. Assuming two days I believe two days So we're going to be close to that, but we would need to hit. The mid to low twenties in order to Kinda rival the all time list and in although that would be possible that's really pushing the limit on how cold we can get. We'll get close to that but not that close I don't think. What about precipitation by the time? It's all said and done. WE'RE GONNA come away with anybody listening is GonNa come away with at least a quarter to a half pitch total water, and most of that's going to be in the form of snow. We had some very heavy rain and thunder last night, which really dowse a lot of folks while I, seventy, six But from here on, it's going to be mostly just snow and you're going to tally in terms of snow if you're closer to the. Hills you can have several inches that will fall How much accumulates depends on your ground temperature right at Ya But then once you hit Greeley and east your snowfall totals are likely going to be less than several inches unless you're out say kind of focused right on I seventy six or down on sections of the Palmer divide closer to the line and in flagler those areas could have easily have several inches. So it's good wet system And again, the rain chances are pretty much gone. We're going to have a rain snow mix if not only snow for Pierre Forward. Okay. All right, and that winter storm warning is still in effect until noon Wednesday goes all the way till noon Wednesday. The biggest push of snowfall now is on the mountains It's nearing Cheyenne it will near Fort. Collins. It will be your bolder and it will east as we go throughout the course of the day and it will be rather heavy late today and overnight. Alright channel to pinpoint weather meteorologists Matt Mickens on it. As always, thank you so much mad appreciate your time. And find your glove there you go. I know there's one out in the dog pen seven, four to seven out thirteen, ten KFI. Party northern Colorado's force thirteen ten KFI. The Block Party Wednesdays from four to ten PM. After mornings with gale's stay tuned for the Dan Patrick show the whole show and the herd with Colin Cowherd. Thirteen ten. K. K.. Three hundred thirteen ten KFI K. Thirteen ten KFI K. A. dot com northern Colorado's voice mornings with Gail live and local from the auto collision specialists. Studios aren't my facebook question does your do you buy into the allegations that president trump during a trip to France in twenty eighteen called fallen American soldiers? Quote losers particularly if you're a veteran I would love to hear from you this morning nine, seven, three, three, thirteen, ten, eight, seven, seven, three, five, three, thirteen, ten, drop me a text on thirteen ten kfi k a text line at three one. Nine nine six president trump getting support from a rather unlikely source working for peace out of the new. York Post by Emily Jacobs, this says former national security adviser, John Bolton. No love lost their reiterated his skepticism over this report. It was in the Atlantic alleging that president trump disparaged America's war dead during this twenty one trip to France now, Bolton as you're well aware who turned from friend to foe to the commander in chief after leaving the White House said during an interview just yesterday with Fox. News's Martha McCallum.

trump Colorado Msnbc Fox KFI France president John Bolton Martha McCallum long Labor cameron peak CNN Colin Cowherd flagler Pierre Forward facebook Matt Mickens Greeley
Saharan Dust Cloud Arrives At The U.S. Gulf Coast, Bringing Haze

Environment: NPR

03:37 min | 2 years ago

Saharan Dust Cloud Arrives At The U.S. Gulf Coast, Bringing Haze

"It's a journey. That's a weeks and spend thousands of miles across an ocean floating on currents of air today, a massive cloud of dust from the Sahara desert arrives in the southeastern United States to walk us through this meteorological phenomenon. We are joined by Professor Marshall Shepherd. The Director of the atmospheric scientists program at the University of Georgia welcome. Thank you for having me okay now. I've seen the satellite images, but. But tell us what it's GonNa. Look like from the ground as this wave of dust from the Sahara arrives in the United States. You know we give these things every year and some are bigger than others. These are this year quite large and so I think that's why it's garnering much attention. Typically you lose the blue sky for more hazy Milky Sky. You tend to see more vivid sunsets and sunrises because. Because of the scattering properties of the dust and interacting with the sunlight, so those are sort of the optical effects, but I think people that suffer from allergy to dust or particular matter, they actually might not find it so amusing. They may have some health issues Why is it so much bigger this year than normal? I think one thing that happened this year are e.. Is that that dust in the? The Hell region in parts of Africa sat there, and just collected because the the wind system this African easterly jet meteorologist talk about it took a bit longer to kind of get itself going, and once it gets going, you can belch and Burp that dust out into the Atlantic, and that's what we're seeing now. Because there was somewhat of a delay, there was a lot more desk sitting there the build up. All right so pros you said good sunrises and sunsets, cons, people who have health problems might find that the respiratory problems are worse. What else is this dust system? GonNa do I mean on the whole is a good thing or a bad thing you know one of the things is an earth scientist. The Earth is so connected, and this is just another example so these dust storms they actually can fertilize the oceans in parts of Amazonia. They're carrying things that really help those ecosystems. Ecosystems but on the flip side of that there's been studies recently say they can actually carry pathogens as well so when you think about Mosquitos as a vector born disease carrier some argued that these dust storms can be vectors, they can carry pathogens another perhaps positive however is that the dust? If there were to be a hurricane forming out over the Atlantic hurricanes don't like the dust. If the dust gets into those forming systems, they can weaken those storms quite a bit. How much? Much bigger. Is this one than what we would see in a typical year? You know it's interesting. I saw a colleague tweet scale. They were using some data from NASA NASA Sir several satellites up monitoring air, quality and air constituents, and literally this event was off the chart. It wasn't even the same type of event. It was just so far off the plot scale, and so four people who study atmospheric science like you is a moment totally nerd out and like remember where you. You were when the Great Sahara Dust of two thousand twenty came across the Atlantic I th I think it is I I've seen some sort of very hyperbolic terms like the Godzillas dust storm. Those types of things I don't i. don't tend to like us such hyperbole when I talk about these things, but it is an anomaly event. My good friend and colleague Tom Gill at the University of Texas El. Paso is an expert on dust storms I know he's geeking out on this. I hosted a podcast call, weather, geeks or the weather channel, and we use the term geeking out. I'm certain it. Scientists like Tom. Gillard geeking out over this dust storm. Marshall Shepherd is the Director of the atmospheric scientists program at the University of and former president of the American meteorological. Society thanks for talking with us about this monster dust storm. Thank you for having me.

Professor Marshall Shepherd United States Atlantic Director Tom Gill Milky Sky Nasa University Of Georgia Gillard Scientist Paso University Of Africa University Of Texas El President Trump
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Three on your Friday morning. Thirteen ten KFI am thirteen ten K. A. Dot com morning so gail live. Local fueled Migrate Western. Petroleum joined this morning by channel to pinpoint weather meteorologists atmospheric scientists to Matt Makings. I'm Connie at a task here. There Matt Megan's was up with all the snow. I didn't think it was ever GonNa Start. Stop snowing yesterday was quite a week. Wasn't it 'cause we yet? We had yesterday's and in the same areas were kind of what kind of the same areas were. Hit Hard Earlier in the week too so a double whammy for the week Do you have a what what. What were the accumulations in northern Colorado? Because I swear in Loveland we had at least a foot. Yeah there's a foot yesterday for Loveland Fort Collins Boulder depending on the part of Boulder. If you're east or closer to the flat irons it was more like a footed a half and then you get the Estes Park Jamestown Nederland. They were closing in on two feet and that was just yesterday You could double that in some cases for what fell on Monday so really incredible And does most of those areas. I just mentioned Boulder Loveland Longmont Northglenn Those locations there are certain snow measurement sites within those cities that are now at their all time snowiest on record and for boulder that record goes back to one hundred twenty five years so that assing tremendous so one hundred fifty inches of snow for boulder. This year is Those kind of told those you kinda hear more so out of the mountains you know not down here on the range so yeah well we certainly need the moisture. We can always You know just kind of reflect on that common refrain. Yeah that's true. I mean all this. This is the north Platte River Basin and so in South Platte too so it's GonNa go up into Nebraska And eventually go downstream the great water for US and It'll tamper that. Fire danger for a little while to. That'll be good. Yeah that's definitely a good thing all right so as we look ahead to the weekend What's the forecast is it? Is the meltdown. Mud season about to begin yet is melting in full force today so Sunshine for most of the day sunshine y temperatures in the forties fifties and then. We'll just keep gradually warming up throughout the weekend early next week to we'll we'll get back into the fifties and sixties kind of more sixties than fifties. We get towards Sunday and Monday So that's back to average and with some sunshine now other areas like if anybody's traveling or something you might be if you're closer to Colorado Springs there'll be some shower activity for the weekend same in the high country but around here pretty much denver north up to about Cheyenne. To about Sydney to Brask it will be relatively dry for the weekend and warp too good to hear Lincoln. Get outside and play as long as we're not in each other's grill right. Yeah that's true. Snowball fights are easier this way because you are forcing social. This is true. And they're now legal in severance. So it's all good to pinpoint weather meteorologist atmospheric scientist Matt Makings. Thanks so much as always have yourself a great weekend Youtube Eight fifty-six now thirteen ten KFI K. Best UNC BEARS TARGET GAME COVERAGE LOVES ON THIRTEEN TEN KFI K. Have you seen this? This sixteens flying over Greeley Loveland for Collins.

Loveland Fort Collins Boulder Matt Makings KFI Loveland Greeley Loveland Estes Park Jamestown Nederland Matt Megan north Platte River Basin atmospheric scientist Colorado US Connie Colorado Springs South Platte K. A. Dot gail Collins Nebraska denver Cheyenne
Climate change: Melting Arctic ice

Environment: NPR

04:39 min | 2 years ago

Climate change: Melting Arctic ice

"Arctic Sea. Ice is one one of the most dramatic indicators of the change in climate some months the ice cover on the Arctic Ocean is about half of what it was decades ago and its thickness has shrunk substantially changes in the ice may also mean a host of other changes in the Arctic system and around the globe to better understand the scientists. I just have frozen an icebreaker alongside and Arctic ice flow that they will absorb for a whole year. And that's where our reporter Ravenna chaotic. Caught up with them out on an the ice floe about five degrees from the North Pole. A bunch of scientists are setting up equipment. It's part of a project called mosaic or the multidisciplinary drifting observatory for the study of Arctic climate climate. And the primary question. They're trying to answer is what are the causes of diminishing Arctic ice and what are the consequences ocean physicists. Tim Stanton stand surrounded by boxes of tools and equipment next to a hole in the ice about fifteen miles from where the mosaics chef is frozen in. Good here dry hairdryer. Well it's a trickle. Would he he got frizzy here. That's for sure. It's about eighteen degrees Fahrenheit and the heat gun is for warming up electrical connectors actors on a science buoy. Stanton is in the middle of a grueling eight hour process to install the buoy. It'll operate independently out here throughout the year. Collecting team data from all sorts of scientific bells and whistles that hang below it in the water flux package mounts on and that's what Beige is the transport of heat. Salt Mamane plugged back in the water column. Here's why Stanton's interested in those things as more sea ice melts in the summertime. It's contributing fresher water to the top of the ocean the salty ocean water which sits lower. Because it's more dense can create a barrier that prevents the fresher water from going down if that top water is trapped near the surface surface. Stanton thinks that can absorb a lot more heat from the sun and lead to even more melting of the ice you can get these Frisch WOM- liars that with a little bit of wind comes along. Does a little bit of mixing really mounts the heck out of the is. He thinks this might play an important role in why the disappearing as fast does it is while Stanton is asking questions about things that are going on. Below the ice other scientists are looking at things going. On above it like Jesse Cremation. WHO's out on the ice testing gene? A device that collects tiny particles from the atmosphere called aerosols. Ampler to say no. We're not talking about the ones in hairspray. Aerosol balls can be dust pollen or fungi and they're the seeds that clouds need to grow and in the Arctic scientists thing that they can also come from tiny organisms in the water like bacteria. Algae less ice on the ocean could mean more aerosols getting blown from the water into the atmosphere and CD more clouds by hypothesis from open water sources. We get generation of these particles from microbes and the ocean. There's a lot that signed to still WANNA find out about clouds in the Arctic. But one thing they know is that they're important for regulating leading temperature like a thermostat depending on the season whether the clouds are over water or ice and the features of the clouds they can wind up cooling or warming the earth below slowdown that affects. How much heat can basically help melt the ice or it can actually reflect sunlight from the CIA so it has a big role in controlling? How much we we have here creaming and Stanton to among hundreds of scientists from different disciplines? Who are trying to better understand? How different parts of this changing region work how? The atmosphere interacts the CIS how the ocean interacts with the ice The ecosystem the biogeochemical processes. That's Matthew shoop an atmospheric scientist and one of the coordinators of the expedition addition. So why do scientists need to know all this. This whole project is aimed at improving our models. When shoop says models he means the computer simulation and scientists use to get estimates for things like how much the earth could warm in the next fifty years the better? You reflect reality in the simulations the better prediction you'll get but because so little is known about the Arctic system. shoop says that the predictions for how it will respond to climate. Change vary a lot. The Arctic is a place where the models agree. The least so that tells us that we're missing something improving. The models will help forecast things like when the Arctic Ocean might have. Its first ice free summer how quickly the globe is going to warm. As as a whole and how the melting greenland ice sheet will add to global sea level rise by observing. How all the little pieces of the system fit together over the next year scientists hope they it can bring that big picture into clear? Focus for N._p._R.. News I'm Ravenna. Kinik in the central Arctic Ocean.

Tim Stanton Arctic Arctic Sea Matthew Shoop North Pole Reporter Ravenna CIA Jesse Cremation Atmospheric Scientist Eighteen Degrees Fahrenheit Five Degrees Fifty Years Eight Hour
Searching For Solid Ice As Scientists 'Freeze In' To Study A Warming Arctic

Weekend Edition Sunday

04:34 min | 2 years ago

Searching For Solid Ice As Scientists 'Freeze In' To Study A Warming Arctic

"Arctic sea ice is one of the most dramatic indicators of the changing climate some months the ice cover on the Arctic Ocean is about half of what it was decades ago and its thickness has shrunk substantially changes in the eyes may also mean a host of other changes in the arctic system and around the globe to better understand the scientists have frozen in ice breaker alongside an arctic ice flow that they will observe for a whole year and that's where our reporter within a caning car put them out on an ice floe about five degrees from the North Pole a bunch of scientists are setting up equipment it's part of a project called mosaic with a multi disciplinary drifting observatory for the study of arctic climate and the primary question they're trying to answer is what are the causes of diminishing arctic ice and what are the consequences physicist Tim Stanton Stan surrounded by boxes of tools and equipment next to a hole in the ice about fifteen miles from where the mosaic shift is frozen and okay the good descents with Dr electrical would be cool if the gun free Z. here that's for sure it's about eighteen degrees Fahrenheit and the heat gun is for warming up electrical connectors on the science Billy Stanton is in the middle of a grueling eight hour process to install the week it'll operate independently out here throughout the year collecting data from all sorts of scientific bells and whistles that hang below it in the water the flex package mounts on here and that's what makes is the transport of heat sold my main point in the water column here's why Stanton's interested in those things has more sea ice melts in the summertime it's contributing fresher water to the top of the ocean the sole tear ocean water which sits lower because it's more dance can create a barrier that prevents the fresher water from going down if that top waters trapped near the surface Stanton thinks it can absorb a lot more heat from the sun and lead to even more melting of the ice you can get these up fresh warm line is that with a little bit of wind comes along just a little bit of mixing really mounts the heck out of the ice he thinks it's my plan important role in why this case is disappearing as fast as it is well Stanton is asking questions about things that are going on below the ice other scientists are looking at things going on above it like just a creamy and he's out on the ice testing a device the collects tiny particles from the atmosphere called air assaults well today no we're not talking about the ones and hair spray aerosols can be dust pollen or fun guy and they're the seeds that clouds need to grow and in the arctic scientists think that they can also come from tiny organisms in the water like bacteria or algae less ice on the ocean could mean more aerosoles getting blown from the water into the atmosphere and see more clouds my hypothesis is from open water sources we get generation of these particles from microbes in the ocean there's a lot that scientists still want to find out about clouds in the arctic but one thing they know is that they're important for regulating temperature kind of like a thermostat depending on the season whether the clouds are over water or ice and the features of the clouds they can wind up cool lean or warming the earth below them that affects how much he can basically help not the sea ice or you can actually reflects on life in the sea ice so as a big role in controlling how much years we had here cleaning and Stanton are two among hundreds of scientists from different disciplines we're trying to better understand how different parts of this changing region work how the atmosphere interacts with the sea ice how the ocean interacts with the sea ice the ecosystem the biogeochemical process sees that's Matthew Shipp an atmospheric scientist and one of the coordinators of the expedition so why do scientists need to know all this this whole project is aimed at improving our models Winship says models he means the computer simulation scientists use to get estimates for things like how much the earth could warm in the next fifty years the better you reflect reality in the simulations the better protection okay but because so little is known about the arctic ice system ship says the predictions for how it will respond to climate change very a lot the arctic is a place where the models agree the least so that tells us that we're missing something improving the models will help forecast things like when the Arctic Ocean might have its first ice free summer how quickly the globe is going to warm as a whole and how the melting green when I sheeple add to global sea level rise by a serving how all the little pieces of the system fit together over the next year scientists hope they can bring that big picture into clearer

Eighteen Degrees Fahrenheit Five Degrees Fifty Years Eight Hour
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Toy maker called the creative world a doll line that's designed to keep labels out and invite everyone in the dolls don't have Barbies curves or Kim broad shoulders what's the weather tomorrow big companies will pay big money to find out Patrice agora Bloomberg has this and focus report let's say there's a freight train full of mayonnaise or beer a snow storm is left stranded in a rail yard for a week the cost to a shipper seven and a half million dollars and to avoid that companies are turning to businesses that forecast weather the field of Bloomberg's Brian Sullivan says is becoming very competitive here of Jupiter you have DTN we have the big whether companies like accu weather you have IBM they bought the weather company client companies one very specific inside in how to decrease risk and sold and says with better computers forecasts are more focused making talk a week out two weeks out and be very targeted in specific where they believe that the snow storm is going to be that will allow companies to start moving around is there a supply chain teams include meteorologists hydrologists civil engineers and even former farmers Sullivan says job opportunities of grown and zip recruiter says job postings for atmospheric scientist was twenty five point eight percent between twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen I'm Patrice Sikora Bloomberg business news radio twelve hundred W. O. A. I. W. away I news time seven oh seven breaking news on the hour at the half and any time at W. away I dot com brought to you by primo plumbing a check of your traffic and weather together coming up after this do you feel like grocery shopping is always on your to do list not anymore but legal home delivery you can freeze your schedule by spending less time shopping and more time doing well whatever it is you rather be at home at work or wherever you are simply pick the time and our delivery service will be there with bags full of high quality legal products at prices you'll love oh and did we mention my little members. an exclusive three percent off every single legal order get started today at legal dot com slash delivery this is Peter on his motorcycle and this is Peter off his motorcycle please move your paper off my desk thank you on his motorcycle. his motorcycle I feel like we covered that already so on wow. look at this article I found about urban planning you're better on your bike progressive helps get you one get a quote and as little as three minutes at progressive dot com progressive casualty insurance company affiliates texting roles you into reoccurring automated text messages message and data rates may apply come on one more rep you got this there it.

Bloomberg Brian Sullivan IBM atmospheric scientist Peter Kim Patrice agora Bloomberg Patrice Sikora W. O. A. primo twelve hundred W million dollars eight percent three minutes three percent two weeks
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Law and says you have to maintain your car in order to get it it get it renewed. salt running question was what is the equivalent between the you know the weather service terms of pollution and automotive. Sanders. equals. cars per square yard. you know. how many parts per million is loose where you are. well Hey I would have to go look at. we have to okay but they ultimately ended it I'm not an atmospheric scientist but the answer your question believe me if it has to do with atmosphere scientists have written about it in peer reviewed study and it's going to be on the line. yeah well my basic question is probably eight to be answered in junior high school just find a conversion table one to the other you and I were in junior high school we were taught that there is a water cycle in the plan things up water evaporates out of the oceans form clouds hits the front turns into rain hits the ground goes into the river back to the ocean repeat. and you know being told that if we have global warming we will be in a drought. well I'm sorry but the cycle of water is water doesn't dissipate it's in the ocean heats up goes up dances in the clouds hits the front comes in a rain makes everything grow goes into the river back into the ocean. yeah so that way if we have hold on if we have claimed that if we have climate change it warms up the climate that would create more of the water.

junior high school atmospheric scientist Sanders.
Tracking Smoke

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Tracking Smoke

"As well. Fires burn a noxious mix of gases and fine particles, enter the atmosphere creating rivers of smoke that crossed the country. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future fire powerful, as a researcher, I use data light gated to look at the large scale, we'd back of fire and smoke on the climate system. And on air quality, Dr amber soya is an atmospheric scientist at the National Institute of aerospace and serves as the associate program manager for Nasr's applied sciences wildland fire program. If you're nearer fire, you know that you're threatening. But if you're far away from the fire, you don't understand the connection to your health smokers pollutant that's unhealthy, and it results in poor quality, it's bad for you Mun that animals. It's bad for ecosystem health, and it can result and respiratory illnesses, heart attacks and even at times Steph while sires affect us all. So NASA researchers like amber will continue to use the vantage of space to safeguard our future for innovation now. I'm Jennifer animation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa and is distributed by w. HR wien.

National Institute Of Aerospac Dr Amber Soya Nessa Atmospheric Scientist Researcher Nasr Nasa
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Twenty two. It's morning edition on weedy. I'm Brian watt. It's been a big year for snow in the Sierra Nevada range records have fallen along with the snow. We've seen reports of fifty feet of snow or more on mammoth mountain in the central Sierra and in the resort town of mammoth lakes. Some people have literally had to tunnel out of their homes. This is the time of year when the snowpack is typically at its peak and tomorrow when surveyors do their monthly manual survey. They're likely to find the snow pack at about one hundred sixty percent of the average we've called up Ben had an atmospheric scientist at the western regional climate center in Reno and Ben in a word or two. How would you describe the snowfall this year, absolutely fantastic and not just for skiers? But also for anyone who uses water in California. All right. So the water supply loves it. But what is it about the storms that have come in this year that has created so much snow and so much water in the snow? Well, we've had very consistent Southall and the storms that have been bringing the snowfall have been somewhat colder than average. And so we've seen snow levels bringing snow down to one or two thousand feet quite frequently. We've even seen snow in the city itself, San Francisco, and the foothills there close to sea level, which is pretty novel and rare, and so we accumulated a lot of snow at the higher elevations at the middle of Asians and even down in the foothills, and we have a lot of water stored in our snowpack right now. All right. So do we ever reach a point where we have too much snow is definitely possible because we have a very nice state of our reservoir water levels right now or at about eighty percent full and running about one hundred and eleven percent of the historic average for the date, and we have a lot of snow stored in our natural snowpack reservoir. So if we have a warmer than average spring or has some very warm spring storms that accelerate the melting we might see some of that water coming down out of the nouns a little bit early, and that could create some challenges for the water management community because our reservoirs are so full right now and those in some of these communities that have been receiving heavy snowfall like Manasota springs and Myers people who've been tirelessly shoveling out of their homes or businesses we've seen overuse injuries from too much traveling. I think the chiropractors are going to be very busy this spring and summer. Oh my goodness. All right. Well, I'm sorry to hear that. Everyone shovel safely shovel safely. Yes. Stretch then hatchet of the western regional climate center in Reno. Thank you very much. Thank you very much for having me on a much more serious note. All the snow we've received this year has also meant a heavy year across the west for avalanches. Especially in the rocky mountains avalanches there have triggered evacuation orders in almost twenty five people have died. That's a lot of people. But it's pretty typical for a heavy snow year. Unfortunately, science editor Daniel Benton has been looking into the state of avalanche science. It's an old problem. But the full solution still eludes us she started with a call to the Sierra avalanche center. Good morning national fan with Alan's forecast for when if you're heading into the Lake Tahoe back country during winter and early spring. This year avalanche center is a good place to start the day. Bottom line, considered changeable exist all of Asians to win. Slab storm slab and loose. Wet avalanche problems. Human triggered avalanches likely with natural triggered avalanches possible. Recording forecast offer about five minutes of info on conditions and where it's riskiest. Everything's available online too. It's the product of lead forecaster Brandon Schwartz and his colleagues who start studying the snow wants the first ball of the season hits the ground, and we tracked snowfall we look at how those snow crystals change on the ground. And as they changed throughout winter each snowfall creates new layers in the snow pack a relatively weak layer of snow under a stronger one on a slope of thirty degrees or more dots. The recipe for an avalanche. Though, we're looking to see what it's gonna take.

Sierra avalanche center mammoth mountain Brian watt mammoth lakes Nevada Reno Southall Manasota springs atmospheric scientist California Ben forecaster Brandon Schwartz San Francisco Lake Tahoe Daniel Benton Myers editor Alan
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:51 min | 3 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Click on the segment or tweet us. Our Twitter handle is at K Q E D forum. I had mentioned in the introduction that there's this new. Well, this is a real real time test for this new categorization system for atmospheric rivers. What could we learn? What are we about to learn what does the categorization system? It's it's it's kinda fascinating. This is similar to hurricane says. People may know, we're not east coasters are Florida residents. But we kind of vaguely now in California. There's a system of one to five for hurricanes gives people an idea of how strong they are. We haven't really had such a thing for these atmospheric river storms, and they can do real serious damage as I mentioned, flooding and mudslides things like that. So scientists at the scripts institution of oceanography down in San Diego, working with other scientists from around the country have devised the system. They just published a paper last week ranking these atmospheric river storms one to five and the criteria. They use basically is two things how much moisture is in the storm and second how long does it linger over land? This storm that's hitting California right now, they say is a three or four. So one and two are considered great a kind of fill up, the reservoirs five is considered sort of band down the hatches, you know, get ready for big time flooding, we're not there. But we're in that middle area, you know, where we're seeing places like the Russian river in Grenville reach dangerous levels. And there's going to be flooding. There's gonna be people getting stuck in cars. There's going to be houses with damage, and you know, what we don't need is another series of storms next week on top of this doesn't look like that. But we need a little bit of a break at least Friday for some of these rivers to go down because in the north bay. They're getting to be at levels that are of serious concern. This has been this parable express have been in the computer models for quite some time now actually for over week. And we've mean Calderon's closed the section of highway one south of Big Sur there's been preparation in your judgment enough preparation yet. You know, the the the the weather models are fascinating, they run these different computer simulations. And they do them, you know, two weeks ahead of time. But you can't even see the storms. Yeah. The storms haven't even formed. So, you know, we think of when we turn on the TV news. And we watch the weather person at night, and they they show us a satellite image of a storm. Usually those are about three or four days away way on the Pacific, but the national weather service, and and scientists who study the atmospheric conditions are looking at models a week ten days two weeks out. Now, those are based on things like what are the conditions right now in terms of temperature and atmospheric pressure and wind and many other variables and they plug them into these giant supercomputers, and they look at what the likelihood is of certain things happening. Now, there's a lot we still don't know and a lot changes. So the further out you get the less reliable these are. So what was happening last week? Last Friday was we knew that one of these atmospheric rivers were was shaping up. The conditions were improving. We didn't. No exactly where it was going to hit or how strong it would be. And then as a got closer on Monday and Tuesday, the national weather service started warning people and saying, hey, you know, flash flood watch things like that. So I think they're doing the best. They can with the technology. We have it's improving a lot. In fact, a new satellite the government runs. Just went live yesterday to give the whole west coast much more clearly defined images of storms as they develop talking with Paul Rodgers. And we're also going to talk about governor Newsom changing the status of the delta tunnel with Paul, but let me go to our calls, and let's go right to a first caller her. And that's you Emily your morning. Hi, good morning. Thank you so much for taking my call longtime listener first time caller, I just wanted to say, I am a alleged driver. I am in San Jose. And I am loving the rain. We are getting a lot more business this morning. So no complaints from me. All I gotta do is just take it a little slower driving to be safe. But otherwise, I love it. Good to hear from you drive carefully. And actually, the rain is welcomed, particularly because of all the fire we've been through. Although as we said the floods are here as well. And flash flooding is really of concern the Windsor of concern too. Aren't they? Yes, they are. There is a high wind warning that the national weather service has in effect through Thursday morning tomorrow morning. We've already seen wins. Just overnight last night hit seventy five miles an hour at mount Saint Helena, fifty miles an hour on mount Tam. So there's some pretty good gusts up there at the higher elevations kind of thirty to forty down lower. More of your calls. Let me go next to you, Dan. Join us welcome. Good morning. I used to live in Seattle U W, professor who runs the weather blog. It's called Clinton masses weather blog. It was wonderful. I was wondering if your guests knows of that log because there doesn't appear to be anything quite like it for the bay area had whatever there was a storm. He explained it. And that our the updates with easy to understand maps. Because some of those weather maps Earhart to read. So that's my question is is there any really really good bay area. Whether blog or source that I can use the tractive. Thank you. Thanks for the question. Dan, Paul Rogers well apart from. And the Mercury News. I would recommend a couple of other places. First of all, there's a guy named Daniel Swain S, W A N. He is a former he's been form is very good. He is good. He's an atmospheric scientist who used to be at Stanford. He's now down at UCLA..

Dan California Twitter atmospheric scientist San Diego Paul Rodgers Mercury News Florida Big Sur mount Saint Helena UCLA Grenville Daniel Swain S government mount Tam Calderon governor Newsom Pacific Seattle
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Actually, the rain is welcome particularly because of all the fire we've been through. Although as we said the floods are here as well. And flash flooding is really of concern the Windsor of concern too. Aren't they? Yes, they are. There is a high wind warning that the national weather service has an effect through Thursday morning tomorrow morning. We've already seen wins. Just overnight last night hit seventy five miles an hour at mount Saint Helena, fifty miles an hour on mount Tam. So there's some pretty good gusts up there at the higher elevations kind of thirty to forty down lower. More of your calls. Let me go next to you, Dan. Join us welcome. Good morning. I used to live in Seattle. And that you w professor who runs the weather blog. It's called Clinton masses weather blog. It was wonderful. I was wondering if your guests knows of that log because there doesn't appear to be anything quite like it for the bay area. Whatever there was a storm explained it and that our the updates with easy to understand maps. Because some of those weather maps are hard to read. So that's my question is is there any really really good bay area. Whether blog or source that I use the tractive stuff. Thank you. Thanks for the question. Dan, Paul Rogers well apart from. And the Mercury News. I would recommend a couple of other places. First of all, there's a guy named Daniel Swain S, W A N. He is a former he's been a former very good. He is good. He's an atmospheric scientist who used to be at Stanford. He's now down at UCLA..

atmospheric scientist mount Saint Helena Dan mount Tam Daniel Swain S Seattle Mercury News UCLA professor Stanford Paul Rogers
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on KPCC

"Have a world now that the ISIS thinning in the Arctic. When the Arctic add a huge amount of all the time. Nobody in the right mind went up there unless you had an icebreaker docks flat. And now you have a military ship or a ship full of cars being shipped across the Arctic Ocean or a ship full Torah. And as soon as you have people up there does re grow in the winter to some extent, and now you can get a ship trapped and you need a sea ice forecast, and they can do ice for they can actually forecast bird migrations. Now, the birds want to go at a particular time of the year, but they want to go when the weather's right? They wanna ride the wind and not fight it. And so you can actually combine knowledge of biology with knowledge of the weather to tell the wind turbine operator. Hey, there's a huge flock headed your way down for tonight. I have to ask and we just have a couple of minutes left, though. Angela as Richard brings up sea ice melting, the, you know, the specter of climate change hanging over all this how much more difficult does that make your job right now? How much more difficult could it be in the near future? I think that I think that we're seeing extreme weather get worse. And we're seeing we're seeing things that that we haven't seen in the past in terms of how difficult it is is to predict. It's I don't know if it's making forecasting more difficult. I think it's it's just that the events that we're seeing are more extreme and maybe less believable in advance for some people. But and Richard you can you can tell me if I'm wrong. But I think that I think that overall that the physics of the the atmosphere fluid dynamics is not going to change unless something really bad happens. Richard. I'd love your thought on that little less than a minute left. Go ahead right for the physics, right? It works. The climate change is making it harder in the sense that if you get more rain flood gets harder to forecast because it comes faster, but they're doing a great job of it. And they can do this physics works in Israel, and you sound very enthusiastic about the future. Richard fantastically, bright. It's it's if we keep the investment going the payoff is very clear, the public private partnership is very clear it's moving forward. We can do great things. But but it takes a big investment. Which is I think maybe a topic for another day, Richard Allie. He's the Evan Pugh. Professor in the department of geosciences at Penn State university. Thank you so much. I appreciate it. Thank you. Real pleasure. Thanks, also Angela Fritz she's atmospheric scientist and deputy weather editor for the Washington Post. Thank you. Angela thanks for having me when we come back from forecasting weather forecasting, volcanoes what we can learn from listening to lava tubes..

Richard Allie Arctic Ocean Arctic Angela atmospheric scientist Washington Post weather editor Penn State university Israel Professor
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

"Have a world now that that see ISIS thinning in the Arctic when the Arctic had a huge amount of sea-ice all the time. Nobody in their right mind went up there unless you had an icebreaker talks. Let a now you'll have a military ship or a ship full of cars being shipped across the Arctic Ocean or a ship full of Torres. And as soon as you have people up there, the does re grow in the winter to some extent, and now you can get a ship trapped and you need a sea ice forecast, and they can see ice forecasts make an actually forecast bird, migrations. Now, the birds wanna go at a particular time of the year. But they wanna go when the weather's right? They wanna ride the wind and not fight. It. And so you can actually combine knowledge of biology with knowledge of the weather to tell the wind turbine operator. Hey, there's a huge flock headed your way. Shut it down for tonight. I I have to ask and we just have a couple of minutes left, though. Angela as Richard brings up C ice melting the specter of climate change hanging over all this how much more difficult does that make your job right now? How much more difficult could it be in the near future? I think that I think that we're seeing extreme weather get worse. And we're seeing we're seeing things that that we haven't seen in the past in terms of how difficult it is is to predict. It's I don't know if it's making forecasting more difficult. I think it's it's just that the events that we're seeing are more extreme, and maybe less believable an advance for some people. But and Richard you can you can tell me if I'm wrong. But I think that I think that overall the the physics of the atmosphere fluid dynamics is not going to change unless something really bad happens, Richard. I love your thought on that little less than a minute left. Go ahead. Right, right. It works. The climate change is making it harder in the sense that if you get more rain the flood gets harder forecast because it comes faster, but they're doing a great job of it. And they can do this physics works in Israel, and you sound very enthusiastic about the future, Richard. It's fantastically bright. It's it's if we keep the investment going the payoff is very clear, the public private partnership is very clear it's moving forward. We can degrade things. But but it takes a big investment. Which is I think maybe a topic for another day, Richard Allie. He's the Evan Pugh. Professor in the department of geosciences Penn State university. Thank you so much. I appreciate it. Thank you, a real pleasure. Thanks Angela Fritz, she's atmospheric scientist and deputy weather editor for the Washington Post. Thank you. Angela thanks for having me when we come back from forecasting weather to forecasting volcanoes. What we can learn from listening to lava tubes. This is science Friday. I'm John sqi. If you've been following our winter book club, you know, volcanoes are high on the list of topics that we're nursing out about in the next few weeks. The club is tackling MK Jemison apocalyptic book the fifth season which follows a world constantly and up evil from earthquakes volcanoes. We've gotta Facebook discussion group weekly newsletter and a lot more. It's not too late to join the fun checkout. Everything you need to know on our website science, Friday dot com slash book club..

Richard Allie Arctic Ocean Arctic Angela Facebook MK Jemison Torres atmospheric scientist John sqi geosciences Penn State univers Israel Washington Post Professor weather editor
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

"We'll be right back after this short break. This is science Friday. I'm John Dan Kaczynski, the American meteorological society is celebrating its centennial this year. And a lot is changed in the past one hundred years, you know, little things like computers satellites the internet. So how these things change local forecast in what meteorologists do day to day, and as the climate changes, how will meteorology have to adapt. Joining me now is Richard Allie. He's the Evan Pugh. Professor in the department of geosciences at Penn State university and co author of an article this week in the journal science looking at the history and future of meteorology. Richard alley. Welcome to science Friday. Thanks for joining us. Well, thank you, John to pleasure to chat with you. And your listeners. Also joining us as Angela Fritz, she's an atmospheric scientist and deputy weather editor for the Washington Post. Thanks so much for joining us as well. Angela I'm so happy to be here. Our number's eight four four seven two four eight two five five that's eight four four si- talk. If you've got big weather questions for our guests. Please don't ask them. Will it rain today? But. Bigger questions about meteorology. And there's a lot to talk about Richard. I'll start with you. How far have we come in one hundred years? Fantastically. I mean, you know, nineteen thirty eight hurricane came storming ashore from about where you're sitting there in New York across the way to Rhode Island. It killed about six hundred people. Nobody knew it was coming. It came screaming out of the Atlantic would virtually no warning when I was a kid you had days warning. And now we have three days. No warning the die when the storm hits day, you might be able to get out of the way. But if it's a big city, you're not going to you don't have time damn to the city three days, you can do it. And so as more and more people are in the firing line of big storms. Fewer and fewer people have to die and big storms. It's just the day today. Accuracy to Richard. I mean, you're able to just tell a lot more about the weather than used to it. It's beautiful. So the sort of the people who work hard on this and Angela knows this very well. But they have developed metrics of how well forecasting is doing and. The improvement in. Forecasts skill is really really clear. It's really obvious because they figured out how to do it better. Angela tell us about that. How much do you think accuracy has improved over these last hundred years? Actually, I think in Richards paper, there's a really great stat in there that we like to cite a lot, Richard..

Angela Fritz Richard Richard Allie John Dan Kaczynski American meteorological societ Richard alley Penn State university Washington Post New York Professor Rhode Island weather editor atmospheric scientist one hundred years three days hundred years
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

"So how these things change local forecast, and what meteorologists do day to day, and as the climate changes how well meteorology have to adapt. Joining me now is Richard Allie. He's the Evan Pugh. Professor in the department of geosciences at Penn State university and co author of an article this week in the journal science looking at the history and future of meteorology. Richard alley. Welcome to science. Right. Thanks for joining us. Well, thank you. John pleasure to chat with you. And your listeners. Also joining us as Angela Fritz, she's an atmospheric scientist and deputy weather editor for the Washington Post. Thanks so much for joining us as well. Angela I'm so happy to be here. Our number's eight four four seven two four eight two five five that's eight four four side talk. If you've got big weather questions for our guests. Please don't ask them will rain today. But. Bigger questions about meteorology. And there's a lot to talk about Richard. I'll start with you. How far have we come in a hundred years, just fantastically? I mean, you know, nineteen thirty eight hurricane came storming ashore from about where you're sitting there in New York across the way to Rhode Island. It killed about six hundred people. Nobody knew it was coming. It came screaming out of the Atlantic would firstly. No warning when I was a kid you had days warning. And now we have three days. No warning the die when the storm hits day, you might be able to get out of the way. But if the big city, you're not going to you don't have time to the city three days, you can do it. And so as more and more people are in the firing line of big storms. Fewer and fewer people have to die and big storms. It's just the day today. Accuracy to Richard. I mean, you're able to just tell a lot more about the weather than used to it. It's beautiful. So the sort of the people who work hard on. This and Angela knows this very well. But they have developed metrics of how well forecasting is doing and the improvement in. Forecasts skill is really really clear it's really obvious because they figured out how to do it better. Angela tell us about that. How much do you think accuracy has improved over these last hundred years? Actually, I think in Richards paper, there's a really great stat in there that we like to cite a lot, Richard. Is it a five to one a.

Angela Fritz Richard Richard Allie Richard alley Penn State university Professor Washington Post New York Atlantic Rhode Island weather editor John atmospheric scientist hundred years three days
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Ologies

"On survivalist message boards. Apparently, if you have a canteen, you fill it up with snow, and you tuck it between your layers of clothing and let your body heat melted. Such a potty do it or you can suck on small amounts of snow time. Just don't eat ice. Like, it's pudding. Also, one thread said you could pee in a bucket of snow and just melted that way, so you wouldn't be eating yellow snow against technically at that point. It would be a beverage. What's my point just bring a canteen or stay inside forever? A lot of questions about climate change, Madeline high sing one or snow. I live in Boston last winter. We had a bomb cyclone storm that everyone's forget about and she's very say, I really don't know what that means. What is a bomb Cyclo, and who gets to make up these dramatic names. I don't know. I don't know what a bomb cyclone is there. It sounds bad. I I think you'd wanna talk to an atmospheric scientist. Yeah. Look it up two. Good friends. I look this up and a bomb. Cyclone is also known as explosive cycle. Genesis a weather bomb meteorological bomb, explosive development, mid latitude cyclone cyclone bomb, or Bomba Genesis or Snowmageddon or a nor'easter. Now, if you're counting linguists that is ten English terms for just one kind of storm, and it means that the pressure drops bunch at least twenty four Mila bars in a short amount of time twenty four hours. It's when a mass of cold air meets warm air and the storm gathers intensity really quickly, but at ENA blizzard unless the Windsor at least thirty five miles an hour. Visibility is reduced to quarter mile or less and this thing lasts at least three hours. And yes. Climate change affects the amount of warm air that slams into cold air, slightly warmer air can also hold more moisture. So we may be seeing shorter snow seasons. But heavier snow dumps because. Of that. So climate change, the unnatural earth puberty that nobody wants in terms of fake snow. What are your feelings? Jordan. Mary field wants to know, what are your feelings on artificial snow made for ski resorts. You know, I think they're really healthy ski resorts. Artificial.

atmospheric scientist Boston Mary field ENA Madeline Jordan twenty four hours three hours
"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"atmospheric scientist" Discussed on Ologies

"On survivalist message boards. Apparently, if you have a canteen, you fill it up with snow, and you tuck it between your layers of clothing and let your body heat melted. Such a potty do it or you can suck on small amounts of snow time. Just don't eat ice. Like, it's pudding. Also, one thread said you could pee in a bucket of snow and just melted that way, so you wouldn't be eating yellow snow against technically at that point. It would be a beverage. What's my point just bring a canteen or stay inside forever? A lot of questions about climate change, Madeline high sing one or snow. I live in Boston last winter. We had a bomb cyclone storm that everyone was freaking out about. And she's embarrassed to say, I really don't know what that means. What is a bomb Cyclo, and who gets to make up these dramatic names. I don't know. I don't know what a bomb cyclone is there. It sounds bad. I I think you'd wanna talk to an atmospheric scientist. Yeah. Look it up two. Good friends. I look this up and a bomb. Cyclone is also known as explosive Cyclo. Genesis a weather bomb meteorological bomb, explosive development, mid latitude cyclone cyclone bomb, or Bomba Genesis or Snowmageddon or a nor'easter. Now, if you're counting linguists that is ten English terms for just one kind of storm, and it means that the pressure drops bunch at least twenty four Mila bars in a short amount of time twenty four hours. It's when a mass of cold air meets warm air and the storm gathers intensity really quickly, but at ENA blizzard unless the winds are at least thirty five miles an hour. Visibility is reduced to mile or less and this thing lasts at least three hours. And yes. Climate change affects the amount of warm air that slams into cold air, slightly warmer air can also hold more moisture. So we may be seeing shorter snow seasons. But heavier snow dumps because. Of that. So climate change, the unnatural earth puberty that nobody wants in terms of fake snow. What are your feelings? Jordan. Mary field wants to know, what are your feelings on artificial snow made for ski resorts. You know, I think they're really healthy ski resorts..

atmospheric scientist Boston Mary field ENA Madeline Jordan twenty four hours three hours
Cover crops, trees key to fighting climate change

Climate Cast

06:30 min | 3 years ago

Cover crops, trees key to fighting climate change

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America, NA member FDIC, Joe, what does your research tell you about the most effective natural climate solution natural Clements solutions are the protection restoration and improved management of natural and working lands, which includes forests grasslands wetlands and agriculture lands and in Minnesota one of the most effective natural climate solutions has to do with conservation agriculture which is practices like cover crops that help store carbon in our soil's. And what in Minnesota works best? Is it those cover crops is it reforestation what pulls the most carbon out of the atmosphere. Sure, there's no one silver bullet, there's perhaps a bunch of silver buckshot, if you will also cover crops take about a half a ton of carbon dioxide. Per acre out of the atmosphere every year, and there's over thirteen million acres of cropland in Minnesota that could be planted to cover crops and take that carbon out and stored in the soil. So this seems kind of like a no brainer. A win win for the atmosphere. How extensive are these natural climate solutions? And why aren't we using more of them? Yeah. There's a lot of things that can be done to increase investment in natural climate solutions. And that's part of why we wanted to do. This study was to draw attention to that in the case of reforestation, there's incentives that could be brought to have people be inspired to plant trees on places that have been deforested when it comes to cover crops. Farmers are excited about them because they build soil health. They can help increase the ability of soils to store water and make them more resilient to drought. But they can also store. Carbon. I'm suburban kid. Give me an example of a couple of different kinds of cover crops, one of the most common cover crops, his cereal rye. These are crops that are grown in the fall and the spring when the main crop is not growing. So that basically doubles the amount of time. You've got something green and growing on your crop field over the course of the year, and what needs to change for these practices to become more common in Minnesota and other places. Sure, there's some expense to farmers to buy that cover crop seed and planted and so some additional incentives may be needed. And I think it's well worth it because that helps all society controlled climate, and they also have benefits including improving water quality. When you talk to farmers, what kind of reaction, do you get about these types of solutions? The most recent cover crops survey shows that they're being increasingly adopted. So we're seeing increasing excitement among the farmers. We work with about cover crops are there policies and. Place that can better be employed to take advantage of these practices or are there specific policies against it recently. There was a barrier that's been removed. One of the ways that farmers benefit now is through crop insurance up cities through the farm Bill, and there were rules that made it harder to get that crop insurance. If you used cover crops, and those have been removed, so one of the things we can do is just kind of get out of our own way. And make sure we're promoting these conservation practices that had such strong benefits. Are you believe Minnesota has great potential for these natural climate solutions? Why while it's not just Minnesota. We looked at the whole country, and we looked at twenty one different kinds of natural climate solutions and one of the things I'm really excited about as they all have very strong co benefits. So for example, the reason that people might plant trees more trees in cities is not because they store carbon. But because people like living near trees. One of the reasons that people might invest more in fuel reduction treatments that can avoid catastrophic wildfires is because it can help protect homes and lives and improve air quality. So there are many reasons that we might want to invest more in nature what you mentioned cities what about urban reforestation? What does the optimal climate-friendly city? Look like, we didn't analysis that looked at the potential to increase the amount of street trees and park trees in cities around the US, and there's up to eight million more years of trees that could be planted in our cities alone, and what are those benefits other than as you mentioned? Right. Most of us like trees we like having them around while what's the benefits for cities to do that. Well, in addition to storing carbon they're at they produce shade they can help reduce a cooling costs in the summer and by sheltering from the wind. They can help reduce heating costs in the. Enter there's also increasing evidence that shows that there's psychological benefits of living near nature such as treason cities while they can also help minimize that urban heat island affect in in summer, especially what are the next steps for individuals, cities and state government on these natural climate solutions. There are a lot of steps that are being considered across the US by different states and that ranges from zoning laws that help have smart growth. So you reduce the amount of deforestation that's happening around some of our cities that are growing that includes the protection restoration of our coastal habitat, which not only stores more carbon but helps prevent buffer our coasts from damaging storms. So there's a wide range of practices that are being considered as an atmospheric scientist, I think of climate change from the atmosphere standpoint more often than. Not the atmosphere. Really doesn't care where the reductions in carbon are coming from or where the carbon getting pulled from the atmosphere is coming from how big picture how much percentage wise are we talking about with these natural climate solutions as an impact on carbon in the atmosphere. Yeah, we found that natural climate solutions can help fight climate change with a potential benefit equivalent to one fifth of our nation's current net. Emissions, and that's the same as if every car and truck in the country, stop polluting the climate. So there's a much bigger potential than most people realize Joe Fargo ni science director for the nature conservancies North American region. Thanks so much for your perspective today. Thanks so much for having me.

Minnesota Bank Of America Joe Fargo United States Fdic Clements Atmospheric Scientist Director Thirteen Million Acres One Fifth
Fire and Air

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Fire and Air

"As well. Fires burn a noxious mix of gases and fine particles. Enter the atmosphere creating rivers of smoke that crossed the country. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future fire powerful as a researcher. I use data light gated to look at the large scale we'd back of fire and smoke on the climate system and on air quality. Dr amber soya is an atmospheric scientist at the National Institute of aerospace and serves as the associate program manager for Nasr's applied sciences, wildland fire program, if you're nearer fire, you know, that you're threatening. But if you're far away from the fire, you don't understand the connection to your health smokers pollutant that's unhealthy and it results in poor quality. It's bad for you Mun that animals. It's bad for ecosystem health, and it can result and respiratory illnesses heart attacks and even at times Steph while fires affect us. All so NASA. Researchers like amber will continue to use the vantage of space to safeguard our future for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer poll animation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa and is distributed by w HR Wien.

National Institute Of Aerospac Dr Amber Soya Researcher Atmospheric Scientist Nessa Steph Nasr Nasa