17 Burst results for "Atlantic Taylor"

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"This would bend Saturday quarter after six men did not come back on until one in the morning home now it went out right as thunder showers moved in and a cold front moved in okay and took it from the night in the nineties to like seventy eight to eighty degrees okay within a period of a couple of hours and the clouds route the clouds were out there to begin with before hand so it wasn't as hot okay I had to try to sleep in it yeah well if your condition folly kicked out about one in the morning but there was a piece in The New York Times the endlessly frosty American indoors what has our obsession with air conditioning made us and what comes next and it wasn't even necessarily the article was a tweet that was noticed and went viral okay by a staff writer for the Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo who wrote conditioning is on healthy bad miserable and sexist six six oh man okay succes okay I can't I can't explain how many times I've gotten sick over this summer because of overzealous air conditioning in offices hash tag band air conditioning okay yeah I don't even know where to go hash tag shut up don't look if you don't want to if you don't want air conditioning great there if you want to live without air conditioning great go live without air condition conditioning I'm this call to ban air conditioning and it I guess it's inevitable we do see it I don't know if we we see it every summer I think part one liberal you know the ID of the man made global warming whatever climate change you don't actually need it and it usually comes from somebody who is in the northeast they can get by through the summer I go out to Arizona go to Texas go to for tell me again how you don't need air conditioning by the way if you say well no I don't I'll just use a fan good for you I'm not using a fan I'm using air conditioning and then for the sexes part they go to Atlantic article frigid offices might be killing women's produktivnosti O. K. as our goose bumps of long suggested women perform better on tests of cognitive.

The New York Times staff writer Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo O. K. Arizona Texas eighty degrees
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on WJR 760

"This would have been Saturday quarter after six men did not come back on to one in the morning home now it went out right as thunder showers moved in and a cold front moved in okay and took it from the night in the nineties to like seventy eight to eighty degrees okay within a period of a couple of hours and the clouds route the clouds were out there to begin with before hand so it wasn't as hot okay I had to try to sleep in it yeah well the air conditioned body kick down about one in the morning but I there was a piece in The New York Times the endlessly frosty American indoors what has our obsession with air conditioning made us and what comes next and it wasn't even necessarily the article was a tweet that was noticed and went viral okay by a staff writer for the Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo who wrote conditioning is unhealthy bad miserable and sexist sex is sexist men okay succes okay I can't I can't explain how many times I've gotten sick over the summer because of overzealous air conditioning in offices hash tag band air conditioning okay yeah I don't even know where to go hash tag shut up don't look if you don't want to if you don't want air conditioning great there if you want to live without air conditioning great go live without air conditioned conditioning I'm this call to ban air conditioning and it I guess it's inevitable we do see it I don't know if we we see it every summer I think by one liberal you know they get of the man made global warming whatever climate change you don't actually need it and it usually comes from somebody who is in the northeast they can get by through the summer I go out to Arizona go to Texas go to for tell me again how you don't need air conditioning by the way if you say well no I don't I'll just use a fan good for you I'm not using a fan I'm using air conditioning and then for the sexes part they go to Atlantic article frigid offices might be killing women's produktivnosti O. K. as our goose bumps of long suggested women perform better on tests of cognitive.

The New York Times staff writer Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo O. K. Arizona Texas eighty degrees
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"This would have been Saturday quarter after six men did not come back until one in the morning home now it went out right as thunder showers moved in and a cold front moved in okay and took it from the net in the nineties to like seventy eight to eighty degrees okay within a period of a couple of hours and the clouds route the clouds were out there to begin with before hand so it wasn't as hot okay I had to try to sleep in it yeah well in the air conditioning folly kicked out about one in the morning but there was a piece in The New York Times the endlessly frosty American indoors what has our obsession with air conditioning made us and what comes next and it wasn't even necessarily the article was a tweet that was noticed and went viral okay by a staff writer for the Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo who wrote conditioning is unhealthy bad miserable and sexist sex is sexist men okay succes okay I can't I can't explain how many times I've gotten sick over this summer because of overzealous air conditioning in offices hash tag band air conditioning okay yeah I don't even know where to go hash tag shut up don't look if you don't want to if you don't want air conditioning great there if you want to live without air conditioning great go live without air conditioned conditioning I'm this call to ban air conditioning and it I guess it's inevitable we do see it I don't know if we we see it every summer I think five one liberal it's you know they get of the man made global warming whatever climate change you don't actually need it and it usually comes from somebody who is in the northeast they can get by through the summer I go out to Arizona go to Texas go to for tell me again how you don't need their condition by the way if you say well no I don't I'll just use a fan good for you I'm not using a fan I'm using air conditioning and then for the sexist part they go to Atlantic article frigid offices might be killing women's produktivnosti O. K. as our goose bumps of long suggested women perform better on tests of cognitive.

The New York Times staff writer Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo O. K. Arizona Texas eighty degrees
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"After this would've been Saturday quarter after six men did not come back until one in the morning well now it went out right as thunder showers moved in and a cold front moved in okay and took it from the net in the nineties to like seventy eight to eighty degrees okay within a period of a couple of hours and the clouds route the clouds were out there to begin with before hand so it wasn't as hot okay I had to try to sleep in it yeah well if your condition fight kick down about one in the morning but there was a piece in The New York Times the endlessly frosty American indoors what has our obsession with air conditioning made us and what comes next and it wasn't even necessarily the article was a tweet that was noticed and went viral okay by a staff writer for the Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo who wrote air conditioning is on healthy bad miserable and sexist sex is sexist men okay sexist okay I can't I can't explain how many times I've gotten sick over this summer because of overzealous air conditioning in offices hash tag band air conditioning okay yeah I don't even know where to go hash tag shut up don't look if you don't want to if you don't want air conditioning great if you want to live without air conditioning great go live without air condition conditioning this call to ban air conditioning and it I guess it's inevitable we do see it I don't know if we we see it every summer I think by one liberal it's you know the you know the man made global warming whatever climate change you don't actually need it and it usually comes from somebody who is in the northeast they can get by through the summer I go out to Arizona go to Texas go to for tell me again how you don't need their condition by the way if you say well no I don't I'll just use a fan good for you I'm not using a fan I'm using air conditioning and then for the sexes part they go to Atlantic article frigid offices might be killing women's product typically okay as our goose bumps of long suggested women perform better on tests of cognitive.

The New York Times staff writer Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo Arizona Texas eighty degrees
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Has our obsession with air conditioning made us and what comes next and it wasn't even necessarily the article was a tweet that was noticed and went viral okay by a staff writer for the Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo who wrote conditioning is unhealthy bad miserable and sexist sex is sexist ma'am okay services okay I can't I can't explain how many times I've gotten sick over this summer because of overzealous air conditioning in offices hash tag band air conditioning okay yeah I don't even know where to go hash tag shut up don't look if you don't want to if you don't want air conditioning great if you want to live without their condition great go live without our consent conditioning this call to ban air conditioning and it I guess it's inevitable we do see it I don't know if we we see it every summer I think by one liberal it's you know the good of the man made global warming whatever climate change you don't actually need it and it usually comes from somebody who is in the northeast they can get by through the summer I go out to Arizona go to Texas go to for tell me again how you don't need their condition by the way if you say well no I don't I'll just use a fan good for you I'm not.

staff writer Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo Arizona Texas
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Has our obsession with air conditioning made us and what comes next and it wasn't even necessarily the article was a tweet that was noticed and went viral okay by a staff writer for the Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo who wrote air conditioning is unhealthy bad miserable and sexist sex is sexist men okay sexes okay I can't I can't explain how many times I've gotten sick over the summer because of overzealous air conditioning in offices hash tag band air conditioning okay yeah I don't even know where to go hash tag shut up don't look if you don't want to if you don't want air conditioning great if you want to live without air conditioning great go live without our consent conditioning I'm this call to ban air conditioning and it I guess it's inevitable we do see it I don't know if we we see it every summer I think by one liberal it's you know the good of the and may global warming whatever climate change you don't actually need it and it usually comes from somebody who is in the northeast well they can get by through the summer I go out to Arizona go to Texas go to for tell me again how you don't need air conditioning by the way if you say well no I don't I'll just use a fan good for you I'm not using a fan I'm using air conditioning and then for the sexes part they go to Atlantic article frigid offices might be killing women's product typically okay as our goose bumps of long suggested women perform better on tests of cognitive.

staff writer Atlantic Taylor Lorenzo Arizona Texas
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Video capturing a child's first steps or first words are first day of school. This is what so many of us do right? As parents, we document the moments that are important in our child's life and we posted online for our community to see. And as we do that. We are inevitably shaping our child's online presence. Most of the time the child in question doesn't really get a say in the matter and that creates complications as kids get older and realized that much of their life is already online and anyone can see it Taylor. Lawrence is a staff writer at the take who's been reporting on this her recent pieces called when kids realize their whole life is already online. She joins us via Skype Taylor. Thanks for being here. Thank you so much for having me, what provoked you to look into this. You know, there's so much about the set from the parent's perspective. But I just wanted you talk to them. So. Selves about when they surged to realize that they had its presence. What was the range of of responses when you engage them on this? I mean, it kind of just runs the gamut. Some kids were upset about the information that was out there about them. So they Google themselves and find, you know, in some cases, their parents have consented to school websites loosing about them. They were upset that may be the whole sports record was up there or that their parents had plus lot more public stuff than they realized. And then some kids really liked it like there was one boy who really felt like it made him feel famous to have all these pictures of himself on the internet. Maybe eighty percent of the kids that I spoke to didn't realize the extent of their internet presence, and the ones that did had parents had proactively warn them about it. But they had been told United staff line, but they got since they didn't have social media themselves. There would actually be that much about them. But in some cases, that's just not the case in your reporting in in these conversations. I mean, did it create tension in any of these relationships, especially as you? You got to like the middle school age or high school? That's when it starts to create tension. I think kids in elementary score the ones that I talked to you between third and fifth grade when they first Google themselves in pants, they're kind of like frustrated by what they find. Or they think it's novel. But it wasn't 'til kids got to middle school that I heard anybody really state like I my about this. I'm really frustrated desert or my dad or whatever. So I think middle school is often when kids want to get their own social media profiles. And I think they just want to start dictating their online presence for themselves. So I think that's the Olympic fiction agrees. But the bottom line is talk to your kids before you post. Yeah. And help them understand these platforms. Do you know a lot of parents wanted to their kids from these platforms? But I think parents need to have a better understanding of how these platforms work, and they just need to open the dialogue Taylor Lawrence. He's a staff writer at the Atlantic Taylor. Thanks so much. Yeah. Thank you so much for having me. Spain used to be one of the few European countries that did not have a far right party. But then last December the populist vox party won seats in the regional parliament, the main issue fueling this party is nationalism though, rather than immigration Lucia Benedetti's reports..

staff writer Taylor Lawrence Google vox party Atlantic Taylor Lucia Benedetti Spain Skype eighty percent
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Yeah. No for sure I it's funny because like I will always set out to write it. They like get away. Another usually like help we get famous verified. No. I mean, most of it. I think it's well one thing I think that's extremely helpful as I'm a woman and most of the people that I talked to her young teen girls. So like like, I more like a older person that they rely on like they asked me a lot of job for a middle age, man. No. I mean, you would be kinda creepy. A lot of the kids. Actually, there's another reporter who wanted to talk to one of my sources, and I was like, yeah. And I was like just heads up. If you try to DM her she's going to screen it and post her like creep feet. So like, let me put you in touch. But, but it's so many times I just I don't ever ever ever in any of my story is set to write about teens. Like, it's always like some weird emergent behavior ninety percent of the time. That's where it emerges, right, usually. But sometimes I wrote about how Twitter's number one platform for nudist and the entire district. But like there's a lot of like things that I read about it's not. But it's mostly teens ninety percent. It's because you message at some new me mccown, and they're like, yeah. I'm twelve. But we do. I mean, it's if you're under thirteen than like, I need to talk to your parents. I the kids also lie all the time. I got a call from a mom of this kid that told me it was seventeen. And I was thinking sounds still young in a mom call did choose like, so he's fourteen. Well to sign things. Okay. Taylor. Thank you so much and thank you all for listening. Our producers DD zongol if you have feedback right to me at B Marzia digital or tweet at me. I'm at MARCY. Thank you to Alexandra stamp who tweeted out after attending our live podcast Conde nast internationals offices of London the other week. She said so insightful and interesting. Thank you at W Blau, that's Wolfgang Blau and digital and Conde nast for hosting the live podcast recording was very thought provoking, and definitely makes me think about fashion sustainability and the role placed on publications like vogue completely differently. Thanks for coming out Zander. Please take a moment and leave us a rating or view on itunes or wherever you are listening to this podcast. This helps our podcast discovered. And thank you again for listening. We'll be back next week with an upset..

Conde nast Wolfgang Blau Twitter W Blau reporter Zander mccown B Marzia Taylor Alexandra London ninety percent
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Evan shouldn't be CEO. He's still, but the teen like all know about the stock price, but they do know about cultural relevance. And I think that Snapchat. Yeah. Everyone's still use a Snapchat for sure for talking. But is it gonna skill is going to grow? No are they gonna ever attract a lot of older users? No. But when you talk with with teens. Yeah. What do they say generally about where Snapchat fits into? You have a p most people I talked to have a Snapchat. But it's not nearly as important as it's not. Okay. Instagram is where their identity lives online Snapchat is like where they go to like shit talk with their friends or like San random pictures or like post some funny stuff, but it's not like core to your social network. Like, you could lose your Snapchat. It's fine like streaks used to be a big thing, and like less and less. So now, I think that's streaks are basically like when you send consecutive messages to each other back and forth. You get like a little fire icon, and it's a streak and. P- people used to go to extreme lengths to keep them. I feel like that kind of is over and I don't know. I don't hear about streaks anymore from kids. Yeah. I just think I I mean, I do think I do think actually so much of the corporate turmoil has affected the product to an extent that it's going to seem stale to users, and it already seems still to users young people have now are they going to need it in five years. I don't know. Okay. What's a platform? That's that's taking off with teens court is really a big dischord as as a chat app. Basically, it's from gaming twitch also. But so a lot of like a lot of like every like mean page has a discord pretty much. It's just another place where people go for communities and chatting, and it's it's all private communities. So unlike some of these other platforms like Twitter face like all these big open platforms discord is closed. So you're invited to a discord and everyone has roles and or not everyone, but you can be assigned roles. So, you know, there's like moderates almost like a little mini read it, but it spent people chat, and yeah, it's just very skews extremely young probably because a lot of the pages that they're pushing kids like a lot of the ways that people are pushed into discords or like, maybe it's a discord for their favorite youtuber their favorite gamer their favorite main page like hazardous court. So they'll join that. Okay. So they're like niche discussion groups. Yes. Sort of. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It's a it's a it's a it's a it's a it's like a slack. Actually. It's it's almost like exactly like a slack. But you have multiple of okay? How about any others? I don't know people always ask me this like, oh, what's new Instagram? I mean, I don't really write about anything till it has a certain amount of scale. 'cause I write about from the user. I mean, there's a lot of weird cool things that I've seen like startups. But I don't know if they're going to resonate. So so final thing how do you find these teens you just like go around the internet and like and talk with team is so full of teens like ninety percent internet is teens. I actually, but you're like an older, you're not..

Snapchat Evan CEO Instagram Twitter ninety percent five years
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"It's like somebody that's sort of like Ryder die for this one person could be pupae could be, you know, whoever Jake Paul, and they are like nothing you can do like we'll sell either, you know, idle in in in their eyes. And they're also the they have endless time. So they will try to hack you and change your profile picture to support their idol or whatever. And I think what I think because these sort of like influencers connect so deeply with their audience. They have right, but they have a more powerful audience than, you know, some of the more traditional celebrities like you're not gonna like go hack printers to print out like support Brad, Pitt or whatever right like, but if you're like, Jake, Paul or or like, a low gang or I don't know, you know, like, you're going to basically like harass. To support, you know, this is usually flawed influence or whatever. So. Yeah. I mean, I think that PD pie PDF has just a bigger audience than anyone on YouTube. So his his fans or like even more crazed. I mean, they're just more of them. But, but I I know that I've, okay. So it's a scale game. Yeah. It's not like, it's only Pudi pies fans are crazy. It's just like he's so many there's. Yeah. Okay. So a final thing is new platforms. You do some stuff on tick tock tick tock as the one everyone wants to talk. Now, I explain tick tock for those for not fully immersed in it. And why you think it's a poor nor if you think sure tic TAC is a God, I kind of botched this yesterday. So I'm going to try and get it. Right. This time, but it's it's sort of like a short form video app, which is kind of meaningless description every everything is short form video up now, but it's sort of a place where you can go to put videos to music, and it has a really robust suite of editing tool. So it lets you make like, yeah. You could record a short video on Snapchat or Instagram with with similar like kind of clip to a song. But on tick talk, you can make like crazy things happen. So videos antetok are like sometimes very just like visually kind of like you're on drugs. They look nuts. It's also kind of a place to be weird. I think because of a lot of. The like editing tools of videos are and then a lot of people a lot of like vine cultures kind of found a home on talk. So like just absurdist comedy, very like gems, e humor to be honest. A lot of the user base skews young. It used to be musically till it sort of rebranded. Relaunched doesn't disappear. No on your. Yeah. So I'm just wondering where it fits in to the suite of gen Z expression teens. It's like a souped up like version, I it's much closer to Instagram than anything else because it's video based and like similar like instrument comedians are all talk and stuff. Okay. So it's more is a competitive to Snapchat. No, like messaging talks not really about that. It's more like you are performing for an audience on tick tock. So it's a public forum, and like challenge culture is huge on ticks. So it's very participatory. Like, if you see a tech talk me like you do your own version of it, which is a very vine lake kind of thing. So we haven't discussed Snapchat. Yeah. Is that like indicative is like five dollars a share? I actually I was thinking the last Arctic while I wrote a I wrote a bunch articles. I haven't read about them and also most year mostly because like it's just..

Jake Paul Snapchat Ryder YouTube Instagram Brad Pitt five dollars
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"I don't know if it's more of a problem or less of a problem because I do wonder, particularly when it comes to the propaganda and fake news and stuff like this about whether. You know, growing up in in in this kind of information overload sort of thing, I think like I really think that people who grew up at one foot analog and one foot digital have really struggled with you know, just overload. I think Baleno probably their brains are a little bit more suited to this. But as I said, this is a pure distillation. Yeah. I mean, a lot of kids are highly skeptical and they'll debate stuff and these are teenagers. So, you know, they're not really like. You know, when you're in high school like you try out a lot of different political beliefs like, they're not necessarily like some thirty year old. That's an issue voter, but it's complicated. Because you you you have to do this almost like publicly the these days people like, oh, they went through a Goth phase. Yeah. That's that's what that's what's. So great about Instagram is you can go through those phases really easily and ditch them just as easily like it's not like Facebook where you have this like reverse chronological feed where your pictures live forever. No, like, if you're going through God phase, you probably start like little Goth six six Instagram account, and like post a bunch of dark stuff and like make a lot of friends there. And then when you're done with it, you wipe it and maybe even account. So explain why you focus on Instagram more than YouTube because my my understanding was YouTube is actually more influential in the lives. I actually think it's equal. I focused really heavily on YouTube. My current job. It has more to do with the Atlantic. Readership. Which is that. It's just it's I don't always get to do those same stories that I have always done that explained that the weird wild world of of YouTube and the pluses and minuses at world went, particularly when it comes to a teen audience. You know, YouTube is like it is also really important for for kids in the sense that they that's where they go to consume most of their content, and they usually are consuming it from people, although they'll go there to like search learn about anything it's sort of like their portal to the internet is often through YouTube, so like whereas a millennial met like Google something. I a lot of kids that I've talked to like just rely on YouTube, and that's a problem because YouTube algorithm is so flawed. Buzzfeed just did investigation this week where they kind of like followed it down the rabbit hole. And you almost always end up with extremist content. Six degrees. Yeah. Exactly. Click italy. Least six times on YouTube. You're going to end up like on like deepen lake and Nazi ciders. Okay. But I mean, a lot of these YouTubers have a lot. You just have like a very powerful influence ultimately their influencers to these kids, you know, they blocked by he's attacked us few very interesting. I mean, I think that's the interesting thing that I find about YouTube is the intersection it has with some of the really pernicious forces in our society just in in my own lake. We wrote some what I think is a fairly innocuous story about PD pie. And he and he he whipped up his army, and and they, you know, our reporter had elect shut down his Instagram. Go underground and stuff like this. And like, I know people are like, oh, it's just PD. Pine is. And I'm like, no like, I mean, this e-. It's okay. So I actually think it's a mall to things like, I I know I know the pain PD did a video on me. I have been advise. I gotta shut down. I just had a. Walkaway? Luckily, I was on vacation is when it happened. So this is great. But I think that's actually I mean, I think it's less Pudi pie and more STAN culture, which is the problem. Like, explain STAN STAN a STAN is like a superfan..

YouTube Instagram STAN STAN Baleno Facebook italy Atlantic Google reporter Pine one foot Six degrees thirty year
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Identities express yourself in different ways and wipe it anytime you want and start over change your username like an all of that stuff is is it's it's sort of like perfectly feeds into kind of like how kids want to connect and express themselves online. I'd like to take a quick break here. I'd like to invite you to come to live recording of the digital podcast where I interview Melissa bell the publisher of media and also the co founder of ox dot com. We have lots of disgust considering the recent spate of bad news at news publishers like BuzzFeed, huffpost in connect-, we're going to be hosting this live podcast event at vox media's. Headquarters in New York City on February seventh starting at five thirty we will start the recording at six fifteen pm. There are refreshments and mingling. So please do come for the podcast, but stay for the mingle. If you'd like a complimentary ticket, we have a few available. You can Email our producer a DD song-ghil Email adidi at DD ADI TI at digital dot com. And she will get you all set up an answer any questions, you may have hoped to see their no back to explain the power of memes to this Haitian. Yeah. I mean, memes are just how you communicate. So it's just a communication format. I would say. I think I mean a lot of us older folk probably like remember muses like something that you'd laugh at. But now, it's just a way of. Talking about the world. So it's just a visual sort of communication mechanism. And it's how you can express. Like, you know that you're mad. I wrote about Nisha MHz, which are little clip art diaries that kids post on Instagram when those because that was an interesting piece. Yeah. So niche memes are basically way it's honestly like. Twelve year olds and under some thirteen year olds and fourteen year olds but it's very young tween things, and they sort of just go on and post everything about their life, which is very normal for teen to do on Instagram. They do that through a lot of different ways. But nutrients became really popular you'd post like here's what I got at the mall today and like little screen shots. If everything you bought or like, you know, like profiles of people in my fifth grade Spanish class, and like post about everyone in your class, or whatever it's just kind of like, a public diary, and it's a good way to connect with other kids because kids see like, you know, it's so highly specific that like if an e Shamim resonates with you, it's like, oh, my God, this person is experiencing the same life. As me, even if they're in Indiana, and I'm in Connecticut. Do you think broadly speaking that this generation will have a healthier relationship with these platforms than some of the older generations? I again more optimistic. I mean, I think it's hard, and there's always pluses and minuses on stuff. I I mean in some ways, it's the internet is. They're toxic and than ever an- and kids can be radicalized very easily, you know, on YouTube and Instagram to be honest, and and that's really bad. But they they are forging their broadening their social networks to an extent that you know, definitely us as millennials never had. And so they're being exposed to more. You know, more new ideas exposed to more people, which I think is good news. Right. Sometimes as new ideas Matic that the earth is not round. Yeah. I mean, that's the downside. Yeah..

vox media Melissa bell BuzzFeed New York City co founder publisher producer Instagram Indiana YouTube Shamim Connecticut fourteen year thirteen year Twelve year
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"It's ridiculous. Okay. So Facebook is pretty bad too. Young Instagram is everything Instagram has ever. At expressed how intertwined especially with young girls like their lives are with Instagram. I mean, everybody has pretty much multiple accounts. It's where there I it's explained that. Well, I mean most people have like a main and then like at least some sort of secondary or tertiary at the secondary council. Well, it's to put like your like spam stuff. Like like, you know, your main is like your public website. Maybe like it's like your public profile. Curated highly curated what you're gonna like it probably has your real name in it. And like, you know, it's like what your parents will follow or like your teacher. You know? It's what like you let the adults or people that you don't really care about. And then you always have like a secondary spammers Festa account, which is just like where you put like your real. This is like this is like having an ad tech person. What is Vince the weight, right yours? Here's Dave had this for a long time. Offense is a it's like a fake Instagram. But it's actually where you're your real self. So it's like you put like this only gosh why I've nephew articles about it. But. I know you're right. You're right. You're right. Not everybody knows this. I know I actually talked to a parent of a fourteen year old who is running a very successful me and presence, and that's like a whole other world because a lot of kids. So you're is like your where you put like your, you know, your your fun pictures with friends or like, you're less edited version of yourself, and then a lot of kids sometimes even if they don't have a fence are spam account. They'll have like a me mccown or some other kind of third type of account where there it's even deeper in terms of self expression. So they're like posting about their life. It's where they go to make friends. It's where they go to like form friendships like I mean, Instagram GM is like a huge way that lot of kids group chat because it's kind of like hidden within the app, and you can so sounds like it's a more sophisticated and complicated. Way of using these tools that they've they've grown up with because. Yeah, it was kind of like all or nothing. Right. I mean like you either like purely anonymous. Or, you know, everything was your name and Facebook forced everyone under their own name to exactly and that's exactly it. So Instagram is like the perfect modern social network that allows kids to express identity in a really fluid way. Which is exactly what a teenager wants like what face. The didn't get right is. Like, yeah. Is this one profile? Also brands are treated differently. You see you can't start multiple things Instagram. You can start endless accounts and perform different.

Instagram Facebook Vince mccown GM Dave fourteen year
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"And so I felt like when I started writing about like internet culture and stuff like I just started sort of like diving into that more and trying to understand like why are they doing this weird thing or like, what's? Yeah. Like what what what are they up to or what why does this resonate? So I think a lot of times that stuff is covered in like a really rude way. And so I wanted to like, I guess understanding condescending. Yeah, they kinda sending like. Yes. The same way that influence our coverage. Me. No, I feel like most my beat is like somebody that like like people something that people hate on. Wait. No. Maybe it's good. That's why I think you're good at this. 'cause you're open minded. Yeah. Well, I used to be really into tumbler like tumbler was my life after I graduated college. And so I had a couple of people, you know, cover some stuff that I was working like I like doing on tumbler. And I always felt it was on fair. And I hate when people come in and are like rude about stuff that you're doing or think it's stupid. No kind of dumb stuff. But like so anyway, so I try to be fair. Okay. So explain to me exactly what's interesting right now about how teens are using these platforms because I think what's interesting is if you look crudely generation -ly you've got like baby boomers who are like sharing fake news on face. What you have gen-x such as usually forgotten. But but grew up analog purely analog, and then, you know, got like the internet like in like early adulthood her or college, and they're sort of one foot in each world. Then the millennials which we've over covered right that that had their aim addresses, and what it with Neo pets or something. So, but then you've got this new the jen's e gen alpha, whatever, you wanna talk about that grew up purely like with all of these platforms and mobile, this is the this is the pure distillation of of of what the society is. Because that's why I find it fascinating. Because they don't have they don't they have a completely different relationship to that. So explain what's going on. Yeah. The kids. Alright. Yeah. I have to admit tears like part of part of this. It was like me as a millennial like starting to feel old like, you know, when you like. Like, I don't know you start to be like we I feel like I'm getting old like becoming Costa middle age. How do you deal with millennials in the workplace? I'm like they're in their thirties. Person was like when this girl I used to babysit added me on Lincoln. And I was like what like your child? I'm old. Well, we just had a pitch media and here where one of the reporters will not name was pitching a story about brands that he was really into when he was like, you know, early in high school, and he was talking about two thousand eight thousand nine so that was. It's tough to relate go on. So explain how jen's e is. I broadly. How are they using you know, media differently than say your generation millennials Chatterly? They're like not sharing fake news. I mean are mostly it's like as like sharing less like pally. Public. Probably. Yeah. I mean, most of what it covers Instagram actually having even written about Facebook and over a year. 'cause I just think it's kind of sometimes I write about Facebook groups, maybe, but like that platform is actually the core. Facebook platform is pretty irrelevant for young people, and it's also relevant like culturally a lot of ways for y'all like youth culture. Explain that. That's interesting. I mean Facebook is just not where teens hang out. I mean sorry to Facebook. I know they're trying to build some Memphis, which is the most insane thing I've ever heard they they just techcrunch announced like last week, but they're testing this thing to actually replace Facebook watch for younger users, and it's called I think it's called L, and it's supposed to be like a place to sit back and watch curated memes, which sounds like the lamest thing ever. And I mean part of like what kids like about me, and like usually they're kind of edgy or like funny or like their fresh and new so the last thing you want is like Facebook curated ING like old memes from three months ago that are like brand safe in a feed..

Facebook jen Costa Instagram techcrunch Memphis Lincoln three months one foot
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"They're also big on tick tock, or whatever other odd is coming out. And I mean, this is not a phase. This is a new form of media that is here to stay. It's been around for a long time. And I mean, I I helped start a sub brand up people magazine and twenty fifteen focused on influencers the time there were still like, you know, people were like, oh, the word influence or it's not going to be around. And like, it's really only risen. I do think that you know, there's going to be a correction in the market so much it's unregulated. It's a it's kind of it's it's very early days. But no, I mean, people people gaining audience on the internet has has been around sort of since these social platforms started to emerge and even previously. I mean, there were my space stars like Tila tequila, merged out of that like, you know, so people anytime workout. Yeah. But anytime you have one of these big broadcast based social networks, you're going to have people gaming it to make money or find fame right there. There seems to be some backlash against influencers at least on the monetization. So you're not seeing that on the user side. I mean this backlash. It's very it's very like. But but less and less and less and less every year when I first started writing about this. Stuff like six seven years ago. You know, people were really rude about it like YouTube or wasn't even considered a job. Like, even if you, you know, you people I think now actually the not only has this sort of like career been validated. But it's aspirational for a lot of young people. So I mean, I think that the backlash especially as these people start to make more money or half more cultural impact a lot of the backlash will fade. I mean, that's not to say that there isn't very valid criticism. From some of these brands that have he's influencers strategies that are just not paying off. But I think, but I do think that this medium is is very powerful. Did you see either of the fire festival documents ops? So did I hated the who won? I didn't hate it. I like the net flicks one better. But I will admit that I tuned in in order to have a little shot in Freud a about the sort of driven culture. And I think a lot of people did that. And and and the the the documentaries themselves. Certainly, you know, look if amend the the sort of ridiculous side of this world. Well, yeah. And I guess what bothered me so much about the Hulu documentary. Was it just it was so completely off? I mean it missed so many things. But like the main thing was it was supposed to be this whole like indictment of social media. And like how you know social media causes is algebra, dive and millennials. It was like, right. Exactly. And like, oh, you know. This is the real scam note like social media millennials. They've given rise to some of the most successful festivals of our time, Coachella like almost billion dollar business because of social media millennials. So, you know, ultimately, Billy was a scammer. And no he was a flimflam, man. And he it didn't matter as age that was the part that I was like this is a story of a snake oil salesman, and we've had snake oil sales people personally forever. And we always will just so happens that you know, he he happened to use the tools that were available to. Yeah. And by the way, if that had gone out, you know, I if. He had actually delivered on that. Like, you would have seen the I mean, I think that we saw the power of influence or marketing through that through that sort of Gasco because like the part of the reason it did become so big it's because the influence or marketing was so successful. I mean, they were selling a fake dream, and that's bad..

people magazine Billy Tila tequila Freud YouTube salesman Hulu six seven years billion dollar
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"You know, connecting with and providing a service to, you know, sometimes millions of followers, so so you don't focus on all the upsurges. And that's why I think your your work. I'm more optimistic optimistic. I tend to read these things in my God, what is happening to us. So what is going on with the rise of influence influencers have been with us for awhile? We used to call them celebrities. But now there's a different category. Explain why these are not just regular celebrities. Yeah. Well, so there's there's sort of this wall in between traditional celebrities and their audience. So, you know, if you think of like Brad, Pitt or Angelina Jolie or someone, you know, they're not acceptable. You don't really know that much about their personal life. And in fact, they're very guarded influencers are people that connect with their fans on a much more personal level. You could argue Arianna Guerande is like the perfect sort of influence. Our pop star where you know. Yes. She's this. You know, Bill like, multimillionaire platinum recording artists, but she also engages so regularly with her fans. She follows all of you know, the communities that that are fan accounts dedicated to our stuff like that. And so. You know, she's an example of a traditional celebrity that walks that line. But then there's also people that are just big on social media or even not that big. But they're, but they're basically monetize their user base. And and and sort of have this very direct more peer to peer relationship with their fans. So I I get it with our Anna ground day, though is famous for something other than Instagram. Well, it's the people that are famous almost for being famous. Well, they're famous for building an audience, and they're famous for usually building an audience or your business. And so I mean YouTubers people used to call before the word influence there was sort of popularized over the past few years. I think there's a better understanding of what it means. But you know, people we've had YouTubers for a long time. We had vine stars people that were sort of more platform specific, I think now a lot of influencers, I mean influence, our culture is so tightly associated with Instagram, but a lot of influencers do bridge over a lot of platform. So they're influencers because they're not just youtuber, but they're also big on Instagram..

Arianna Guerande Instagram Angelina Jolie recording artists Brad Pitt
"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic taylor" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Taylor. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me, very excited to have you. It's a little bit different than are. You were usually just like deep into the business side with CEOs and stuff like this talking about pivots and whatnot. But I wanted to have you on to talk about your very weird. Interesting beat because it interests me quite a bit. How do you explain it? Well, I cover broadly, internet culture. So I'm a staff writer covering internet culture that you know, internet culture can kind of take a lot of different forms. But my main beat is kind of like how users use social platforms. I guess everything. I read about this from the user perspective. So that can be at twelve year old teenager, or a, you know, massive influence, or, but I basically just write about like user behavior and emergent user behavior on the internet. Okay. So that can be everything like how teens are using these platforms. But also the Instagram husband. Yeah. Explain what an Instagram husband share. So and Instagram husband was a term that was sort of popularized by a a YouTube video that went supervisorial back in two thousand fifteen and it's basically well it used to me in back, then sort of like any man that was grudgingly. Taking you know, his wife or girlfriend Instagram pictures. So, you know, you always see the model on Instagram and supposed to be the man behind it now. Instagram, husbands, add as a lot of these women have become super successful influencers, you know, running. We'll be million dollar businesses have hired their husbands. So Instagram husband means more of a employees kind of. So whoever's the one doing the work taking the photos, but now he's often paid. Okay. So this is the rise of sort of influencers, micro influencers, maybe proto influencers of people who just want that that perfect Instagram shot. Yeah. Yeah. An Instagram enables all of this. I I was amazed. We were talking about Los Angeles. But I I was miss out in Los Angeles. How many places hotels, restaurants, etc? Have Instagram installations in them like they're made for Instagram? Yes, it's crazy. How much Instagram has affected like architecture and our physical space. There's a writer at the rear Elissa bresnik who's a good friend of mine like she's she's amazing. But her beat overlaps a lot with mine, but she's written a lot of good stuff on sort of how Instagram is transforming physical spaces. And I am always so shocked by it. You know, people have a Instagram wallet parties now to take pictures in front of and, you know, obviously, the famous Paul Smith while in L A, and yes everywhere. Everyone wants a good backdrop for their. So I'm moving to the crotchety phase in my life. Explain why this is not all terrible. Well, it's terrible. I mean, it's it's just a way that users are expressing themselves. I actually was thinking. I know. Yeah. I mean, it's so terrible. Because it's I mean, it's giving these people in new way to monetize, which I think is really interesting, you know, living life like life seems to be lived more often now to sort of show show off like, you know, a life that you might not really lead and to and I just wonder how I don't think we fully, and that's what I really want to get into. I don't think we've really fully. We don't know all the impacts these things are having on on all of us. Yeah. I mean, it is obviously like these big sort of like broadcast-based tradition systems have made it so people are very performance active. I mean, the goal is to get as many followers as possible kind of. And so people will do a lot of crazy stuff in pursuit of that. Which I agree. It can be very negative. I would say they're also really positive places for self expression, and for creativity. And I mean, I do think I do think that a lot. Of that stuff. Yeah. Maybe it is these lifestyle influencers seemingly being really cringe. Taking a lot of these pictures changing outfits ten times in front of the same wall. But they are also building a new business model, and,.

Instagram Los Angeles YouTube Taylor. staff writer writer Paul Smith million dollar twelve year