19 Burst results for "Atlantic Monthly"

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:50 min | 5 months ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WJR 760

"To the capital or haven't been to the capital, it feels like a small little town. You know, Lansing is not a massive, busy, bustling place necessarily in when you feel like you can maneuver around town really easily so when when security does get to this level, it's not feeling when you see The windows being boarded up. It's a little it throws you back a little bit. Did you have an opportunity to talk to police at all? Or any of the protesters? Well, what were they saying throughout the day? There were a number of different reasons that brought brought the public. Oh, but you're right. I should've mentioned that there were a number of stores even blocks away. Some of them boarded up the windows just in case on Saturday. But I talked to people that were there. They set out of curiosity that they wanted to see what happened. They thought, you know they thought that Recent events were historic, and they wanted to be witnesses to it. You know, we talked to this this, you know, the self described Boogaloo group and it's an interesting It's not a real You know, it's not a group that necessarily has membership cards. It's It's almost a kind of a movement and their you know, that's an interesting group. I'm not an expert on these, but you know, there's been some pretty good articles in the Atlantic Monthly about it recently. You know, they're not necessarily even pro trump there basically. Anti government sort of an anarchist group. That's basically you know, looking for kind of a conflict of breakdown society, Some kind of, you know, some kind of a civil war that would that would basically tear down existing structures. And, um, you know when they read Ah manifesto talking about government overreach and that sort of concerns that were certainly there were pro Trump. People there There was, you know, some waving trump legs and that sort of thing. There was. There were entrepreneurs. There was a man there trying to sell Trump paraphernalia in anti Wittmer signs. He didn't seem to be doing a booming business because, you know, I mean, the state police estimated there were only maybe, like 20 protesters there talks. I think I think they're estimate was a little light. But it was not at the line. You know, there was Was definitely more media there than there were demonstrators and there were far more police than there were, um, you know, reporters and demonstrators combined. Yeah. And you want to give you want to make sure people have the ability and the right to exercise free speech at the same time after seeing what happened at the Capitol, you understand why there was an abundance of caution and hopefully things will stay peaceful between now and Wednesday, and they're after, but definitely interesting time to be up there..

Lansing Trump Atlantic Monthly
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:34 min | 8 months ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"In the September 8th issue of the Atlantic Monthly. You know, under those laws. Theoretically, the state legislatures were Republicans control both houses could throw out the election and appoint their own electors to the electoral college. Amazing stuff. Never even heard about that possibility. And that's why I love having you on. I just love having you on. So Lord knows what are you writing? About in your column, it WMD dot com Really don't know. I have to write it tonight. Do you have any suggestions? Thie. The political The astute political brilliance of Jerry Jeff Walker. Can that be your everything about that before? Oh, Okay, So it's old hat. See the art? Well, the audience just assumes it now across the country as well. They should loved Alan loved to you. God bless you. Thank you for your time, both the pre and post election and I guess we're still Not at post election yet. And if I may say Jesus, take the wheel and God God is still in charge here. Maybe he sees on economic catastrophe or other disaster. A suit is Biden takes over. And they'd rather have that credited to Democrats and Republicans. I love it when you do. You're Carrie Underwood Impression. Low. Ponte A read it. Read him and wmd dot.

Biden Jerry Jeff Walker Carrie Underwood Atlantic Monthly Ponte Lord Alan
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:09 min | 9 months ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"You know, Governor Parker has Outlawed joy in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. And if I don't if I keep seeing people enjoying themselves here, laughing and chuckling, and you know, having fun with their friends, I may have to call the snitch line. Karen pay to play. Police will be out here. With a bucket and you'll have to put some money into it before you could continue to. Ah, party Hardy. All right. Remember a couple of weeks ago? It seems like It's probably about six or seven bombshells against President Trump ago. They said. Or this guy that writes for the Atlantic Monthly, which which is one of these magazines like Playboy or Esquire or Newsweek. They don't really exist anymore, except online any any. And he wrote this story with no no confirmed sources. Nobody on the record, saying the president Trump called that the dead soldiers that were buried from World War one in France as Stupid and losers. Very soccer's. And of course, it wasn't true and everybody, including people at all, like Trump, like John Bolton, John Kelly, the former chief of staff from right, they all said. That's It's nonsense. He didn't say it. But the story was out everywhere. Wasn't true. So Today. Some new audio has emerged of Joe Biden. It's video, actually Taylor. What is this? That you were about to play here? It's a video of speech he gave in 2016 to the troops, and I'm not sure what it was about, but he was talking about Hey, has very good judgment. And then he gives an applause line or what he thinks. Was it Applause line, and he doesn't get the applause that he wanted. It's a it's a Jeb Bush. Please clap moment, except it's a lot more harsh. Okay, let's listen to it. This is, uh, this is Joe Biden, who was shocked, shocked by what President Trump allegedly said, But he never said so. Now. I'm sure that Joe Biden is about to deny what you're going to hear right now. I have incredibly good judgment one.

President Trump Joe Biden Taylor president Governor Parker Atlantic Monthly Massachusetts Jeb Bush John Kelly Karen soccer Hardy France chief of staff John Bolton
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:04 min | 10 months ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The Atlantic Monthly magazine that a report it said it had four sources who had said that the president on the trip to Europe to honor the war dead World War. Made disparaging remarks about going to a cemetery where Marines from that war were buried. It said. Why would I want to go? Ah Ah, see guys who adjust suckers and I forget what else was attributed to what he said. And then, in fact, he chose not to go to the cemetery not because the weather was in climate and didn't permit the helicopter to fly there. But because he just decided he didn't want to go because his hair would get wet. Well, so he when this story came out, I mean, there's so many parts of this story that are just sort of job dropping, but number one, he attacked Jennifer Griffin from Fox News. Jennifer Griffin was hired at Fox News. A long, long time ago, when it first was, you know, sort of the fair and balanced. It hadn't gone so completely all the way to the right it had. It was not a It wasn't a publicity or propaganda machine. The way I think it is now. But this woman is considered one of the best journalists out there and I've known her for many, many years. She is as straight laced as they come. She would never, ever ever say that there was an anonymous source. Ah, without having that actual source confirmed, and Fox News would not have let her run with it. If they didn't absolutely trust that she had confirmed with multiple sources. She's been around for a long time. She's been down in D. C for a long time she's called so many sources. And the fact is anybody that says, Will you come just because you have an anonymous source? Obviously, that shows it's fake news bull That is not true. And you guys know it. The right uses it. The left uses that Trump himself was an anonymous source for years and years and years, so enough with this anonymous source nonsense. This is a tactic. It's a tool used by journalists, and it is a very effective tool, and we wouldn't have had a lot of the major stories and a lot of major scandals broken if we had not used anonymous sources. Well, the problem here, though, is it Had a nemesis of Donald Trump has emerged. John Bolton, who was his national security advisor, who made the trip with him to Europe, and he's saying that in all the time that he spent with the president Which was not all the time but a lot of the time. Ah, he didn't hear that attributed to the president. He didn't hear others talking about it at president had said that And that in fact, he verified why the one visit to the cemetery to visit the Marines was cancelled because of the weather. On. This is not a guy who is a friend of Donald Trump. Ted, you know, I mean, but here's the thing so I would just like to hear from Trump supporters who blasted him for all of the things that, he said in his book. Are you going to blast him for saying this or you're going to continue to call him a liar? Because you can't have it both ways. I mean, if you're if he's saying something that now appeases you, and then you're saying Well, Okay, well, then he's obviously he's telling the truth. I mean, it's just the hypocrisy is just astounding on both sides of the aisle. But this look, the fact is, I don't know what what His motivation is. He's one guy. But there were step for several sources and the sources that Jennifer Griffin has our high place sources. And there are too many people agreeing with this. Plus, we've heard him say. We heard him, say, Loser Loser loser about some of the most heroic people on this planet, including John McCain. It's usually when he uses the term loser. It's somebody who's attacked him or criticize him so Hey, calls people human scum. He just called again today. The media human scum. I mean, it's just this is a guy who uses these words. He throws them out like candy at a parade, right? But with 55 days left now to the actual cashing of the vote, although we don't necessarily think it will be resolved by the night of November, 3rd. You would think now they're Bolton has come up No friend of Trump and said that didn't happen. According to my recollection. I wasn't with him every minute of the trip, but it didn't happen. Almost like you've got to come up with someone to counter act it Well, you might end up saying ah, a lot of people obviously who had beef with the president of the United States. How do we know they didn't just concoct? All I want is one of his major critics, John Bolton and saying I want to hear didn't happen why they believe John Bolton now, but they don't believe him. When he's talking about all these other things. I'm really curious to hear that, because to me, that's very hypocritical and it's It's what we do. We don't call our own our own sides. We just always have to believe we put our blind loyalty. I That's not write. The other thing is the president, um, basically went out and attacked the Pentagon leaders. I mean, this is like Classic Divide and conquer. It's It's Politics Strategy, 101. He's pitting the rank and file now against military brass. This is the commander in chief. And he thinks that this is acceptable. Why are we not hearing from me is there's a reason he's accusing the Pentagon leaders have fighting wars to boost defense contractors profits? We haven't been pulling out of any wars. This is exactly what this is what exactly? Eisenhower said upon his departure. There were very few generals of his prominence when he left the presidency, he said, Beware. Of the military industrial complex, which I agree you have generals who leave the military. Then they are employed its lobbyists or they get big, fat jobs with defense contractors. I just find it interesting, incredible amounts of money. Now he's he's He's launching this attack. What he's trying to Dio in. My opinion is he's trying Teo make us make his supporters questions the credibility now of the military brass because he is concerned that there going Tio, they're going to call him out. As well. They should. All right, let's go to Adam was calling all the way from Atlanta. Welcome to W. A. B. C and the reuniting get, said Juliet and yours truly courteously, Adam Hey, courtesy, Julia. How you doing Quite well, how it thinks in Atlanta there, remember, Originally we saw it that you'd be in complete lock down your whole state of Georgia because you were really the first to burst out before Florida, Texas or Arizona. Right. We're doing good. People could eat inside restaurants or outside of depending their choice, But things were almost back to normal. So that's a good thing and I just wanted to say that, for example, with this newest trump controversy, there are four people who said that he said it but I, As of latest. I think there's about 15 to 20 people saying that he didn't say it are. Who are these people? They're all members of his administration..

Donald Trump president John Bolton Jennifer Griffin Europe Fox News Pentagon Atlanta Atlantic Monthly magazine John McCain Adam United States Ted Eisenhower Teo Dio W. A. B. C
Will Early Retirements Crash the Economy?

Money For the Rest of Us

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Will Early Retirements Crash the Economy?

"I recently saw a poll that was sponsored by T. Rowe price it showed forty three percent of millennial workers expect to retire before the age of sixty five that compares to thirty five percent of those from generation. X. which is ages forty fifty five. This survey was referenced in an article by Gina Smith Alec of The New York Times. The article was titled. How millennials could make the FEDS job harder. The subtitle they love the idea of retiring early that could diminish the Federal Reserve's firepower the article reference. How millennials in order to leave the workforce early with need to build up massive retirement funds and buy less things and that lack of demand could hit consumption which would slow economic growth leading to ever lower interest rates. The author mentioned the paradox of Thrift. Which is if everyone tries to save in mass that could lead to lower economic growth lower inflation and trip up the economy. She writes when consumers save a big portion of their income. They are not spending as much on dinners out. Movie Nights and cars businesses respond by investing less than equipment and technology and productivity stalls. Bosses are unwilling to pay their workers more for the same output and week pay gains further restrain spending. Would a wave of early retirements cause such economic turmoil? That's what we're going to explore in this episode. The fear that early retirements would cause economic. Turmoil is not new. It was prevalent in the nineteen twenties. Which are sometimes called the roaring twenties because it was a period where economic growth was very very strong in the US was following World War. One Manufacturers really hit their stride. They were able to produce goods that were affordable to the masses the economy the measure of output gross domestic product grew by about forty two percent during the nineteen twenties that compares to about twenty five percent economic growth during the most recent decade real per capita GDP. The amount of output produced per person grew from sixty five hundred dollars. This is on a real basis so negative inflation to nine thousand seven dollars about a forty percent increase between twenty ten and twenty nineteen real per capita GDP in the US grew from just under fifty thousand to just over fifty eight thousand about a seventeen percent increase now is from a smaller base in the nineteen twenties but it was a period expansion even greater than the expansion of the most recent decade where we didn't have any economic recessions in the US in the nineteen twenties. There were several brief periods of economic contraction. But generally speaking the economy was doing very very well Lincoln steffens. He's an investigative journalist was known for his investigations on corruption. Business in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight he wrote big business in America is producing what the socialist held up as their goal food shelter and clothing for all president. Calvin coolidge said. This is essentially a business country. Journalist Samuel Strauss in the Atlantic monthly in one thousand nine hundred eighty four wrote. This is our proudest boast. The American citizen has more comforts and conveniences than kings had two hundred years ago. He pointed out the signs of that prosperity. Automobiles radios buildings bathrooms furs furniture. Ocean LINERS HOTELS BRIDGES VACUUM CLEANERS. Cameras Bus Lines Electric Toasters moving pictures. Railway cars packaged foods telephones. Pianos novels comics. These things were made available. Because of mass production efficiencies in the manufacturing process they were also accessible to the public not only because the prices were affordable but credit was available installment purchases

United States Gina Smith Alec T. Rowe Federal Reserve Lincoln Steffens Calvin Coolidge Feds Pianos Samuel Strauss America President Trump The New York Times
[Part 1] On Great Teachers and the Remarkable Life: A Deliberate Practice Case Study by Cal Newport

Optimal Living Daily

03:57 min | 1 year ago

[Part 1] On Great Teachers and the Remarkable Life: A Deliberate Practice Case Study by Cal Newport

"Predicting greatness. The impact of teachers is profound if you rank the world's countries by their students academic performance the US this is somewhere in the middle in two thousand Nine Yorker Article Malcolm guy well knows stat. Replacing the bottom six percent ten percent of public school teachers with teachers of average quality polity could be enough to close the gap between our current position and the top ranked countries quote. Your child is actually better off in a bad school with an excellent teacher then in an excellent school with a bad teacher Gladwin concludes. But there's a problem quote. No one knows what a person with the potential to be. A great teacher. Looks like Mike and quote or at least. According to Glad Well Teaching for America nonprofit recruits outstanding college graduates to teach in low income. School districts disagrees. His organization is fanatical about data for the past twenty years. They've gathered massive amounts of statistics on their teachers in an attempt to figure out why some succeed in the classroom in some fail Ale then work backwards from these results to identify what traits best predict a potential recruits success as a man Ripley reports in a comprehensive look inside the teach for America process published in the Atlantic monthly the results of this outcome based approach to hiring our humbly. I came into this with a bunch of theories to former head of admissions at teach. Teach for America told Ripley quote proven wrong at least as many times as I was validated and quote when each for America I started twenty years ago applicants were subjectively subjectively scored by interviewers on twelve general traits like communication ability sample interview question. What is wind by contrast? If you're one of the thirty five five thousand students who applied in two thousand nine a pool that included eleven percent of Ivy League seniors. Thirty data points gathered from a combination of questionnaires demonstrations in interviews us were fed into a detailed quantitative model that returned a hiring recommendation. This data driven approach seems to work as readily reports in two thousand seven twenty ninety four percent of teach for America. Teachers advance their students at least one and a half grade levels or more two years later as the organization's models continue to evolve this number has almost doubled to forty four percent. I'm fascinated by teach for America for a simple reason the trace. They discovered at the core of great teaching are unmistakably a variant of deliberate practice not the pure coach driven practice a professional athletes and chess grandmasters but a hardy adaptable strain rain applicable to almost any field put another way these outstanding teachers may have unwittingly cracked the code generating a remarkable life inside inside the classroom of an outstanding teacher in her Atlantic. Piece Ripley recounts and afternoons spent in the math. Classroom of William Taylor a teacher in Southeast Washington. DC who ranks in the top five percent of all math teachers in the district. When Taylor enters the classroom is students fall into a strictly choreographed interaction? Good morning he calls

America Piece Ripley William Taylor Nine Yorker United States Malcolm Guy Gladwin Ivy League ALE DC Mike Southeast Washington
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Based on the true story. I believe it's of the same title as I think it was an Atlantic monthly article that became also the, the basis for maybe that maybe the Dustin Hoffman often movie outbreak two, but it was it was based on that notion of the escaped Ebola virus and what happens if it suddenly gets into the mainstream of society, and there, again, just to say it because you brought it up earlier, and I wanted to mention it, there's Julianne Margulis as you said, in the NBA narratives, it's the women dot the renegade. Women doctors. And the detective stories it's the hard boiled. You know, stand against the power structure, shaking, his fist to the world, male detective stories, but a lot of ways they sort of parallel each other, and that's interesting. I didn't really make that connection until I heard a couple of breaks ago and the clarify the article by Richard and came out in the New Yorker in New Yorker. Okay. I was thinking about a real life people outbreak in reston Virginia. Right. And that the crust of it was that it was a strain of a bowl of it was heiress allies, which meant that it could spread in the air, which is not how he Bola normally transmit so made it highly highly dangerous. Luckily, the strain, they had rest in only affected the monkey. And so it was able to be contained but that was sort of the first and only able outbreak on American soil. And so when the article was published. It got a lot of attention. And then he got a Richard Preston. Got a book deal and the book version came out in nineteen ninety four. And he also got a movie deal. And what's interesting is that it has taken until now for that, that become something that they were trying to make it into a movie. And they knew that they had to compete with outbreaks and outbreak went into production. I like they, they were like racing outbreak went into production before the script was even finish and because outbreak got into production. I basically pulled the plug on the crisis in the hot zone movie, and then Linda, oaths and really thought had been trying to make it as like, you know, a mini theory limited edition..

outbreak Richard Preston Dustin Hoffman Julianne Margulis Atlantic monthly NBA reston Virginia Linda
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Com. An office look into it on Jack. Then the born very tired English teacher school principal and I've been interested in dinosaur for some time. And then I saw this article in the Atlantic monthly about that lady who talk about all those volcanoes blowing up in India. And then so I kind of well what's going on here? So then I thought that's something for science weekly. And so it's it's this lady professor Keller at Princeton University. She has an alternative theory, and she thinks that a series of volcanic eruptions in India is actually responsible for the extinction of dinosaurs. Not this massive asteroid and hating in Mexican area. Right, right. Presumably the asteroid. Oy, also hitch. But anyway, it's something I thought, hey, this is this is the topic of times meekly can explore neatly in a way that I very much appreciate. They separate of science weekly is for you, Jack. I'm Greg Jackson. My name is Paul upchurch, professor of Palo Bilgee, the department of sciences university curriculum than I sat down with pool to discuss the conventional theory the impact hypothesis. Okay. So the audio of the impact this is the just over sixty six million years ago. The earth was hit by at least one very large asteroid probably asteroid raw than a comment, but it could be a comment if it was an asteroid probably something like ten comatose in diameter. And it seems that it hits the earth in the region of the chick syllable crater, and that's on the Yucatan peninsula, which is essentially Mexico, and the idea of this hypothesis is the this would be the mechanism for causing a massive extinction. Where the earth probably lost somewhere between about fifty and seventy five percent of species. Potentially very very rapidly. Or what I like to call other people have called this the afternoon scenario where everything is is going along fine. Everybody's very happy. And then suddenly bang mass. Devastation has been pummeled by asteroids throughout its history. And they've not caused Matic's sink Sion's as far as what was it about this one that made it different? So in the case of the chicks impact, this was half, online and half in shallow ocean, potentially. This could you know, throw a lot of material into the atmosphere essentially block out sunlight four period of maybe weeks or maybe months, but but enough to cause a very sudden relatively sharp decrease in in global temperatures. And if we fast forward sixty six million years to today, I wonder what was the first piece of evidence that made us think a ha- it does appear to be this massive asteroid that came and impacted with the earth. Well, I remember this because I was a child at the time and back in. In nineteen eighty a couple of American scientists Louis Alvarez who I believe is a physicist Walter Alvarez, his son who's a Joe just were interested in looking at how much of a particular very heavy. Metal could rhythm was raining down on us from space on a regular basis because if you could measure the rate, which radium filthiest down onto the earth is accumulated in rocks. You'd have one way of sort of measuring the age of rocks. But then they found something rather unusual. There's a clay layer what the call the boundary clay at the very end of the tastes periods. So exactly when the mass extinction seems to happen in that clay layer. There was what the new radium spike or radium anomaly, so it's far more originally you'd expect just from so background levels of rainy after space. So they ask the question work. This rhythm have come from and one possibility is from a great pulse involved captivity because as radium in the deep earth that can be brought to the surface. Through Volk Newsham, but another possibility would be through some kind of a massive asteroid impact. And shortly after that people were looking for some kind of remnants of the crater and they found one hundred eighty two two hundred climate of wide ring shaped structure in the chick slip region, which turns out to be the remnant of a very large maitre impact. And it's exactly the right age potentially to coincide with the extinction..

India Jack Paul upchurch Volk Newsham principal professor Keller Princeton University Walter Alvarez Louis Alvarez Greg Jackson Palo Bilgee Yucatan Mexico professor Matic physicist Sion sixty six million years
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"Because if it's not there than it will naturally sort of swing to complexity it will swing to things that slow things down and any lose that nimble because not a great organization. You can still have great support. It can still be a great place to work. It's still be all those things. But which? He'll stop doing his innovating. You'll stop leading at some point. You know, you'll lose your position because you haven't had the nimble nece ability to kind of move things for. All right from body Grunwald to one of the great thinkers in the world today. Charles duhig Charles is a repeat guests. Love Charles always makes me think and he gives us tremendous freedom to act and think differently with this excerpt as we talk about ignoring conventional wisdom listening to Charles duty. I wanna talk about this. Other term creative desperation. What does that mean to you? There's this really interesting science behind who gets to be creative. Right because we tend to think of creativity as something that you're born with or you have some temperament for right there are creative artists in this world. And they're soak short creative. It what we found is that science tells us that's exactly raw anyone can be creative. Anyone can be incredibly innovative. It's about learning. These kind of mental habits these tricks that allow you to tap into your creativity. And the first one is you mentioned is created ration- one of the things that we know is that many people tend to become much more, creative not necessarily when they're feeling calm, and relaxed. But rather when they're feeling like they're back is against the wall. The deadline is coming up. Sometimes in fact, a number of studies have shown that when we're angry, we tend to become more creative. We tend to see more solutions. And I think what it comes from is that often times when we're facing a deadline when we're feeling upset will were feeling kind of all riled up. We feel this need to ignore convention rent. We ourselves permission to take risks because we don't have any other options because either PO or or the deadlines coming up, we gotta do something. And it's when we give ourselves permission to take risks to ignore convention to kind of do the crazy thing. That's when often times we have our most, creative ideas. Interesting. Okay. So the anger angle, that's interesting. We're not telling you leaders to go get angry, then walk into a brainstorming meeting. But I'm taking notes is a motion overriding the brain at that point. It would anger what we know about anger. Anger is really interesting actually writing an article right now about anger for the Atlantic monthly, and what we know about it is that when you are angry, we tend to think of anger as a antisocial behavior, that's negative. But. What we what anger is that? It's actually pro social anger makes us feel energize. It makes us optimistic about the future. It prompts us to take matters into our own hands, and to take more risks as I mentioned, but also to be able to say, look, there's an obstacle. They're gonna go overcome it because I'm just so pissed that it's my way one of the things that we know about anger, in fact, is that if you look at brain scans of people who are angry the closest corollary to that is people who are happy. Now, it's not necessarily the anger is a good thing. It's exactly right business leaders shouldn't go out there and his benefit timing angry for no other reason than we want to save their hearts and their marriage is right. What we can learn something from this, which is the more. You put yourself in a position where you feel like you're in control, the more aware, you give yourself permission to ignore convention to say, look, this is how it's been done a thousand times. But you know, what I'm just gonna try to different weight. Even if it feels risky if you'll scary if it feels kinda mad. Then oftentimes that's where something successful comfortable. Okay. That I wrote down folks permission to ignore convention jaws. That's worth the entire conversation. I'm telling you that's used because now we've got to go from so anger. Does that for us? I tell you what else does that for us is fear that fight or flight down. You know, you think about creativity is when your life is on the line..

Charles duhig Charles Atlantic monthly Grunwald
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Money banking debt equity assets liabilities and why he's not rich. And neither a you here. He is PJ O'Rourke PJ. How are you, sir? I'm well. How are you terrific? Thank you. I I love the description of your career as you're filing stories for Rolling Stone, Atlantic monthly weekly standard from countries. And not the nice ones. My job was basically to watch people try to kill each other sounds like rewarding work. Yes. Yeah. Well, instructed work at the very least, and it's how I learned economics. I mean, some people studied in college some people learn the school of hard knocks some people read up on their own. I watched people kill each other always for economic reasons. Interesting. What did you learn from that experience, which would probably? In any situation, including some of the ugly, political ones, you were just talking about who profits from this who profits from this. And always remember that the prophet isn't necessarily calculated in money you like it is for us normal people. Sometimes it's calculated in power. Sometimes it's calculated in fame and even the good good people the peacemakers in the aid workers piling up treasure in heaven, aren't they? Oh, wow. Wow. That's that's interesting. So do you think our culture whether individuals in the country or politics are even more focused on that? Then they were back when you started writing about it. Oh, no. They've been debased in pretty much every way Jimmy too. You know, the the the wonders of the internet lowered the tone. I mean, it's I look at this, and I go well who's bright idea was that the put every idiot in the world in touch with every other..

Atlantic monthly Rolling Stone Jimmy
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Let's they miss an important texts during the night. But now they're skins will be buzzing all night long. So so much for repair to sleep. The point is when technologies developed the stuff they overly high the positive advantage. They don't look at the negative side effects, the unanticipated unacknowledged side effects because they only look at the positive, and they overly hype that well, I think we need a new agency equivalent to FDA Federal Drug Administration to overlook effects of technology and in order to be in order to run as a company one must develop a crisis plan. I mean, for example, there there is no reason why. Prior to Facebook's launch the people who launched it where we're will develop the Dulce that the equivalent symbol teams appearance. Kids psychologists, and I bet you they will come up with the strong possibility of its being used as a platform for cyber bullying, not to say all the other things that it's been used as a platform for tissue formation fake news meddling in our election. The point is that. Technology which is made our lives incomparably better. We live longer healthier. It's not one of the greatest threats facing humankind. Let let me give you another example recently Atlantic monthly ran a chilling article about people are thinking about putting a I directly chips. Directly in our brains can make his quote, more improved human beings. God help us if we don't know all the effects that has your you're interfering to put it mildly in a very complex human being human organism. And the question becomes you? Start playing around quote, redesigning human beings, who and what will be human. Let alone all the unanticipated unacknowledged side effects that we have no idea about. So that's what the book is about. How can we regain control technology for the betterment of humankind? I'm not against technology. I have a PHD in engineering from UC Berkeley. So that's not the point the point is that we've done a poor job of managing and the tech companies have enormous power that has to be counterbalanced. It's it's just gone too far. And we're not we're not about this. We're in. We're not even talking about this one of the things that's happening is that there's new.

Facebook FDA Atlantic monthly Federal Drug Administration Berkeley
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

The EntreLeadership Podcast

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on The EntreLeadership Podcast

"We're going to get into that. But before we get into that, I want to talk about this other term creative desperation. What does that mean to you? There's this really interesting science behind who gets to be creative, right? Because we tend to think of creativity as something that you're born with or you have some temperament for right. There are creative artists in this world, and there's folks who are creative. And what we found is that science tells us that's exactly raw. Anyone can be creative. Anyone can be incredibly innovative. It's about learning these kind of mental habits, these tricks that allow you to tap into your creativity and the first one as you mentioned is created desparation. One of the things that we know is that many people tend to become much more creative, not necessarily when they're feeling calm and relaxed, but rather when they're feeling like they're back is against the wall when the deadline is coming up sometimes. In fact, a number of studies have shown that when we're angry, we tend to become more creative. We tend to see more solutions, and I think what it comes from is that oftentimes when we're facing a deadline, when we're feeling upset will were feeling kind of all riled up. We feel this need to ignore convention right. We give ourselves permission to take risks because we don't have any other options because we're either owed or or the deadlines coming up. We gotta do something and it's when we give ourselves permission to take risks to ignore convention to kind of. Do the crazy thing. That's when often times we have our most creative ideas. Interesting. Okay. So the anger angle. That's interesting. We're not telling you leaders to go get angry and then walk into a brainstorming meeting, but I'm taking notes is emotion overriding the brain at that point with anger, what we know about anger. Anger is really interesting. I'm actually writing an article right now about anger for the Atlantic monthly. And what we know about it is that when you are angry, we tend to think of anger as a antisocial behavior. Negative. But what we would anger is that it's actually pro social anger makes us feel energize. It makes us optimistic about the future. It prompts us to take matters into our own hands and to take more risks as I mentioned. But also to be able to say, look, there's an obstacle, they're gonna go overcome it because I'm just so pissed that it's my way. One of the things that we know about anger in fact is that if you look at brain scans of people who are angry, the closest corollary to that is people who are happy now. It's not necessarily the anger is a good thing. It's exactly right business leaders shouldn't go out there and has been timing angry for no other reason than we want to save their hearts and their marriages, right? We can learn something from this, which is the more you put yourself in a position where you feel like you're.

Atlantic monthly
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Book entitled money morality and the machine logan have you back but he how are you today thanks to donald trump's decisive and courageous action to a plot strongly by the way i commend anyone out there not i left wing magazine but the atlantic monthly article a few days ago the iran deal is strategically and morally absurd wow it lands may force why why why do we talk that way and i it's not a treaty new the and this is important the joint comprehensive plan of action a bummer refused to submit to the senate because he knew it would be defeated if proposed as a treaty so he imposed at purely on his own we've been opposed but you remember when people are insisting well what's in place you still can't take it away because there it is and we can't we can't you know come across other nations that long term agreements won't be honored by succeeding administrations well actually if the preceding administration takes a shortcut and doesn't do it the proper way will then nobody in the world can expect us to treat an agreement in the same fashion as we would've treaty because you and i both know once you have a treaty that essentially is on a par with the constitution i mean that's that's the thing which even if it somehow differs with state laws throughout the land doesn't matter that treaty almost has constitutional wait takes a two thirds to pass the sucker it would take two thirds to repeal a treaty so yeah while trump while obama was able to get this thing more easily pass it only takes an executive memoranda to get rid of it here in about twenty committee chairman in congress republicans sent a letter to the leaders of iran explaining that under the us constitution what obama had done was not a treaty and was not constitutional ford you remember that.

logan senate obama chairman congress us donald trump wing magazine atlantic monthly iran executive
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Lot of people felt she's not shooting from the hip on all this and so i mean poor rat poor rex i mean the guys i mean well not it he's not the greatest guy jay exacts a feel for the guy because he's like he that's why anybody who i don't know anybody who uh hitches their wagons to this guy i don't really feel bad for 'cause you knew what you're getting we we knew who he was from the moment he gave that first speech came down the escalator had said mexicans were rapists essentially had enough upbeat thought it with well okay i'm exaggerating but you know what i mean yeah i know what you're but i mean i think i do feel a little sympathy for perec because i think he just thought that there will be some semblance of normalcy and uh but you know how can you how can you have talks with north korea regardless of where they are without in ambassador to south korea it's just five five all in the face and as i said because he thinks he's the only one who can do it now he he thinks he's the only person who can solve every single problem which is just mindbogglingly narcissistic right nah mindboggling narcissistic and it's just i mean i'm i'm you know reacting to it rationing like you need a you know but y you you might need to make that leap to look at it from the other side that that uh but you know it's um you know i've read a big article atlantic monthly of a few months ago about narcissistic personality disorder is all the earmarks of uh the boss sell this is an actual line from his rally in pennsylvania i swear to god this is a direct young uh but you like me i think so right i like you to i love you that's the president of the.

jay north korea south korea pennsylvania president atlantic monthly
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Is that again this statement modern culture is not just revealing transgenders it's creating them you've got the western societies and again this is a little eddie such as the uk sweden the usa um australia will throw them they've seen this spectacular rise in the number of persons especially within young people seeking treatment of gender identity issues paralleling the attention given to gender theory and communications madison entertainment media so in the usa the percentage of adults currently identifying is transgender is double double what it wasn't two thousand eleven that's according to the best estimates double when it wasn't two thousand eleven none of this should come as a surprise according to the people who study this tough in the year two thousand there was a bioethicist by the name of curl elliott published kind of a groundbreaking article in the atlantic monthly entitled a new way to be mad which foretold of this rapid growth in gender identity issues by comparing them to pass psychological epidemics is that with this is a psychological epidemic think about it quote why do certain cycle pathologies arise seemingly out of nowhere in certain societies enduring certain historical periods and then disappear justice suddenly great statement is apps that may be exactly what's happening here this some bioethicists carl elliott suggested that sokaiya tourists and other clinicians are helping to create psychological epidemics they've done so in the past simply by the way that they viewed the disorders by the kinds of questions that they're asking patients the treatments they used the diagnostic categories available to them at the time and by the way these patients fit within those categories and this kind of sounds exactly like what's what's what's going on how does it not so because of the open times in the way we communicate does this mean more and more transgender individuals her are just feel free to come forward they feel better about themselves more open about themselves they feel a less ridiculed and they're therefore there are more free to come forward or or is just all of this talk about them this this this industry that's being created of transgenderism creating this psychological epidemic where people think that may be they are when they're not by making any sense with news this.

sweden usa uk atlantic monthly carl elliott sokaiya
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WREK

"Be responsible for making sure that the next generation aunt addicted to this stuff him in in my book i quote one statistic the suggests that we now have the average of attention span less than a goldfish nine seconds and what's going on it's because we are so addicted to doid devices that we've lost the sense of the world around us we can't stop his laws to forces to put a devices down but we need teachers and parents um and other regulators to see this and just as the first food or drink of the industrial age was extremely unhealthy and got reshaped by consumers and regulators we need to do the same with technology that the guy in the valley likud tristan harris is very much focused on this and he's an important figure imply a nearing a way of rethinking technology is also important to understand and and harris is pioneering this that engineers should not uh the software designers should not be consciously actively designing technology which is addictive that is a moral so the creators of today's technology have to take a more responsibility they off the obviously want to create products that are attractive and used but they shouldn't be designing products that are by definition addictive otherwise it's like selling heroin legally on the streets we have to tighten engineering school absolutely engineering schools and education are key my final chapter focuses on education shen and in many ways whilst everyone was as well the biggest problem is fixing education uh that's a kind of a throwaway remark which means we don't have to that we don't know how to deal with the problems the real challenge and opportunity lies in people pioneering education in my book i go to some montessori schools and waldorf schools where my kids went to see how technology can be tort responsibly rather than just thrown at the kids and kale always a pleasure thank you for coming up he come back fifty can i'd love it thank you for some really great questions more my guest today is andrew keen the book is how to fix the future it's published by atlantic monthly press i'm wear again you're listening to tech nation welcome to tech nation health reimagined in the future of health and health care with the emergence of new technologies and breakthrough science.

tristan harris heroin andrew atlantic monthly nine seconds
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Using to that one of franklins big concerns in doing this alphabet was to eliminate spelling errors which i find utterly pedantic ito editor at half because again it's like ito if you're a purist okay uh that's fine if if you're a stickler for the spelling i get that but ultimately gin know what someone saying if the communication is successful is successful is it isn't that what matters most and in fact uh you know webster actually persisted and publish books as he said using a sort of adapted orthography that was a cop i believe it was not exactly franklins but he sort of use that as a jumping off point in developed something of his own and he was ridiculed by critics in in this this uh new language was called unsightly uh and and corrupting moved a bastardisation of the be proper english language and that's your that's another question rate at what point is it evolution at what point is it devolution you know at what point are they deluding or ruining a language verses improving because one alphabet entrepreneurs improvement is another alphabet entrepreneurs in a downfall they see it as the ruination of language and noel webster did succeed in creating in american spelling but he did uh also eventually walkaway from alphabet reform which he saw as a bit too radical and it turns out he was absolutely on the money about the importance of political identity or zacklin you you know and and language and we see this happening in other countries as well there is a cool article in the atlantic monthly magazine in 1997 that talked about how alphabet shifts became common in times of instability in former soviet republics for instance.

editor noel webster atlantic monthly magazine
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"The no no problem there you know a great job you're listening to tommy beater and fabbro and the other guys out there that oh yeah the laughing at this administration saying these guys will know what to do in particular did know what they're doing f dubbed the world moving in its you don't see much coverage isis right now because trump is destroying them so that's why won't see it much isis coverage it means so much to the media to not tell this story impromptu throwing throwing them that they're not even telling the story that you go with it is that civilian casualties were way up as well um used in the media would like that with that in trump gaps fought the price is too big you can't have him defeating isis now so no no no we'll just that you will not hear about that you will hear a lot about lebar ball jim an cnn's new analysis which says that is as trump aside conduct and that mcmaster thinks he's an idiot and they all want to leave you'll hear about that but the eu will not the gone about your pumpkin pie hillary oh no i that was uh that was allow certainly we have updates on about and this is sort of the fun thing about places that prowls on political correctness tom shattuck it is always i in our you know this goes on at every level for example there was there there is among media a delight that occurs when people considers consider themselves to be politically correct suddenly ran amok of scandal and there are other media outlets that enjoy watching the others scorer so has political correctness runamuck previously well adan i'll give you some examples hilton win i think the only reason i got at my internship at the atlantic monthly was because i was a coop ag boston globe and i was there during the whole uh mike barnacle scandal and like i did like a news you know camera people were yelling at mayo no comment on the mic barnacle you know to sum like entering go up kid but i atlantic monthly people wanted the juice um they wanted to know what was going on they wanted the nittygritty details they wanted the salacious you know staff that barnacle was how were the people.

tommy beater trump cnn mcmaster eu other media outlets atlantic monthly mike barnacle the juice
"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:31 min | 4 years ago

"atlantic monthly" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Atlantic monthly years ago about the three tenors you remember them jose carreras placido domingo on luciano pavarotti they were performing together in los angeles and reporter tried to press the issue of competitive nest between the three men and domingo said you have to put all your concentration and opening your heart to the music you can't be rivals when you're together making music dear brothers and sisters that's also true in the church he ties paul us also this were gentleness in with humility the wits literally the word meekness which is strength under god's control were controlled by god it's the opposite of self assertiveness and running over other people i mean it's a willingness to even see tough people in my life is being permitted by god to come into it for my own purification my own spiritual disciplined grow me in love and then this patience which means being long tempered showing selfrestraint and hoping for improvement in relationships use struggling with and finally tied up with burying one another in love living an enduring difficult people some people in a church in in our homes can drive us absolutely nuts amen a murmur statement someone shared with me one time he says the churches alight of the world but remember light attracts bugs some people really buga's and we are to have an enduring love seeing them as crises them on the way on the way to heaven just like you and me they are to be loved and served you might be feeling like i can't do this kind of thing i mean my pride get so easily wounded i have ego the size of a football field and i can be so impatient with folks and i have this very rough agean loving and that kind of stuff that comes hard for me listen the same holy spirit the called you into this family the unified you with others is here to help you and me to keep it together he isn't want us to fail at that it will never achieve perfection the site of heaven know that but as you call on the holy spirit in prayer as you study god's word and apply it in your lives and obey the words of jesus this spirit walsh he will shape you and mold you into the image of.

luciano pavarotti los angeles reporter paul walsh jose carreras placido domingo football