23 Burst results for "Atherosclerosis"

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:27 min | Last week

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Yeah, these days it'll get you a tank of gas in a Mountain Dew, you know? And that's pretty amazing. So I guess the next big question in thinking about this is if you're able to sequester this oxidized form of cholesterol, which is the one that leads to the pathologies. Is it able to actually reverse the effects of things like atherosclerosis or other, you know, if you say it plays roles in Alzheimer's things like that, does it reverse it or is it just help limit the accumulation on the front end? The idea is that it will reverse it. So what we've been able to show in cell culture models was first could oxidize cholesterol is very toxic to cells, any cell type that you incubate with oxidized cholesterol is at a fairly low dose of 7 KC will kill pretty much any cell type that you can culture in a dish. And so the first thing we tried was, well, if we, if we add in some 7 KC and we add in our drug into the into the cell culture media that the liquid broth that the cells grow in, can we prevent their death. And the answer was quite dramatically, yes, at pretty low concentrations of our drug, we could prevent their death. Now, you might say, well, okay, you selected that sort of a tautology because you created the drug to bind the target, and then you put them in together, so it just encapsulated the target and didn't let it get at the cells. Fair enough. But then what we did next was two really exciting things. One is that we got some plaque tissue from humans who had atherosclerosis when they died. And we took that plaque tissue, fresh from a cadaver, and incubated it with our drug and measured the oxidized cholesterol inside of the before and after we incubated with our drug, and we found that we could draw out in a dose dependent manner, huge percentages of the oxidized cholesterol in that plaque, not only that, we could do it in an incredibly short amount of time, which was a total shock to me that we started out looking at hours and 24 hours and three hours, and bizarrely, the 24 hours and the three hour curves were exactly the same. So then we did it for 15 minutes. And that was exactly the same. So the system is coming to equilibrium extremely quickly. So it's acting. It's doing what it needs to do and it's doing it really quickly. The next thing we did was we created foam cells in the lab. So you take macrophages and you feed them some lipids in our case, we do it in a way that we only need to feed them a little bit of oxidized cholesterol as opposed to a ton of bot cholesterol, like most people do, you just need to give them a relatively small amount of oxidized cholesterol, and they'll turn into foam cells fairly quickly. So they balloon up and what we did next is after that, we they're not being fed the oxidized cholesterol anymore. That's sort of a permanent state. It's like senescence. It's like cells in essence..

Alzheimer's atherosclerosis
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Mind Pump

Mind Pump

05:56 min | 2 months ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Mind Pump

"They're more likely to get taken up by immune cells, which can initiate atherosclerosis. So when you have an LDL, particle that's chugging along, tugging along these potentially pro inflammatory fats, the immune system sees them as being toxic, right? So there was a study, I believe it was published in 1999 that found that compared to oleic acid, which is the primary fat contained in extra virgin olive oil and avocado oil, it basically makes your LDL lipoproteins toxic. So you're going to have lower LDL, but worse LDL. Yeah, yeah. Well, so you said earlier, there's a twofold increase in these inflammatory fats in our own body fat. So not only are we fatter, but the type of body fat that we're storing now is changing. Changing. I had no idea. Making it much more inflammatory. And something just popped up for me as you're talking about this, something that might make this even more dangerous is that you may be blissfully, I don't know, either unaware or even kind of coddled a little bit by your lipid number. So your doctor does a blood test. It was, oh, your LDL won't went down. You're like, oh, my health is much better. Not knowing that, although the number went down, the type of LDL you have now, because of these fats, is more inflammatory and worse for you. So kind of gives you this like this double this issue where you feel like you're doing better. You don't change anything and you're going down the wrong path. How much does this conversation changes in the context of a calorie surplus versus a calorie deficit? Because I know right away, that's the thing that there's the other side of the fitness space that will hear this and be like, oh, max is an alarmist and oils aren't that bad for you. And if you're in a calorie deficit, so in the context of a calorie deficit and a surplus, how much does this conversation change? Well, I mean, it doesn't change the fact that you are the fats that you eat. I mean, fats are not like glucose, dietary sugars, for example. Dietary sugars actually, you burn them off, you store them in the muscle tissue in your livers. If you don't burn the glucose that you're consuming or whatever the source of dietary sugars that you're consuming right away, they get siloed on, they get siloed for later, right? But the fats you consume actually integrate themselves into, as I mentioned, your lipoproteins, your adipose tissue and also your brain. Your brain requires polyunsaturated fats. The omega 6 and omega three fatty acids are essential. And so regardless of your calorie intake, the fats that you consume are still going to become a part of you..

atherosclerosis
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

04:11 min | 3 months ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"Arm. I look forward to seeing that data. We're just up on 90 minutes so I think we're going to start closing this out here with that we maybe will just end with the conclusion to the two main questions we've been discussing today, which are essentially two sides of the same coin, are two different sides of the same coin does low serum cholesterol cause a harm to health and then therefore does high cholesterol level lead to health benefit. And I think we've put or you have put forward the case against those propositions and hopefully people find your arguments compelling. And if not, maybe they think it's statins are still the hoax, but I think you have done your best to put forth the arguments that you see fit. So I don't know if there's anything you want to add before we leave people go. I think just to put some cold hard numbers on this because it comes back to this whole trope of like the body needs cholesterol bro. It's like, yeah, it does again. No one has disputed that. Just to put some cold hard numbers on this for people. The LDL receptor itself becomes saturated at about .06 millimolar per liter or 2.5 milligram per deciliter of available cholesterol, right? So that means that the actual physiological maximum for total circulating cholesterol that could be required is about 25 milligrams. And any more than that could be surplus requirements. And as Gaussian and brand did look at, when is actual tissue, if this molecule is so important for all this growth and development. When is actually the highest tissue requirement for energy and substrate in any given human's life? It's during the phase of infancy and early development. And mean cholesterol levels in that life stage when we're going through our most rapid period of growth and tissue growth and development is 28 to 32 milligrams. And that covers the basis for the most kind of traumatic phase of tissue cellular requirements for substrate under our lifespan. And then we also have evidence that under levels of give or take around 80 milligrams per deciliter, the evidence for atherosclerosis is pretty much absent. So for the cold hard numbers for all of the kind of hysteria that levels of LDL at low levels, the body needs more than that. There's categorically little to no evidence to support that there is any physiological requirement for more than the levels that have just outlined. And to just reiterate the point about this molecule.

atherosclerosis
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

05:58 min | 3 months ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"While facilitating more than enough cholesterol, production and delivery to cells for all of Yeah, and I think those steps are really important to keep in mind because they are the best way to think through some of these claims. So maybe I'll just recap on essentially what you've laid out there because I think it's important going forward in this conversation for people to bear that in mind. So you started by saying we have this regulation of cholesterol balance at the liver. We have this molecule, cholesterol that is hydrophobic, so it's water insoluble molecule. Whilst that is beneficial for its role within the cell membrane, it also has this potentially problematic aspect of it making it harder to remove from plaque in the arterial wall, which will probably circle back to. Therefore, then to move this molecule around the body, its package within a lipoprotein, we have then VLDL, so very low density lipoproteins contain triglycerides and cholesterol, and as it deposits those triglycerides, it becomes more cholesterol rich, and then it eventually becomes this low density lipoprotein. The LDL receptor, then is what allows cholesterol to be delivered into a cell. These LDL receptors bind to apo B 100, which is on the surface of this lipoprotein. That allows the live protein to be brought into the cell, cholesterol that can be removed and used in the cell as needed. And the number I think you said was about 5% of the cholesterol is needed for cell membranes if I have that figure correct. And then under normal conditions about only 10% of the maximum capacity of the LDL receptor is expressed and all that is to go to say that the LDL receptor has this really high affinity for LDL. Therefore, that allows us to have enough cholesterol delivered, whilst maintaining low levels of serum LDL particles and low enough by low in this context, we mean low enough that atherosclerosis doesn't rapidly progress..

atherosclerosis
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:09 min | 7 months ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"You know, these metabolites are lowering the risk of colorectal cancer. They're driving down inflammation throughout the body. And protecting us against things like neuro degenerative diseases. So there's a there's a bandaid solution here where you get this short term benefit. What I think is being overlooked is that chronic diseases have a long latency period. You know, they bubble away under the surface for for a while. And, you know, you might experience chronic disease in your 40s or 50s or 60s, but by and large, the lifestyle that you were leading ten, 20, 30 years ago was had a lot to do with the development of that chronic disease. You know, you spoke to the soldiers from the Korean War. They were young. They were laying down the pathology of atherosclerosis. So my fear is it is this sort of short term band aid solution. And my biggest fear with it is that it sends LDL cholesterol through the roof. I'm talking. I said before, a hundred milligrams per deciliter is like it's considered the kind of recommendation here in America and in Australia. But as I said, really, you got to get down to 60 or 70 milligrams per deciliter where you don't see atherosclerosis. And here's the really, really interesting thing rich. Lauren Corden, he wrote the paleo diet book. He also published a paper that goes into what is a healthy LDL cholesterol level. This is coming from the father of the paleo diet. And he went through and he looked at LDL cholesterol as a primates and of hunter gatherer tribes where there is low incidence of atherosclerosis. And his conclusion in this paper that he wrote, the father of the paleo diet was that human LDL cholesterol needs to be at 50 to 70 milligrams per deciliter in order to avoid atherosclerosis. So this is coming from him. And you might think, well, hang on. He's advocating for the paleo diet, then how can he be also saying that LDL cholesterol should be low? And a lot of this comes back down to what the paleo diet is versus how people are doing it. Yeah. And so it's a very good point. Yeah, because it's not exactly the way that it's been massively adopted. That's right. And the paleo diet if you look how Lauren cordain, what he recommends, you know, it's talking about mates that are very low in saturated fat. If you went back and looked in the Paleolithic era and you look at woolly mammoth or these types of mates that would have been eaten then there are more equivalent to venison and antelope, which are very low in saturated fat and higher in polyunsaturated fats..

atherosclerosis neuro degenerative diseases Lauren Corden colorectal cancer chronic disease Australia America Lauren cordain
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:11 min | 10 months ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Biohacking conference dot com. We'll have started Before i actually even got into my internship that my wife and i could not get pregnant. And i called the seven most famous holistic doctors that i've ever heard of at that point. This was nineteen seventy nine. And i was able to reach all of them and i asked them. What do you do for infertility. They would say you know what a category one is. i'd say no and they say learn. Okay okay private down. And i wrote down The nodes talking these seven doctors. And i put a program together. We were pregnant in six weeks when you go to the doctor with symptoms irrespective of what they are. It's kind of like you fall over a waterfall into the pond below. You know and you swim up to the surface and you spit out the water. You're trying to stay afloat in the pond of recurrent miscarriages or in the pond of chronic fatigue. Whatever the pond is at. You're stuck in your trying to stay afloat. And everyone's looking for a life jacket to stay afloat in the pond of their symptoms. And that's important but once you've got a life jacket on and you're okay you're stable. At the moment. You have to swim over to the side of the pond. Get out of the water. Walk up the hill go back upstream to figure out what the heck fell in the river that eventually took you downstream and falling over the waterfall. That's medicine is what is it. That's going on way back there that that has triggered or is fueling whatever the symptoms are that you have going on right now. Talk about What was going with immunity unim- unity on the rise as well. You know it. It's on the rise in the last thirty to forty years and most people and even doctors don't put together is that we think the number one cause of getting sick and dying morbidity mortality is cardiovascular disease. Well every doctor knows or should remember from their studies that cardiovascular disease the plugging up of your pipes. Atherosclerosis is immune driven. It's an auto immune mechanism so this topic of auto. Immunity really becomes a primary concern for all of us but we never looked at it that way so once. We understand that. This is prevalent in almost all of us that it's an auto immune mechanism meaning your immune system attacking your own tissue. Whether it's your blood vessels or components in your blood vessels that vat fatty members of the blood vessels or your brain or your joints or whatever it is when your immune system is attacking your own tissue. That goes on for years. It's called the spectrum of auto immunity. It goes on for years before you ever have a symptom. You have an entire new body. Every seven years some cells reproduce really quickly like the inside lining of your gut every three to five days depending on what steadier read than some cells are really slow like your bone cells but every seven.

dying morbidity mortality chronic fatigue cardiovascular disease Atherosclerosis
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:19 min | 10 months ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Progression of underlying atherosclerosis and hartfield. You remember when we place the we are looking at the culprit lesion the lesion that either causing acute coronary event or has a large amount of myocardium at risk. But that one lesion will not be predictive with that patient long-term outcomes if we don't control risk because there are other mild to moderate lesions which can grow and even before becoming symptomatic rupture and cause an acute event and that's probably why some of the failings of interventional large cohorts showing that intensive risk-reduction is just as good as approaching the one culprit. Lesion is not because approaching one corporate. Lesion doesn't help in terms of saving myocardium and relieving symptoms. But because if you don't control the risk the other mild to moderate legions will continue to grow will become unstable rupture so when you look down the road. Two three four years. It's going to be hard to show that you were able to improve survival so i'm not anti coronary intervention by any means but i'm also suggesting that that needs to be done in conjunction with intensive risk reduction the high intensity stat and we need to make sure he got it. We have to educate him of why he has to take it because many patients when they heaven intervention and sometimes the cardiologists the culprit. The patient will feel that they have been quote fixed in probably somewhat lazy fair about risk factor modification. So yeah i would intensively lowered. I would do the high intensity i would suggest. Adding may have some benefit anywhere from ten to fifteen percent would not be surprised if he's going to need a pcsk nine inhibitors. The prior authorization has become a little bit less rigorous at this particular point especially have that relationship with a pharmacy that knows how to access the medications. He may benefit from a pcs nine inhibitor and dietary intervention along with cardiac rehab because cardiac rehab won't allow someone to touch him to measure his blood pressure to make sure he has but drawn to talk to him about his adherents interaction and visualize him while he participates in aerobic activity..

atherosclerosis
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

05:18 min | 10 months ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"They can be food additives and there's two major types sodium nitrite which is has an e number e two fifty on potassium nitrite which is e two four nine and they're typically added to cured meats to inhibit the growth of bacteria and they kind of odd color and a degree of flavoring to it as well you can have certain preform. Immense of preforms nitrites in vegetables in foods. But it's not. The present in quite small amounts so nitrite intake from the dyas can be taken primarily through as food additives particularly in process meats. And then it can also be nitrites in the body that are that are endogenously synthesized from nitrous intake would be the kind of the the the the the major source of nitrite star synthesized in the body twin. Tastic yeah and i think one references for people listening that they might want to check out. We'll probably refer to later of if we're looking at sources of dietary nitrate their reserve quite useful nitrate vegetable that was developed by Satnam litter and andrew web. I i think that was for the british heart foundation. Originally if i believe and kind of just showing different foods are source of those but quantifying them in in units of nitrate and so people can just refer back to that to kind of get. A gauge of how much of these different foods would confer various units. But we'll probably talk about that a bit later on. I think probably based on where we're starting with. I if we look at some of those potential beneficial impacts and we're looking at really here we keep our focus to impact on Hypertension or just for people who are normal pensive. What the impacts. on blood vessels and their overall risk than of things like atherosclerosis. We will leave to the side for the moment maybe exercise performance which is a a separate conversation which nitrates can be quite big in but for moment in relation to health. There does seem to be. Initially there is evidence looking at How nitrites in the body can then have potential beneficial impacts in certain circumstances..

british heart foundation atherosclerosis
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

03:36 min | 10 months ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"And so potentially it's thought whereas unprocessed fresh red meat would not and would have lower levels of preformed nitrates in it so that's often offered as an explanation for well on process meets not likely to be a risk but maybe if we accept process mijas this could explain the difference so i think they're kind of high level points that are mostly interesting. I think with this topic shire's and we'll definitely get into the topic of processed meats because we're talking about that within the processing of those in the curing of meats is where we have this nitrites added and there's certainly a lot to discuss their. I think probably from the health aspect it might be useful for us to outline will. Why are we thinking about this nitrite nitrate nitrite and pathway as a being nitric oxide. And here this may have potential effects. Weren't we're looking like blood flow advisor. Dilation and hence what's being looked in areas of like atherosclerosis. And i think kind of an interesting side note when i was looking at some of the the history of some of this research when it started being noticed that there may be conversion within the body where we're getting movement from take. No two no two minus which is nitrite and no three minus which is nitrate one of the early studies. That was done was by green at all. Nineteen ninety-one where they showed that this nitrate excretion seemed to be four times the intake that someone would have of dietary nitrates. So hence like. Where's that coming from and started this work to work that out and given about what you said about the sources of nitrate being particularly a good sources green leafy vegetables. That paper by green at all nineteen eighty-one was followed up by one of his colleagues almost unbelievably leaf at all nineteen eighty-nine which showed this nice lineage. Of one of the precursors think than conversion into no no two minus three minus. and so. we're starting to see that there's conversion between these and it can go up and down this pathway. Which will probably discuss at a later point but hence why we're trying to work out. Want his having these various impacts on health because it seems at least on the dietary nitrates. Which again were mainly getting from green leafy vegetables spinach rocket beetroot and so on seems to carl with positive health outcomes which will discuss including blood pressure. But that was just an interesting aside when looking at some of the evolution of this. yeah and coming across. There is a nice paper a review which had laid at some of the in relation to cardiovascular disease ashim ischemic heart disease in particular that you know for treatment of hypertension and Both nitrates and nitric esters were used kind of early as the nineteen thirties for for those indications so that there is there is a history of use of these compounds in a clinical context out. Of course there. There are these inverse associations epidemiologically with vegetable sources of nitrites and reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease. Nobody intervention studies using nitrate rich. Beetroot juice in particular has been a popular intervention supplement..

atherosclerosis cardiovascular disease ashim i hypertension cardiovascular disease
What Are the Warning Signs of Clogged Arteries?

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

02:33 min | 1 year ago

What Are the Warning Signs of Clogged Arteries?

"Abroad are good to see you. My friend how you doing today. I'm doing fantastic. And i'm glad you're here because today's top question a really thought an interesting one and it comes to us from alice and alice says heart disease runs in my family and it wasn't until recently that i stopped eating fried food and a lot of fat. But i'm worried that i might miss the warning signs that i have clogged arteries. Are there any There are some You may not have them But there are some of the classic ones obviously are. The person might have chest pain Which engine And so that the heart muscles just not getting adequate oxygen and after walking if you block the person gets chest pain and then they're equivalent ones where you could get like paints because your legs aren't getting adequate blood flow. Surprisingly enough lower back pain might be in the same category but for a different reason. And that is that. If you're not getting enough of blood supply to your lower back. The discs start to degenerate and so this disease is now thought to be one of the manifestations of arterial disease amazingly enough And less person. Imagine that's quite rare. Researchers have looked at Autopsy studies of young people who are tragically killed in car wrecks or something like that and they found that there are serious artery blockages in kids as young as eighteen. And twenty. where it's because they lost an entire lumbar artery. So the bottom line years this starts early on the classic Canary in the coal mine. the big. Sign that you're gonna artery. Disease is in men in direct. The guy who's forty years old and goes to the doctor fight for viagra. He does not have a performance anxiety. What he's got narrow arteries But that of course doesn't apply to a woman so there are these warning signs. You do see them. Sometimes but for the most part you don't know you can have narrowed arteries and never know it. So that's why. Dr look at your blood pressure your cholesterol and your weight and your smoking To see if we can predict who's got atherosclerosis. Fontham line live in america. Assume you got it. It's just that comet. So that means lambaste. I'd get again. Get rid of the fried stuff as you as you doing. Get rid of the junk. And luckily artery disease can be

Alice Arterial Disease Heart Disease Atherosclerosis America Artery Disease
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on ITN Live

ITN Live

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on ITN Live

"The lower extremity and the coronary artery disease is the upper body. So let's kinda like just separate that for a second both disease. These are result of atherosclerosis. So when when folks you know you've gone to the doctor. Maybe some of your family members have had coronary artery disease and how it works. They have gotten test where they put a die into the To if there's any kind of blockage will the same thing applies to peripheral artery disease except it's in the lower legs and how that works is Your arteries from your waist down can also get clogged with plaque. In fatty fatty lipids. And what happens is when those things continue to manifest. that's when they can get completely bought. A same applies for coronary artery disease except for. It's going the flow stops towards your heart so your legs and feet need the blood flow. In order to keep you moving in thriving same as the blood flow needs to go to your heart to keep moving in thriving so the are similar in the results that they are both With Fatty fatty lipids and definitely with plaque. It's just in two different places. So you're you're essentially telling us don't be sedentary get up and move right to make sure that we don't have those types of issues Because as what the proper diet as with you know not eating the things that are bad for us maybe getting more towards up. I'm gonna say any more towards the plant based diet some folks that want to hear that but but again eating more more nutritious foods that helps the entire body and obviously the heart but just being active being mobile Those are the kinds of things that could possibly help reduce the chances of getting getting correct correct. Pd iran cad. And the reason. Why is because when you are active it allows those arteries to keep the blood flowing. The blood will continue to flow through your body so the the plaque doesn't have a chance to build up and you're right. You're right that in fact that eating healthier we all know we're our mom told us told us you gonna eat that. Sure our spouses tell us. Even you know our our siblings. Tell us you know one may be more healthier than the other and trying to tell them you know if you ate this. You know you wouldn't be like this and we're like yeah. It's all good but then we resort.

both two different places both disease atherosclerosis second
Diabetes Mellitus with Dr. Dennis Bruemmer

Cardionerds

05:21 min | 1 year ago

Diabetes Mellitus with Dr. Dennis Bruemmer

"Take hardy and hurts summit clear so excited for this installment of our cardiovascular prevention series with the deep dive into diabetes. Which i think you'll learn by the end of the episode is so important for us. Be attention to. We're joined by a phenomenal and true. Genuine in the field. Dr dennis brumer hughes. The director of the center for cardia met about health in the section of preventive cardiology and rehabilitation. At the cleveland clinic. Dr boomer earned his md and degrees from the university of hamburg in germany following residency training in internal medicine and cardiology in berlin docker boomer completed a research fellowship as the diabetes center fellow in the department at ucla. He is board certified in internal medicine and chronology hardy vascular disease and cardiac graffiti quite a unique combination. Dr boomers research is focused on mechanisms of atherosclerosis and risk factor intervention for the prevention of coronary artery disease soccer. It's such a pleasure to invite you to the show success. have you on. And as i invite you. I'm going to just reflect on your unique training path and we were just discussing before we started recording. Here that there's going to be a probably a lot of interest. In pursuing some sort of combined die batali cardiovascular education for court in the future. But would you mind just telling us how you got interested in really devoting yourself to cardio metabolic disease and diabetes in general. Absolutely am so first of all i. I'm super thrilled to be here. And i i'm so excited to be talking to the nerds here tonight so i. I think it's phenomenal. What you guys are doing and again. I very much appreciate the opportunity here so so i was. I'm kind of bridge between endocrinology in cardiology back in germany. I did my thesis. Actually in endocrinology lie protein metabolism. And that kind of got me interested in cardiology. I went to pursue cardiology training back in germany and then research fellowship at ucla. I was supposed to go back after that to germany. But i decided to stay and then obviously being a foreign Repeated training and i was always torn between the endocrine in preventive cardiology aspect than truecar ideologies. So i ultimately decided. I'm just gonna do both so. I did endocrinology fellowship and cardiologist fellowship by the university of kentucky. I had a phenomenal time. There and kind of still even now much of what we do in cardiology is really prevention. And that much of it. This endocrinology so i think these sub specialties really are complementary in or very closely together but let me say on behalf of everyone here at the clinic. How glad we are that. You decided not to go back and stayed here. Join us over here as a faculty because you've just added tremendous value to the program and you've been such an incredible resource for all of us. Thank you for being here. Yes dr burin. And i extend that thank you. Because you know you've stayed here. We are talking to the nerds. I think this is a totally fortunate. And i am really happy to benefit from your stay here now. We are very excited to dive into cardio dive tallahassee which begs the question dr boomer we are cardio nerds why should cardiologists focus on diabetes. I mean why not. Just refer are diabetic patients to endocrinologist or leave the to their primary care doctors. Yeah i think. I think that's kind of the common theme and that is the current care. We leave it to others in cardiology. Now i think that is sub optimal. I think we as cardiologists we see these patients all the time i mean when is ever a patient. In the cath. Lab that presents with an semi or stemming that doesn't have diabetes so we do see the far spectrum of this disease of cardiovascular complications that arise of having ama- diagnosis of diabetes. So i think we have to be involved in managing this. I think to a minimum. We should referred patients to primary care or make sure that the diabetes is. What managed or console endocrinology now as as we all know as physicians quite frequently. Not even that happens so and there's good evidence for that if you look at registries just about six percent of diabetic patients with cardiovascular disease actually get appropriate care for their diabetes and cardiovascular conditions as you know that vitas says associated with the two to four fold increase in risk it is a cardiovascular risk equivalent termed many many years ago seventy percent of our acute coronary syndrome patients have diabetes. So you you could argue. Yes we leave it to primary care but or the endocrinologist but keep in mind that endocrinologists currently see about five percent of the patient population with diabetes.

Diabetes Dr Dennis Brumer Hughes Center For Cardia Dr Boomer Germany Cardio Metabolic Disease Ucla University Of Hamburg Cleveland Clinic Vascular Disease Batali Hardy Atherosclerosis Coronary Artery Dr Burin Berlin Soccer University Of Kentucky Cardiovascular Complications Tallahassee
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Diet Science

Diet Science

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Diet Science

"Bananas can help prevent high blood pressure and protect against atherosclerosis, which is basically atherosclerosis is like when you have inflammation in the arteries and they constrict and oftentimes cholesterol buildup can occur because of that so that's really important a second cardiovascular benefit from bananas involves their content of something called sterols. So bananas are there's no fat food, but one type of fat they do have are small amounts of these compounds called sterols, like saitou sterile campus sterile and stigma sterile and they look structurally similar to cholesterol. So when we say sterile people might not think of cholesterol, but cholesterol is a type of sterile as well. They're they're all similar compounds month. Literally, so these plant sterols because they are structurally similar to cholesterol. They can block the absorption of dietary cholesterol. So if you if you have some cholesterol in your meal, but you also have eaten a banana along with it though sterols and the banana May block the absorption of some of that other cholesterol from your meal off then that helps keep your blood cholesterol levels in check. Wow, so that's and that's another you know, really important aspect of having plant Foods in the diet as a lot of plant Foods off kardos have sterols and them as well and that's like avocados are known to be a cholesterol-lowering food because of their sterile content and then a third type of cardiovascular benefit from banana juice is has to do with their fiber content. I probably talked about this before but bananas are really good source of something called soluble fiber which fiber dissolves in a Fluidity Waters that are you know, from foods that are coming through your digestive tract. So it forms kind of like a gel in a way. I always like to use an example of cuz people can use this visual what happens when you put chia seeds with water. They they absorb the water and they jell up they make like a almost like a gel and so that's happening in your intestine when you have soluble fiber in your diet. So bananas have a lot of soluble fiber and what that does is it attracts cholesterol to it and it also attracts even some of the carbohydrates and sugars from the meal. It tracks them into that gel and then they don't get absorbed into your bloodstream. They stay in the stool and then they are eliminated through the bowel movement rather than actually having them into the bloodstream. So that's how soluble fiber manages our blood sugar and manages our cholesterol levels. So that's you know, some bananas man. They're really good. Yep..

atherosclerosis Fluidity Waters
A Banana a Day Keeps the Heart Disease Away

Diet Science

07:03 min | 1 year ago

A Banana a Day Keeps the Heart Disease Away

"What's the topic for this week this week? We are talking about bananas bananas. Yeah, you know, we always have that old adage of an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but we can actually add a banana into that too and banana a day may keep the heart disease away. Oh heart disease. Okay. Well, I'm listening bananas have a lot of cardiovascular health benefits because of the nutrients that are in them and here again kind of like wage. Talked about on a previous podcast of potatoes being banished right as a a food that is too high in whatever bananas have often been relegated to that category as well because they're always considered to be thinking that they're high in sugar and that sugar content is, you know too much for our you know, our blood sugar levels that but actually a bananas are actually in the office low glycemic category. Hm all different stages of ripeness. So for example, a under ripe banana, which we would basically call like a green banana. It's glycemic index level is a 30 which is really low to be low glycemic. You need to be between 1 and 55. So 30 is considered a very low glycemic if you have a slightly under ripe banana, that's yellow with a little bit of green. The GI is 42. Okay, and then in a ripe banana cake Can all yellow his fifty-one so you're kind of getting close to the 55, but it's still in the low range and then an overripe yellow flecked with brown has a GI of Forty-Eight. So all varieties of banana and no matter what type stage they're all low low glycemic. Hm. So I think that that's a you know, it's a myth that's been perpetuated and of course, you know, we have different sized bananas that you can buy. There's like really big ones during those small ones. So I always try to go with the medium sized banana cuz that's what these GI numbers are from. Well I can see why the internet just kind of grabs onto that. It's got a lot of sugar boy if we only didn't have bananas we would be better people. I don't know what the deal is but they really don't like bananas the internet. Yeah, and you know, we see that in low carb diets and those types of things that bananas are off the list but so here's a nutrient quality of bananas. They're high in vitamin K. 6 about 25% of our daily value comes from a banana and they also have vitamin C fiber 11% of our daily need for fiber is from a banana. And of course, they're very rich in potassium. Oh, that's that a medium sized banana has about four hundred milligrams of potassium. So I'm not good for our emotional health isn't that potassium is good for a number of things but really good for the cardiovascular system potassium is also an electrolyte so long we need it to have fluid balance within our body kind of has an electrolyte is something that has like a little electrical charge within the body. So it it actually takes care of our own nervous system all of the nerve impulses that we have. So potassium's important for that. But in terms of cardiovascular health are actually three different ways that bananas help. So the first one off It has to do with the potassium content because potassium is a mineral for maintaining normal blood pressure and heart function. And so the inclusion of bananas can help prevent high blood pressure and protect against atherosclerosis, which is basically atherosclerosis is like when you have inflammation in the arteries and they constrict and oftentimes cholesterol buildup can occur because of that so that's really important a second cardiovascular benefit from bananas involves their content of something called sterols. So bananas are there's no fat food, but one type of fat they do have are small amounts of these compounds called sterols, like saitou sterile campus sterile and stigma sterile and they look structurally similar to cholesterol. So when we say sterile people might not think of cholesterol, but cholesterol is a type of sterile as well. They're they're all similar compounds month. Literally, so these plant sterols because they are structurally similar to cholesterol. They can block the absorption of dietary cholesterol. So if you if you have some cholesterol in your meal, but you also have eaten a banana along with it though sterols and the banana May block the absorption of some of that other cholesterol from your meal off then that helps keep your blood cholesterol levels in check. Wow, so that's and that's another you know, really important aspect of having plant Foods in the diet as a lot of plant Foods off kardos have sterols and them as well and that's like avocados are known to be a cholesterol-lowering food because of their sterile content and then a third type of cardiovascular benefit from banana juice is has to do with their fiber content. I probably talked about this before but bananas are really good source of something called soluble fiber which fiber dissolves in a Fluidity Waters that are you know, from foods that are coming through your digestive tract. So it forms kind of like a gel in a way. I always like to use an example of cuz people can use this visual what happens when you put chia seeds with water. They they absorb the water and they jell up they make like a almost like a gel and so that's happening in your intestine when you have soluble fiber in your diet. So bananas have a lot of soluble fiber and what that does is it attracts cholesterol to it and it also attracts even some of the carbohydrates and sugars from the meal. It tracks them into that gel and then they don't get absorbed into your bloodstream. They stay in the stool and then they are eliminated through the bowel movement rather than actually having them into the bloodstream. So that's how soluble fiber manages our blood sugar and manages our cholesterol levels. So that's you know, some bananas man. They're really good. Yep. Really good, they also so something really interesting with athletic performance that I found information on about the banana. So the name of a unique mix of vitamins minerals and the low glycemic carbohydrates making them a favorite fruit among athletes a study of distance cyclists found that eating the equivalent of about one half of a banana every 15 minutes of a 3-hour race was just as good as keeping energy levels steady as drinking an equivalent amount of a carbohydrate and minerals from a processed

Atherosclerosis Apple Fluidity Waters
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Cardionerds

"You heard in our first annual prevention rules, FOR CARDIO-METABOLIC DISEASES CME conference, we are starting to develop peace to take care of elevated LP literally intruding work that's going on right now at Baylor College of Medicine and these are things that it's an interesting space as we look forward to. Now before we moved from there, I must. Fellows didn't such an outstanding job moderating the sessions. It was really a remarkable job. Well, done guys. So the next thing that we have to understand is once we looked at all the potential risk factors is take a step back and understand the pathophysiology of actress grossest genesis and myocardial infarction. Itself Goes Your Talk About Clark rupture inciting event, and that's an important aspect often now, the thing is don't forget though that atherosclerosis is a lifelong event right in other words only process about the scores has been identified even before the age of. Fatty speaks have been noted by the age of thirty through international studies. We've noted that about eighty percent of men and the majority of women have some block develop into the coronary arteries. We've done some work with ultrasound of the characters using a candidate intermediate thickness prevalence of plock in predicting cardiovascular disease, and again, I can tell you the prevalent off atlas crisis is so high that presents the plug tells you that the process is going on..

Baylor College of Medicine atherosclerosis myocardial infarction Fatty Clark
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Okay okay what can vitamin D. B. C. three times but it could be taxes are taken to high levels is it goes above a hundred fifty becomes a toxic level and what how does that manifest itself no consequences of high vitamin D. is nausea that was one of the things that this person was talking about anorexia the in other words you you can't you don't want to eat weakness headaches and that was a big problem that we've seen are probably one of the first things we see is an increase in headaches excessive urination it can cause mental retardation and if you're taking it as a as a too high levels too high of levels can actually damage the brain remember it's very important for the nervous system it's important that you don't go too low but it's also important don't go to prime extreme digestive disturbances it can cause atherosclerosis it can cause dermatitis and it can cause irreversible kidney damage I have had a patient who came in for treatment and the cause of their kidney damage was from taking too high vitamin D. can also cause kidney stones it can calcified the soft tissue an interesting so you can get some really serious types of issues if you're if you're taking too much vitamin D. and you find when people these patients you're talking about that have come in was it something they were doing on their own well the one was a kidney damage was actually prescribed by a physician okay without doing blood test that was during the big vitamin D. craze mmhm so that and put everybody in vitamin D. everybody was getting put down last without a lapse in without rejection so most of the time it is people who are deciding to do it on their own who have read them and another was a little bit of knowledge can be dangerous so what are some of the symptoms of low vitamin D. well one of the things in their search we've just had a patient so recently they have this I have a vitamin.

atherosclerosis kidney damage
All about TMAO with W.H. Wilson Tang, MD

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

14:22 min | 2 years ago

All about TMAO with W.H. Wilson Tang, MD

"All right in today's episode we we are with Dr Tang from Cleveland Clinic. I am beyond honored to have after Tang on the podcast. He is absolutely brilliant and I cannot appreciate appreciate more tank taking the time busy busy schedule to talk with us about. Tma Island off the research is not so thank you Dr Tank for joining us. Oh thank you Danielle pleasure to be here. Thank you so I I would want free to just introduce yourself and tell everyone kind of about what do and what your work is a cardiologist researcher well. I'm actually a heart transplant cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic and my day job I see patients with heart failure and trying into identify potential courses and trying to delay the progression and if unfortunately they get worse I try to see where what we could do with mechanical devices or transplants and then actually take care of them after wits so obviously that's very different from my research were which is trying to prevent that from happening it is too many people heading towards the same cliff and we definitely need to find ways to prevent ben from developing heart disease and more importantly heart failure absolutely and your research is is just outstanding. We'll everything you do is incredible. The heart failure and transplant is obviously very amazing aspect because so much is changing with our different not only medical therapies irby's but now with transplant and some of the mechanical circulatory support so it's really a dynamic changing an unbelievable feel. Your research is so groundbreaking and fascinating to me so I would love if you could give everyone. There's a lot of physicians scientists and Science Lovers listened to my podcast and a lot of them are interested interest in the work you did so. I'd love if you could kind of give an overview just starting kind of about what tm Ao is an and your work and how it relates to cardiovascular disease sure so I've always been fascinated by how heart how the heart interacts with other organs and in particular the kidneys and so for a long time I've been working with a different researchers to look at how the heart and the kidney interacts and my translational research has actually headed towards that direction early on where we were trying to find molecules in the blood that distinguish between those who progress develop you know kind of the events versus those who do not aw and early on I measured a lot of small molecules that we actually know to have kind of aspirations something like the adm a is symmetric saw Janine which is really an endogenous Netra. I'll say synthase inhibitor and also different small molecule metabolite so that's actually actually where I started looking at oxidative stress and nitrogen stress and how you know kind of using blood and urine we could actually detect early triggers that can can help us identify. You Know Progressive Diseases so we have this kind of. I did that potentially many unknown substances in the blood at also tell the same story and when we first started we have a mass SPEC machine that could identify different small molecule us and we have samples of patients who subsequently develop diseases that we have collected early on with a control group of those who did not develop disease so we actually try it over and over again using different incase controlled comparisons to look at a vast array of molecules small molecules usually under like a hundred Dalton and so America weight a hundred and trying to figure out you know these sma- accused whether they could distinguish patients who have events versus don't have events events and as you imagine when we keep going this case control you know comparison over and over again using different cohorts of samples we ended up saving down filtering down you know less and less number molecules until we hit about eighteen of them only after like multiple secessions off ah case controlled comparisons and so that actually seeps out from thousands of molecules through eighteen but then they all kind of in molecular weight the we actually don't know what they are art we knew one or two of them but we didn't know the rest and and so it's a hard work of a few postdoctoral fellows from Dr Stan Heathens lab that started working on literally figuring out the permutation combination of these potential compounds and then of course we have to validate date them as you can imagine many many difference. Amok you have to say molecular weight so if you think about it literally doing trial and error at that point that was it's kind of a hectic work but then we we certainly find three molecules in these eighteen that seemed to be correlating into each other and we were very perplexing what they are so we actually focus assets in looking in a band and it turns out the all having a Trimbe Isao group so three mess me sell that linked to link together and one of them seem to be a by product that is conversion version by humans but it was generated by bacteria in the literature so that's how we actually you know mentally got into the whole field of Gut microbiome grown obviously never predicted that this is going to happen but we started to be able to specifically identify the NFL which was try Michel and and Tommy fell and oxide superbeets I mean and so this is actually how we act on that and so after that we have you know obviously other samples that had long term outcomes and we started to kind of off generate and the perspective cohort of patients who we know over time had you know so a number of people have diseases and we started added to you know analyze those ampoules identify independently identify the pro value of Cameo in those cohorts which which was independent of all the traditional sectors and to demonstrate that indeed it may be a causative factor we have to turn to animal role models and conveniently the most model that we had had the bacteria and got that produces a good amount of tm that with your Mayo we learn about subsequently because some mouse actually don't have those bacteria that makes him a which becomes very very convenient for us otherwise but we the most common laboratory mouse list electric miles and in fact it does generate a lafayette meal when they were Fed with choline rolling diet chain a really comes from bacteria consumption of substrates that we the food that we eat every day so anything anything with me saw groups that they could actually use as food the bacteria used as food. ended up generating this torturing us. I protocol brought a copy emmy which it goes into the blood and through the liver and deliver. I should convert it to Tamil so the foods that are most post high in choline and carnitine which are the precursors when they go through the microbiome to go from t t mail so these you find find highest in you would say things like eggs and at red meat yeah meat liver. You know things that actually have high cholesterol electro. It's kind of some people even called it the third cholesterol and it is something that that the other thing that we as cardiologists tell patients to avoid for good balanced diet half high choline content now just be aware that choline is important some people. I feel quite strongly that in early development we do need cold into a precursor for Coleen which obviously is important for neural zero development so that's why it's actually Africa as a supplement for pregnant women and actually consumption guidelines guidelines for that and some older patients also use Coleen for that purpose thinking that they may actually help with reducing cognitive decline fine except that obviously the data there is not very strong but I think it is important to recognize this is where we found out later and improbably interesting to your audience that another compound that is common in foot- groups is commenting which is a meet and red meat in particular and that certainly has a different type of enzymes in different types of bacteria that convert the connotation into and subsequently lead to production of TM L. so I think that's where we have the the a unique opportunity to truly understand what the environment in this case that dietary intake and different food groups particularly meet and how that impact the body's response and also the metabolites produce when eating red meat. I not eating red yeah. That's fascinating and so when did you start to make the connection between TMA. Oh and Athar Genesis Platelet let aggregation atherosclerosis things like this yeah. This is actually quite early. Once we actually got the animal models going recognized at the mouth that we use indeed indeed when eating Choline fossils you're calling in particular lead to production of Cameo. Obviously we were able oh to start using the mouse model to look at after genesis so what we do is we were able to feed the mouse with without the choline content in detail and then this is the type of mouse flex most at more prone to development of Roma. This is so call eight now mice and so studies have actually shown that with like accelerated girls and and interestingly when we were well we were able to demonstrate firstly the bacteria is involved in this by giving both anybody and see whether the the cameo levels go down which they do but also for germ free mice when they don't have any gut flora where we did them choline lean diet they don't generate male or female but then when the mouse was exposed to kind of you know the the wild meaning they start doc accumulating gut bacteria `timeo production increases and the presence of this elevation leads to more through through ask the Roma and they order and when we give short-term anybody with a triple regimen something that you know stays in the bow for the four the mice we actually found that is attenuated. All these really have a direct cost-effective this now we could demonstrate you know almost like the cost postulate that we learn in in infectious disease microbiology that the presence of the bacteria is essentially making the metabolite and obviously tm AOL is also present some food particularly fish and seafood the task you I I was this is like the number one question to ask. You is in a preformed. TM In fish does this raise your humans ends and if so is a rise from that form of TMA. Oh bad for us it actually it does in fact if you actually have you you know just otherwise healthy individuals eat a wide variety of food which people have done experiments on that the the main food component that leads doue transient rise and fall and cameo is dish and particularly but not off fish half the email. You think Judy Logically Cameo. Oh is made by the muscles of the fish particularly deep sea fish because changes the melting of the the freezing point of the muscles. I was actually the muscles antifreeze so it provides a protection for the deep sea fish so that's why doesn't look like the fish in the freezer it actually make make make sufficient up freeze and so so impact people have done a lot of work in marine green biology on on this and in fact the enzymes made in fishes muscles that actually convert TMA os well alm aw generate and also eliminate because when fish you know moves from Coda to warmer waters. Actually some of this also changed so we actually actually know that not auditions created equal to not only from cameo levels but also their fish oil levels so you actually measured him. Ill level in say you know lake fish will Shallow Water Trish they actually timmy levels are quite low in back some of them. Are you know non you know very very low. Concentrations whereas deep sea fish like called and like you know a fish that we actually tuna in you know or

Cleveland Clinic Dr Tang Coleen Tma Island Dr Tank Danielle Irby Researcher Carnitine Janine Gut Microbiome NFL Mayo Trimbe Isao BEN Dr Stan Heathens Africa Dalton AOL Postdoctoral
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"But what I would insert there is we're now coming into the limit hypothesis as it's known, which is the higher concentration of LDL in your vascular system leads to a higher rate of heart disease because of what we call atherosclerosis the plaque and the arteries, right, Dave, let me just throw a monkey wrench in there. There's also the particle size of the deal that comes into play as that. That's the real thing. No, no, those particle sizes. We out the out. Yeah. Large fluffy, and you have versus. All right. Yeah. And what and what I would say is. Well, this is passed around in low carb community a lot which is you find if you on a low carb diet, you tend to find that your LDL particles are big and fluffy in the terminology that the uses its pattern a versus pattern be which is you ever preponderance of your LDL particles, looking small dents and the sm- in the small dense pattern be is got a much higher association with cardiovascular disease, and when I'm going to say to you as an engineer is I think that it's being looked at backwards. I think that your your lipids are a reflection of your state of your metabolic state and potentially your disease state much more than they are the drivers. In other words, why is it that when you change your diet? Get these patterns would change they change because clearly they do have a metabolic connection. That's that's why I Mabel to move my LDL up and down you've seen, of course, the inversion pattern. I've showed how I can move my cholesterol down bay based on how much meeting that exploited people. Well, and this is this is a graph. We may need to share. If you're putting this up in the show. You could on Twitter them. Yeah. It's on Twitter in its in presentations, and so forth. I'm I'm able to move my cholesterol down substantially the first public presentation my data, which was in October twenty sixteen I had built an experiment around that conference. So that on the Friday before I had taken a blood draw and then on the following Sunday. I then went ahead and did a presentation where I said bet my reputation all my did everything on the testimony. Take tomorrow, my elbow cholesterol, be substantially less and everybody watched that throughout the conference. I was just showing down on fatty meats cheeses and heavy whipping cream shakes, everything, right and sure enough. My LDL vad lab verified had dropped a seventy three milligrams per deciliter, my elbow particle count. The audio P had dropped by one thousand one hundred fifteen points and. The reason I knew that this would happen is because getting back to these veal belts. There's another kind of boat called a Kyla Micron. That's also a lipoprotein in that gets formed in your gut which gets packaged with triglycerides from food. You just ate. So if I eat a whole lot of fatty foods, I'm packaging up a lot of that into Kyla microns that has a whole interplay with the current system where like the insulin gets a little bit higher and so forth. And then what happens is there's a limit of VO boats that are shipped out and some large scale, it makes sense. I'm saying to my body. Hey, we've got an abundance of fatty energy coming don't spent some ships don't need to send out as many that are from storage. And therefore if there's less field yells deliver storage yet from from liver. Search if there's less field heels, they'll be therefore less successive LDL's. Therefore, my LLC will drop way. Now, we have a dangling question. So the audience sitting there going. Wait a minute. Dave started this whole diatribe by mentioning that. Right. When you go in the ketogenic, diet, your LDL skyrocket..

Twitter Dave Kyla Micron engineer
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

Nutrition Rounds Podcast

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on Nutrition Rounds Podcast

"There's about sixty four times more antioxidants in plant based foods than animal based foods and berries have about ninety times more antioxidants do fish and interestingly in marine model mouse model which isn't exactly a Kita genyk die, but this is in the low carb category when they fed these mice either a low carb diet, which I think was like ten or fifteen percent hearts versus their usual Chow, which is something like forty percent versus a more western style. The group that had the most authors grosses of those three or those eating a more atherogenic become a low carb diet, those mice eating a low, carb diet, competitor standards Cal or a western style diet had more ather slurs, but they're pressures will say it was the same. So it wasn't traditional risk factors. It was actually looked at more non traditional risk factors and the mice eating a low, carb diet one had more atherosclerosis thing, you are and less healthy endothelial progenitor cells. And we know more of them can be good, and they had more anonymous notified fatty acids, which can promote inflammation. So that's another reason why I will think that, you know, an Arab as Keita genyk diet is not your friend because sometimes the Cato people say, well, you know, pressures the same this same doesn't that look good for time. There's many reasons beyond the tradit-. Risk factors at suggest dishing harm or the heat agenda. I like, look I have no interest one. I know book the selling product to sell you patients to get any evidence to me suggests at a genyk diet is absolutely not going to do. That's my pain. So why do people eat Akita genyk dye? Well, there's a couple reasons that can be affected for weight loss. And there's speculation that it could be good for diabetes now in regard to weight loss in is indeed good for short term weights. Because when you don't eat it any carves? You don't need.

atherosclerosis Cal Chow Keita Cato fifteen percent forty percent
Fighting Aging

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 3 years ago

Fighting Aging

"You probably remember that centuries ago explored search for the fountain of youth, but never found it do. Modern sizes sten- any better chance of doing something about aging. Yes, they do on aging is complicated and involves multiple processes, but biomedical researchers are starting to understand some of them one is called cellular senescence Nissen's. What's that? When our bodies cells become damaged by the wear and tear of being alive or by stresses. They shut down the state of shutdown is cellular senescence. The senescence response can prevent damaged cells from becoming cancerous and multiplying out of control. But senescence cells can still cause trouble. They produce compounds that damage surrounding tissue the body's immune system destroys senescence cells, but it becomes less effective as we age senescence cells accumulate and do harm what kind of harm. Researchers have. Linked elevated numbers of senescence cells to osteoperosis frailty atherosclerosis arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. I wonder if they're away of taking over the immune system and killing off senescence sales with this prevent those diseases and extend the lifespan, researchers have found substances called Senna lyrics that may do exactly that biomedical. Researchers studied there affects in mice because mice are physiologically similar humans. They succeeded in using similar substances to extend mouse, lifespans by as much as twenty five percent, that's extending human lifespan from eighty to one hundred years in two thousand eighteen scientists identified ascetic called Fisons, which is found in many kinds of fruits, especially apples, and strawberries, it has excellent prospects for use in humans moment of science comes from Indiana University. I'm Don glass, I NIA Cassandra.

Fisons Alzheimer's Disease Indiana University Twenty Five Percent One Hundred Years
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"We'll talk more about the the farm tours and some of the high points that a little known uses for Nonni both externally and internally as we talk about Hawaiian herbal medicine. Herbal medicine for a healthier new year. State filings my guest, and we will be back with more information for your good health right after this. Let's say to now for this week's health report with dick. Geyer? Doctor burnout is becoming a huge problem. According to new research in the annual Medicaid report, it finds nearly half of all physicians field completely depleted to the point where one in seven have contemplated suicide forty four percent of the medical professionals have considered leaving the field altogether. Most are women, according to this survey and most doctors say it is the level of paperwork and data input. They've had to do sense. Medical records went digital doing less sitting and more moving is tied to living longer. According to a new study in the American journal of epidemiology, replacing thirty minutes per day of sedentary time with thirty minutes of physical activity at a light intensity was associated with us. Seventeen percent lower risk of early death. Thirty minutes of vigorous exercise is even better almost a thirty five percent lower risk of death. Six hours. That's the minimum amount of sleep per night. You need to help your heart. Stay healthy new research says the study found that chronic lack of sleep and poor sleep quality, raise the odds of fatty plaque accumulation in the arteries, a condition known as atherosclerosis that increases the odds of heart attack stroke..

Nonni American journal of epidemiolo Geyer Medicaid thirty minutes thirty five percent forty four percent Seventeen percent Thirty minutes Six hours dick
"atherosclerosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"atherosclerosis" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"This case atherosclerosis, and heart attack and stroke, and it's because one individual has a different gut microbial community, and therefore is making different levels of metabolites that are in their bloodstream, and and that impacts our disease risk, and we have evolved always colonized with bugs for the past millions of years, and they have evolved inside of us. And it's an interplay that is absolutely essential some of our vitamins vitamin k require gut microbes to actually make them. And you know, we evolved a need for vitamin k that can only come from. So they're not all bad, in fact in majority. They're necessary in good. Yeah. Amazing. So just take it up a little bit. We have about ten times many bacterial cells us as our own cells. And we about a hundred times much bacterial DNA. Twenty thousand. Jeez. There might be two to four million genes of bugs in there. And they're all making stuff, and they'll making these metabolites proteins that absorbed, and we were on a panel recently. And you're saying that, you know, so many of our blood metabolites are not even human their microbial, and they all have different effects on our biology. So the question is why if we've evolved for years with these microbes co evolution. Why is it in in the last hundred years, we see this explosion of heart disease has our gut bacteria changed and how and why that that is an excellent question. It's not totally figured out. But what is for certain is that our gut bacteria are changing as we have changed not only are environment. And terms of how we generate food and processed food in the whole science of agriculture is changed as well as the prevalence of antibiotics use which is like a nuclear bomb to the community. And every time a person takes antibiotics the whole. Munity are a big portion of it gets replaced and often it doesn't come back the same way as where it was start with. So there there are differences in what's actually interesting and exciting is that if you look not just at humans, but even at squirrels in the park in New York, central part central part, they're getting obese also my God I was in the park yesterday. And these fat fat, squirrels, I'm like cow. Well, we have an adultery level are putting things in our food chain and that works its way through the entire pyramid have food pyramid. And there was a study that was reported several years ago about the obesity of squirrels in central park, and at least the association with gut microbes shift in but obesity has been known to be linked to alterations in micro community as well, we're going to get into the whole link between your gut bacteria obesity. We know you focused on which is fascinating. And. And it's like how does your gut flora play a role and even animal studies, they found they could swap out gut bacteria from a fat mouse too thin mouse, and the thin mouse gets fat on the same out or even less calories. Right. So the whole idea that all your weight is depend on calories in calories out. It's kind of an old idea. Basically is what you're saying. Well, the reason I it still requires calories in calories out, but the differences is what we now realise or think about is. You don't absorb all of the calories in the food that you eat in different people may actually have a slightly different efficiency of where their engine runs. And so it turns out that one person may absorb extra two percent of the calories from their food compared to the other because the different constellation gut. Microbes they have may make it more efficient for them to extract energy from the same amount of food than the other individual. And well, it may only be a dozen two dozen fifty calories a day when you add that up over time. It really adds up. If you say three thousand or so calories is one pound two three percent difference in energy extraction makes a huge difference time. So you're saying basically is that we've done a lot of things to mess up our gut. We've eaten foods at are processed were not eating as much plant foods where having less fiber were taking any botox or born by C sections. We're taking other drugs and mess up got like acid blockers, and any plan Matori's all these things are driving this ecosystem to be out of balance, and that seems to be leading to morbidity more disease more chronic illness across.

atherosclerosis Matori New York two three percent fifty calories hundred years two percent one pound
Study: Increasing Omega-3 intake decreases risk of heart disease

Travelers 411

00:48 sec | 4 years ago

Study: Increasing Omega-3 intake decreases risk of heart disease

"Dale looking at data on twenty two thousand people followed for many years increasing your official and take or your omega three fatty acid intake was preventing fatal heart disease and heart attacks higher levels officials in the blood a twenty five percent lower risk of having a heart attack oh no i'm sorry a forty nine percent lower risk of fatal coronary heart disease a sixty two percent lower risk of a fatal heart attack i i mean this is real so here's a meta analysis of a whole bunch of studies it's an journal atherosclerosis more than one hundred journals and the american heart association that's levin randomized.

Dale American Heart Association Official Heart Disease Levin Twenty Five Percent Forty Nine Percent Sixty Two Percent