24 Burst results for "Associate Vice President"

Democrats demand investigation over firing of powerful New York federal prosecutor

America's First News

02:06 min | 11 months ago

Democrats demand investigation over firing of powerful New York federal prosecutor

"The chair of the house Judiciary Committee at representative Jerrold Nadler confirming he's planning on issuing a subpoena to Attorney General bill bar that to compel testimony about the firing of U. S. attorney Geoffrey Berman over the weekend Berman was investigating trump associates Senate minority a Democrat Chuck Schumer as the senator from New York I will not return a blue slip on Mr Clayton's nomination but regardless Jay Clayton should withdraw his name from consideration and refused to be an accomplice to this game there appears to be no legitimate motive to fire Mr Berman which leaves the obvious question for president trump and Attorney Attorney General General trying trying to to remove remove them them for for a a corrupt corrupt motive motive was was it it because because Mr Mr Berman Berman of of the the Southern Southern District District of of New New York York or or pursuing pursuing criminal criminal investigations investigations into into president president trump trump and and his his associates associates president president certainly certainly has has a a pattern pattern of of firing firing government government watchdogs watchdogs were were investigating investigating his his misconduct misconduct or or that that of of his his associates associates we we need need an an immediate immediate top to bottom investigation into what transpired with applied to dismiss Mr Berman every time the president breaks a window the Senate Republican majority dutifully sweeps up the glass every Blue Moon or sell Republican senator will issue a mild rebuke of the president's behavior behavior Dennis Dennis wrongly wrongly worded worded letter letter but but the the response response is is never never commensurate commensurate with with the the offense offense and and as as a a result result president president trump trump knows knows there's there's no no lines lines he he can't can't cross cross Berman Berman was was never never formally formally nominated nominated to to the the post post despite despite having having been been personally personally interviewed interviewed for for the the job job by by the the president president instead instead he he was was installed installed by by a a federal federal court you heard as Schumer mentioned Clayton residents of replacement pick now in response to president trump saying he wasn't involved with the firing of Berman White House press secretary Kaylee McEntee is said that the president was only involved in a sign off capacity and that Attorney General bill Barr requested the termination bar claiming that the president requested that the termination

Dennis Dennis Press Secretary Berman White House Blue Moon Chuck Schumer Senate U. S. Attorney Representative Bill Barr Kaylee Mcentee House Judiciary Committee President Trump Trump Trump New York York Southern Southern District Dis Mr Mr Berman Berman General General Jay Clayton Senator
Giuliani associate: 'President Trump knew exactly what was going on' in Ukraine

AM Tampa Bay

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Giuliani associate: 'President Trump knew exactly what was going on' in Ukraine

"Man president trump says he doesn't know Rudy Giuliani's associate Lev partner as a Soviet born businessman who says trump knew everything he was doing in Ukraine new video released shows trump and partners talking but trump denies it had any connection to

President Trump Rudy Giuliani Partner LEV Ukraine
Giuliani associate: 'President Trump knew exactly what was going on' in Ukraine

AM Tampa Bay

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Giuliani associate: 'President Trump knew exactly what was going on' in Ukraine

"Room president trump says he doesn't know Rudy Giuliani's associate Lev partner as a Soviet born businessman who says trump knew everything he was doing in Ukraine new video released shows trump and partners talking but trump denies it had any connection to

Donald Trump Rudy Giuliani Partner President Trump LEV Ukraine
Giuliani associate: "President Trump knew exactly what was going on"

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Giuliani associate: "President Trump knew exactly what was going on"

"Summer an associate of president trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani claims trump was fully aware of his efforts to pressure Ukraine's president to investigate Joe Biden and his son live partners made his comments in an exclusive interview with MSNBC's Rachel Maddow last night president trump exactly

Donald Trump Rudy Giuliani Ukraine President Trump Joe Biden Msnbc Rachel Maddow
Giuliani associate: "President Trump knew exactly what was going on"

WBZ Midday News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Giuliani associate: "President Trump knew exactly what was going on"

"Also in the impeachment probe last night indicted associate of president trump's personal attorney went on national television making dramatic claims not just about Mr trump also how much he knew about activities in Ukraine live partis the Soviet born associate of the president's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani says despite president trump's denials he was fully aware of his activities in Ukraine to dig up dirt on Joe Biden president trump know exactly what was going on he was aware of all my movements I wouldn't do anything without the consent of the really truly I mean or the president interviewed on MSNBC part is asked about president trump claiming he didn't know him or his Ukrainian associate eager Freeman I was with with

Donald Trump Attorney Ukraine President Trump Rudy Giuliani Freeman Mr Trump Joe Biden Msnbc
Giuliani associate: 'President Trump knew exactly what was going on' in Ukraine

WBZ Morning News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Giuliani associate: 'President Trump knew exactly what was going on' in Ukraine

"A close associate of president trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani says he delivered an ultimatum in may to the incoming president of Ukraine that no senior U. S. officials would attend his inauguration and all American aid to the war torn country would be withheld if an investigation into Joe Biden was not announced Lev Parnassus made several potentially explosive claims on CNN last night adding that president trump knew exactly what was going on he also says Attorney General William Barr knew about his efforts in Ukraine as well a justice department spokeswoman quick to call the claims

Donald Trump Rudy Giuliani President Trump Ukraine Joe Biden Lev Parnassus CNN Attorney General William Barr U. S.
Giuliani associate: 'President Trump knew exactly what was going on' in Ukraine

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Giuliani associate: 'President Trump knew exactly what was going on' in Ukraine

"Bruce an associate of president trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani claims that the president was fully aware of his apparent connection to efforts to pressure Ukraine's president to investigate Joe Biden and his son president trump know exactly what was going on she was aware of all my movements he I wouldn't do anything without the consent of the Rudy Giuliani or the president this week house Democrats released records that detail Lev partners's role as an intermediary between Giuliani and Ukrainian officials no word on whether he would be called as a witness in the upcoming

Bruce Donald Trump Rudy Giuliani President Trump Ukraine Joe Biden Lev Partners Attorney
"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Associate vice president of prison programs for new lease on life USA right before the break we were talking about the adoption piece of the process that the new lease on life offers so the dogs go through this eleven week program they live in the prison alongside the individual they're getting this amazing Kerr the person's getting this amazing education and the day comes when you have a canine good I heard you say canine good citizen test is that like their graduation day how does that work they cannot go services that is a different entity someone from the AKC comes in and test the dog she if the dog is behave I'm not to be considered appropriate in the community and that makes track yes yes okay and so they if they pass their tests then they and I assume everyone pass their tests are you had anybody who hasn't passed we have had a hundred percent K. non citizens three one billion mobile and that's because of the hard work of these people who are imprisoned working day in and day out and the hard work of you and your team making sure that they have the resources to make these stocks successful so they passed her canine good citizen test they are graduating from the program and then it you got to find I'm all right how do you like that well yes so during the eleven week that the dogs are in your dreams we're actually like trying to prepare them for the transition to a home so they don't crate trained begin everything during that process people will apply on our website to adopt one of these dogs join a lot and we are adoption staff director of adoption of one of our volunteers we'll take the dog out of prison and do occasional visits way the people at the tension with doctors yes just seeing how that relationship and that bond works we go to the house we meet in neutral area and you know once the director of adoption or that the doctors said yeah great about this match they approved the adoption and after graduation when both that participants and the dogs are graduating that doctors are there to to get the dog they get it directly from the trainer who work with them and get to learn a lot about what day learning does the level and I thought that's amazing and you know I'm a I'm a big fan of the transparent you know person to person conversation especially when were assisting at one of our canine companions from going from one environment to another and I think something like this really aligns with the belief that I have about home to home pet adoption you know you're the prison system is a home for these people and it's a home for these dogs so for them to be able to interact directly with the person who's going to be caring for their probably their best friend for the last twelve weeks or eleven weeks you know that helps them and it helps the people who are adopting because they get to learn everything about this dog from the person who knows him or her back straight absolutely is a very joyful and emotional moment because you're right this was this person companion for the last eleven weeks in a place where it's not normal to have emotions or joy this dog brought that so there's an incredible bonding and you know because of that before the graduation we do have a grief counselor that comes in and does the artist for graduation I know I feel like my heart's breaking over this idea of spending very intensive eleven weeks it's not just like you know you see the dog once a week I mean it's your your BFF's by your side for level weeks and then to have to say goodbye I'm sure it's it's extremely bitter sweet for these individuals yeah and and you know Michelle agreed countered that the meeting job to prepare them for that one of the things that you know they would love to adopt a dog but one of the things that we talk about in basic animal here it is yeah the financial responsibility comes with the dog we will what an individual to come out and try to re integrate back into the community and have another financial responsibility should have to look after well what we do is encourage them because now they have the skills to train shelter dogs in a one day on your feet and they you know they're working in your stable going rescue and save another life yeah yeah I think that's such a great message and it's actually a great segue because one of the other questions I had for you is how do you think programs like new lease on life could really affect recidivism rates what kind of impact is this going to have in our community but also as a country I mean by providing these programs people are coming out of prison with a whole different set of skills that they never had before what is this really mean in terms of an impact well Adam was there be work in so many different way and in this case it just that person in charge with that compassion that in that that lives within the but also teach them you know what integrity is all about because I'm not trying to stay in prison twenty four hours a day I have to walk out that prison indeed that dog in this person's hand and you know they have to do the right thing even when nobody is watching so yeah it does those things out and it prepares these people for society my motto is that you know success is the competition the preparation phase not the execution so when you prepare these people and you give them opportunities what newly shall live does that we set up every individual that screen Randy an appropriate with an internship and we partner with local shelters and you know places that are not animal show to provide them a sixty day internship regarded the strangers fifteen hours a week and they do whatever they need down to do at the work site new Nissan I paid dash type in twelve fifty an hour for sixty days plus we provide the transportation a lot of the internship has turned into a full time employment but not just jobs careers you have people who started as kennel attendance and today they're animal control officers you know they're not looking back and thinking about going back to prison if you don't need to yeah I mean they're looking for just like you did I mean you you really were a pioneer in the work that you've done and I can only imagine that the people that you're working along side today and the prisoners that you see on a daily basis are looking to you for guidance because you've really set the example rob it's amazing let's talk about Donna okay so Donna is a dog she has gone through the new lease on life program she's currently available for adoption through new lease on life but also listed on get your pet dot com and certainly the links for both new lease on life website and get your pet dot com and Donna's profile in particular will be made available on this episode's he age but right tell me about Donna and what type of home would be the ideal home for her Diana died every rescue from actually she had a harm me trust surgery done ability and she went to the program she is an incredibly soft dog if you're not like a very active person and just kind of like to just you know just sit around watching TV coddle and died the dog for you you know very mild energy an amazing on the lovable and loves to cuddle I was looking at her picture I mean she looks like you you know you see some dogs and you want to touch them there's there for looks it's gonna be like butter and that's what I see when I look at Donna she's this very light brown tan with a beautiful white now silly pit bull type dogs it looks like she's just one of those dog that wants to snuggle up on the couch with you and and you know Netflix in jail so if you're listening and you're interested in adopting probably the most well trained a dog that you could ever get your hands on it sounds like Donna would be a perfect fit for your family and according to our adoption profile she's he's very affectionate she loves to be with people she loves to ride the car she loves to be petted she's good with dogs cats children men women everyone so I really think that and hopefully someone out there is listening and wants to get Donna a permanent home so I think that's about all the time we have for today I want to thank you rob for taking the time and speaking with us today you know the work that you're doing with new lease on life it's just incredible and I want everyone listening to remember that I said the.

Associate vice president USA Kerr eleven weeks eleven week twenty four hours hundred percent fifteen hours twelve weeks sixty days sixty day one day
"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

12:02 min | 1 year ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Rose that associate vice president of prison programs for new lease on life USA thanks so much for joining us rob thank you for having us and July and and as always it's always a great pleasure to speak with you see you in different conferences or different environments and how we run into each other in the field yeah I know it's always a pleasure as get excited to see it because you know we were really there's a time where you and I were really in the trenches together we're really working side by side in the you know the Philadelphia animals animal welfare space that that animal care and control team the Philadelphia at the time I think was Paka at the Pennsylvania SPCA I mean we've been there in the thick of it we know what's going on behind the scenes yeah what an experience that was it worth a lot it loads in an IRA hide then but I have to say that it was a wonderful experience to work alongside you and and learn from you and you know and they've all those lies that we did when we was on yeah absolutely and you know what is things and I think this is a perfect way to kick off our conversation as I knew you then but I don't know much about you before you you came to the Philly shelter system so can you tell us a little bit about your history and how you got involved with new lease on life what was the progression there well I always had a passion for and from the time that I was six I would you know buying stray animals in the street and take a man you know my parents were fine kitten in my closet in dogs random dogs just locked in my basement that I would find out on the street and obviously they would tell me out well it wasn't able to keep on so I would be home on that was the compassion that I had that I was born with but at the early age of nine my life you know took a turn of events I went that when actually went right and I succumb to addiction and criminal thinking so for a long time I was the person they've been in the diction well I never knew in is about you I mean working with you for as long as we did I did not know that how is that affected you you know as you I mean obviously you you got on your feet and you have followed your passion for animals and even to this day we're gonna talk about with new the work you do with new leash but I mean this is just that's just incredible so how do you think that is shaped what you did when you sort of landed on your feet and how you ended up where you are today well you know because how society stigmatizes people I was told at sixteen then I would be a career criminal and eighteen when I was sentenced to state prison to serve twelve year I was told that I would never be rehabilitated and I believe that those labels that were placed on me was who I was and for a long time I continue to try to live up to those labels and in two thousand I had an opportunity while is an and state correctional institution and greater for to participate and volunteer any prison dog program that trains service dogs and a with the rescue dog of black lab mix that was on the brink of being euthanized in that organization rescue date and they brought it to me and threw it ashtray dog off on my path to recovery wow what a story you know one of the questions I had on my list to ask you today is why the mission of new lease on life so we're into you but it's crystal clear now especially having you member the name of that organization that introduced you to the first dog that really I mean that changed your life sure yeah the the name of the organization but cannot partners for life they truly changed my life in a way because while dad organization specifically focused on jazz training the dog and not working with the people and providing opportunities for the people what they recognize what the skills that I had trained dog you know most of my ears we're still trying their first dog while I was already training my second dog and you know taking it way beyond just the basics dog they're always training we're already learned some skills turn on a light taking up things off the floor and the treatment games so you know they recognize that and they did something that was you know not the norm for that organization and they find out that I was getting ready to see the parole board and they offer me an opportunity and a job that's incredible and said this is sort of the the precursor of how you ended up in the animal shelter space in Philadelphia yeah yeah and you know one of the things that my mentor and I I mean I owe everything to her she Darlene thought of then I remember her telling me one time you know if you if you ever want to get in to rescue you should first work in an animal control shelter and I know I'll be done like what would she knew about it that was it just kind of stuck in my head you know yeah I I'm curious what do you think she meant by that well I had the opportunity to learn firsthand because unfortunately I didn't stay we cannot punish for life because it was it was just a long distance from Philadelphia and I have been away from my family for twelve years and the traveler was you know just overwhelming so and it took a lot of time away from me trying to reunify with my family so I had an opportunity to work at the city of Philadelphia animal control shelter at the time was Pat guy and and I took the opportunity because it was closer to home start at the kennel attendant and I truly know that you know the difference and what she meant by that until you are in that shelter and you experience the challenges of working in the open admissions shelter and having to make those tough decisions for whatever reasons it is maybe the conditions of the animals and or or strange you know you really truly can appreciate rescue and the animals through the rescue where you had the opportunity to say you know we can't take that away yeah I think this is such a great point and and for people who are listening you might not know the difference of open admission or limited mission slash rescue type organizations let me break it down for you so open admission shelters are organizations that are funded very limited funding from their city or county to take in animals unwanted animals from the public stray animals and even victims of cruelty and neglect and and they have no option to turn people away they're not allowed to because of receiving funding there not allowed to say sorry we don't have any space today we can't help you they have to take the pets limited missions is the exact opposite so a rescue can sort of cherry pick or select pets that they feel very strongly that their adaptability criteria and say we can take this Pat we know we can find him or her home but they're not in a position where they have to take the Pat as as opposed to the open admission shelters and and I think what your mentor was talking about is it is really eye opening when you're in that environment and we know there's a lot of judgment about this right a lot of people say oh open admission shelters high kill shelters are terrible the euthanize pets because there's no space but the reality is that when you are out of space and they're still pets coming through the door there's not many other options unless you have people lining up to take them out the other door and that's not always the case because there's only so many adoptive homes it's obviously why my work at get your pet dot com is so near and dear to me it's keeping pets at a shelter soap so I get what your mentor was saying and and I can see for you how eye opening this experience must have been coming from the environment you were and I mean just being honest there so many parallels between living in prison for human and living in a kennel for dog would you agree at the first time I interviewed at animal control and when I was taking that tore at the shelter you know answers to walk me into the receiving room yeah there is in the process of checking the docking and I thought I feel like I've been here before but I can possibly have been there the place was built and set up while out with the cars rated on the twelve years so there was no way that I've ever been here but you know as they were attacking the animal going to medical and and then Russian it off over to a section of the shelter I thought well this seems so familiar to me and it was the process that I went through when I was you know being transferred into our greater for went to the receiving room I was given a number and went to medical medically cleared then I was put in one part of the prison and jail dealt with the value waited and my level dropped and then I went to another section should the parallels are incredibly are similar you know but then you have those parallels the text between the animal and the person and some of these dogs they end up in the shelter because either they didn't have the training that they needed as poppy and maybe they chew things up in the hospital yeah there is because they don't know any better right and they ended up in shelters and so many people that we work with behind a wall they lack the guidance because maybe their father wasn't home either because maybe he wasn't present are maybe he's just not around absent father and who these people turn to for guidance well the streets and they make these poor choices and end up before judge with a presence but we don't believe that a prison sentence should be the end of someone's story you know dash chapter in your life yeah I couldn't agree more rob I mean I'm sitting here nodding my head and hearing the just the passion in your voice and how sincere you are about this but you are an expert in this field I mean there's nobody else that has lived and breathed it and has a story like you and I'm so happy that new lease on life has you on their team let's shift gears a little and talk about what the process is for new lease on life how does it work the head of the dogs get paired to the inmates what type of dogs do you look for where they come from tell us about the process so once we have the participants is dying to the program we work with on the first week individual just just without it just learning the introduction to the program what to expect when they were she'd get dog and Dan in that time frame our dog trainer and director of dog training in adoption to mark who is incredible and she's just like means everything to me because she checked a lot off my plate so that's a good thing right show she based on what she's learning about the individuals when she goes off to act early search for dog with her team of volunteers she's looking for specific dog that would match the person out and also how bad she feels this person will be able to handle high stress or lows dress what energy so she's doing it that way what's the criteria for the docks I mean do they obviously I heard you say she's she's looking for the the right dog for the right person which makes perfect sense but is there restrictions on size or breed or gender or anything for the dogs that are coming into the prison so we basically Aubrey rescued all re rest you will we will take whatever you know is most needed but we target mostly the dogs that either were adopted in return because of lack of training or nuisance behaviors are we look at the.

associate vice president Rose USA twelve years twelve year
"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We have to integrate them into our clinical operating models and we have to figure out what that R._O._I.. Is and what that time famous and I think if we do those things will make this work sustainable and scalable. I'm we'll be able to influence more people so that's that's the message that I would leave folks with and in terms of getting a hold of me you can get a hold of me and my humanity email address. It's A. R. E. N. D. A. NUMBER ONE AT HUMANA DOT com. I'm also on Lincoln so feel free to <hes> you know shoot me an email an idea to connect and it was like minded folks a great great invitation for everybody listening. If you feel like you could contribute to the work being done here raise your hand reach out and you'll find his email address and a link to his Lincoln profile in the show notes so they won one other thing. I forgot to mention that if anyone is interested in learning more about our bogle population health work we do have a website. It's Humana DOT COM Ford Flash bold gold and on that it has had some of our research it has the work that we're doing in communities examples of interventions and it has our most recent progress reports every year we release publicly a progress report to show kind of where we we are in our in our journey towards proving help a twenty percent. We just released our most recent progress report about two weeks ago that went on that site. You can download it and have a look at it lots of really good information in there racal out glad you mentioned that Andrew that's humanity dot com slash bold goal and will leave that link there in the show notes as well a true privilege and pleasure to have <hes> had you here on on the on the show today Andrew so really want to give you a big. Thanks on behalf of all of us appreciate having me on this. This is a great podcast appreciate the opportunity..

Lincoln HUMANA DOT Andrew racal A. R. E. N. D. twenty percent two weeks
"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"My kids are nerds like I am and so they're not they're not fantastic. Ask Sports but we love being outside and so what we do together we'd like to hike you know we just like to be outside State Parks National Parks splashing and creeks to staying active and I think just being outside in that heart rate up and spending time together is really. It keeps US healthy. That's awesome under yeah. We love that to my son's two and <hes> we love to go to the forest preserve in his favorite thing to do is hike and throw sticks into the river yeah yeah it's pretty common. That's and my kids like the same thing it's throwing rocks and sticks in the Greek Yeah Yeah it is fun and what's your number one success habit yeah. That's another great one. I mean to me. It's it's about work life balance. It's understanding what's important that it's it's really easy to get caught up with the idea of career progression of you know answering the five hundred emails you get everyday of traveling for work and speaking engagements but you know I think you always have to go back and remember what's important and that's that's family emily and kids and so you know it's not always easy but I try to balance my travel and my speaking engagements and my work with a coachman kindergartner soccer team and I'm the Scout Leader for my third grader and I I really feel like it's important especially in those early early years to be an engaged parent and so just keeping that balance I think ultimately makes me more successful because I have a better perspective on things that's Great Andrew. I applaud you for that. It's definitely not easy to do and it's not but you know what that you're. You're you're you're clear on it and that's why you're doing it so Kudos early. So what book would you recommend the listeners yeah. It's another I you know I know I'm giving you a lots of multiple answers to two simple questions. <hes> I'll give you a personal one. I'm in one that's more related to the population how <hes> my favorite book of all time is the count of Monte Cristo Alexander Duma's. It's been my favorite author for a long time. I just love the vivid way that he writes. He describes things and and the Count of Monte Cristo Presto is a story of redemption. You know this idea of bad things happen to this person and he starts out about revenge but ultimately he doesn't take revenge because it's about redeeming himself making himself a better person I just I just love that and so so <hes> more relevant to <hes> to population health though I'd say as blue zones blooms the whole kind of mission amongst the Blue Zone solution that original book is always fascinated me. It's this idea that there are these spots. What's around the world where people live to be you know an older than one hundred and how do they do that? It's their lifestyle. It's what they eat. It's how they live their lives and to be able to <hes> understand how that happens and to take some of those best practices and apply it to myself. Personally into our organization is always kind of inspired me that is inspiring some great recommendations. They're Andrew and folks again a reminder to outcomes rocket that health in the search bar type in our N._D._A.. Is Dr Andrew Rhonda or type in Humana. You'll get links to our conversation. A full transcript the short notes to help you get informed on this podcast today so Andrew Andrew this has been a a ton of fun. I mean I really enjoyed our discussion if you can just leave the listeners with the closing thought and then the best place where they could learn more or continue the conversation with you yeah absolutely well you know I'm a broken record but I I just I believe social. Determinants of health are so important to address and so I just feel like we need to stay the course with that. I recommend everybody to focus on that within their organizations and what I would say is talking about business case talking about money in relation to you. Addressing social determinants should not be considered a dirty topic. I think in order to make addressing social determinants sustainable. We have to understand that business case the R._O._I.. On that work and we just have to bring so strengthen as clinical gaps in care we have to address them on interventions..

Andrew Andrew Monte Cristo Alexander Duma State Parks National Parks Monte Cristo Presto Dr Andrew Rhonda soccer emily Humana
"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Doctor Rhonda or type and Humana and you'll see this podcast pop up with all the details and links and also if you're wanting to contribute to this project at the end of the podcast here will leave you the best way okay to to connect with Doctor Rhonda and his team to to help with that tool so andrew. It's it's time for for the lightning rounds. I got a couple of questions for you followed by a book that you recommend the listeners ready all right. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes for me? There's a couple of components to that. I like I mentioned before I think giving equal weight and mental and physical health is really important. I think it's about disease prevention about stabilizing chronic disease. It's about using all the assets at your disposal people technology data using all those things to improve health for an individual and for populations. What is the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid you know again? I'M GONNA go back to what I'm really passionate about right now. It's social determinants of health. I think the biggest mistake we can do to ignore the social economic environmental aspects of health be focus only on these itself your during the root cause of how it is these you know originally manifested and you're ignoring things that are likely exacerbating diagnose conditions powerful. How do you stay relevant as an organization despite constant change yeah? That's a great question I mean I think you know read study research. You know I think certainly look at at peer reviewed journals but I think also so pay attention to thought leaders read up. Ed's see what's happening on Lincoln. Check your competitors see what they're publishing. See what they're doing it. You know make sure that you're staying relevant. I think all those things just a matter of paying attention of of reading up the to do it love it and what's one area of Focus that drives everything in your organization. Yeah I mentioned before its its population how I mean that's really what we're about is is about improving the health of populations the communities that we serve and I think it comes down to you know those five points of influence primary Care Pharmacy Behavioral Health Home Health and social determinants of health those five things working towards the idea of improving the health of populations doesn't get any clearer than that folks. Thanks Andrew in <hes> these next two or more on a personal note. What's your number one health habit number one health habit? You know I for us. <hes> I am married. I have three kids and we we like to stay active..

Doctor Rhonda Lincoln Andrew Ed
"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"I'm proud of the social determinant interventions that we've done. I mentioned the randomized controlled trial that we've done but you know we've done. You know other interventions to address different social determinants in the last year we we screened over five hundred thousand of our members for social determinate gaps and that's something we've never done before and I'm just incredibly proud that that our team was able to do that just through our various wellness platforms and disease management platforms screening. Half a million people and not just screening when it comes to social determinants it can't just be about screening and saying Okay Great. Thanks for that information offering them. Something you know whether the referral or an intervention or something resource is really critical so I'm incredibly credibly proud that we've we've stream and intervened with that many people I'm also proud of our analytic tools. We launched an Olympic tool. Just last month called Zoom in and it's a publicly available tool anybody can access. It's you know Humana Dot COM <hes> <hes> for its last two men and it's a heat mapping data visualization tool with over a hundred different social determinant data sets from C._D._c. from Robert Wood Johnson from census data and enables you to pinpoint a location station whether it's a practice or where a patient lives and heating up a number of different things so do they live in a food desert you know are there foodbanks around looking at prevalence of different conditions. It's a really really robust data visualization tool and the other component of it is it it has a community resource directory integrated into it and so it ends up being not just sort of diagnostic tool to understand what those gaps are but it also is an interventional tool because if someone lives in a food desert you can overlay foodbanks there and then say well. Here's is your nearest food bank so it's something that you know. Physician can use in their practice. It's something that our care managers use telephonically when they're doing disease management with patients so that's you know again i. I'm proud of so many things that we've done between research between interventions between data analytical tools that we've done it just and it's been a fantastic journey and certainly it's not over yet. We have a lot more work to do. That's awesome. Congratulations that that's zoom into sounds very useful yeah absolutely I mean as I said it's it's a new the tool so right now and has about fifty cities in the tool itself and then the next month or so. It's going to have over two hundred the we're actually actively looking right now so we're we're looking for physicians to partner with hospital systems. <hes> were certainly integrated into our internal disease management programs but use cases we will publish our findings are like the validate the tool that it doesn't fact do what we expected to do but yeah I'd say it's a really robust tool really proud of it and as I said it's publicly available you know we're not keeping it behind a firewall or putting it <music> out there for people to us because our mission is to improve the health of the communities we serve. It's not just about our members but it's been community. They live in. It's that whole theory of rather the rising tide raises all ships brilliant brilliant and folks are for those listening. We'll leaving link to the tool as well as all the other things that we've discussed today with Dr Andrew Randa from Humana here will leave all that in the show notes. It's <hes> humanity dot com slash zoom in but go to outcomes rocket that health in the search bar type it in Rendova R._N._D...

Humana Dot Dr Andrew Randa Humana Rendova R._N._D Robert Wood Johnson partner
"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Care deeply about primary care about wellness checks about prevention like GonNa work but primary care docs are also almost a liaison in between the sort of traditional healthcare system which is pharmacy and hospital e._r. in all all those things but they're also they helped connect patients to community resources when you have those social determinate need that you need a food bank. If you need a community center if you need public transportation they can be that liaison and so. I think primary cares really important. <hes> pharmacy is really important so many people now have hypertension or they have things like that they need. Medications pharmacies really important behavioral health as I've said throughout this this conversation is absolutely critical. It's something that you you know. We need to bring into the limelight. We need to understand that these behavioral conditions are far more prevalent than we might expect. When you dedicate resources we need adequate networks clinicians to address? Another one is home health home. Health is becoming really important. There's people wanting to age in place they want care brought to them as opposed to having to go out to different places and so I think home health is really important and again near and dear to my heart. The fifth point of influence is social determinants of health and I think that's something that we just haven't talked about in a long time and were finally bringing social terms of health through the forefront or really treating them like the chronicle gaps in care that they are well some great things to to think about folks and as you think through what Andrew just just discussed <hes> don't don't be afraid to hit the rewind button and replay take some notes on this. It's a good one so what's one of your proudest the experiences to date here in the last three years enter well. I mean it's actually really hard to narrow down to one. I'm single thing I mean I think honestly my my most gratifying proudest experience. Is this job that I have right now. I've been at Humana for eleven years now and I've been on this population health team for three now and I it's just been the most fun job the most challenging job I've ever had. I just loved that Humana has given me the permission space to really address population health to look upstream to address these social terms of how and I'm just really proud of what we've done. We we have developed a robust robust research and publication portfolio because I believe if we're gonNA convince clinicians to address social determinants. You know we need to get this information out. In peer reviewed journals have peers kick the tires and say yes these are the right you know insights and conclusions nhs and you know we have like I said almost fifty publications that we've done in the last three or four years.

Humana nhs Andrew eleven years three years four years
"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Even as a frontline physician and it's a privilege each to have him here on the podcast today to speak about what he believes is the way forward to twenty percent by twenty twenty and also how to improve community health so without a do wanNA open up the MIC to Andrew Welcome. Thank you so appreciate you having me. It's a true pleasure Andrea now. Tell me what is it that got you into the medical sector yeah. That's a great question. You know I've always been interested in helping people but the big question that I've had throughout my life is how do I best do that and when I started in Undergrad I majored in psychology and biology. I knew I wanted to go into the health field in some way I did some basic science research looking at the foul Mobutu a Terry adrenal stress access using rat models so kind of from starting I'm from my macro and the micro perspective and then went to medical school and wanted to you know focus in psychiatry and go down that path and it wasn't really till residency that I realized that I wanted to go even more macro and and I felt like I could do the most good by <hes> by going into population health or public health and in particular you know because I've always been interested in mental health really interested in reducing the stigma of mental illness and populations so that that got me just go back to school and get a masters in public health and then take my career from there. That's a fascinating journey. They're Andrew and talk about a timely journey for where we're at today right. The mental health is is front and center. How do we improve population health front and center so definitely forward forward thinking in in in your interest there what would you say is a hot topic that needs to be on health leaders agenda today and how are you in the folks at Humana approaching yeah well? I'll I'll give you two and then we can figure out which one we want to talk about. I but the first I went to me and actually both of these are things that I was not trained for in medical school or even in residency the first one is really advanced analytics. If using new data sources things like predictive models machine learning artificial intelligence regions leveraging those capabilities to better serve populations to help people be healthier but I think I think that's one where I feel like I was not trained to do and I when I went through my medical training the other one is really passionate mine now and that's social determinants of health. I feel like we've gone to this evolution and medicine where we dealt with acute care so if someone comes into the hospital what do we do for them there when when they're in the hospital and prevent them from coming back and then we sort of went back upstream a little bit and said okay well we need to do things like disease management where we need to help stabilize people with chronic condition things like that before they end up in the hospital and now I feel like we're at this inflection point where we're recognizing that we need to go even further upstream and in deal those social economic environmental things that are really profound influences on health and so that's that's an area again where I I was not trained to do you in medical school but it's something that is as I've gotten into the population feel recognized that that's an area that needs a a lot of attention a lot of research a lot of test and learn interventions and that's really what our organization is doing now. That's fascinating and great that you called out to key areas the advanced analytics and social determinants tons of people pouring in resources and and time to effect these these areas in anything about the chronic diseases chronic conditions and you know the thought that hey you know five percent of the people will drive a majority of the cost addressing those is key to write as as as the population health <hes> approaches that we take focus on that more what what would you say is an example Andrew of of what Humana has done today to create results by doing things differently to impact these areas..

Andrew Andrea Humana twenty twenty Mobutu twenty percent five percent
"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:35 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Associate vice president of prison programs for new leash on life, USA, thanks so much. Joining us, rob. Thank you. And always always a great pleasure to speak with you see you different Hafiz or different environments in how we run into each other in the field. I know it's always a pleasure. I always gets excited to see you, because, you know, we were really there's a time where you and I were really in the trenches together, we were really working side by side in Philadelphia animals, animal, welfare space at the animal care, and control team Philadelphia. At the time. I think it was Paca at the Pennsylvania SPCA. We've been there in the thick of it. We know what's going on behind the scenes. Yeah. What an experience that was, it was lows in, then that, that it was a wonderful experience to work alongside you and learn from you. And you know and Dave all those is that we did when we was in stretches. Yeah. Absolutely. And you know what are the things and I think this is a perfect way to kick off our conversation as I knew then but I didn't know much about you. Before you came to the Philly shelter system. So can you tell us a little bit about your history and how you got involved with new leash on life? What was the progression there? Well, always had a passion for animal from the time that I was six, and I would, you know, find stray animals in the street and take them in the, you know, my parents would find kittens in my closet in dogs, Brandon dogs just locked him up basement, that I would find on the street, and obviously, they would tell me out, but wasn't able to keep on rehome them. That was the compassionate. I had that I was born with but at the age of nine my life, you know, took a turn of events when I should have went, right? And I- succumb to addiction and criminal thinking Joe for a long time. I was a person in the diction. I never knew about you. I mean working with you for as long as we did. I did not know that. How? How is that affected you as you? I mean, obviously, you got on your feet and you have followed your passion for animals and even to this day. What we're gonna talk about with the work you do with new leash. But I mean this is just just incredible. So how do you think that is shaped what you did when you sort of landed on your feet, and how you ended up where you are today? Well, you know, because how society stigmatizes people, I was told at sixteen and I would be a career criminal and eighteen when I was sentenced to stay prison to serve twelve years. I was told that I would never be rehabilitated, and I believe that those labels they were placed on me was who I was. And for non time I continued to try to live up to those labels and in two thousand opportunity while and stay Correctional Institution at greater for soup participate in volunteer, in prison dog program that trains. Service dogs, and it would to rescue dog of black lab mix was on the brink of being euthanized and that organization rescued eight and they brought it to me and stray dog pack to recovery. Wow. What a story, you know, one of the questions I had on my list to ask you today is why the mission of new leash on life. So foreign to you. But it's crystal clear now and especially having do you remember the name of that organization that introduced you to the first dog that really changed your life show yet at the name of that organization with canine partners tonight. They truly change my life in a way because while that organization specifically focused on just training, the dogs and working with the people and providing opportunities for the people, what they recognize what the skills that I have in training, dogs, most of my here's were still training. Their first dog while I was already training, my second dog, and, you know, taking it way beyond just. The basics dog was training. We're already learned some skills turning on lights, picking up things off thrower and retrieving gains. So, you know, they recognize that and they did something that was not the north for that organization, and they find out that I was getting ready to see the parole board. And they offer me an opportunity and a job. That's incredible. So this is sort of the, the precursor of how you ended up in the animal shelter space in Philadelphia. Yes. Yes. And, you know, one of the things that my mentor, and I mean, how everything her truly appreciate her daunting, Delvin. I remember her telling me one time if you ever want to get into rescue, you should I work in an animal control shelter. What what does she mean by that? That was just kind of stuck in my head. No. Yeah. I'm curious what do you think she meant by that? I had between two nine first hand because unforthcoming stay with keanae punch for night, because it was it was distance Trump's Duffy and have been away from families, which years and traveling was overwhelming, so and check it out of time away from me. Trying to be unified with my family. So I had to work at the center of the animal control shelter at the time was Paca and took out the tunechi closer to home start to Canada Tanny, and I truly know that, you know, the difference and what she meant by that until you are in that shelter, and you experience the challenges of working an open admission shelter and having to make those tough decisions for whatever reason. Zain's. It is maybe the conditions of the animals coming in or or space. You know, you really truly can't appreciate rescuing animals to the rescue where you have the opportunity to say. We can't take that. Yeah. I think this is such a great point. And, and for people who are listening, who might not know, the difference of open and mission or limited, mission slash rescue type organizations. Let me break it down for you. So open mission shelters are organizations that are funded very limited funding from their city or county to take in animals unwanted animals, from the public stray animals, and even victims of cruelty and neglect. And, and they have no option to turn people away. They're not allowed to because of receiving this funding. They're not allowed to say sorry, we don't have any space today. We can't help you. They have to take the pets, limited missions, the exact opposite. So a rescue can sort of cherry pick or select pets that. They feel very strongly fit their adopt ability, criteria and say we can take this pet. We know we can find him or her home. But they're not in a position where they have to take the pet as opposed to the open, mission shelters. And, and I think what your mentor was talking about is really eye-opening when you're in that environment. And we know there's a lot of judgment about this. Right. A lot of people say, oh, open admission shelters, or high kill shelters terrible. They youth Nuys pets, because there's no space, but the reality is that when you are out of space, and there are still pets coming through the door. There's not many other options, unless you have people lining up to take them out the other door, and that's not always the case, because there's only so many adoptive homes. Obviously why my work at get your pet dot com, so near and dear to me, it's keeping cuts out shelter. So, so I get what you're mentor was saying. And, and I can Steve for you how I opening this experience. Must have been coming from the environment. You're in just being honest. There's so many parallels between living in prison for Hugh. Human and living in a kennel dog, would you agree, the first time I interviewed at animal control? And when I was taking the tour of shelter, you know, and to want me to receive him room. They wasn't a process of checking dogging, and I thought I been here before, but I couldn't possibly have been there that place with Bill and set up while I was incarcerated doing the twelve years. So there was no way that I've ever been there. But you know, as they were tagging animals and doing the medical, and then rushing it off over two a section of the shelter thought. Wow. This seems so familiar to me and it was the process that I went through when I was being trash bird into greater for mine to receive in room Alice, given number and went to medical medically cleared. I was put in one part of the prison still evaluated and my leg. Dropping that went to another section. So the parent of incredibly similar, you know, the dang had those parallels experience between the animal, and the person and some of these dogs, they end up in the shelter because either they didn't have the training that they need it at puppies. And maybe they chewed things up in a house, and they did things because they didn't know in bet. Right and the ended up in shelters. And some of these people that we were behind day, lack the guidance because maybe they're bother wasn't home, either because maybe he wasn't prison. Or maybe he's just not around absent father, and who these people turn to for guidance while the streets and they make these poor choices and, and up before a judge who prison sentence, but we don't believe that prison sentence should be the end of someone's. Story. You know, chapter new life. He I couldn't agree more, rob. I mean, I'm sitting here nodding my head and hearing, the just the passionate your voice in house and seer. You are about this, but you are an expert in this field. I mean, there's nobody else that has lived it and breathed it and has a story like you. And, and I'm so happy that new leash on life has you on their team. Let's shift gears a little and talk about what the process is for newly sunlight. How does it work? How did the dogs get haired to the inmates? What type of dogs, do you look for where do they come from? Tell us about the process. So once we have the participants nine shoe, the program we were with the first week, individual just just with them. Just learning the introduction to the program. What's expect when they received their dog and Dan, in that timeframe dog trainer and director dot training, Daojun tomorrow with incredible? And she's just like means everything. Me because she took off my pace. So that's a good thing, right? So she based on west, she learning about the individuals when she goes on to actively to search dogs with her team volunteers sheaf looking for specific dog that would match the personality of an auto haag-based. She feels this person will be able to handle high stress lows energy. So she's doing it that way. What's the criteria for the dogs, do they obviously, I heard you say she's, she's looking for the, the right dog for the right person, which makes perfect sense..

Philadelphia Paca USA Associate vice president Dave Delvin Pennsylvania SPCA Philly Correctional Institution Joe Zain Canada Tanny Dan Hugh Bill Steve Trump Alice Daojun director
"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

06:25 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Rosa associate vice president of prison programs for new leash on life USA rob before the break. We were talking about the adoption piece of the process that that new leash on life offers. So the dogs go through this eleven week program, they live in the prison alongside the individual. They're getting this amazing care the person's getting this amazing education. And the day comes when you have a canine, I heard, you say canine good citizen test is that like their graduation day? How does that work? This is a different entity someone from the AKC comes in and test, the dog to see if the dog is behaved a not to be considered appropriate in the community that make sense. Yes. Yes. Okay. And so they pass their test, then they an item everyone passed their tests. Or have you had anybody who hasn't passed, we have had a hundred percent k non citizens has rate unbelievable. And that's because of the hard work of these people who are imprisoned working day in and day out in the hard work of you and your team making sure that they have the resources to make these dogs successful. So they pass their canine, good citizen test. They are graduating from the program, and then you gotta find him home. Right. How do you do that? Well, yes. So during the eleven week that the dog in their Trini, we're actually trying to prepare them for the transition to a home so they can creek trained begin potty trained. Everything during that process, people would apply on our website to adopt one of these dogs during a seven week, our adoption staff, director of adoption of one of volunteer would take the dog out of prison and do occasional visits with the people. The potential adopters just to see how that relationship in that Bonn worse. We go to the house, we meet in new areas. And, you know, once the director of adoption that adopters said, great about this match, they approved the adoption and after graduation, when both the participants and a dodger graduating the doctors are there to, to get the dogs, they get it directly from the trainer who work with them and learn a lot about what will be. From that. All that's amazing. And, you know, I'm a big fan of the transparent, you know, person to person conversation, especially when we're a sustained one of our canine, companions from going from one environment to another. And I think something like this really alliance with the beliefs that I have about home-to-home pet adoption. You know, you're the prison system is a home for these people, and it's a home for these dogs. So for them to be able to interact directly with the person who's going to be caring for their probably their best friend for the last twelve weeks or eleven weeks. It helps them, and it helps the people who are adopting because they get to learn everything about this dog from the person who knows him or her best. Right. Absolutely. It's a very joyful and emotional moment. Because you're right. This was this person companion for the last eleven week in a place where it's not normal to have emotions or joy this dog brought dead. So there's an incredible bond near and because of that before. The graduation, we do have a grief Kassir that comes in, and does it work job with all the participants to prepare them for graduation. I know I feel like my heart's breaking over this idea of spending very intensive eleven weeks. It's not just like you know you see the dogwoods week. I mean it's your your thefts by your side for eleven weeks. And then to have to say goodbye. I'm sure it's, it's extremely bitter sweet for these individuals. Michelle grief concert does an amazing job to prepare them for that one of the things that they would love to adopt the dogs, but one of the things that we talk about, and basic animal care is financial responsibility comes with a dog, we will an individual to come out and try to Rian great back into the community and have another financial responsibility to have to look after the what we do is encourage them because now they have the skills to train a shelter dog is a what they on feet and they, you know, they're working and your stable going rescue as even. Yeah. Yeah. I think that's such a great message. And it's actually a great segue. Because one of the other questions I had for you is. How do you think programs like new leash on life could really affect recidivism rates? What type of impact is this going to have in our community, but also as a country, I mean by providing these programs, people are coming out of prison with whole different set of skills that they never had before what does this really mean in terms of an impact? Well animals, there be worth in so many different way in this case, it gives that person in touch with that, compassion, empathy in that, that lives within the integrity is all about because I'm not trying to stay in prison twenty four hours a day. I have to walk out that prison and the dog in this person's hand, and, you know, they have to do the right thing even when nobody's watching so at bills doors things up and prepares these people for society. My motto is that, you know, success is the competence in the preparation phase, not the execution phase to the win. Prepare these people, and you give them oportunities, what that we set up every individual that screens ready inappropriate with an internship, and we partner with local shelters, and places that are not animal -ffiliated to, to provide them, a sixty day internship, where they're going to these places fifteen hours a week. And they do whatever they need to do at these worksites newly shy pay that stipend twelve fifty an hour for sixty days. Plus, we provide the transportation of the internship had turned into full time employment, but not just jobs careers. You have people who start it as kind of attendance. And today, they're animal control officers. You know, they're not looking back and thinking about going back to prison that they don't need to. Yeah. I mean they're looking for just like you did. I mean you, you really were a pioneer in the work that you've done, and I can only imagine that the people that you're working alongside today and the prisoners that you see on a daily basis. Looking to you for guidance because you've really set, the example, rob? It's amazing. Let's talk about Donna. Okay. So Donna is a dog. She has gone through the new leash.

Donna director AKC USA associate vice president Rosa Michelle rob Rian partner eleven weeks eleven week twenty four hours hundred percent fifteen hours twelve weeks seven week sixty days sixty day
"associate vice president" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"If you need help if you know if somebody else who does the doctor is still sitting here with us. And and giving some excellent tips because as a mother, and I, you know, I'm I'm quite concerned about the mental health of young people. You know, my daughter, obviously in particular, and Dr cross now when when you just kind of sum up, you know, when somebody comes to you with help, whether it's a child a teen or an adult or a co worker, whomever. It may be it's as simple as two words. Thank you. Thank you for bringing this to me. Thank you for telling me, and like we make these problems to be so big. And this is such a critical issue. It's an epidemic in our community right now that two words can have a profound impact. Thank you. And I think that that's empowering to parents. I think that that's empowering to educate. I think that's empowering to everybody to know. It's just as simple as relating to each other on a human basis being vulnerable sharing your stories. I shared my story. Jim Sharpe shared his historic. You shared your story about depression and the battles that you've gone through. We have to share that that we're all going through this in some way, shape or form and to talk about it touches everyone in. So if it's not you personally at somebody around you, but the doctor cross now again, we have Dr cross now here with us. He is the associate vice president of health and counseling services at ASU in a clinical psychologist. I do have a concern. And we're talking about it. We're trying to destroy ties it we want to get that conversation going. Is there a risk in normalizing it is there a risk in talking about it too much? Is this the the contagion effect? I hear about the worry about talking about it too much. Tends to be a lot about our fears of the conversation, and then we project that onto the community. So like if we bring it up, then somehow we're gonna plant seeds in people's minds that weren't there before the risk of contagion is really related to how we talk about the aftermath of suicide as opposed to the topic of suicide. Okay. And that's a really important difference. When we talk about the topic of suicide what you're doing is normalizing something that people feel is extraordinarily rare. Even though it's extraordinarily common. And so what you're saying is this thing this experience these feelings of. Sadness of pain of wanting to escape that pain, which is really the essence of suicidal behavior. Are somehow. Not common and not worth talking about. Instead what we're saying is it's actually pretty normal because we're wired as humans to not want to feel pain and we're wired, and and that's really early. That's why you can even see that suicide -ality in young people because it's in us as human beings. We don't wanna feel pain. We wanna scape from pain. What some of us have available to us. It's multiple pathways to escape that pain. And sometimes when we're distressed enough, we can only think of one and that would be taking our life. And so as a result of that by talking about what we're doing is setting the stage for the conversation is this experience of feeling suicidal is common, and it is a result of feeling that you are in inescapable paint. And also to say there are other ways to help your pain in addition to that. And so that what that does is allows us to have broad conversations about help about coping about pathways while also not shaming individual. For their experience because their experiences, actually human. It is human to not want to be in what feels like inescapable pain. Even if I as the observer think there's another way to manage it. They as the person experiencing feels like there's only one way to manage it. At least for that moment. Dr earn Krosno associate vice president of health and counseling services at ASU. And I think there is an important distinctions you made in there. It strikes me that while we're we've gotten so much better at talking about maybe de stigmatizing mental illness, the concept of mental health. There's there's like another wall we need to get over when it gets suicide like we're okay going all the way to there. And then we start talking about like hold on a second. I'm okay. Talking about depression. I'm okay talking about other things. But now you get to this. And I think there's another barrier, and then we're trying to break through it. And that's why we're trying to go through it. That's why we're dedicating an hour or two right now..

pain associate vice president ASU depression Dr cross Jim Sharpe Krosno
"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Rob Rosa, associate vice president of prison programs for new leash on life USA. Rob before the break. We were talking about the adoption piece of the process that that new leash on life offers. So the dogs go through this eleven week program. They live in the prison alongside the individual. They're getting in this amazing care the person's getting this amazing education and the day comes when you have a canine. I heard you say canine good citizen test is that like their graduation day. How does that work? This is a different entity. Someone from the AKC comes in and test. The dog to see if the dog is behaved a not to be considered appropriate in the community. Yes. Yes. Okay. And so they pass their test. Then they and I assume everyone passed their tests or have you had anybody who hasn't passed? We have had a hundred percent k non citizens has rate. Unbelievable. And that's because of the hard work of these people who are imprisoned working day in and day, the hard work of you and your team making sure that they have the resources to make these dogs successful. So they pass their canine good citizen test. They are graduating from the program. And then you gotta find him home. Right. How do you do that? Well, yes. So during the eleven week that the dogs are in their training. We're actually trying to prepare them for the transition to a home. So they get in Craig trained again. During that process. People will apply on our website to adopt one of these dogs. Join eleven week are adoption staff director of adoption of one of our volunteer would take the dog out of prison and do occasional visits with people the potential adopters Justice see how that relationship in that Bonn worse, we go to the house we meet in areas. And once the director of adoption adopter says great about this match. They approved the adoption and after graduation when both participants and the dodger graduating the doctors are there to to get the dogs they directly from the trainer who work with them. A lot about. That's amazing. I'm a big fan of the transparent, you know, person to person conversation, especially when we're assisting one of our canine companions from going from one environment to another, and I think something like this really alliance with the beliefs that I have about home-to-home pet adoption. You know, you're the prison system is a home for these people, and it's a home for these dogs. So for them to be able to interact directly with the person who's going to be caring for their best friend for the last twelve weeks or eleven weeks, it helps them, and it helps the people who are adopting because they get to learn everything about this dog from the person who knows him or her best, right? Absolutely. It's a very joyful and emotional moment because you're right. This was this person companion for the last eleven weeks in a place where it's not normal to have emotions or joy this dog. Brought that so there's an incredible bond near and because of that before the graduation. We do have a grief Kassir that comes. Does the workshop? To prepare them for graduation. I know I feel like my heart's breaking over this idea of spending very intensive eleven weeks. It's not just like, you know, you see the dog once a week. I mean, it's your your BFF's by your side for eleven weeks. And then to have to say goodbye, sure, it's it's extremely bitter sweet for these individuals. Yeah. Michelle, our grief counseling does an amazing job to prepare them for that one of the things that they would love to adopt the dogs. But one of the things that we talk about and basic animal care is the financial responsibility has with Dr we were an individual to come out and tried to reintegrate back into the community and have another financial responsibility to have to look after. But what we do is encourage them. Because now they have the skills to train me shelter dog is a on your feet, and the they're working in your stable going rescue and save another life. Yeah. Yeah. I think that's such a great message. And it's actually a great segue. Because one of the other questions I had for you is how do you think programs like new leash on life could really affect recidivism rates. What type of impact is this going to have in our community? But also as a country, I mean by providing these programs people are coming out of prison with a whole different set of skills that they never had before. What does this really mean in terms of an impact? Well. L animal assisted therapy worth in so many different way. In this case, it gives that person in touch with that, compassion, and empathy in that lives within. Integrity is all about because I'm not trying to stay in prison. Twenty four hours a day after walk out that prison and the dog in this person's. And they have to do the right thing. Even when nobody's watching so bills does things up and it prepares these people for society. My motto is that, you know, success is the in the preparation not the execution phase when you prepare these people, and you give them opportunities what newly life we set up every individual that screens ready inappropriate with an internship. We partner with local shelters in places that are not animal thirty eight to to provide them a sixty day. They're going to these places for fifteen hours a week. And they do whatever they need to do at the worksites newly shy pay stipend twelve fifty an hour for sixty days plans, we provide the transportation internship turned into full time employment, but not just jobs careers. You have people who started as Kano attendance and today, they're animal control officers. They're not looking back and thinking about. Going back to prison. They don't need to. Yeah. I mean, they're looking for just like, you did I mean, you you really were a pioneer in the work that you've done, and I can only imagine that the people that you're working alongside today and the prisoners that you see on a daily basis are looking to you for guidance because you've really set the example, rob, it's amazing. Let's talk about Donna. Okay. So Donna is a dog. She has gone through the new leash on life program. She's currently available for adoption through new leash on life. But also listed on get your pet dot com, and certainly the links for both new leash on life's website and get your pet dot com and Donna's profile in particular will be made available on this episodes hate. But rob tell me about Donna, and what type of home would be the ideal home for her Donna that we rescued from actually she had a heart surgery done. I believe and she went into the program. She is an incredibly soft dog. Like, a very active person and just kind of like to just sit around Lassen TV KADO. Doc. A very mild energy, an amazing, the lovable and loves to cuddle. I was looking at her picture. I mean, she looks like, you know, you see some dogs, and you you wanna touch them. They're there for looks like it's gonna be like butter. That's what I see what I look at Donna. She's this very light Brown tan with a beautiful white snout. Silly pit bull type dogs. She looks like she's just one of those dog that wants to snuggle up on the couch with you and Netflix and chill. So if you're listening, and you're interested in adopting probably the most well trained dog that you could ever get your hands on it. Sounds like Donna would be a perfect fit for your family. And according to her adoption profile. She's he's very affectionate. She loves to be with people. She loves to ride in the car. She loves to be petted. She's good with dogs cats. Children men women everyone. So I really think that hopefully someone out there listening and wants to give Donna a permanent home. So I think that's about all the time. We have for today. I wanna thank you rob for taking the time. And speaking. With us today. You know, the work that you're doing with new leash on life is just incredible. And I want everyone listening to remember that I said in the.

Donna Rob Rosa AKC associate vice president Michelle USA. Netflix Bonn director Craig staff director Brown tan Kano partner eleven weeks eleven week Twenty four hours hundred percent fifteen hours
"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Rob Rosa, associate vice president of prison programs for you leash on life USA, rob before the break. We were talking about the adoption piece of the process that that new leash on life offers. So the dogs go through this eleven week program. They live in the prison alongside the individual. They're getting this amazing care the person's getting this amazing education and the day comes when you have a canine. I heard you say canine good citizen test is that like their graduation day. How does that work for citizens is a different entity someone from the AKC comes in and test the dog to see if the dog is behaved a not to be considered appropriate in the community that makes us. Yes. Yes. Okay. And so they pass their test. Then they and I assume everyone passed their tests or have you had any? Who hasn't passed? We have had a hundred percent k non citizens has rate believable. And that's because of the hard work of these people who are in prison working day in and day out in the hard work of you and your team making sure that they have the resources to make these talk successful. So they pass their canine good citizen test. They are graduating from the program. And then you gotta find him home. Right. How do you do that? Well, yes. So during the eleven week that the dogs are in their training. We're actually trying to prepare them for the transition to a home. So they get in crate trained again potty trained during that process. People will apply on our website to adopt one of these dogs. Join eleven we are adoption staff director of adoption, one of our volunteer would take the dog out of prison and do occasional visits people the potential adopters Justice see how that relationship in that Bonn. Worse. We go to the house we meet neutral areas. And once the director of adoption that adopter said already great about this match. They approved the adoption and after graduation when both the participants and a dodger graduating the doctors are there to to get the dogs they directly from the trainer who work with them. A lot about those. From that thought, that's amazing. And you know, I'm I'm a big fan of the transparent, you know, person to person conversation, especially when we're assisting one of our canine companions from going from one environment to another, and I think something like this really alliance with the beliefs that I have about home-to-home pet adoption. You know, you're the prison system is a home for these people, and it's a home for these dogs. So for them to be able to interact directly with the person who's going to be caring for their ugly, their best friend for the last twelve weeks or eleven weeks. It helps them, and it helps the people who are adopting because they get to learn everything about this dog from the person who knows him or her best, right? Absolutely. It's a very joyful and emotional moment because you're right. This was this person companion for the last eleven weeks in a place where it's not normal to have emotions or joy this dog. Brought that so there's an incredible bond near and because of that before the graduate. We do have a grief Kassir that comes in. And does the workshop participants to prepare them for graduation? I know I feel like my heart's breaking over this idea of spending very intensive eleven weeks. It's not just like, you know, you see the dog once a week. I mean, it's your your BFF's by your side for eleven weeks. And then to have to say goodbye, I'm sure it's it's extremely bitter sweet for these individuals. Yeah. And and you know, Michelle our grief counselor does an amazing job to prepare them for that one of the things that they would love to adopt the dogs. But one of the things that we talk about and basic animal care is the financial responsibility has with Dr we were an individual to come out and tried to reintegrate back into the community and have another financial responsibility to have to look after a what we do is encourage them. Because now they have the skills to train a shelter dog is a on your feet. Fee, and they they're working and your stable going rescue and save another life. Yeah. Yeah. I think that's such a great message. And it's actually a great segue. Because one of the other questions I had for you is how do you think programs like new leash on life could really affect recidivism rates. What type of impact is this going to have in our community? But also as a country, I mean by providing these programs people are coming out of prison with a whole different set of skills that they never had before. What does this really mean? In terms of an impact well animal assisted therapy worth in so many different way. In this case, it gives that person in touch with that, compassion empathy in that lives within them. Integrity is all about because I'm not trying to stay in prison. Twenty four hours a day after walk out that prison and the dog in this person's hand, and you know, they have to do the right thing even when nobody's watching. So it builds does things up and prepares these people for society. My motto is that you know, success is the copies in the preparation. Not the execution phase prepare these people, and you give them opportunities. What newly like we set up every individual that screens ready inappropriate with an internship, and we partner with local shelters in places that are not animal to to provide them a sixty day in church you where they're going to these. Fifteen hours a week. And they do whatever they need to do at each worksites newly shy pay stipend while fifty an hour for sixty days. Plus, we provide the transportation the internship at turned into full time employment, but not just jobs careers. You have people who started as Kano attendance today. They're animal control officers. They're not looking back and thinking about going back to prison that they don't need to. Yeah. I mean, they're looking for just like, you did I mean, you you really were a pioneer in the work that you've done, and I can only imagine that the people that you're working alongside today and the prisoners that you see on a daily basis are looking to you for guidance because you've really set the example rabbits, it's amazing. Let's talk about Donna. Okay. So Donna is a dog. She has gone through the new leash on life program. She's currently available for adoption through new leash on life. But also listed on get your pet dot com, and certainly the links for both new leash on life website and get your pet dot com. Tom and Donna's profile in particular will be made available on this episodes page, but tell me about Donna, and what type of home would be the ideal home for her Donna that we rescued from accidentally. She had a heart surgery done. I believe she went into the program. She is an incredibly soft dog not like very active person and just kind of like to just sit around watching TV KADO. You know, very mild energy, an amazing, Lee, lovable and loves to cuddle. I was looking at her picture. I mean, she looks like you, you know, you see some dogs and you wanna touch them. They're there for looks like it's gonna be like butter, and that's what I see what I look at Donna. She's this very light Brown tan with a beautiful white snout. Silly pit bull type dogs. She looks like she's just one of those dog that wants to snuggle up on the couch with you and Netflix and chill. So if you're listening, and you're interested in adopting probably the most well trained dog that you could ever get your hands on it. Sounds like Dada would be a perfect fit for your family. And according to her adoption profile. She's he's very affectionate. She loves to be with people. She loves to ride in the car. She loves to be petted. She's good with dogs cats. Children men women everyone. So I really think that hopefully someone out there listening and wants to give Donna a permanent home. So I think that's about all the time. We have for today. I wanna thank you. You rob for taking the time. And speaking with us today, you know, the work that you're doing with new leash on life is just incredible. And I want everyone listening to remember that I said in the.

Donna AKC Rob Rosa USA associate vice president Michelle Bonn Netflix director staff director Brown tan Kano partner Dada Lee Tom eleven weeks eleven week Twenty four hours
"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Rob Rosa, associate vice president of prison programs for new leash on life USA. Rob before the break. We were talking about the adoption piece of the process that that new leash on life offers. So the dogs go through this eleven week program. They live in the prison alongside the individual. They're getting in this amazing care the person's getting this amazing education and the day comes when you have a canine. I heard you say canine good citizen test is that like their graduation day. How does that work? The test is a different entity someone from the AKC comes in and test. The dog to see if the dog is behaved a not to be considered appropriate in the community. Yes. Yes. Okay. And so they pass their test. Then they and I assume everyone passed their tests or you had anybody who hasn't passed. We have had a hundred percent k non citizens has rate. Unbelievable. And that's because of the hard work of these people who are imprisoned working day in and day in the hard work of you and your team making sure that they have the resources to make these dogs successful. So they passed their canine good citizen test. They are graduating from the program. And then you gotta find him home. Right. How do you do that? Well, yeah. So during the eleven week that the dogs are in their training. We're actually trying to prepare them for the transition to a home. So they get trained again potty trained during that process. People will apply on our website to adopt one of these dogs. Join a Levin, we are adoption staff director of adoption of one of our volunteer will take the dog out of prison and do. Occasional visits with the people the potential adopters Justice see how that relationship in that Bonn worse, we go to the house, we neutral areas, and once the director of adoption that adopters said great about this match. They approved adoption and after graduation when both participants and the dodger graduating the doctors are there to to get the dogs. They get it directly from the trainer who worked with them. A lot about what? That's amazing. And you know, I'm I'm a big fan of the transparent, you know, person to person conversation, especially when we're assisting one of our canine companions from going from one environment to another. And I think something like this really alliance with the beliefs that I have about home-to-home pet adoption. You know, you're the prison system is a home for these people, and it's a home for these dogs. So for them to be able to interact directly with the person who's going to be caring for their best friend for the last twelve weeks or eleven weeks. You know, it helps them, and it helps the people who are adopting because they get to learn everything about this dog from the person who knows him or her best, right? Absolutely. It's a very joyful and emotional moment because you're right. This was this person companion the last eleven weeks in a place where it's not normal to have emotions or joy this dog. Brought that so there's an incredible bond near and because of that. Before the graduation. We do have agreed Kassir that comes in. And does it work Chabahar participant to prepare them for graduation? I know I feel like my heart's breaking over this idea of spending very intensive eleven weeks. It's not just like, you know, you see the dog once a week. I mean, it's your your BFF's by your side for eleven weeks. And then to have to say goodbye, I'm sure it's it's extremely bitter sweet for these individuals. Michelle a grief counselor doesn't amazing job to prepare them for that one of the things that they would love to adopt the dogs. But one of the things that we talk about and basic animal care is your the financial responsibility with Dr we were an individual to come out and tried to reintegrate back into the community and have another financial responsibility to have to look after.

staff director Rob Rosa AKC associate vice president Bonn USA. Michelle Kassir Chabahar Levin eleven weeks eleven week hundred percent twelve weeks
"associate vice president" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Joining us it's my pleasure to be here linda thank you so what is your reaction to the trump administration's decision to revoke the obama guidelines well i don't think it will have much affect on colleges and universities in the short term and in fact a few university systems have already come out and said that they're not going to change anything that they're doing currently with the admissions process as long as the recent supreme court decisions are still the law of the land colleges are not obligated to follow any of the guidelines issued by the administration but there's the possibility i assume that this tells you which way the administration is heading i think it's pretty clear and it's probably no surprise to anybody who's looked at what's going on in washington that there is sort of leaning or an orientation toward reducing or eliminating the use of race in college admissions you do take race into account now you're allowed to and you do as i understand it that's correct the supreme court has been pretty clear about what we cannot do and less clear about how far we can go when considering race so for instance quotas have never been considered legal in our system but using reason ethnicity is one factor in a series of factors in the holistic admissions process is in fact the law of the land and still completely legal and colleges and universities at least the ones i've talked to him indicated they'll keep doing that some college leaders have suggested that so far this is just guidance and it's not law and they're not changing anything do you worry at all that the trump administration might object to that well i think they can object i'm not sure that they have any recourse to unilaterally change the law of the land and certainly no recourse to change the supreme court decisions which is said the way colleges universities do it now is completely legal but certainly with the appointment of new supreme court justice anthony kennedy being the swing vote on previous college admissions decisions i think there is some concern among college leaders that we may deal with a new reality within a few years and that's that's troubling some people and i think people are already sort of planning and thinking about what happens if in fact the supreme court decisions are reversed john back instead is the associate vice president of enrollment management and marketing that's quite a title at depaul university thank you very much for joining us mr battiston thank you for having me.

washington anthony kennedy john associate vice president depaul university obama
"associate vice president" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Joining us it's my pleasure to be here linda thank you so what is your reaction to the trump administration's decision to revoke the obama guidelines well i don't think it will have much effect on colleges and universities in the short term and in fact a few university systems have already come out and said that they're not going to change anything that they're doing currently with the admissions process as long as the recent supreme court decisions are still the law of the land colleges are not obligated to follow any of the guidelines issued by the administration but there's the possibility i assume that this tells you which way the administration is heading i think it's pretty clear and it's probably no surprise to anybody who's looked at what's going on in washington that there is sort of a leaning or an orientation toward reducing or eliminating the use of race in college admissions you do take race into account now you're allowed to and you do as i understand it that's correct the supreme court has been pretty clear about what we cannot do and less clear about how far we can go and considering race so for instance quotas have never been considered legal in our system but using race and ethnicity is one factor in a series of factors in a holistic admissions process is in fact the law of the land and still completely legal in colleges and universities at least the ones i've talked to vindicated they'll keep doing that some college leaders have suggested that so far this is just guidance and it's not law and they're not changing anything do you worry at all that the trump administration might object to that well i think they can object i'm not sure that they have any recourse to unilaterally change the law of the land and certainly no recourse to change the supreme court decisions which have said the way colleges and universities do it now is completely legal but certainly with the appointment of new supreme court justice anthony kennedy being the swing vote on previous college admissions decisions i think there is some concern among college leaders that we may deal with the new reality within a few years and that's that's troubling some people and i think people are already sort of planning and thinking about what happens if in fact the supreme court decisions are reversed john back instead is the associate vice president of enrollment management and marketing that's quite a title at depaul university thank you very much for joining us mr back and say thank you for having me you're listening to weekend edition from npr news parenting so much good advice you should never kiss your child you should never hug your child you should never put your child on your.

washington anthony kennedy john associate vice president depaul university obama
"associate vice president" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"associate vice president" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Water institutions you will centre for water and technology but through the exciting news that's going on right now is that uh president castro has put his energies into making certain that the water issues are addressed in the prisoner state has a place there at the table and so we are in the process of recruiting and we'll be eventually hiring a brand new position as an associate vice president over water and sustainability and we see ourselves becoming the place to go to certainly in the csu system an an throughout california we already have partnerships with universities throughout the the state and outside the state and water so we know that we've already been recognised for our strengths and so this is going to help us pull together and make us even more accessible to all of those individuals that need that education and need that information it with other school of agricultural is limited to thus student body that they can take in an educator said come on come all you know what i'm kind of asking you i mean is it is it is it is it unlimited in the area of education of did it can be applied to to uh somebody coming in and wanting to learn more about egg or is it is it narrow in its field of approach we only do this this and that were limited by our resources certainly we have we have ten undergraduate degrees in their related to agriculture that's where i'm going yeah okay we deal and and as you are unsure where that we're not funded to the extent that we could beat from the state and therefore could could grow more effectively in caceres the simple question could have been could you do a lot more and more money as indeed i think that's where i was eric but will we are uh i think we're doing agree great job of partnering with with industry and partnering with the um uh people out there that really care about the future for i'd mentioned the be sweet another example is that we partnered with cowl west rain and nattaphen men we put in a completely automated irrigation system on a new allman plot it's automated it can be monitored and managed from.

castro associate vice president caceres president csu california eric allman