40 Burst results for "Atlantic"

Fresh update on "atlantic" discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

00:34 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "atlantic" discussed on Jim Bohannon

"Chicago. Pure refreshing drinking water. Not for some island around Fiji. God drawn there. I thought some fancy glacier somewhere in Scandinavia. Really cheap. But from some cargo. A city known for a skyscrapers and sports teams and hot dogs. But you know what else it should be known for Exactly. And there's no shortage of it. To Chicago snuggled up next to one of the greatest expanses of fresh water on the face of the area. In fact, this whole city exists because of war. We're just a pissed on between the Atlantic and the Mississippi. For this gentleman happened to set up shop. We raised our entire downtown over it, reversed the flow of it, even stitched his blue on our flag. So that's what the blue me. The point is, Wanda's our entire past, and our city will be turning it into clean, refreshing, drinking water, well into the future. Goes on like

Chicago Fiji Scandinavia Atlantic Mississippi Wanda
Tropical Storm Colin threatens a wet weekend for Carolinas

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Tropical Storm Colin threatens a wet weekend for Carolinas

"A tropical storm is bringing the threat of rain and high winds to the Carolinas I'm Ben Thomas with the latest Tropical storm Colin formed along the South Carolina coast Saturday the national hurricane center warns of possible flash flooding with up to four inches of rain possible in isolated areas At latest report the storm center was located inland about 25 miles west southwest of Myrtle Beach moving northeast at 8 mph maximum sustained winds near 40 mph with stronger gusts a tropical storm warning is in effect from south Santee river in South Carolina to duck North Carolina However the storm is not expected to strengthen as it moves into the Atlantic on Monday I'm Ben Thomas

Tropical Storm Colin Ben Thomas Carolinas National Hurricane Center South Carolina South Santee River Myrtle Beach North Carolina Atlantic
Fresh update on "atlantic" discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

01:30 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "atlantic" discussed on Jim Bohannon

"The cans. Mayor lightfoot will hold a news conference later this morning at get it, water tower plays. The good one. Right, right? Are you sure about this? I'm telling you it was according to channel 7. So if I'm reading some fake news here, that's on ABC's fault. Chicago. You know, the thing is, all the rage is the fancy designed on cans of beer these days. You can't even tell what it is. You know, all the IPAs all the independent brewers, all of the craft brews, the cans or works of art. About the water which Chicago is putting in cans and selling is Chicago, city leaders are marking national drinking water week with a humorous branding campaign to heighten awareness of the importance of Lake Michigan drinking water and the history of the city has with the great Lake. I think this is a good idea. As a novelty of nothing else, it's going to be available to a couple locations throughout Chicagoland, but I think they should sell it and put it in Benny's for crying out loud. Because the cans are really cool. The cans are done by Chicago street artists, and they look like the sort of craft brew cans that you see in the refrigerator case at the liquor store. It's kind of amazing how colorful and almost hard it is to tell which beer is which, you know? They don't say papst. They don't just say bush. They are works of art, and so true are these cans of water along that sort of street art vibe. This is from the city. That's right. Chicago's cozied up next to the greatest of all lakes in our opinion, and nearly endless source of water that our city turns into clean, delicious drinking water. There is enough to fill future east chicagoan gullets for a really, really, really long time. So whether you're drinking Chicago from a can, or any faucet or garden hose in the Chicago metropolitan area enjoy And remember, stay shy traded. That's a word we made up. It means hydrated, but with Chicago water, you get it, right? Incidentally, not to kick sand around, but I don't think you're supposed to drink water out of a garden hose. I do all the time. I don't let my wife see me do it. I let it run for a little while, so all the germs come out, and then I go ahead and have a sip while I'm doing whatever I'm doing with my garden hose. But you're not supposed to drink garden hose water. Steve, you sound adamant about that. No, it's true, you're not supposed to. I have, and I will survive. Well, that's the thing. The species moves on. So the Chicago, this is a real thing. You can't believe it. I've talked about this for a while now. It's a real thing. Okay. Here's a video. The audio from the video where they're marketing campaign. Introducing Chicago. Pure refreshing drinking water. Not for some island around Fiji. Not for some fancy glacier someone Scandinavia. Make really cheap matcher. But from some cargo, rappers, a city known for a skyscrapers and sports teams and hot dogs. But you know what else it should be known for? Exactly. And there's no shortage of it. To Chicago snuggled up next to one of the greatest expanses of fresh water on the face of the area. In fact, this whole city exists because of water. We're just a pissed on between the Atlantic and the Mississippi. For this gentleman happened to set up shop. We raised our entire downtown over it, reversed the flow of it, even stitched his blue on our flag. So that's what the blue means. The point is, Wanda's our entire past, and our city will be turning it into clean, refreshing, drinking water, well into the future

Chicago Mayor Lightfoot Great Lake Chicagoland ABC Liquor Store Benny Michigan Bush Steve Scandinavia Fiji Atlantic Mississippi Wanda
Buckhead Residents Want to Secede From Atlanta

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:58 min | 5 d ago

Buckhead Residents Want to Secede From Atlanta

"The wealthy suburbs that are paying all of the tax base and they're the ones that are funding the police and the fire department, but they're the ones not getting the services. They're not getting the protection of the police department because the police officers are busy taking care of crime elsewhere in the city. And a group of folks in one of the suburbs in a place called Buckhead, which really is a beautiful area of super wealthy. You have Linux bowl, you have some incredibly wealthy shops and Neiman Marcus and those kinds of places. So it's very Tony section of Atlantic. Kind of like maybe and I know our folks in games will Georgia and the north, Georgia suburbs might be able to help us out here with this, but it's almost like the Beverly Hills of Atlanta. So you have a lot of wealthy people, a lot of celebrities, music stars, athletes, and they live in this area. And the folks of Buckhead are saying, you know what? We're done. We are done. We're done with the crime. It's unbelievable how many shootings there have been at Linux mall, which again is a high dollar high end mall. But you have all these people coming in from the city. They're taking the subway and they've got a subway stop right there at the ball, and they come up, they call all sorts of mayhem, start shooting people up and then they get back on the subway and they go back home. And now the people in Buckhead are saying, yo, we're done here. We want to secede from the state or from the city of Atlanta. And we've had the people involved in this campaign, the guy in charge is named Bill white. And their argument is that they need the right to be able to create their own police force and that they're concerned that the defund the police movement has really weakened the Atlanta police department. I mean, it makes

Buckhead Georgia Linux Mall Fire Department Neiman Marcus Atlanta Beverly Hills Atlantic Tony Bill White Atlanta Police Department
Fresh update on "atlantic" discussed on Bloomberg Wall Street Week

Bloomberg Wall Street Week

01:07 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "atlantic" discussed on Bloomberg Wall Street Week

"This is a Bloomberg money minute union organizers say left behind tech workers are ready to embrace, organized labor. The outpour has been very good. It's definitely a wave and we're very pleased with it. David Sullivan, with the international association of machinists and aerospace workers, after employees at an Apple store in Towson, Maryland, recently voted to join the union. And we're hoping that other workers and Apple see that they were able to do it. They didn't buy into some of the anti union rhetoric that was out there for many retail tech workers scheduling is a priority. William Gould is a former chairman of the national labor relations board. It's not simply a matter of benefits. It's a matter of worker involvement. Worker participation. Unions though have struggled to make inroads at other Apple stores and have had a mixed record of tech giants such as Amazon. I'm Charlie pellet. Bloomberg radio. I was in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean when it happened. There was a sudden jolt and our submarine crashed on the sea floor. We were in total darkness. That's doctor Dijon figueroa

David Sullivan International Association Of M Apple William Gould Towson Maryland National Labor Relations Board Charlie Pellet Bloomberg Amazon Atlantic Ocean Dijon Figueroa
Heavy rain expected in parts of Florida, Cuba, Bahamas

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

Heavy rain expected in parts of Florida, Cuba, Bahamas

"Parts of Florida are bracing for heavy rain and wind as a storm system that battered Mexico moves across the state I'm Ben Thomas with the latest The national hurricane center says the storm that began as Agatha in the Pacific Ocean will be known as Alex in the Atlantic Ocean basin once it reaches tropical storm status It's been drenching Cuba where people in Havana have been sloshing through flooded streets The tropical storm warning is in effect along portions of coastal Florida as well as the Florida keys Florida bay Lake okeechobee along with the northwestern Bahamas and much of Cuba the storm is expected to reach tropical storm strength off Florida's east coast by Saturday night and strengthen as it moves out into the Atlantic Ocean I'm Ben Thomas

Atlantic Ocean Basin Ben Thomas Florida National Hurricane Center Agatha Pacific Ocean Cuba Florida Bay Lake Okeechobee Mexico Havana Alex Bahamas East Coast Atlantic Ocean
Fresh "Atlantic" from AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:58 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh "Atlantic" from AP 24 Hour News

"Are recovering fragments from missiles at the building to determine the specific people guilty of what she calls a terrible war crime. I am Karen Chammas. Tropical storm call and is making for a wet weekend along the Carolina coast. I'm Ben Thomas with the latest. Wind heavy rain and dangerous surfer among the hazards folks in coastal north and South Carolina should watch out for the national hurricane center says Collins top sustained winds have been about 40 mph with higher gusts. Those winds extend as much as 80 miles from the storm center in The Rain, perhaps as much as four inches in isolated spots could trigger flash flooding. For those near the beach, the hurricane center warns ocean swells could cause life threatening surf and rip current conditions. Colin has been tracking northeast toward the Atlantic, where it's expected to dissipate early Monday in time for July 4th celebrations. I'm Ben Thomas. Rescue efforts after a mudslide in India's northeast are being hampered by fresh rain and falling boulders. So far rescue workers have pulled over two dozen bodies from the mudslide that wiped out a railroad construction site in the area, about three dozen people are still missing, but there is little hope they'll be found

Karen Chammas Carolina Coast Ben Thomas Tropical Storm National Hurricane Center South Carolina Collins Colin Atlantic India
Brian Birdwell: Every Veteran's Scar Is the Price of Our Freedom

The Dan Bongino Show

01:16 min | Last month

Brian Birdwell: Every Veteran's Scar Is the Price of Our Freedom

"I think we need to hear the horrors of it You know I know it sounds macabre but we do I mean I don't think we should ever turn away and the details of your story you know they matter I mean you were in really really bad shape I mean these murderous savages this had a real I mean you were you were banged up bad Yes sir I think you're right that it's not that we gratuitously share the gruesome details Right right But it's a measure of the price of freedom Because every headstone at Arlington and every national cemetery and military cemetery every vessel that's sitting at the bottom of either the Atlantic Pacific or somewhere else whether it was World War II World War I that's every scar that I wear both physically and emotionally and that every other veteran where that is the price of our national and earthly freedom The same way that the scars that the lord bears on his body will be a reminder of his and our eternal freedom That's why it's so important to remember that capacity for suffering that we've endured as a nation and as individual citizens serving that vision

Atlantic Pacific Arlington
Fresh update on "atlantic" discussed on Meet the Press

Meet the Press

01:49 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "atlantic" discussed on Meet the Press

"Green jellyfish. Here and see the whistles swirling as tentacles below the green jellyfish. Spectators won't see any effects commemorating COVID-19. We don't have any mass cells where this is kind of the celebration of hopefully maybe we're done. Music will also accompany the display. The head of the U.S. Supreme Court police is asking Maryland and Virginia officials to enforce local laws prohibiting protests outside the homes of Supreme Court Justices, Gail curly sent letters to Maryland governor Larry Hogan and Montgomery county executive Mark Ehrlich to make the request in her letter to Hogan, curly noted protesters have gathered outside justice's homes in Maryland for weeks on end. Police in Washington D.C. say two people are dead after a car plowed into a firework stand Saturday afternoon. Officials also said multiple pedestrians were struck in the accident, investigators say a truck ran a red light just before crashing into the stand the truck initially hit and killed a bicyclist and a crosswalk, the owner of the fireworks stand was also killed. Police believe the driver was suffering a medical emergency at the time. And President Biden will visit the city of Cleveland on Wednesday. I'm Brad Siegel. And I'm Susanna Palmer in the Bloomberg newsroom. Chinese developer shimmei group holdings limited said it didn't pay a $1 billion note that matured today, adding to a record year of offshore Bond delinquencies in the sector. The luxury builder said in a Hong Kong exchange filing, it also hasn't made principal payments involving some other offshore debts and has been in discussion with creditors while trying to reach quote amicable resolutions. An Atlantic City strike has been averted the hard rock casino reached a tentative agreement with local 54 of unite here, Atlantic City's main casino workers union on Saturday. That removes the last threat of a strike during this busy holiday weekend. General Motors expect second quarter sales and profit to take a hit due to supply chain problems. But the automaker said it can make up for delayed production later this year and reaffirmed its full year guidance. David Welch is Bloomberg's Detroit bureau chief. Hello car companies are still making good profits because they're charging so much for these vehicles and that's a reason I think why GM reaffirmed full year guidance, but they told us the second quarter was going to be rough because they've got these vehicles that they've built, so they paid the wages and they paid for the parts, but they can't sell them. But they're saying they can get it done by the end of the year. Bloomberg's David Welch, there. A Brooklyn man accused of stalking Taylor Swift at her Manhattan home faced a quarter appearance on Saturday, we get more about that from Bloomberg sting's Pellegrini. Joshua Christian of crown heights is accused of sneaking through the unlocked door of one of swift's Tribeca homes and making threats at another New York home in incidents reported in March and June, and he is also said to have shown up at swift's tennis sea home. The daily mail reports Christian demanded he be allowed to ditch his court appointed defense lawyer and instead represent himself during yesterday's testy arraignment hearing. And the New York Post reports Christian was arrested Friday. Bloomberg's Denise Pellegrini. Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. I'm Susanna Palmer. This is Bloomberg

Maryland Gail Curly Larry Hogan Mark Ehrlich Washington D.C. U.S. Supreme Court President Biden Susanna Palmer Brad Siegel Shimmei Group Holdings Limited Bloomberg Atlantic City David Welch Montgomery County Hogan Curly General Motors Virginia Cleveland
Weather's unwanted guest: Nasty La Nina keeps popping up

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | Last month

Weather's unwanted guest: Nasty La Nina keeps popping up

"La Nina the flip side of the better known El Nino weather condition keeps popping up in meteorologists say the west's prolonged drought won't go away until it does I'm Ben Thomas with the closer look La Nina is a natural and cyclical cooling of parts of the equatorial Pacific As opposed to El Nino's warming The current la Nina set a record for strength last month and is forecast to likely be around for a third straight winner It changes weather patterns worldwide amping up storms in the Atlantic while decreasing them in the Pacific producing more Atlantic hurricanes less rain more drought and more wildfires in the west and agricultural losses in the middle of the country Studies have shown la Nina is more expensive to the United States than El Nino And scientists are noticing the world has been getting more lanes in the past 25 years Just the opposite of what their best computer models say should be happening with human cost climate change I'm Ben Thomas

Equatorial Pacific La Nina Ben Thomas El Nino Atlantic United States
Kevin Spacey facing charges of sexual assault in U.K.

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Kevin Spacey facing charges of sexual assault in U.K.

"Legal pressure is increasing on Kevin Spacey as he faces sexual assault charges on two continents It was a case of world colliding for Kevin Spacey the day found him in court in New York City testifying in a case in which accuser Anthony rapp says that he sexually assaulted him at a party in the 1980s at the time Spacey denies it meanwhile across the Atlantic authorities in Britain were announcing that they were giving police authorization to charge the House of Cards start with four counts of sexual assault against three men police say he will be charged later and authorities say if he doesn't show up on his own they could seek to extradite him asked about the UK charges neither Spacey nor his attorneys responded to reporters questions in New York

Kevin Spacey Anthony Rapp Spacey New York City House Of Cards Atlantic Britain UK New York
Stormy repeat: NOAA predicts busy Atlantic hurricane season

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Stormy repeat: NOAA predicts busy Atlantic hurricane season

"Federal meteorologists say it looks like an extra busy Atlantic hurricane season again this year I'm Ben Thomas with a look at the forecast The national oceanic and atmospheric administration's Atlantic hurricane season forecast calls for 14 to 21 named storms with 6 to ten becoming hurricanes and as many as 6 major hurricanes with winds topping 110 mph Each of the last 6 Atlantic hurricane seasons have been above normal which is a record Among the factors this year forecasters point to warmer ocean temperatures overall la Nina which sees equatorial waters in the Pacific cool climate change and active monsoon season in West Africa and long-term patterns There have been more category four and 5 U.S. landfalls in the last 5 years than the previous 50 I'm Ben Thomas

Atlantic Hurricane Ben Thomas National Oceanic And Atmospher La Nina Pacific West Africa U.S.
Phelim McAleer's Film Set Was 'Infiltrated' by Hunter Biden's Lawyer

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:09 min | Last month

Phelim McAleer's Film Set Was 'Infiltrated' by Hunter Biden's Lawyer

"So what you're talking about took place in November, you're filming this film and somebody comes claiming to want to make a documentary. About Hunter Biden. And his name was Kevin Morris. He's an Uber Hollywood lawyer. They flew in on a private chat. He's part of the South Park team that the cartoon adult cartoon. The book of Mormon, they do that. They've just signed a $900 million streaming deal. He said they were going to expand their content in their own making documentaries. And they wanted to come on Saturn film a certain interviews with me and the interviews with the actors, which they did and we give them unprecedented access, fast forward to promote the film, of course. The film. I mean, by the way, I'm pretty open, anyway. Fast forward, I opened the newspaper as they say, the other morning. And it turns out Kevin Morris is not a retired lawyer. He's a very active lawyer. He's representing Hunter Biden. His job is to craft legal and media strategies for Hunter Biden. Part of that job and part of the thing he wants to do is discredit people who are spreading smears about Hunter Biden, discredit. I think he means spreading the truth. Exactly. He wants. Yeah, he wants to, he wants to make the truth sound like mere smears. And so he literally flew across the Atlantic Ocean to Serbia in a private jet on whose dime I don't know. Good question. In order to get this information from you, misrepresenting who he was. Totally. And you know, that's an ethical breach for a lawyer with harder doubt, not saying. Even for a lawyer, and we know they're not averse to ethical breaches. But in this case, a clear ethical reason. It was someone infiltrated the set of miser hunter under false pretenses. Now, partly, maybe he is making a documentary, but he's also representing his firm admitted to CBS News that he is representing Hunter Biden and he is crafting a legal and media strategy for Hunter

Hunter Biden Kevin Morris South Park Hollywood Atlantic Ocean Serbia Miser Hunter Cbs News Hunter
Josh Hammer Reflects on Sen. Amy Klobuchar's Abortion Comments

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:42 min | Last month

Josh Hammer Reflects on Sen. Amy Klobuchar's Abortion Comments

"Yeah, I want to play a clip for you here from senator Klobuchar. That I think, you know, when we talk about the constitutionality of roe V wade and obviously Casey sort of, in my opinion, obviously I think you would agree that it's unconstitutional. I think Alito's opinion was a skewered the original road decision. But let's play senator Klobuchar here, and I want to get your take on what she says because actually what she's saying from a sitting U.S. senator is something. I mean, this is not mazie hirono here talking here. I mean, which we just assume is she's going to say the most Atlantic, you know, far left out to see kind of the type of things. Is it senator Klobuchar, who many think is sort of moderate or left of center, but not far left. Listen to cut 6. Why should a woman in Texas have different rights and a different future and a different ability to make decisions about her body and her reproductive choices than a woman in Minnesota? How can that be in this country that we'd have a patchwork of laws? Your response. So senator Klobuchar and I actually went to the same law school and, you know, I would like to think that when she was in common law back in her law school day, she knew better about the actual constitutional law underpinning the roe versus wade and its murderous successor, of course, Planned Parenthood versus Casey 92. Now, look, I mean, John Hart Eli, okay? There are so many liberals who have criticized roe versus wade's fallacious reasoning or beers. But John Hart Eli, who is a longtime constitutional law professor at Harvard Law School, he was the dean of Stanford law school as well. He was personally liberal progressive he supported abortion rights, but he famously said in 1982 that roe versus wade was not constitutional law and barely even gave a semblance of purporting to be constitutional law. It was literally no less a feminist leftist progressive icon than the late justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg herself. We said the roe versus wade overstepped that the court should not have acted there when it did. They should have stayed cool, let it play out democratically in the states. So, you know, what I hear from senator Klobuchar there is, you know, it's constitutional illiteracy. It's also moral illiteracy, of course. We can't forget we're talking about it. You are talking about the wanton murder of now 63 million unborn children since roe versus wade came down in 1973. 63 million. I mean, it's really just difficult to kind of wrap your mind around around that kind of number. But you know, there's something about you said there, Andrew, that I think there's a modicum. There's a small, small sliver of correctness. Where I think she's correct, is that it ultimately is unsustainable for in the long term. My personal perspective in the long term for this to actually be a state

Senator Klobuchar John Hart Eli Roe V Wade Mazie Hirono Wade Casey Alito Atlantic Stanford Law School Harvard Law School Minnesota U.S. Texas Ruth Bader Ginsburg ROE Roe Versus Wade Andrew
Hurricanes claim testy win vs. Bruins, take 2-0 series lead

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Hurricanes claim testy win vs. Bruins, take 2-0 series lead

"The the the the hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes have have have have a a a a two two two two games games games games to to to to none none none none lead lead lead lead following following following following a a a a very very very very chippy chippy chippy chippy five five five five to to to to win win win win over over over over the the the the Bruins Bruins Bruins Bruins Sebastian Sebastian Sebastian Sebastian aho aho aho aho and and and and need need need need Niederreiter Niederreiter Niederreiter Niederreiter each each each each scored scored scored scored twice twice twice twice Tony Tony Tony Tony deangelo deangelo deangelo deangelo had had had had three three three three assists assists assists assists for for for for the the the the Atlantic Atlantic Atlantic Atlantic division division division division leaders leaders leaders leaders who who who who finished finished finished finished the the the the game game game game with with with with that that that that anti anti anti anti Ron Ron Ron Ron to to to to the the the the canes canes canes canes netminder netminder netminder netminder had had had had to to to to leave leave leave leave in in in in the the the the first first first first period period period period after after after after receiving receiving receiving receiving a a a a shot shot shot shot to to to to the the the the head head head head by by by by David David David David Pasternak Pasternak Pasternak Pasternak the the the the hit hit hit hit was was was was followed followed followed followed by by by by several several several several aggressive aggressive aggressive aggressive Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson penalties penalties penalties penalties by by by by both both both both teams teams teams teams d'angelo d'angelo d'angelo d'angelo says says says says his his his his team team team team kept kept kept kept at at at at school school school school we're we're we're we're generally generally generally generally in in in in between between between between whistles whistles whistles whistles and and and and they they they they want want want want to to to to get get get get in in in in the the the the stuff stuff stuff stuff after after after after hopefully hopefully hopefully hopefully the the the the same same same same thing thing thing thing happens happens happens happens with with with with life life life life and and and and lesion lesion lesion lesion they they they they dumbbell dumbbell dumbbell dumbbell is is is is we're we're we're we're gonna gonna gonna gonna try try try try to to to to go go go go to to to to the the the the power power power power plant plant plant plant capitalized capitalized capitalized capitalized but but but but our our our our our our our our main main main main goal goal goal goal is is is is a a a a status status status status window window window window between between between between was was was was Peter Peter Peter Peter could could could could check check check check off off off off made made made made twenty twenty twenty twenty nine nine nine nine saves saves saves saves in in in in relief relief relief relief of of of of Rhonda Rhonda Rhonda Rhonda allowing allowing allowing allowing a a a a pair pair pair pair of of of of goals goals goals goals by by by by Patrice Patrice Patrice Patrice Bergeron Bergeron Bergeron Bergeron game game game game three three three three is is is is Friday Friday Friday Friday in in in in Boston Boston Boston Boston I'm I'm I'm I'm Dave Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie

Bruins Hurricanes Jackson Jackson Angelo D Sebastian Sebastian Sebastian Tony Tony Tony Tony Deangelo D Deangelo Deangelo Atlantic Atlantic Atlantic Atl Ron Ron Ron Ron Canes Canes David David David David Paster Pasternak Pasternak Angelo D'angelo School School School School Peter Peter Peter Peter Rhonda Rhonda Rhonda Rhonda Patrice Patrice Patrice Patric Bergeron Bergeron Bergeron Boston
Lightning snap Florida's 13-game streak, beat Panthers 8-4

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Lightning snap Florida's 13-game streak, beat Panthers 8-4

"The the the the Panthers Panthers Panthers Panthers thirteen thirteen thirteen thirteen game game game game winning winning winning winning streak streak streak streak has has has has ended ended ended ended with with with with a a a a defeat defeat defeat defeat for for for for trapping trapping trapping trapping by by by by the the the the lightning lightning lightning lightning Nikita Nikita Nikita Nikita Kucherov Kucherov Kucherov Kucherov Steven Steven Steven Steven Stamkos Stamkos Stamkos Stamkos and and and and Victor Victor Victor Victor Hedman Hedman Hedman Hedman combined combined combined combined for for for for thirteen thirteen thirteen thirteen points points points points with with with with Gujarat Gujarat Gujarat Gujarat delivering delivering delivering delivering two two two two goals goals goals goals and and and and three three three three assists assists assists assists Stamkos Stamkos Stamkos Stamkos scored scored scored scored twice twice twice twice and and and and had had had had two two two two assists assists assists assists while while while while Hedman Hedman Hedman Hedman set set set set up up up up four four four four goals goals goals goals Nicholas Nicholas Nicholas Nicholas Paul Paul Paul Paul also also also also scored scored scored scored twice twice twice twice for for for for the the the the bulls bulls bulls bulls who who who who remain remain remain remain three three three three points points points points ahead ahead ahead ahead of of of of the the the the Bruins Bruins Bruins Bruins for for for for third third third third place place place place in in in in the the the the Atlantic Atlantic Atlantic Atlantic division division division division the the the the Panthers Panthers Panthers Panthers to to to to lead lead lead lead the the the the overall overall overall overall standings standings standings standings by by by by four four four four points points points points over over over over Colorado Colorado Colorado Colorado Sam Sam Sam Sam Reinhart Reinhart Reinhart Reinhart scored scored scored scored twice twice twice twice for for for for Florida Florida Florida Florida I'm I'm I'm I'm Dave Dave Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie Ferrie

Nikita Nikita Panthers Panthers Panthers Kucherov Kucherov Steven Steven Steven Steven St Stamkos Stamkos Stamkos Victor Victor Victor Victor He Hedman Hedman Hedman Gujarat Gujarat Gujarat Bruins Stamkos Stamkos Stamkos Stamko Hedman Hedman Hedman Hedman Bulls Nicholas Nicholas Nicholas Nic Atlantic Atlantic Atlantic Atl Colorado Sam Sam Sam Sam Reinhart Reinh Florida Dave Dave Dave Dave Ferrie
Obama Speaks at Chicago Conference About Disinformation

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Obama Speaks at Chicago Conference About Disinformation

"Barack Obama is in the news again. He attended a somewhat ironically titled conference on disinformation. The God was sponsored by the Atlantic monthly, which by the way, has been one of the chief purveyors of disinformation. They've been part of the Russia collusion hoax. In fact, one of the Atlantic writers, Franklin four, was the source of putting out all the lies that were concocted by the Hillary Clinton campaign by this guy sussman by Christopher Steele. So the Atlantic were the not only the dupes, but I think the willing collaborators of these lies. And but this conference was in conjunction with the University of Chicago institute of politics and of course they trot out good old Barack Obama who can be always counted on. I mean, this is America's leading con man. I mean, there's competition, Stacey Abrams is in that competition, Hillary Clinton. There are others. But I think Obama owns the title. In part because he's able to kind of put that pompous expression and look to the left and he looks to the right. It's kind of his style. It was a little bit befuddling when it first came out in 2008, but of course by 2012 and later 2016, everyone had sort of seen through it. It's like the con man who was like fanning out the cards, take a look. Well, you know, we kind of know the routine by now. Well, let's look at Obama. And he's talking about disinformation and here he goes. It's something I grappled with. Imagine Obama grappling with disinformation. During my presidency, I saw it sort of unfold. And that's the degree to which information disinformation and misinformation was being weaponized.

Barack Obama Christopher Steele University Of Chicago Institut Hillary Clinton Stacey Abrams Sussman Franklin Russia Atlantic America
4 Reasons Why American Teens Are More Depressed Than Ever

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:24 min | 2 months ago

4 Reasons Why American Teens Are More Depressed Than Ever

"Of validity to these claims and what we could possibly do about it. I don't want to live in a sad country. We are living in a sad country right now. This is something that transcends political lines, by the way, where it should, even though our politics played into the significantly. Our political decisions of locking down our country, putting masks on children have made children sadder. And a lot of parents don't know what to do about it. Well, the first problem that I'm going to go through the Atlantic piece and where they go wrong, the first problem is the overindulgence of pleasure. The restraints that you put on your impulses, the restraints you put on what feels good is what we call civilization. Not doing what feels good all the time is what creates mature and happy people. Unfortunately, we've created a set of circumstances and a scenario where 1213 and 14 year olds do whatever they want to do whenever they want to do it, whether it be sexually, whether it be with drugs, whether it be through any sort of process. They have prioritized not process any sort of indulgence I should say. They have prioritize our society has prioritized pleasure above all. Pleasure comes with a price. Pleasure comes to the price that means that you are going to overload your dopamine reactors, your life will not, you won't know what meaning

Why Are American Teens So Sad?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Why Are American Teens So Sad?

"This segment and the one following is not going to be the most uplifting segment that we ever do here on the Charlie Kirk show. But arguably one of the most important. This is a segment that you're not going to want to hear and you might not think it's real, but I could tell you from my experience with young people, it's absolutely real. And it's a story that actually starts in the publication for lorene Powell jobs, the Atlantic, quote, why American teens are so sad. Four forces are propelling the rise of rates of depression amongst young people. Now before you kind of just roll your eyes and say, oh, whatever, toughen it up. This is a huge problem with our nation's young people. I know at least two young people in my general circle, periphery, I did not know them personally, that committed suicide in the last week, to serious issue. Young people are, by definition, now the most alcohol addicted drug addicted, depressed, sad, suicidal, anxious, medicated generation and history. Now there's many reasons as to why this is the case. One of the reasons, of course, would be our imprudent response to the Chinese coronavirus, locking down our entire society. It was not the pandemic that did it. It was our reaction to the pandemic. Now, if you're listening to this right now and you're a parent or a grandparent, an ant or an uncle, I hope you listen to these words very carefully, because if you have a young person in your life, they might not be telling the truth about how sad they actually are. This generation will be the most suicidal generation of history when the numbers come out. In fact, the numbers already show it, we don't know how this year is going to shake out. The Atlantic dot com writes, quote, the United States is experiencing an extreme teenage mental health crisis. From 2009 to 2021, the share of American high school students who say they quote feel persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness, rose from 26% to 44%,

Charlie Kirk Lorene Powell Atlantic Depression American High School United States
East-leading Panthers beat Jets 6-1, win streak at 9 games

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

East-leading Panthers beat Jets 6-1, win streak at 9 games

"The the the the Panthers Panthers Panthers Panthers picked picked picked picked up up up up their their their their ninth ninth ninth ninth straight straight straight straight win win win win by by by by blowing blowing blowing blowing out out out out the the the the jets jets jets jets six six six six one one one one Jonathan Jonathan Jonathan Jonathan Huberdeau Huberdeau Huberdeau Huberdeau stretched stretched stretched stretched his his his his point point point point streak streak streak streak to to to to thirteen thirteen thirteen thirteen games games games games scoring scoring scoring scoring twice twice twice twice and and and and setting setting setting setting up up up up another another another another who who who who were were were were to to to to reach reach reach reach the the the the thirty thirty thirty thirty goal goal goal goal plateau plateau plateau plateau and and and and leads leads leads leads the the the the NHL NHL NHL NHL with with with with seventy seventy seventy seventy eight eight eight eight Gustav Gustav Gustav Forsling Forsling Forsling scored scored scored twice twice twice in in in the the the second second second period period period to to to put put put the the the Panthers Panthers Panthers ahead ahead ahead for for for nothing nothing nothing I I I don't don't don't know know know if if if you you you got got got a a a lot lot lot of of of confidence confidence confidence when when when you you you score score score for for for sure sure sure but but but you you you know know know you you you can can can you you you can can can play play play good good good without without without scoring scoring scoring and and and have have have a a a good good good confidence confidence confidence but but but for for for sure sure sure scoring scoring scoring goals goals goals is is is not not not bad bad bad Florida Florida Florida has has has outscored outscored outscored its its its opponents opponents opponents forty forty forty seven seven seven twenty twenty twenty six six six during during during the the the win win win streak streak streak as as as it it it tries tries tries to to to wrap wrap wrap up up up the the the Atlantic Atlantic Atlantic division division division title title title the the the cats cats cats are are are ten ten ten points points points ahead ahead ahead of of of the the the may may may believes believes believes the the the division division division race race race and and and two two two points points points in in in back back back of of of Colorado Colorado Colorado for for for the the the overall overall overall legally legally legally I'm I'm I'm chain chain chain ferry ferry ferry

Panthers Panthers Panthers NHL Jonathan Jonathan Jonathan Jon Huberdeau Huberdeau Jets Plateau Plateau Plateau Platea Gustav Gustav Gustav Forsling Forsling Florida Atlantic Atlantic Atlantic Div Cats Cats Cats Colorado
Elon Musk: A Good Sign of Free Speech Is Allowing Someone to Disagree

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Elon Musk: A Good Sign of Free Speech Is Allowing Someone to Disagree

"Why is it that a Saudi prince Vanguard and all of the really angry unhappy people on television are going from not caring at all about Elon to a straight ten out of ten to try to prevent him from buying Twitter and turning it into a free speech platform. Well, this is why. Cut 89 Elon Musk explains this. Listen to it yourself. And a good sign as to whether there is free speech is someone you don't like allowed to say something you don't like. And if that is the case, then we have free speech. And it's damn annoying when someone you don't like says something you don't like. That is a sign of a healthy functioning free speech situation. And we don't have that right now. Donald Trump is not on Twitter. I'm not on Twitter. People have tried for years to get me off Twitter. And we've been suspended. Donald Trump has been banned. So here's how it works. Jeff Bezos can buy The Washington Post, Elaine pal jobs is able to run the Atlantic, Bill Gates can dictate global health policy, but Elon can't buy Twitter. It's because Twitter really has become a place where the most consequential ideas and mostly journalists get their stories and it's the top of the tributary. It's the beginning of the downstream effect. Is that if you are able to have a free and open Twitter, it will then open and liberate the conversations in op eds, it'll open and liberate the conversation in newspapers, Tucker Carlson, beautifully put it. It's where elite opinion is

Twitter Elon Elon Musk Donald Trump Elaine Pal Jobs Jeff Bezos The Washington Post Bill Gates Atlantic Tucker Carlson
Daniel Schmidt's Mindset When Questioning Anne Applebaum

The Dan Bongino Show

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Daniel Schmidt's Mindset When Questioning Anne Applebaum

"You and Evita and others you just did amazing work You essentially want to a conference which in my opinion was designed to attack conservative thought and push for censorship and taras is disinformation specialist And you turn the conference into an international narrative on media malfeasance itself Now you asked Anne applebaum of the Atlantic a very specific question You asked her about the Hunter Biden laptop in the role in the election And the answer she gave you was stunning calling it largely irrelevant The president's son and all this damning information As you're asking this question and getting this answer back what's going through your head You've got to be stunned that she's so candid or so silly I mean of course of course at the same time I mean this is what we wrote and so used to over the years These journalists do not give a damn about being fair about representing a fair narrative They tossed over this information around like it's a political tool The funniest part is I think Jack is so they actually did this He actually dug up old tweets from an apple boxer in the Trump years and she tweeted constantly about how much she hated how the Trump kids were using the Trump name to do all these partnerships So she's out of that to be interesting But she didn't find a laptop of a son of a president whose contents found that he was in the board of a Ukrainian energy company with no expertise which found that 10% of the salaries go into the big man I mean clear evidence of corruption she didn't find it to be interesting And the starting point on top if I could just say this in a few days afterward she blocked us on Twitter I write for the accounts I think you're Chicago on Twitter She totally blocked us She blogged a bunch of college students to request it So yeah that's where we're at

Anne Applebaum Hunter Biden Evita Jack Apple Twitter Chicago
Christopher Phillips Questions Brian Stelter Over CNN's Ethics

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Christopher Phillips Questions Brian Stelter Over CNN's Ethics

"Kid named Chris Phillips, who's a freshman at the University of Chicago. And he went to a some panel discussion that the Atlantic magazine was hosting that Brian stelter from CNN was on the panel. And this young man stood up and said the following to CNN's Brian stelter. Hi, thank you for coming. My name is Christopher Phillips. I'm a first year at the college. My question is for mister stelzer. You've all spoken extensively about Fox News being a purveyor of disinformation. But CNN is right up there with them. They push the Russian collusion hoax. They push the Jussie Smollett hoax. They smear justice Kavanaugh as a rapist and they also smeared Nick salmon as a white supremacist. And yes, they dismissed the Hunter Biden laptop affair as pure Russian disinformation. With mainstream corporate journalists becoming little more than apologists and cheerleaders for the regime, is it time to finally declare that the canon of journalistic ethics is dead or no longer operative. All the mistakes of the mainstream media and CNN in particular seem to magically all go in one direction. Are we expected to believe that this is all just some sort of random coincidence or is there something else behind it? It's too bad it's time for lunch. You have 30 seconds. No, there's a clock that says 30 seconds, but I think my honest answer to you, and I will come over and talk in more detail after this. Is that I think you're describing a different channel than the one that I watch. But I understand that that is a popular right wing narrative about CNN. I think it's important. When we talk about shared reality and democracy, all of these networks, all these news outlets have to defend democracy. And when they screw up, admit it. But when Benjamin hall, the fox correspondent, was wounded in Ukraine. The news crews at CNN and The New York Times stopped what they were doing. And they all cared about the injured Fox News reporter and that's

Brian Stelter CNN Atlantic Magazine Christopher Phillips Mister Stelzer Jussie Smollett Chris Phillips Nick Salmon Hunter Biden University Of Chicago Kavanaugh Fox News Benjamin Hall FOX Ukraine The New York Times
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

03:06 min | 3 months ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Is for all the times we didn't live up to our ideals for all the times that we've made mistakes on the international stage. Or. Hypocritical in terms of how we applied our faith and democracy. If we get democracy right, democracy is stronger around the globe. And when we don't get it right or we don't look like we care about it, others fill that gap. People, even our enemies, recognize that what happens here. If we can make a democracy function where you look at this room and you've got people from every corner of the globe, every racial group, every ethnicity, every religion, every culture that if we can figure out how to live together and treat each other with dignity and respect, then others start feeling like, well, maybe it's possible in our play in our country too. And when we look like we have abandoned those ideals or we're not willing to fight for them, robustly. Then around our around the world, people start saying, see? That was always a pipe dream and the putins of the world have a much easier time. There are a dozen other subjects to talk about, but well out of time. And just a reminder that we're meeting here again at 9. We have an amazing program tomorrow and I want you all to come, but in the meantime, please join on behalf of David in the institute of politics and behalf of the Atlantic. Please join me in thanking president Obama for his time today. Thank you everybody. This episode was produced by Kevin Townsend and Rebecca Rashid with help from Emily gotcha Marconi. Our executive producer is claudina bait. If you value what we're doing here at the Atlantic, please consider subscribing. You can watch the full coverage of the event at the Atlantic dot com slash disinformation conference. A special thank you to the University of Chicago's institute of politics..

institute of politics and beha Kevin Townsend Rebecca Rashid Emily gotcha Marconi David Obama Atlantic University of Chicago institute of politics
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

03:31 min | 4 months ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"<Speech_Male> whatever, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Male> I might have a different <Speech_Male> answer <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> counter signaling <Speech_Male> to that to say <Speech_Male> enough's enough. <Speech_Male> But I think <Speech_Male> NATO's <Speech_Male> doing what NATO ought <Speech_Male> to be doing, which is making <Speech_Male> clear. <Speech_Male> We can't defend <Speech_Male> this, <Speech_Male> we can't defend this country. <Speech_Male> We understand <Speech_Male> you have a home court advantage. <Speech_Male> There's a lot of terrible things <Speech_Male> you can do. <Speech_Male> And we're <Speech_Male> going to do everything we can <Speech_Male> to make sure that this <Speech_Male> fails, including helping <Speech_Music_Male> our Ukrainian Friends. <Speech_Male> But don't even <Speech_Male> think about going <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> anywhere else here <Speech_Male> because that's <Speech_Male> all different volume. <Speech_Male> Thanks, Tom. And let me <Speech_Male> just add on one <Speech_Male> final. I'll give you the last <Speech_Male> word here, but let me <Speech_Male> add one more question <Speech_Male> to it. <Speech_Male> What would you, <Speech_Male> if you were <Speech_Male> advising President <Speech_Male> Biden on <Speech_Male> what to say tomorrow <Speech_Male> night to the nation <Speech_Male> in the world, <Speech_Male> what would you like <Speech_Male> to see him, what <Speech_Male> points would you like to see <Speech_Male> him hit, <Speech_Male> including in this area <Speech_Male> of <SpeakerChange> what can <Speech_Female> America do? <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> would like him to <Speech_Female> explain to Americans <Speech_Female> who I think despite <Speech_Female> the heavy news coverage <Speech_Female> may not <Speech_Male> understand it. <Speech_Male> Why <Speech_Male> this matters to us, <Speech_Female> why <Speech_Female> it's about more than <Speech_Female> just Ukraine, <Speech_Female> brave is <Speech_Female> the Ukrainians are <Speech_Female> an extraordinary as they <Speech_Male> are. Why <Speech_Male> it's about <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the preservation <Speech_Female> of peace in Europe, <Speech_Female> you know, why <Speech_Male> it's about <Speech_Male> respect <Speech_Female> for borders <Speech_Female> and for a certain idea <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Female> political order and <Speech_Male> stability, <Speech_Female> why the shattering <Speech_Female> of that order <Speech_Female> would damage us <Speech_Female> materially <Speech_Male> economically, <Speech_Male> politically, <Speech_Female> you know, <Speech_Female> spiritually <Speech_Female> and in every other way, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> you know, actually I <Speech_Female> slightly disagree that <Speech_Female> this is a good moment <Speech_Female> for foreign policy. <Speech_Female> I wonder <Speech_Female> whether a lot of <Speech_Female> people are following this <Speech_Female> and understanding it. And I <Speech_Female> would like him to hit <Speech_Female> really high <Speech_Female> notes in <Speech_Male> framing <SpeakerChange> this and <Silence> explaining it to people. <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Male> we'll <Speech_Male> see you tomorrow night, what <Speech_Male> he does. <Speech_Male> I'm sorry that <Speech_Male> we're run <Speech_Male> out of <Speech_Male> time, but <Speech_Male> we all have <Speech_Male> writing <Speech_Male> to do, including that <Speech_Male> big andropov, <Speech_Male> <Silence> dual byline, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> 10,000 word <Speech_Male> profile, which <Speech_Male> I'm looking forward to by <Speech_Male> tomorrow morning. Thank you <Speech_Male> both for agreeing to <Speech_Male> do it in advance. <Speech_Male> Let me thank <Speech_Male> Tom and <Speech_Male> Anne and the <Speech_Male> thousands of people, <Speech_Male> thousands of Atlantic subscribers <Speech_Male> in Atlantic readers <Speech_Male> who've <Speech_Male> joined us today <Speech_Male> are really do appreciate <Speech_Male> it. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I just want to let you <Speech_Male> know that if you want <Speech_Male> to support <Speech_Male> our journalism, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> which I hope you <Speech_Male> want to do and you're not already <Speech_Male> a subscriber, you can go <Speech_Male> to the Atlantic dot com <Speech_Male> for more information <Speech_Male> on how to do <Speech_Male> that. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> again, I just <Speech_Male> want to thank you all for joining <Speech_Male> us today. And <Speech_Male> we'll do this <Speech_Male> again as <Speech_Male> soon as <Speech_Male> necessary, which <Speech_Male> could be in a couple of days <Speech_Male> for all we know. <Speech_Male> Anyway, on behalf <Speech_Male> of the Atlantic and <Speech_Male> on behalf of <Speech_Male> Tom and <SpeakerChange> Anne, thank you <Speech_Male> very much for joining us. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you to Atlantic <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> staff writer and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> applebaum and contributing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> writer Tom Nichols. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our <Speech_Music_Male> producers are Kevin Townsend <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and Rebecca Rashid <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and our executive <Speech_Music_Male> producer is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> claudine eBay. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Jeffrey Goldberg, <Speech_Music_Male> editor in chief <Speech_Music_Male> of the Atlantic. <Speech_Music_Male> We plan <Speech_Music_Male> to be here for you on <Speech_Music_Male> a regular basis at <Speech_Music_Male> radio Atlantic very <Speech_Music_Male> soon. You <Speech_Male> can find us in the Atlantic <Speech_Music_Male> app and at <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the Atlantic dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And if you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> value <SpeakerChange> what we're doing, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> please consider <Music> subscribing.

NATO Biden Ukraine Tom America Europe Tom Nichols Kevin Townsend Rebecca Rashid Jeffrey Goldberg eBay Atlantic
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

05:41 min | 4 months ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Hi, I'm Hannah Georgia, staff writer at the Atlantic. If this conversation is helping you make sense of what's happening in the world right now, then join me and my colleagues like van newkirk, Katherine Wu and Adrian, working to bring you the most interesting ideas and consequential issues of today. I'm thinking of the insurrectionist an outro of this existing anti democratic message and spirit that's been in America for forever. I think the biggest thing to point out here is just that this feels like a wave on fast forward. We're seeing case rates doubling at astounding rates. The U.S. healthcare system can not take anymore. It is already endured two years of trauma, healthcare workers have quit in droves, leaving those left behind with too much work and too few people to take it on. Please consider subscribing to the Atlantic and visit us on the Atlantic app or at the Atlantic dot com. You know, you're making an interesting point about what people know. We have to be very careful not to assume that the Russian population is understanding or getting information the way we're getting information. And that's a very important put aside, put aside Russian leadership. Here's something I never thought I would say, but I have a feeling I'm about to assign an andropov profile, which is not something that anybody would imagine in 2022, but he seems to be the sort of the man of the moment. Can I add one thing about andropov that's also interesting and drop off had great faith. He believed so much in the power of these movements that one of the strategic errors he made in the early 1980s was that he really thought that public dissent in the west was going to help the Soviets squash a lot of reaganism and rearming Europe and all of that stuff that he really like he gives they're now declassified speeches where, you know, he says, okay, comrades..

Hannah Georgia van newkirk Katherine Wu Atlantic U.S. Adrian andropov Europe
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

04:14 min | 4 months ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"I'm Jeffrey Goldberg, editor in chief of the Atlantic. And this is radio Atlantic. The sound of war, not heard in this European capital, since World War II. This is what Russian president Vladimir Putin unleashed on Ukraine. It's been 5 days since Russia launched a full scale invasion of Ukraine. We're here to try to make sense of the crisis and to understand what might happen next. In this bonus episode of radio Atlantic, I'm joined by two of our writers and applebaum and Tom Nichols, who also happened to be two of the world's preeminent experts on Russia on autocracy and on nuclear weapons. We spoke Monday afternoon at a live event. Hello, everyone. And welcome to this edition of the big story. We have a very serious subject to talk about today. Russia's war against Ukraine and we're going to jump right in. I just want to introduce very briefly my two guests today, the first is Anne applebaum, staff writer of the Atlantic, and of course Pulitzer Prize winning historian, one of the preeminent scholars and commentators on Russia and Ukraine, all of Eastern Europe and autocracy as many Atlantic readers know. And we have with Ann Tom Nichols, contributing writer at the Atlantic, one of the country's preeminent experts on Russia and on nuclear policy, which we're going to be talking about today at some length, Tom, just finished 25 years on the faculty of the U.S. naval war college. Congratulations on your graduation. Let's call it graduation. And Tom, of course, is the author of many great Atlantic pieces and also the Atlantic newsletter peace field. And those of you who haven't been reading Tom, you ought to subscribe to that newsletter. It's been very, very valuable, especially in the last couple of weeks. So let me just jump right in and maybe we could start with Anne and just ask you to situate us 5 days into the full on invasion. Of course, we all know that the invasion was happening incrementally for quite a while. But tell me where we are in just a minute what the situation looks like from your perspective. And give us something that has surprised you so far about the course of events. So thank you, Jeff. And it's great to be here, especially with Atlantic readers. I mean, I think almost everything has been surprising about the last 5 days. At least if you were listening to the prognosis, particularly from experts in the Russian military. What most people expected was going to happen was that the assault on Kyiv would take a day or two within four to 8 hours the country would be pacified. We now know that Putin had a very clear plan. He sent saboteurs into the capital city with the goal of creating a kind of fake coup d'etat and taking over the government. Instead, what's happened is that the Ukrainians who were almost not part of the conversation in the run up to the war. You know, we were talking about Russia and America and Biden and Putin and NATO and NATO expansion and so on. The Ukrainians suddenly appeared as the main actors. President zelensky, who did not have much fame or reputation abroad. He'd spent his career as a comic actor before being elected president. Has made a series of incredibly brave and impressive videos telling Ukrainians I am here..

Russia Ukraine Atlantic Tom Nichols Anne applebaum Jeffrey Goldberg Ann Tom Nichols U.S. naval war college applebaum Tom Vladimir Putin Eastern Europe Anne Putin Kyiv Jeff NATO President zelensky Biden America
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

01:54 min | 9 months ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"And on the Atlantic's new podcast the review. You can join writers from our culture desk and around the magazine. I am Shirley wig. I'm David soon. I'm Hannah Georgia. I'm Sophie Gilbert. We'll talk about movies, TV, music, and more, and try to tackle the big questions they raise about art and American society. So much of the reckoning now is a confrontation with how mean the Internet was and why that was. And whether we can be different as people who continue celebrity culture now. We'll go deep on great artists like August Wilson. He's the closest we have to look at Shakespeare in the 20th century. This Wilson's work really concerns itself with the experiences and with these language and the music of black people in America who are working class who's experiences are not hashtag black excellence, if you will. And we'll explain how the business of entertainment shapes culture. Often in ways that are hard to see at first. I think we've never needed fictional villains more to kind of inform the way we think about real-life villains. But the problem is, is that the conversation is so polarized on who the real life villains are, it's sort of impossible for a company as mass marketed as Disney to say things to the meaningful. Pop culture is also just fun, and we have fun with it. I just wanted to point out that Top Gun in my mind at least is about a bunch of cute boys calling each other cute names. But it's very true. That's very true. There's also so much sweat in this movie. Just everywhere everyone is just like, I hope they hydrate it after filming. It's a damned movie. Very damp. Don't just watch a movie, understand it. Don't just hear a song, listen to what it has to say. Subscribe to the review, coming soon from the Atlantic..

Shirley wig Hannah Georgia Sophie Gilbert August Wilson American society Atlantic David Wilson America Disney
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

02:00 min | 9 months ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"There's a lot of advice out there on how we should live our lives. Most of it sounds great on paper, but more often than not, I ask myself can't the pursuit of happiness be just a little bit easier. A little busy over here. Welcome to how to build a happy life. In this series, I want to simplify things for you. My expert guests and I will uncover the how to's of happiness. From the inside out from controlling our inner monologue through meditation. What this does is develop a skill called mindfulness, which you could just translate into self awareness. To discover what it actually means to open your heart and be vulnerable. Even when you're not in the mood, the container of the relationship needed to morph in some relationships it can, and in some relationships, it's simply can not. Happiness, first and foremost, requires self awareness. Only when we understand why we do the things we do, can we begin to transform our lives through self discovery. And love. I have to find a way to do everything I can to make sure my kids know that they're worth fundamentally it's not extrinsic. But it's intrinsic. It is determined by their ability to give and receive love. Each week I'll not only provide the theory behind happier living through these conversations, but also the application. Unless we embed something more sustainable purpose and having that higher meaning of doing something that's beyond yourself is what makes us individuals have this more sustainable form of happiness. If there's one thing I know for certain about happiness, is that it's not a linear path. But through the ups and downs, we can spend a few moments to talk.

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

16:23 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"So much of our politics ends up being consumed by celebrity. And I think that's true not just obviously with Donald Trump put on the in the Democratic presidential race. The people who are doing the best for the most part of people who were well-known before the race started The the process plays out on. TV me for the most part. We have short attention spans. It does seem like maybe we're we're in a place that we're the entertainment. Part of politics is consumed politics. It is but I mean I think that We just have a wacky system. Yeah we have created kind kind of in a way a show business system where you have a presidential campaign. Did last two years my employment so but it is. I think it gets boring when you see the same people up there and arguing with each other and not only arguing with each other but real fake and terrible acting after salmon did should take acting lessons all of this people up Dan the stage because the acting is just so horrible attack each other and tried to be like acting out Seriously like always appalling that you used to endorse is this. And how could you have done that. Oh my God. It was like horrendous and did do this whole drama as really affects the live in any walk of the stage again in smiling often and have a good time and probably doing some snaps together. But I mean it's like it's like it's show business and then it's all about you know who got the ratings up up and who get the ratings down and then the one that is sliding down a little bit. He said his leg away out. And it's the it's like for two years it'd be we now. Coaches have gotten close enough to be considered a year from now is election so this next year is going to be crucial to be already now had people dropping topping out to envy of already had this kind of Woma period where we kind of lake say. What was that all about the GERRYMANDERING for a moment i? It's a because it's important to you. I wonder what you would say to people whether they're Republicans or Democrats who look at. What happened Californians? Nyan say listen you wanted to reform the system and it ended up being bad for Republicans and so it's important for us to have power to do these other things that we WANNA do. That are priorities. For Republicans you might agree with or Democrats and they say we can't go and change to. What would be a fairer error districts who had? How does that choice work? If they say you WanNa make the fair district we want to keep the power so we can do the the things that we think are important. Well it's clear again. You say we wanted to keep the ballot self interest. It's it's IT'S A. It's a selfish L. Fish way of thanking because We know that the system is rigged and we know that it really hurts. The country when Democrats and Republicans are so far apart with the ideology and So stuck in the ideological corners. That can't come together so then nothing gets done. So how do we stay competitive. As a nation the other countries move ahead. China moves ahead. European Union moves ahead. Amend is a lot out of this country really India's moving ahead and I think that we have to really be competitive and the only way we can be competitive is collectively come together and say he does things we need to do. In order to fix the problem. You would say you should give up. You should not be resistant to giving up power right. which is what in the desert to change? The Laws in California was bad for California Republicans would not really it was actually good for the Republicans begins but it means that you have to be competitive and if he cannot be competitive. If you don't have better ideas than the Democrats then you're GONNA lose if you're not in touch with boaters you're GONNA lose if you didn't touch of what California's need specially what women and looking for and it was like Republicans in California lost a huge amount of women. Why because these issues education issues or environmental issues healthcare Asia's when addressed the Republicans did just would talk about money? The neons You know factories. And how do we protect the companies. How predict business noted that is oh great we should predict businesses and we should predict the economy in orders but we have to the same time have a sound healthcare system that people can go and get the treatments and California's the number one st eight and we should have the number one health care system? And that's what we should shoot foot but they had absolutely no interest in talking about that and In the same was within bomb. The women were very interested in a clean environment. They were worried about the kids in the water. They drink in order stuff and be couldn't even guarantee anymore. The water in every one of the towns is safe life into the ground is safe to women. were interested those issues. Not Republicans were not all they kept. Denying the days in pollution Shindig kept denying the day's global warming to keep denying this climate change in order stuff see what is arising and as dangers ahead In in and women just said look. I'm Outta Outta here. I so data they kind of Really did this to themselves. Not The redistricting resistance created the fear atmosphere That you had to be more competitive so it was. It gave everyone a chance to win. So you know that's why I disagree with you that day when you say it makes you lose and you cannot protect your job you can protect your job. As much as Olympic champion can protect his medal and come back again and do it again but he has to be the best he this the only way you can protect. You can't shoot in at because you had already a metal that you could shoot in because the way the system works and so would I wanted to create is I wanted to kind of take my Republican hat off. When do which you have to do? Because I didn't really want to look at who is an advantage disadvantage. I just wanted to make it fair and even for everybody in everyone has the same shot than everyone can go and campaign and show the de performing deaf vision and they have of great goals for the state notice and then they get laid get elected look at me. I was in a state that was definitely sixty percent Democrats whereas the forty percent of Republicans and elected as a Republican because I was in the campaign to talk about the issues did not just Republican issues but there was environmental lugers and healthcare issues then migration issues. Let let me ask you with your Republican hat. On though a there are a bunch of California Republicans who are who've left the Republican Party. The Republican Party has changed a lot in the last few years Chatham as WHO's the former Republican assembly leader in December announced announced. He was leaving the Republican Party. He's a person you've worked with. You are not leaving the Republican Party. What makes you stay well? It's I think I'm a true Republican if you look at Ronald Reagan overlooked president. Nixon Prison Lincoln. I'm in desma. People dead were fighting for equality. I'm in Lincoln. Think about that. I mean it was really so far ahead when it comes to giving equal rights to blacks and getting rid of slavery and giving them the voting rights being inclusive So I'm inclusive. I I see myself as that as soon as as Ronald Reagan Republican Someone that is very very good. Predicting the economy but also good in protecting the environment them Ronald Reagan created to first air resources put in California that enables us to really have total control over the embalming dominant issue and be able to set goals. Like fifty percent doers or reducing greenhouse gases by twenty. Five percent does that all can be done through the air resources which Ronald Reagan created any was governor and the same thing as the case with Nixon Nixon was in those striving for was first created that EPA yea In in Washington to protect the environment but at the same time he wanted to have universal healthcare. So but party. And isn't that isn't that Kinda. The Republican gone. Isn't that Republican Party. Dad know that the party changes. But you don't have to change your principles. Apply to changes in the get go one way or the other and what might responsibilities is to keep reminding everyone. This is what the true Republican Party is all about and we should not just change because new president does. He then came in that he may be. He's a little bit. You know different in his approach and orders I think that we should really as Republicans fight fight for totally quality. Have the people who've left. The party made the wrong decision. No I look it's like it's like an in training and in a bodybuilding. I mean there was guys did with doing twenty reps of twenty cents To get the the most muscular chest and I was doing in five different exercises of five cents each of twelve repetitions so who was riding. Who was wrong while you petitions? I wanted to communicate this other guys. Also ahead fantastic hostak pectoral muscles and fantastic jess and so it is different training principles to get in shape. You may say I like BICYC- to keep in shape someone else's I love running You know kind of Every day may seven miles. Someone else says you know. I like to go to the gym and go from one exercise machine to the next so everyone. So there's a dispute about it but who is ride news wrong and read so that to me is really no ride in the wrong. I think what it is is if if someone feels like the Republican Party has left them the Dan relieving the Republican Party but the Republican Party is left them therefore IFA perfectly fine find stepping out of the Republican Party become an independent. That's derogatory. I I think that if it makes them feel good. I support that one hundred percent and I would endorse a candidate that anytime because to me. It's comes always down to one thing whereas the hot of that candidate is it really help people always into kind of like to support the Party and be a party. Hack d wear that. You're going to be the last one left. No this many indium too. Many of us have been thinking about. You know the guy that I always love talking to that kind of things like me is John Casick and and he and I we both say there's so many of us out there in no. It's it's very clear that people are not you know people try to be supportive of the trump and that's good report. Republicans should be supported trump especially some who were. I'm very very supportive of some of the issues that the deals with and I'm not support. If any comes to the environment you have a lot the thoughts about all this. Do you think about what you want your role to be over the course of this next year and as the country figures out what its future is politically you you know. I won't be as supportive as possible to get things done. And to demean the America is the most important nothing not a political position and That's why I have no interest in running myself. Why knitting for Senator for Congress or anything like that Can't I can't really imagine you as a freshman member of the house will be overnight senior member just because of But the but the but I just I think I can do a lot of good from the outside. I became very passionate about issues interesting. Thing is that when I ran my wife said to me you know that you will be very good in politics and it will be very good in running for office competitive. You know exactly how to sell yourself how to communicate an office causing you're very disciplined and moving around and to get to the to the rallies and to fire them up and you always if the energy knows but I ran deal when it comes to sitting in your office and doing policy you will get bored put.

Republican Party California Ronald Reagan Donald Trump Dan president European Union Nixon Nixon India Asia Lincoln GERRYMANDERING Nyan John Casick China desma
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"I never go for that kind of an answer. Because it's like It's no different than when you are in a let's see eighty five years old and you say well it's too late. You know y mice by going going to the gym and work out. Why should I do a lot is why should I go and do some exercise? Some cardio broke. It's in no. It may be late but it's not too late because still that person that is eighty-five can instead of in wiping out eighty seven. Maybe stretch to ninety cindy in a we have a gene that determines waiting to die. But you can alter that you can destroy it and said yourself back by drinking. Allow allow smoking a lot and and eating shitty foods and then you wipe earlier but you can also go in excise and deliver clean life and extended for five years so ten years the other way I mean look clean east with his perfect example of the guy's ninety as odin standing around the Christmas party for Alice and Schmoozing with people in zones of this guy. I never get tired. But that's what he doesn't. It said many directs. So you know I think the way you live. He lives a healthy life so the way livid does make a difference and it's also the the same way with the environment. I think that if we all go and beg an effort now it's never delayed. I think it would definitely have a huge impact and I think I think it's just a political will. Do the various different leaders have the political. Will everyone always admires heroes But when it comes to to the time of stepping up to the plate and becoming a hero yourself that sometimes people kind of freak out in. What does that mean? I have to make now commitment. I have to go and fight. The oil companies have to fight the cold comments. I have to fight off this. You know. Kind of lobbyist tested out the fighting for fossil fuels and having a lot of power. Oh my God. This is overwhelming and I've seen it would lead as in Europe and I was governor when Edward. Dammit I know the mention any names But I just tell you I met in a prime minister's chanceless presidents and they all just said The police don't do this in two thousand six. Don't go and try to roll back. The greenhouse gases Oh don't do the things. TAILPIPE emission standards That Tata tough for us as it would it mean to us we are giving you to two thousand and fourteen. It's two thousand six so we are giving you eight years lead because we don't want to punish any companies we wanted to say to the car companies have done a fantastic job you made as move around from one place to the other in a very comfortable way over the years and Continue doing that but be now have found out that the way power. Our engines through fossil fuels is he's having damaging effects and environment until it slowly change. Not Though a night. We know that people have just bought in new machines to build a equipment equipment and build. 'cause we don't want them to rip down from one of the next now. Does the eight year lead time and so that was the idea. But they're scared of making any move so I could see that there was really a lot of dragging and dragging on going on in Europe and We were kind of way ahead in in California be built in the meantime the Tesla factory here in California and then building the cost of the most successful. 'cause so we are moving in the right direction and we have have shown that it is possible that you can do those things that you can confront this lobbyists and fight them and every step of the way and then top of it We have also proven that you do not They economy or jobs because this is what they always say. Ours is will be terrible for for the job. See we will lose. Jobs be will have a terrible economy. They Connie will go south and didn't know this will be horrible for everybody and then made I mean cutting for any any of you. The number one economy in the United States and be the fifth largest economy in the world. You know a lot about what people respond to. You had a successful career in entertainment because of that you get politics. Are you surprised by what has become of politics at this point point. The the the Cliche is that it's all become a show has an all become a show. I don't think it has just become a show but the minutes. I think the politicians today concentrate too much on just winning again the next election and so therefore they don't even give it said two year of grace period where the say okay. Let's go and get things done for two years and then the next two years we confide and You know presidential elections are coming up but let let's at least get coming down for the two years that's what it was in the old days. It was the same in in in Sacramento. Where people just say? I can go there. I can't vote for that because you know I'm up for reelection. The data want someone to come in. That is more to the right than me. or The desert in the left. In order of things that's eventually got redistricting title mark in in the district's Democratic and Republican districts. But that's what's going on on a nationwide basis and It's it's it's all about how. How do we win the elections but they will always you know people forget that the politics is a dirty business and and that people do horrible things and Benetton but horrible things? It's about just really being interested in their self interest interest. It's it's all about self interest. What is good for me rather than what is good for the country because if anyone would at all think about what's good for the country they they know what they're doing right now is not good for the country Let's take a quick break. And we'll be back with more from the Austrian room with Arnold Schwarzenegger. This is Jeffrey Goldberg. I'm the editor in chief of the Atlantic this show and all of our journalism here at the Atlantic depends.

Europe Atlantic California Arnold Schwarzenegger Jeffrey Goldberg editor in chief United States Sacramento Tesla factory prime minister Alice Connie Edward
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"I never go for that kind of an answer. Because it's like It's no different than when you are in a let's see eighty five years old and you say well it's too late. You know y mice by going going to the gym and work out. Why should I do a lot is why should I go and do some exercise? Some cardio broke. It's in no. It may be late but it's not too late because still that person that is eighty-five can instead of in wiping out eighty seven. Maybe stretch to ninety cindy in a we have a gene that determines waiting to die. But you can alter that you can destroy it and said yourself back by drinking. Allow allow smoking a lot and and eating shitty foods and then you wipe earlier but you can also go in excise and deliver clean life and extended for five years so ten years the other way I mean look clean east with his perfect example of the guy's ninety as odin standing around the Christmas party for Alice and Schmoozing with people in zones of this guy. I never get tired. But that's what he doesn't. It said many directs. So you know I think the way you live. He lives a healthy life so the way livid does make a difference and it's also the the same way with the environment. I think that if we all go and beg an effort now it's never delayed. I think it would definitely have a huge impact and I think I think it's just a political will. Do the various different leaders have the political. Will everyone always admires heroes But when it comes to to the time of stepping up to the plate and becoming a hero yourself that sometimes people kind of freak out in. What does that mean? I have to make now commitment. I have to go and fight. The oil companies have to fight the cold comments. I have to fight off this. You know. Kind of lobbyist tested out the fighting for fossil fuels and having a lot of power. Oh my God. This is overwhelming and I've seen it would lead as in Europe and I was governor when Edward. Dammit I know the mention any names But I just tell you I met in a prime minister's chanceless presidents and they all just said The police don't do this in two thousand six. Don't go and try to roll back. The greenhouse gases Oh don't do the things. TAILPIPE emission standards That Tata tough for us as it would it mean to us we are giving you to two thousand and fourteen. It's two thousand six so we are giving you eight years lead because we don't want to punish any companies we wanted to say to the car companies have done a fantastic job you made as move around from one place to the other in a very comfortable way over the years and Continue doing that but be now have found out that the way power. Our engines through fossil fuels is he's having damaging effects and environment until it slowly change. Not Though a night. We know that people have just bought in new machines to build a equipment equipment and build. 'cause we don't want them to rip down from one of the next now. Does the eight year lead time and so that was the idea. But they're scared of making any move so I could see that there was really a lot of dragging and dragging on going on in Europe and We were kind of way ahead in in California be built in the meantime the Tesla factory here in California and then building the cost of the most successful. 'cause so we are moving in the right direction and we have have shown that it is possible that you can do those things that you can confront this lobbyists and fight them and every step of the way and then top of it We have also proven that you do not They economy or jobs because this is what they always say. Ours is will be terrible for for the job. See we will lose. Jobs be will have a terrible economy. They Connie will go south and didn't know this will be horrible for everybody and then made I mean cutting for any any of you. The number one economy in the United States and be the fifth largest economy in the world. You know a lot about what people respond to. You had a successful career in entertainment because of that you get politics. Are you surprised by what has become of politics at this point point. The the the Cliche is that it's all become a show has an all become a show. I don't think it has just become a show but the minutes. I think the politicians today concentrate too much on just winning again the next election and so therefore they don't even give it said two year of grace period where the say okay. Let's go and get things done for two years and then the next two years we confide and You know presidential elections are coming up but let let's at least get coming down for the two years that's what it was in the old days. It was the same in in in Sacramento. Where people just say? I can go there. I can't vote for that because you know I'm up for reelection. The data want someone to come in. That is more to the right than me. or The desert in the left. In order of things that's eventually got redistricting title mark in in the district's Democratic and Republican districts. But that's what's going on on a nationwide basis and It's it's it's all about how. How do we win the elections but they will always you know people forget that the politics is a dirty business and and that people do horrible things and Benetton but horrible things? It's about just really being interested in their self interest interest. It's it's all about self interest. What is good for me rather than what is good for the country because if anyone would at all think about what's good for the country they they know what they're doing right now is not good for the country Let's take a quick break. And we'll be back with more from the Austrian room with Arnold Schwarzenegger. This is Jeffrey Goldberg. I'm the editor in chief of the Atlantic this show and all of our journalism here at the Atlantic depends.

Europe Atlantic California Arnold Schwarzenegger Jeffrey Goldberg editor in chief United States Sacramento Tesla factory prime minister Alice Connie Edward
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Was. Janse gay marriage all of us heiress. Obama me were all around the same age. We're all African Americans. You know, we all have kind of mutual friends, and I knew there's no way that he could actually think that, but these are political stances that we understand everybody has to take and again, just like Obama was very strategic. I think that Harris is also very strategic, and so she's not going to run away from the fact that she was tough on crime. And I'm not sure she's going to shy away from descent from people in the movement for black lives about that. Because that will bolster hurt and some other communities say it's the same as a sister solo moment, but the fact that she is being criticized by folks who allowed people would think of as as radical or far left that's not going to hurt her. Her. Come president credential for her in the general election, right? The the question is how much you pay how much difference you pay to primary voters versus general election voters when the when the field is much wider and more centrist question. None of us can truly answer in this insanely unpredictable moment in American politics and with the field grows ever larger by the day. But nonetheless, an important conversation and one that is ongoing Paul Butler and Emily Baz LAN. It is so great to have you guys with us. Thank you for your energy, and your thoughts, and your smarts. And of course, your time. Thanks for having us to be with you, Alex. Always a pleasure to be on with you, Emily. Yes. Thank you every day that I feel the same way it all ends in harmony. That's my friends will do it for this week of radio Atlantic, thanks to Kevin Townsend for producing an editing. This episode to our fellow Patricia Yacob and to Catherine wells, the executive producer for Atlantic podcasts. Our theme music is the battle hymn of the Republic as interpreted by John Batiste, check us out at the Atlantic dot com slash radio. And if you like what you're hearing rate and review us, apple podcasts, and subscribe and your preferred podcast app. Thanks for listening. We'll be back next week.

Obama Emily Baz LAN Janse John Batiste radio Atlantic apple Harris Patricia Yacob president Kevin Townsend Paul Butler Alex executive producer Catherine wells
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

08:41 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Far. We're gonna posit there for one second and take a quick break. But when we come back, we will have much much more on comma, Harris and the politics of progressive prosecution. Wanna support the Atlantic and keep up with their journalism throughout the year thing consider becoming a subscriber to the Atlantic magazine available in both digital and print formats, plus radio Atlantic listeners, get a special fifteen percent discount to learn more go to the Atlantic dot com slash radio. Subscribe. And we're back with Paul Butler and Emily Basilan. You know, when we're talking about all of this and trying to place Harris's passed in the context of the present, the conversation around mass, incarceration and more broadly criminal Justice reform is a constantly changing weather system. Right. I mean, Paul let's talk a little bit about sort of where you think we are right now in terms of the fundamental debate over, you know, criminal Justice being a left right issue. There was recently, a very large criminal Justice reform Bill that was passed with bipartisan support, do you think that makes it tougher for a candidate Comal Harris, given the fact that there seems to be emerging consensus? Emerging consensus is an overstatement about we are criminal legal process is now we still lock up more people than almost any country in the history of the world famously five percent of the world's population. Twenty five percent of the world's inmates. If you're an African American man you have one in three chance of getting locked up doing your lifetime. And so part of the effort has been to get people to understand that mass incarceration and race. Disparities are actually a problem for a while. The idea was that it was locking up so many people, and frankly locking up so many young black men that was keeping us safe that was responsible for the lower crime rate. And now, we've dispelled those myths in part because in states that have reduced their prison populations in states that have LA. Up your people? They've also seen crime rates go down even more. So there's nothing about math incarceration that makes us safer. That's the argument that a lot of reformers were making in the nineties the poster boys and girls, we chose were drug users because everybody has drug users and their family, nobody thinks that their family members who are using control substances should be locked up if they have problems, then it's a public health issue. Not a law enforcement issue a lot of headway there. But it turns out that if nobody's locked up for any drug crime possession distribution trafficking. US is still number one in incarceration. And so we have to think about reform and even transformation in a different way. And progressive have usually been there in part based on concerns about. Racial Justice, economic Justice. And there were arguments that should have appealed to people on the right faith base. Conservatives a lot of this is about redemption second chances not giving up on anybody. Libertarians ram Paul have often been concerned about how much law there is how much power the police have their four thousand at least federal crimes, no one's actually been able to account to count them all and they're way more state crimes, and then fiscal conservatives because locking up let's say two point three million people conservative estimate twenty five thousand dollars a year for each of those two point three million classic in a fishing government spending. And so with this new first step act. We saw a lot of the people in the conservative community. Get it. They signed on and apart. They were imparts. This new deal was strengthened by this school up progressive. Prosecutors who are talking about being smart on crime rather than just tough on crime. And it turns out that being smart on crime can't mean being in favor of giving people who've caused harm the kind of services that they need. So that they won't cause harm again. Well, smart on crime ironic that ironically, perhaps that was comma harasses sort of like slogan, right, Emily. Yes. Paul brings up the question. I mean, so there is there. The political dynamics play. There's also a sort of if you will almost like measuring yardstick litmus test that come la- Harris's career might be compared to which is the the progressive. Prosecutors that exist in reality today you've written an entire book. About this. Right. There's there's a new crop of of people who are decidedly. And specifically progressive who are working as DA's and sometimes attorney general's across the country. What are they doing? And how much do they really test? The upper bounds of Harris's claim to be a progressive prosecutor will first of all Paul was ahead of this curve for a long time. And so he has this more stork perspective on all this than I do. And I think that's important to keep in mind because there's promising to do things, and then there's actually delivering the movement. I'm talking about in focusing on in my book really just started in twenty sixteen. So we're talking about people who've been in office for a year or at the most years or even just a couple of months. I do think there is momentum for a wider array of changes not prosecuting marijuana charges is like the low hanging fruit that people start with. But they have to go. Away pass that to make a real dent amassing Carson just as policy. So here's another example, a couple of prosecutors can FOX in Chicago and Larry crasner in Philadelphia have changed how they prosecute shoplifting. The state may say that like if you just steal few hundred dollars worth of goods, that's a felony could go to jail for that. These prosecutors are saying in my office, we're going to raise the threshold. We're gonna say that unless you steal thousand dollars worth of goods really a lot of stuff. We're going to treat this as a misdemeanor, and we're gonna try to divert you away from jail or prison, not charging sex workers is another kind of change you can you can hold people accountable for in this area. And then I think there's just this broader challenge of changing the whole way that prosecutors charge in plea bargain because almost all the cases that end in convictions, go through plea bargaining moral upwards of ninety five percent, we really. We have very few trials anymore. When prosecutors charged the maximum, they possibly can they have a lot of leverage over defendants and people knuckle under and they plead guilty. If prosecutors are willing to charge less from the outset they said, a different baseline, and that's where you can start to see some charges that we count as violent crimes, but don't necessarily involve actual violence or or minor violence, for example, like punching someone in the face. These are things we've been treating serious felonies in sending people to jail prison for can we stop doing that. If prosecutors change how they charge his offenses. So so I mean, you can look at this as kind of a continuum, right? I mean, they're there. As I'm sure Harris's campaign does to a certain degree, right? Like that. These change agents couldn't exist had the system not been to some degree broken open by people, you know, who who were sympathetic to these causes like, comma, Harris and in their careers complicated. And I won't say checkered but mixed there were reforms and then there were steps backwards. But it's all part of the work. More broadly, Paul before we go. I I wanna get your, you know, your thoughts on your career specifically. Right. You you go into law enforcement

Comal Harris Paul Butler Atlantic magazine Emily Basilan LA marijuana DA Carson FOX shoplifting attorney prosecutor Larry crasner Philadelphia Chicago twenty five thousand dollars Twenty five percent ninety five percent
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

08:09 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"When he announced his candidacy in June of twenty fifteen Donald Trump said this if you can't make a good deal with a politician, then there's something wrong with you. You certainly not very good. Well, there appears to be something wrong with President Donald Trump in December. He refused to sign a compromise budget Bill, and instead he shut down the federal government weeks later, we are in the middle of the longest shutdown in US history with no apparent deal. Incite the president through all of this has not exactly looked like a master dealmaker. And his behavior has only made a solution seemed further away when Trump claimed he'd apply his business tactics to government was that empty political rhetoric or are we actually getting exactly what he promised. This is radio Atlantic. This week's guest is Maggie Haberman New York Times White House, correspondent Trump whisper. National treasure Maggie, my friend, his great to see you. It's great to see. And in person. I this is not in years has this happened happened. Finally, the universe is allowed us to in the exciting. So as we speak is Thursday morning. It looks like federal workers are going to miss another paycheck tomorrow to Senate bills to end it are up for vote later today. But both of those are likely to fail on like past shutdowns. This is not a legislative deadlock that we were looking at it is the president himself who closed the government. So I wanted to try and spend some time understanding his mindset and the best way to do that is to talk to you and understand how he operated before he was president. So if you have not read at everyone should read it recent piece that you wrote with ROY. Butte ner you guys, quote, a number of people from Trump's time as a real estate developer. They say they see quote, multiple parallels between Mr. Trump, the businessmen, and Mr. Trump, the steward of the country's longest government shutdown. Maggie you have been reporting on Donald J Trump since he worked for the New York Post in the early two thousands and probably more than any other political journalists in the US understand and to some degree have access to the mind of DJ t-. Are you surprised that the shutdown negotiation 's if we can even call them negotiations? This is unfolded in the manner that it has. Yes. And no, I am surprised that the shutdown is still going because I thought that he would take the national emergency offramp, which he did want to do and was told by everyone around him that he couldn't it was legally problematic. So he backed off. But I thought he would take that much earlier and try to extricate himself from the situation that was clearly going. Be bad before it got much worse. I think now because he has basically two speeds in one is dig in and the other is don't dig in and then declare victory on whatever was he is taking the former he is he is being told by his most conservative backers. And there's been a lot of focus on, you know, an Coulter criticized him, that's really not a lot of what's happening at some of it. Right. I mean, he's aware of sort of the right wing media ecosystem, but from his conservative backers and congress has freedom caucus. They are telling him stay strong. This is important for your re election, and that is in his head in a big way. Because remember while he is intuitive about what people who watch TV or pay attention to certain culture will respond to he's actually not intuitive politically at all. And he is not an I shouldn't say at all he's not intuitive politically on in men in many ways, and he certainly not intuitive about congressional negotiations. Which are just a very very different animals. So I think he has gotten himself into some kind of a puzzle box, and he can't really seem to figure out how to get himself out and like doors in that puzzle box. You know, where you can go from one little section of the box to another are closing on him. And I think he is finding himself trapped. This sounds like a scary puzzle box. Sorry, is it bad movie? Pose talks. No, okay that. Okay. Okay. But I would I guess reading your piece, right? The the the the idea that okay? He doesn't have honed instincts for politics is one thing. But but surely he had honed instincts in his business career because those are the sort of modified as that got him elected, or at least that were central to his platform of getting elected. I let me just ask you a big picture question about hell, Trump style as a businessman in New York City back in the day. What were the hallmarks of that style? Look the star that style is actually quite similar to what you're seeing now. And I think that's really important to remember. I think anybody. Who wants to understand the way that he functioned in business? Read a book by Jack O'Donnell who is a casino -secutive. He worked with in Atlantic City who explains it pretty well. But basically, the style is. So chaos be inconsistent. You know, move the goalposts constantly say that you want even if you haven't and really just be relentless in terms of beating on your opponents because he is we know he is ruthless. We know that he is willing to do things that other politicians wouldn't do, but he has this willingness to keep going and just try to grind the opposition down in in a way that is is pretty rare for president virtually in this town. He it's sort of important to remember. He's lead a pretty consequence free life. So even when his businesses went bankrupt. It almost was a way for him to get out from under them because they were not doing well. Anyway, the banks took a hit the creditors took a hit. But he didn't personally. I mean, he did take a hip, but it was not quite as bad as what other people took. And then he went into entertainment, and he had a sort of a hit with the the first time he was on a show with the apprentice. And then the apprentice, I think. People still don't really fully appreciate this. The apprentices such a factor in why he got elected because it just branded him to an audience viewers. Not as this sort of see list developer from New York City and somebody who was constantly striving to be part of the elite, which is how people in New York New him. But it branded him as this industry, you know, sitting in the leatherback chair and firing people which as we know he doesn't really like to do himself. Right. But but this set him up this kind of master of the universe. And so I would find when I would go to Iowa or New Hampshire. People would bring up the apprentice note, ask them whether voting for maybe I watched him for years. You know, he he ran his business. I watched how he did that. And you know, he was firing Gary Busey or he was doing something. It was not really it's business. But you know, Roger stone once said to me, and it was dead on that the line between news entertainment that we rely on is just so blurred for people who are not in our industry. And I don't think that we really appreciate it. So and then Trump runs for office one time, and he wins. So his style is to assume that he will always win and to just keep going and Nancy Pelosi doesn't need anything from him. Look. I mean, we're setting this up as if it's a diehard, right? There's also Mitch McConnell who is arguably the person that can open the government or at minimum caucuses. Also getting restless, right? Unlike would like a lot of his lot of his senators need this Cory Gardner would like the government opening Colorado because Senator from Colorado because he's facing a reelection. And this is not helpful. But but in terms of just the the two people who are at odds, it's Nancy Pelosi and Donald Trump, she isn't even from him. And when you don't need anything from him. That is the most powerful position you can ever be because Donald Trump never is more interested in you when you're back is to him, and she has and she look, yes, I think she has figured that out. But she also recognizes that her caucus her voters do

President Donald Trump president Maggie Haberman US New York City New York Times Nancy Pelosi Senate Mitch McConnell New York Post Atlantic City Colorado Gary Busey Coulter Roger stone Cory Gardner Butte congress Jack O'Donnell
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"You. That's my friends will do it for this week of radio Atlantic, thanks to Kevin Townsend for producing and editing. This episode to our fellow Patricia Yakub end to Catherine wells, the executive producer for Atlantic podcasts. Our theme music is the battle hymn of the Republic as interpreted by John Batiste, check us out at the Atlantic dot com slash radio. And if you like what you're hearing rate and review us in apple podcasts, and subscribe and your preferred podcast app. Thanks for listening. We'll be back next week. This episode of radio. Atlantic is presented by city from the civil war in Syria to Boko haram in west Africa. The last decade has seen a tragic swell in conflicts leading to an ever growing population of displaced peoples these displaced, millions art risk of being left out of the workforce impacting bolt their futures. And the global economy young refugees are especially at risk of being left behind more than half her children in only twenty three percent of adolescent refugees are enrolled in secondary education. This is why the city foundation and the International Rescue Committee. Have partnered to create rescuing futures and urban initiative the trains young people to learn entrepreneurial skills and start their own businesses. Given the opportunity many of them succeed take melody who spent several months with rescuing futures in northeast Nigeria after being. Driven from her home by armed men. Now, she's learning to write a business plan to generate income for her family. Elsewhere a man from the Western Sahara opens an African dance inspire, Jim. A woman from Tunisia opens a multicultural bar and a woman from Afghanistan starts selling handmade bags and jewelry these stories and others show. The skill resilience, and ingenuity of refugees and learning to create a business isn't just about the economy. It is a vital way for refugees to form bonds with neighbors in their new communities to learn more about how the city foundation and the I R C are working together to help phone youth. Charter sustainable economic path. Visit the Atlantic dot com slash refugee crisis.

radio Atlantic John Batiste Patricia Yakub Kevin Townsend International Rescue Committee executive producer apple Catherine wells Nigeria Western Sahara Tunisia Syria west Africa Afghanistan Jim twenty three percent
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

10:30 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Okay. We're we're going to step out of our own lab for just a moment and take a short break. But when we come back, we will use all sorts of qualifiers that responsible. Journalists us, and we will get back to the central question of the president as a potential asset of the Russian government. Yes. You heard that correctly. Stay with us. This episode of radio. Atlantic is presented by city, we empower people to embrace the future with confidence sixty eight point five million displaced, people worldwide that's more than the population of the UK and many of them have little access to education or opportunities for advancement. Stay tuned to learn how the rescuing futures program is training displaced youths to start their own business and become integrated into their new communities. Okay. We are back and we were talking to the inimitable Frank four about a subject he's reported. So deeply on which is the Trump campaign and Russia. So there are these little smaller data points indicators if you will in the last two years, but this week though, there is a focus on five or so meetings that President Trump arranged with President Putin meetings about which we know very little the Washington Post reports that Trump has gone to extraordinary lengths to conceal details of these conversations with Putin, including on at least one occasion, taking possession of the notes of his own interpreter. And instructing the linguist not to discuss what had transpired which is pretty hardcore in the magnum opus on the Atlantic website, unthinkable which is a compendium of fifty norm shattering moments of the Trump presidency. Frank, you contribute. A fine piece of writing about one of these meetings in. Humbert tell us if you will recap for us what happened at this meeting, and why is it unusual? So they're they're chew meetings. That happen. The first is an official and planned one where Rex Tillerson was in attendance. And this is the one where I think the notes the interpreters notes he tried to abscond with. And then there was a second meeting. That was unplanned that happened during a dinner after a concert where all the leaders of the world or raid at a long table and Trump has one translator with him. Who speaks Japanese because he's sitting next to the Japanese premiere Shinzo obey. And in Putin is sitting next to Malaysia. And so in the middle of dinner in front of all the leaders of the world who are all the way for the most part nervous about Trump's relationship with Latimer. Putin and can't understand. Band. Why he so obsequious to him Trump gets up maneuvers around the room sits down next to Putin and engages in an extremely long conversation with him. Now, they're so many good reasons not to have the president of the United States engage in an unshackled groaned impromptu conversation with Ladimir Putin. If for starters, Putin is incredibly cutting guy who is able to rewrite fact patterns and. And has a very clear view of where he wants to maneuver things, and they're all sorts of reasons why you wouldn't want Donald Trump talking to Vladimir Putin by himself because at worst a few weeks earlier, the FBI had opened an investigation into whether the president is a potential Russian asset, you know, in a best. He's he's somebody who has a man crush an obvious man crush on Vladimir Putin. And so they sit and we have no earthly idea what they discuss, of course of this conversation. And it's am I correct in thinking that the way President Trump is able to understand what President Putin is saying is because they're using Putin's interpreter for this. That is correct. So the only information we might glee at even he can't even he can't even take away that guy's notes, right? The Russians have the notes. Yeah. Now after after the that those two meetings in Germany. The day after those two meetings. The New York Times reports that as Trump was on Air Force One taking off heading back to DC he telephones a New York Times reporter and argues that the Russians were falsely accused of election interference on the same flight. He huddles with aids to decide how to respond to an emerging story by other times reporters about a Trump Tower meeting between Trump campaign, staff and Russian operatives. That's where Trump dictates this misleading statement saying that meeting at Trump Tower was really just about Russian adoptions and doesn't admit that. It was actually intended to accept Moscow's aid for his campaign, coincidentally or not free. These things happen, right? After those conversations she has with Putin. What's the most generous explanation that we can come up with here? I'm struggling for it. Well, did Magnitsky act seems like that's the Russian adoptions piece that becomes central to the misleading memo that Trump rights. That's a really interesting thing for him to pull out of a hat the moment after talking about flat with Vladimir Putin. Yeah. I've been and all right. So at this stage, Donald Trump already knows that everybody is focused on his relationship to Ladimir Putin. And so maybe just maybe all this has gotten inside of his head. He feels like he's doing something illicit by having these conversations with Vladimir Putin. He knows that if he talks about it. He'll get lashed for it. And so he decides that he's going to do everything in his power to bury it, that's the most generous explanation that I can come up with for this. But evidence seems kind of implausible I mean, you know, it just knowing that you're. That you're taking endless political flak for being this guy's puppet. Like, why why would you engage in any of the the the behaviors that you've just described that moment Frank, you know, you wrote about Hamburg, which was in twenty seventeen. And then we have this Putin by latte in two thousand eighteen. What was your thinking in that moment when you witness those two men at the Mike together? Really if we were to focus on one moment, that's the most I think one of those incredible moments of the Trump presidency, the one that just seems to confirm everything it's that moment. Just because here he is sitting in front of the world leader who he said to be an asset of and instead of trying to find a way to distance himself from Vladimir Putin instead of condemning Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election, which is, you know, not a speculative thing. It's something that had been confirmed by the entirety of the US intelligence community that had been well documented by journalists. But instead of accusing Russia of interfering in asking them to stop. What does he do? He turns against US law enforcement. He turns against our own intelligence agents, and he spreads this conspiracy about how the deep state is trying to undermine him. Now, the the big thrust of Russian propaganda Russian counter-intelligence Russian misinformation is to create a sense of suspicion in division in the west. And so he's essentially doing Putin's bidding for him in front of Putin in front of the cameras on foreign soil. It's one of those moments that I think when we look back on we can just say, you know, that's the holy shit moment that really just seems beyond belief. Okay. So what's interesting about the moments that we've discussed thus far is they don't with the exception of the Republican platform at the RNC. It's not concrete policy changes. Right. And so I wanna speed us up to the present. Day where the although I think it's important to say that if you if you think about what the Russians were after at the very beginning of their attempt to interfere with the election. You know, they probably did have certain policy objectives in mind. But I think most of their goals were a lot softer than that. I think it really does. It really does trace back to their desire to create division to create convenient chance to create confusion. Exactly. Well, with those with those objectives checked off the list, your degree there are policy asks potentially right there are there are there goals that that Putin would like to see accomplished, and you need to look no further than recent reporting beginning I think probably most explosively with New York Times reporting saying that several times over the course of twenty eighteen Trump privately said he wants. To to withdraw the US from the North Atlantic Treaty organization withdrawal from NATO would have been it's hard to quantify. How large a gift that would be to Ladimir Putin? But that would be sort of the the golden fleece is that the right metaphor use the chalice atop the ark of the covenant. I'm not quite sure I'm mixing metaphors here Frank,

President Putin Donald Trump Trump Tower president Trump Frank United States Atlantic The New York Times Russia UK Rex Tillerson Germany Humbert RNC Washington Post FBI official Magnitsky
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

08:29 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Quasi. I an archaic. Pseudo-democratic entity of Twitter has determined that the ratio tweet is a bag very getting booed off stage, basically getting off stage by the broad public. That is Twitter. So I announced to my followers on Twitter rate at the start of the year that I wanted to try an experiment called break the ratio and the rules. I told my followers are these. I'm gonna speak my truth. I'm gonna go speak things that I am have on my mind into Twitter, and anyone who follows me on Twitter, of course, may hear them. And anyone may like any other tweet on Twitter, re tweet them my Twitter feed as public it's Adam Thomas, I will do my thing on Twitter as I have, however to the followers who want to participate in this break, the ratio experiment. I asked them not to like or retweeted anything that spoke to them anything that that they felt in any way touched by whether positively or negatively I said, please do not like or tweet those things if anything that I say on Twitter moves you. I asked just reply to me just reply to that tweet. You're intentionally Ray showing yourself couldn't. So I asked people to ratio me on Twitter and. Alexis. It has been years since I had the experience of not only being delighted to pull up Twitter, but actually waiting for people to tweet things toward me. The for the past several years. My experience of Twitter has been this crazy making experience just pulling it up and seeing thousands of people very few of whom in decreasing number of whom I had any idea of the context for just saying random things into this disorienting bog, and I found myself increasingly just not liking that I found myself wanting a platform where if someone had something to say about something I said, they would say to me. So they would ratio me. And the most extraordinary thing happened. When I ask people to ratio, my tweets, I found myself having conversations on Twitter like with people with many of whom people that I know some of whom were people that I didn't know, but who had intelligent and interesting things to tell me. And then I found myself delighted by the prospect of pulling up Twitter. And seeing all of these replies things, I gave my followers a promise that if a tweet was ratio that I would try to respond to that tweet. I think I promised to respond to that tweet in part. So what that looks like for me is when I I have like eliminated the quote, unquote, home feed of Twitter, I have eliminated every other feed that is not either a reply to a tweet that I have made. Or a mention of a tweet that I have made those are the two things that I see when I when I pull up the platform, and all of a sudden that feels like this tiny corner of Twitter is just speaking to me, and I can talk back to them. And it's like, we've got our secret little club. I mean, of course, by telling radio Atlantic listeners, I'm telling them that this club exists somewhere. But it has been a beautiful few days. I mean a week. Plus, we're not that far into the new year. It's been a beautiful little while just like hearing from people their thoughts about my thoughts. And some of those thoughts are negative in some of those are positive, and they're like human scale thoughts. And I know that somewhere outside of this. Someone might be like re tweeting the things that I say, but I don't see any of that anymore. And I don't really care in some ways. How far my words travel into the fog. I just increasingly care more and more about who's talking to me, and what how respectfully and lovingly intelligently. I might respond back to them. I'm curious. What you think of that experiment? Yeah. Well, you know, it's really an interesting question, which is how can we live with these technologies? Even if we sort of like, you know, play them against the grain or or play them in a way that is, you know, unusual kind of reminds me of like mutual friend, Robin Sloan who went into this video game, and in instead of you know, there's no way to talk to people. So he would just sort of like try and create alliances in a game for which there is no affords for an alliance. To spoil the sport night. Game on the Atlantic about it. It's great awesome, strain, the Atlantic about it. We will link to the show. It's the one rule of fort night. Is that when you get dropped into the game? You gotta go find the nearest player and start killing them, basically. Right. And so Robin decided he wanted to basically play the peaceful version, of course night or at least collaborative version, and he had a whole experience that was quite wonderful. Of course, I hear him playing fortnight sometimes because we share an office, and he's just in their killing people now. So you may that may that may foreshadow what I'm about to say, which is that I think that we sometimes I think it's like a we underestimate particularly in this era. Which reference another book called age of fracture. Which historians take on sort of how society became considered to be a bunch of little particles making independent decisions on a lot of in a lot of realms of life. Not just the market, but like sort of market thinking extended to like, lots of other things I and to me it's kinda like that. Like sure could you have your own personal socialism within like a capitalist system. Could you do, you know? You do that. You know, what I mean like, you could totally do that. But I, but I I don't know how that translates. In two greater change. And that may be a reflection of my own cynicism. But I also think it's a reflection of how powerful I think the rails. Are you know, and that even if you can get off them for a second like these things are very well established. I mean, I my own personal Twitter experiment began like six months ago when I sensuously switched to kind of read only and only article so I use it to called nuzzle. And I basically just read stories that people tweet and then around those stories I'll sometimes read the tweets because it's tool captured those as well, so I'm not like gone from Twitter, but I don't tweet anymore. And I and I use it as a tool for like seeing what people are talking about. And how they're talking about it. So I'll tell you. I that makes me a little sad. I like many people who kinda came of media age in the air. Era of blogging have missed blogging, right? I don't know if you feel that way. I totally feel that way. I totally miss blogging. I mean, it's not like blogging went anywhere. It's just that it did not persist as a sort of social activity it no longer it no longer felt like a norm. So I was John Rao that fell out of fashion exactly away of writing that you no longer around. I still blog. I mean, sometimes probably not near as, but you know, I still follow several people who blog, and it's still nice. But it still feels like it's like we are making salmon flies in our like little niche artisan antiquarian club together, you know, in a cabin very butcher shop remember shortness, but what was beautiful to me about blogging in the air when

Twitter Robin Sloan Adam Thomas John Rao Atlantic Ray fort night six months
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

06:58 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Well, let's pause and come back to explore that new line of thinking after this message. Want to support the Atlantic and keep up with their journalism throughout the year thin consider becoming a subscriber to the Atlantic magazine available in both digital and print formats, plus radio Atlantic listeners. Get a special fifteen percent discount to learn more go to the Atlantic dot com slash radio. Subscribe. What is continue with the completely unoriginal insertion of advertising before this next phase of our conversation Alexis, I want to make a straight up argument about technology and the way that it's interacting with society at this moment, and I wanted to law Laba premise at your way. So can we stipulate that the making of any tool is actually collaborative exercise between the people who design that tool the people who pay for that tool and the people who primarily use it that fair? So like Twitter is made in part by the company writer incorporated in part by the companies that advertise on Twitter and the market the Twitter's embedded in and also, of course, the scads and scads of people who use Twitter, and the thing that I really wanted to ask you Alexis was who do you think actually has the most power in this equation and? And before you answer, I want to confess that have got a side in this argument. And I think my answer is that users that users might have the most power in this equation that both collectively on that scale and individually. I think that we users might have more power to shape the platforms that we the us then we give ourselves credit for. But I want to leave that argument there and ask your just first thoughts to that. Well, I think that there's a question of sort of like Layton in actual power. I think that the there's probably more latent power in the user's like if all the users started to do a certain thing than that could work. I think that when we think about this though, when you think about kind of question of organization, and whether there is meaningful organization between Twitter users to act on their own behalf or not. And I think the answer to that is no. And that. That there isn't. There aren't really means. There's no mechanisms for for Twitter users to really exert power. And you know, we left out another group, which shareholders, and if people who own the company who are also different from the management. I, and I would say in some ways that would be the group that I tend to think is could exert the most power both in the sense that they have large amounts of late power. And they actually have a means for doing it on the other hand, they don't wouldn't know what to do. I mean, I think the main problem that we have here. Matt is that no one knows what to do to fix these problems? And I actually think that includes the companies and the users now what you've described to me sounds like a basic. Almost geopolitical governance problem. And it sounds not at all dissimilar from the problems that we talk about every day about America and its design and some of the places where it's designed might be actually democratically deeply dissatisfying to many of its shall we say users that the government of the platforms feels deeply highly imperfect. And there's no unlike the American government, there are fewer, or at least there are less democratic institutions through which users might change that governance in government structure, but -solutely I mean, like this guy put one more thing, you know, their conversation with a gun in Tim Wong, and the guy who's the former head of SEI, you this service employees union, and your when that Tim said was that you know, because. Guy was basically like it's amazing like Uber, and lift and all of these companies have actually concentrate done half, the work of organizing force by getting all these people onto these platforms as workers, right? Like were talking lift drivers or drivers whatever they are. And he's like this is like what like a union organisers? The best target ever you organize this one shop, and you got two million people, you know. And I and I take that as an interesting point. Tim's point though, was that in order for that to happen. People have to conceive of themselves as a public, or as in this case, you they have to conceive themselves as a as a as a unit as having some form of solidarity or cohesion or just like to an identity as workers, and I've done a lot of work around the ports and dockworkers, and like the culture of dock working. Over many decades lent itself to this incredibly dense social network that was very remains a very powerful organizing tool, and I think what you look at with something like Twitter is like there's just nothing like that, you know, and they're never has been on any platform. There have been little pushes here. And there, you know, like, oh, let's not formalize retrieve. I mean, if I was part of, you know, some of these like organizing efforts, but they all came to nothing more or less, and I think we need to recognize that, you know. Well, so I wanted to actually narrow down from this collective we that we've been speaking in this collectively of users and speak on that personal skill. You were talking about before because I've been trying this experiment on Twitter, and it has been fascinating to me. And I wanted to ask you about it. And what it meant have you heard about this experiment that I've been doing I've been calling break the ratio. So you know, there's this. Dominant twitter. I don't know who I invented the term to get ratio. But the term generally refers to a moment when a Twitter mob has descended upon someone who has tweeted something that the Twitter mob. Does not like so the way that you can identify a tweet that has been deemed bad by the NRP of Twitter is you count the number of replies to the tweet. And if the number of replies to the tweet exceed I believe the collective number of lakes and re tweets to the tweet, then the tweet has gotten quote unquote ratio that means that the quasi.

Twitter Atlantic magazine Tim Wong Alexis Laba American government Layton Guy America Matt writer fifteen percent
"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

08:05 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Twenty was a rough year for some of us the already angry medium of the offline world confused, even angrier on social media after the early promise of digital communities uniting the world, many of them have become digital diss Unity's instead on this week's show. Can we make our socialites positive again? If so how this is radio Atlantic. Happy new year listeners. Welcome to the first radio Atlantic of the year. I am once again that Thomson executive editor of the Atlantic. And I have got if you surprises in store for you this episode and let me get right to the first my guest, Alexis magical, Atlantic staff writer, and one of the world's smartest writers and thinkers on the past in future of technology, minster magical. Thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me met. So we are convene today to talk about are problematic platforms. Maybe first and foremost Twitter possibly because it's the one that I use the most. But I think the discussion that I wanna have with you. Alexis encompasses more than just Twitter. I think it's Facebook it's YouTube net flicks, possibly all of the technological things that we currently call platforms and one of the reasons I'm excited to have this conversation with you, Alexis magical is your particular history with technology. I remember that moment when you came from wired after covering technology is a reporter and writer for wired and started the Atlantic tech section here. I was not yet working at the Atlantic. I was then merely a happy joyous customer of the Atlantic work. And I remember the moment the tech channel started. And it was. Like this totally different approach to covering technology. And remember how exciting that was this was in the blogging era. And so a lot of the big then outlets that were covering tack or without of his like tech coverage vehicles were like tech crunch and Gizmodo and and wired, of course. And you brought this sense ability that totally fused the idea of technology with the idea of the Atlantic. Which was you really infused the coverage that you assigned and ran and wrote on the site with this deep sense of history, and I really appreciated that lens all at once. It felt like before you came to the Atlantic tech. A lot of the technology coverage that I had access to was coverage really of things that were being made and the coverage the lens that you brought to our technology coverage at that moment was. Sort of more. How things have gotten made over time. And it felt like that lens was deeply infused by the fact that you had just finished a rating publishing and publicizing your book powering the dream history of green technology in America, and you would dive into the history of our green clean energy future. Going back to the nineteenth century, right? And it felt like you were so rooted in that long expanse of history that by the time, you got here and started running our coverage of technology, you were able to cover these stories appropriately. As though the new things that we invent the new tools are not departures from the long record of the technology that we've made, but actually just part of that long record that they're often just Evelyn's of the ways that we've been making tools in the tools that we've been making for a long time is that fair. Death totally fair. I mean, you know, what happens I think with any book project, and particularly one like that that covered so many periods of history is you end up kind of having to go deep into not just the history of a particular kind of technology, but like sort of all technology, and so I was really immersed in this field academic field. Science and technology studies. And a lot of that field is devoted to not like sort of deconstruction, like a train doesn't exist. But sort of what are the possibilities that exist? For putting a machine on a track and moving around like if you look at the German railroad system that develops the nineteenth century versus the American railroad system that develops in the nineteenth century like what do we learn does? It train always looked like the train that we saw in the transcontinental railroad or can it look like a bunch of different things can different configurations of society economics and technical possibility generate a bunch of different outcomes, or in or is there really just one path are things more deterministic than it sounds, and you know, in my book, like the big example of this is more around the internal combustion engine, and the idea that the energy density of petroleum products is just so good that it makes it impressive impossible to imagine a world in which electric vehicles one in the late nineteenth century. On the other hand, it there were attempts to build other kinds of systems that didn't require the kinds of road networks and infrastructures of mobility that we did build around the car. And so, you know, I think just as a small example, like literally everything in the world like every human made thing you can tell certain stories like that around. And that is what scholars have been doing. And when I showed up at the Atlantic. I was like bursting with thousands of those stories which I had been squirreling away when I couldn't write about them because I was working on a book. And I think that that style. Was really useful? At that time when social media companies had the mantle of progress, so firmly upon their shoulders, and it allowed me think about other types of technologies that have a -ssume that kind of mantle whether it was radio whether it was the personal computer in the nineteen eighties. Whether it was nuclear technology in the nineteen fifties. And to kind of just peel away chip away some solvent on the mantle progress and see what was underneath. And I think that's why a lot of our coverage of the platforms early on was more complex than. Oh. This is great. It gives everyone voice. Yeah. I think one of the things that is interesting about this moment is Zora in this kind of epic backlash moment against almost anything that we have. Come to call a platform, right Amazon. Netflix YouTube, Google Twitter Facebook, all of them have come under this massive horde of criticism because these feel in some ways, I think to some users and critics of the services like shortsighted profit driven attention grubbing advertising owned machines for stealing people's attention from them that fair characterization

Atlantic Alexis Atlantic tech Twitter Facebook YouTube Thomson executive editor Gizmodo wired Zora staff writer America Amazon Evelyn Netflix reporter