35 Burst results for "Associate Professor"

The Media Comes At Charlie for His 'Church and State' Comments

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:24 min | 3 months ago

The Media Comes At Charlie for His 'Church and State' Comments

"I saw you went viral for saying something about the church and state being mixed together. Can you please elaborate on that? Yes, so we were interviewing congressman Jim banks. You should go back and listen to episode. It's pretty awesome. And he was talking about how the Biden regime is exporting atheism worldwide. And I'm going to read exactly what I said, and I'm going to allow my words to hold itself. So this is from mediaite who they said Charlie Kirk, the bag of potatoes. That's what they call me. Who runs turning point USA erroneously claimed the nation's founders wanted religion and government mixed together. They did. He called the siloing of the two, a fabrication contrived by humanists. Speaking on his program, he said that, quote, there is no separation of church and state. According to the founders, that is correct. And I said, quote, it is derived from a single letter that Thomas Jefferson wrote to the Danbury baptist convention. He said referring to a correspondence in which Jefferson a founder endorsed the idea quote of a wall of separation between religion and government. I said quote, of course we should have church and state mixed together. Quote, our founding fathers believed in that, we can go through the detail of that, the established literally a church in Congress, which is true they established chaplain's offices and prayer rooms and religious ceremonies in Congress. And so immediately the media responded to this never giving me a chance to reply. But there was one very smug person who's a professor from Wheaton college, which used to be a really good place and is now a complete woke and unfortunately increasingly godless institution, Wheaton college. By the name of Miranda yaver, doctor Miranda yaver. So she tweeted something at me. She said, good thing Charlie is not taking my constitutional court law course or else he would fail. So I responded, I emailed her, and I said, hey, do you want to come on the show? And we could talk about this. And we won't debate it. I want to know your thoughts and I'll tell you mine. And because I know a fair amount of history and you're an important person, you're an associate Professor of political science and you're supposed to be super smart. Why don't we have a conversation about this? And so then she says, quote, very smugly and arrogantly, hi Charlie, if you enroll at Wheaton college, you're more than welcome to take my constitutional law course. In the meantime, I suggest that you read the First Amendment.

Congressman Jim Banks Charlie Kirk Miranda Yaver Danbury Baptist Wheaton College Biden Thomas Jefferson Congress USA Jefferson Charlie
Stanford's Ram Rajagopal: Today's Grid Wouldn't Support All EV Society

Mark Levin

00:58 sec | 4 months ago

Stanford's Ram Rajagopal: Today's Grid Wouldn't Support All EV Society

"Let's say we were to have a substantial number of electric vehicles charging at home as everybody dreams Says ram Raja Paul and associate Professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford Co authored a recent study looking at the strain electrical vehicle adoption is expected to place when the peregrine He told Yahoo finance today's grid may not be able to support it all boils down to Are you charging during the time solar powers on In Sacramento officials said California great could face a potential shortfall of roughly 1700 megawatts Which would affect the power supply between one and 4 million people this summer That number would likely be exacerbated by an additional short for fall of 5000 megawatts In the case of extreme heat and further fire damage to existing power lines

Ram Raja Paul Stanford Co Yahoo Sacramento California
Who Is (the Now Infamous) Dr. Robert Malone?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:02 min | 8 months ago

Who Is (the Now Infamous) Dr. Robert Malone?

"First. Doctor Malone, welcome to the Salem radio network. Thank you very much, mister gorka and thank you for the opportunity to speak to you and to your audience today. Well, I could spend the next hour just rattling off your curriculum vitae and your various qualifications in the scientific world for those who didn't see your hours long interview with Joe who haven't seen all the interviews you've given with my friend and my former colleague Steve Bannon. Would you mind would you indulge us for a second for those across the country for whom you are a new name just to give us a prey see of your background and your relationship, for example, to the mRNA vaccines that are so in the news currently? Well, for your audience, I have been vetted and have secret clearance with Department of Defense. I've won over $8 billion or managed them for in government grants and contracts. I typically work very closely with the Department of Defense defense threat reduction agency. Kim biodefense group and have for decades, I have been a vaccine developer and innovator for well over 30 years as when I was a graduate student, I had a series of discoveries that led to 9 issued U.S. patents and numerous international patents that include all of the core technology for what we call RNA and DNA vaccines, including the first proof of concept reduction to practice using an RNA vaccine in a mouse model to produce immune responses against the envelope glycoprotein of aids. So an aids vaccine candidate my first major contract was with as a newly minted MD intern at UC Davis was with the Department of the Navy for development of an aids vaccine. I am trained at northwestern university for my NDI hold a license in the state of Maryland. I'm trained in my graduate studies at the salk institute and UC San Diego undergraduate biochemistry UC Davis multiple research fellowships at UC Davis in the department of pathology was an academic for well over a decade reaching associate professor level at the uniformed services university of the health sciences. So that's the DoD medical school. In D.C., I have been involved in way too many outbreaks intimately. I spearheaded for DoD for quite a while. The development of their Ebola vaccine candidate, which eventually I brought murk in. It was licensed to American. It's now the licensed Ebola vaccine. I've worked on flu vaccines. I've worked on literally all the biodefense vaccines used to work under contract directly for DoD at dying port vaccine company.

Doctor Malone Salem Radio Network Mister Gorka Steve Bannon Department Of Defense Defense Kim Biodefense Aids Department Of The Navy For Dev Northwestern University For My Department Of Defense Salk Institute JOE Uc San Diego Undergraduate Bio Department Of Pathology Uc Davis Dod Medical School U.S. Uniformed Services University
The Federalist: Why the Wall Street Journal Is Wrong About the 2020 Election

Mark Levin

02:17 min | 8 months ago

The Federalist: Why the Wall Street Journal Is Wrong About the 2020 Election

"And over at the federalist William Doyle writes why The Wall Street Journal is wrong about the 2020 election They've done a hell of a job over there as have some other His PhD principal researcher at Caesar Rodney election research institute and Irving Texas sounds like he's more qualified than any of the board members specializes in economic history and private funding of American elections Previously was associate professor and chair in the department of economics university of Dallas Seems pretty smart Wall Street Journal editorial appeared on Tuesday entitled the best summary of the 2020 election rules were bent GOP voters defected and real fraud hasn't turned up This conveys the position of many establishment conservatives concerning the 2020 election There is some slight problems with the election that we're overshadowed by normal political phenomena such as controversies about Trump and GOP voters switching sides When The Wall Street Journal begins with the expected anti Trump admonishment and his first big rally of 2022 president Trump was again focused on 2020 Way to rigged election in the proof is all over the place Trump said But mister Trump was apparently too busy over Christmas to read a 136 page report by a conservative group in Wisconsin whose review shows no evidence of widespread voter fraud quote unquote This is a long report allegations of literal vote fraud by the Wisconsin institute of long liberty are well they call it For which they find little corroboration But there's another side of the argument regarding the legitimacy of the 2020 election that The Wall Street Journal has relentlessly ignored The hypothesis is that a deeply corrupted corporate media big tech censorship legally questionable intervention by the courts and infiltration of key election officers by lavishly funded democratic activists you know they're talking about Zuckerberg there Resulted in heavy handed election interference of a kind we have never seen before and quote that decisively rigged the 2020 election in favor of Joe Biden This has been my point all along

The Wall Street Journal William Doyle Donald Trump Caesar Rodney Election Researc Irving Texas Department Of Economics Univer GOP Mister Trump Wisconsin Institute Of Long Li Wisconsin Zuckerberg Joe Biden
Who Is Dr. Robert Malone, Inventor of mRNA Vaccines?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:58 min | 11 months ago

Who Is Dr. Robert Malone, Inventor of mRNA Vaccines?

"And he is the president of the international alliance of physicians and scientists, doctor Malone, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thank you. Thanks a lot for the opportunity to be here and talk to you and your audience. So let's get on it. So I'm an admirer and fan of yours. I first was made aware of you and your work when you join Brett Weinstein on his podcast all the way back in April or May or June if I remember correctly. In the back in the 20th century. It feels like yeah, that was a different world. And I was very interested in that conversation and I've watched hours of your footage since because it seemed that you were confirming some of the suspicion that I had and skepticism in my head towards the current rollout and the vaccine that we are now being in some ways forced to take. Please establish your background in vaccine technology, the original inventor of MR MN RNA and DNA vaccines and talk about why and how you got concerned about this. And we'll go from there. Let's see. So briefly, the bona fides. Let's see, you see Davis, biochemistry, bachelors and science. You see San Diego and the salk institute masters in biology, MD from northwestern university in Chicago. Fellowships, research fellowships at UC Davis and a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School for global clinical scholars research training that was just a few years ago to kind of tighten up all of my credentials having to do with clinical research regulatory affairs and all that stuff also completed a internship medical internship at UC Davis. I'm a licensed physician in the state of Maryland. I did invent the core platform technology that gave rise to these vaccines. I did not invent these vaccines. And I'm a little aggravated at what's been done with these vaccines as what's happened to the technology. But I had a extensive academic career top pathology at UC Davis and new Maryland Baltimore and also was an associate professor at the uniformed services university of the health sciences. You could look up all the papers and the many patents through if you look on Google scholar is a site so you can just Google scholar and I'm having trouble with that just like you were with the mRNA. With my name on it. And you'll see the over hundred papers and 12,600 plus academic citations for the work blah,

International Alliance Of Phys Charlie Kirk Brett Weinstein Salk Institute Malone Harvard Medical School For Glo Uc Davis Northwestern University Davis San Diego MD Chicago New Maryland Maryland Uniformed Services University Baltimore Google
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"I have a family. I not just some statistic that goes out on the field every day. So i think it gives fans a little more insight into who these people are that they're cheering for you. You spoke about mental illness earlier and importance of Society you taking that more seriously and being more gracious toward those who are mentally. Ill the press or you know bipolar. Whatever whatever it is. Ptsd and i was intrigued by what's going on with simone biles olympic. I think federally interesting situation so for those. Who don't know an and donna correctly. If i have this wrong. But she was a fabulous of gymnasts and one every metal that was to exist for many years. And then she. She hit a wall of mental illness and withdrew from competition for a good chunk of the olympics. This was last summer. And i just thought it was really interesting. About how how the media and how we as a society said reacted to this my sense is that most of us had no idea what was going on and and she treated rather badly but to her great credit she stood up. She stood for her for her needs. Instead i need to do this. And i'm gonna have to disagree with one thing you said. Please do you said the media treated her badly. I need to really differentiate. Fearfully commentators and the news report sue commentators. Their job is to stir up stuff. Uk the commodore. she's coward. she's this she's that now. The news reporters could not have been more fact based more gracious. I watched how these stories reported on. Nbc cbs pbs cnn msnbc. Yemi everywhere even fox news every place that they reported on it as news. They were very factual they sought out. Experts they tried to explain what was meant by this term. The twisties that she mentioned where lost for orientation they had gymnasts come on ellie race. Men came on Talk about like what does it mean when this happens to an athlete but the commentators and the people on social media they were just brutal and here again. it doesn't take a lot of courage via keyboard warrior. My attitude is like in what olympics. You compe- always you did so. Just sit down wrench Before before to raid. I wanna thank you. Because you're right. I i was. I was too quick to serve generalize. You're right reporters were great. The commentators not so good. I think that's more than fair. Bob yes so we want to give our participants chance to talk to you. Donna as we do all the time. So ray you can let everyone know what they need to do. All right to suffer asking questions we ask you to raise your hand with star nine on regular telephones. All twi on p. c. option. Y on mac and under the more tab for for iphones. Such one nine for meeting. And i'm going to wait as far as needing on reading goes until we have called on you. It's star star six on the telephone on pc Command command shift a on mac and under the lower left on smartphones. And we have someone good phone number nine seventy two. That would be glen. He's he's..

simone biles Yemi olympics donna msnbc pbs fox news Nbc cbs cnn ellie Uk Donna Bob mac glen
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"That for those that are accustomed to her is the security analysts who knows everything the pentagon and yet it's like. Aw and it was a moment that you would not have had like. I never get upset and i know some people do but i don't. I never get upset. When i see an athlete with their kid. Okay like after a big win and they bring their kid onto the field or something. Like i think it's adorable and years ago it wasn't allowed and now it's like. Hey why not. What's wrong with a father being a father. What's wrong with the father hugging their kid. And you know showing their kid with the field looks like i think it adds a dimension. Don't wasn't possible before. now you think donna. Do you think this human interaction that you're talking about this home life of famous people and other people. How do you think that helps. Our hurts political candidates. They talk on zoom and when they do press conferences and when they have their little promos that they do in order to gain votes. Do you think it helps them. Do they try to get their own. Personal lives into the discussion with their own children. They're all because our times living. I'm glad you mentioned that because unfortunately politicians and here again big sign both sides. Do this okay. Politicians since time immemorial have been using their kids crops. If you're using your kid is a prop to give votes to show like look at my adorable kids. And i'm such a family man or whatever that's problematic for me okay. I blog last week about the country singer. Jason algae posing his little two and three year old kids with anti joe biden shirts now again. I would have said the same thing. If it was anti-trump shirts you can look at my history on social media. I am really consistent about this. Leave kids out of your political battles. Let them be kids. I don't care if they like biden. I don't care if they like trump. They're two and three. They don't know who these people are. And that's probably a good thing. Leave them alone. Don't pose them in shirts now again. Sometimes apology will just like bring a kid onto the c ring. One of their children along to campaign. That's been happening since forever. i like it. There's nothing wrong with these are human beings they have families. I may or may not like their political views. The can't deny that they're human beings and who they are off camera or off microphone may be very different and it might be good for the audience for the voters to see that side of them especially factored. I me i. I get so cynical when i hear about things like this. The other thing. I find actually bore. Worrying is when they bring their splc hits the demonstrations and again both sides the pro-life folks used to do this all the time they wanna see. I don't wanna see it and pro-choice folks either say it's just it's just i. I just find the whole thing really distasteful. I saw a I saw a rally and here again. This is not one side or the other. I saw a trump rally but i've also seen other rallies from the other side where parents had their kids and their kids were like saying rude slogans and their parents were applauding nut. Bad-debt bad. don't do it. Don't take your kids and rope them into stocks that they don't understand it's not cute and it also teaches hatred of the other side really us. It's like. I'm not a horrible person. Because i tend these days to.

Jason algae pentagon donna joe biden biden splc
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"Let me introduce my good friend. End co host. Peter out chill. Peter how are you today. we're doing fine. It's a fall here in columbia until sunday when it's going to get back to eighty degrees so but we're doing fine missouri. Football team is terrible but we reserve used to that by now and the good. They don't play this weekend so we can all relax be disappointed when they lose. They always seem to be doing these days. You know state. One of our former introspective guests. Steve roberts the climate change guy is probably saying to himself. I told you so three. And i'm sure he's saying that but anyway actually talking about tornadoes and hail and thunder here on sunday so we'll tornadoes halen go. He's gonna arrest his case even further. That's strength but anyway. I wanna thank raymond gaya producer for making it possible for in perspectives to be equality program. I also want to thank the media. Outlets for making sure that our show is properly aired and tom dolly of rosie's place for posting our shows on reading or number fifteen and to jacqueline sylvia of j s web solutions for archiving. Our programs on my website just go to. Www dot branko events dot com arrow down until you get to in perspective podcasts. Click on those. And you will see our archives programs from latest to earliest maher c. Jackie and thank you to all of you who make sound better than we actually are. And that's a humble statement from mr chill back with us for a third visit. We have the associate professor of media studies. Donna alber donna. It's always great to have you with us. how i you know. I'm happy to be walking around. I know you happy when it's a brand new day you're able to do what you wanna do. My correct well. I'm a cancer survivor. As i have mentioned on more than one occasion and every day that i'm walking around. I figure it's donna for the win. You know what i mean. Are you in remission. I am indeed by the grace god. It will be seven years in december. If i make it much to the disappointment of my enemies. I'm sure but if i Get to the seven year mark. I am told that with the kind of cancer i had. If it hasn't come back and seven years it's probably not going to bulk. Congratulations that is totally awesome. Yes congratulations donald. While of you survivors out there. Keep your head up and for those of you go through that battle. I mean we're here for you and we're pulling for you and you just never know what's gonna happen. They've got so many better treatments now than even ten years ago. I mentioned on more than one occasion. I'm not trying to be morbid. But my grandmother only lived to be forty four here. I am only two generations later. I'm seventy four snow. Walking around. And i am.

raymond gaya tom dolly Peter jacqueline sylvia branko Steve roberts maher c mr chill Donna alber donna missouri columbia rosie Football Jackie cancer donna donald
Critical Race Theory Activists Hate Your First Amendment Rights

Mark Levin

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Critical Race Theory Activists Hate Your First Amendment Rights

"Critical race theory theorists and activists declare that not only a society incurably racist and white dominated But there's no point in attempting to assert a pursue your rights because such rights really are not rights at all Why Because they do not deliver the kind of Marxist egalitarianism and people's Paradise demanded by the critical race movement Indeed rights are used They are get to uphold the white racial structure and deny minorities power CRT activists like Marxist revolutionaries stick with this Here's the point Our intolerant of contrary arguments and challenges to their views therefore free speech is particularly threatening to their cause Got that This is in the book Although the focus is said to be on hate speech which is a term applied to both obvious and offensive racial smears as well as a broader political and philosophical deep disagreement Chris Damascus associate Professor of communication at the University of Washington to come explained CRT scholars have critiqued many of the assumptions that they believe constitute the ideology of the First Amendment For example instead of helping to achieve healthy and robust debate the First Amendment actually serves to preserve the inequities of the status quo This is why they're attacking teachers excuse me parents This is why they're attacking taxpayers Anybody who goes to board meetings and doesn't sit down and shut up

Chris Damascus University Of Washington
Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

"You study ones that civil kano eruptions on singular events but can continue with follow up last for thousands of years after the first eruption super volcanic eruptions are among the most catastrophic event in any planet's history then includes the earth they vet tremendous amounts of magma almost instantaneously they impact global climate here on earth that means triggering volcanic winter with abnormally cold temperatures causing widespread feminine population disruptions and e findings reported in the journal nature based on a study of volcanic debris from the turbo eruption indonesia. Seventy five thousand years ago. There's no other way to say it. Tober was the largest volcanic eruption in human history. It had a volcanic explosively index of eight the highest possible score on the chart. The volcanic explosively index is a lot of rhythmic scale for an eruption depend on how much welcoming materials thrown out to what hide it's thrown and how long the eruption lasts. Well people these days talk about events. Such as the famous eighteen eighty three eruption of krakatoa in the sunda strait between the islands of java and sumatra or more recently mount saint helens eruption in washington. State these with thousands of times smaller than tober. Thankfully super volcanoes like turbo. A few and far between the last was new. Zealand's taboo volcano. Some twenty eight thousand five hundred years ago. Should volcanoes often erupt several times with evils of tens of thousands of vs between bigger options. But it's not known what happens. During the dormant periods one of the study's authors associate professor martin denny shake from curtin. University says gani understanding of these lengthy dormant periods hope scientists workout. What to look for an young active sipa volcanoes and help. Scientists prick future eruptions

Tober Sunda Strait Mount Saint Helens Indonesia Sumatra Java Martin Denny Washington Zealand Gani Curtin
Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

Data Skeptic

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

"Name is chung show carney associated professor and the southwest johnson university in trump province in china. And can you tell me a little bit about your specific research areas. What do you study my research areas. Congress daytime my machine learning and data analytics gender most specifically focused on forecasting demand focusing in retail and time series focused sich of sees. So the main pay for. I asked you on to discuss. Today is wire arena and serena or s arema not sufficient. You'd mentioned you have a good background in machine learning. I don't necessarily think of a reema as a machine learning technique. How do these two areas fit together in your mind. Actually because the site focused teams all problems and can be served by machinery and when the approached this focusing problem with fines and attorney time service models are very important solutions to forecast team problems. Other side focused is very important in today's areas because you're low many many data so always Focused in problem. We find penser is very important and we also find iron man. Sarah map and armagh. Those are very classic. Run divided news time service motives and when we do couldn't this i remind saruman model. We're fans than actually the classical extre nation or classical. Modern for iran. serena is northern sufficient sarichichekli. Either way actually approach. I remember sarim from elisa angle which is spectral lenzi's digital delivery and in your system theory so we use elisa angle to do countries a romance. I remember motive defines onto loads dench a sufficient from the rich porno view. So this is the whole ground

Southwest Johnson University Carney Chung Penser Sarah Map Congress China Saruman Sarim Elisa Angle Lenzi Serena Iran Elisa
The Life and Loves of Elizabeth Taylor

Even the Rich

02:18 min | 1 year ago

The Life and Loves of Elizabeth Taylor

"Img thank you so much for joining us today. We're really excited to chat with you. Yeah we're super stoked to get into. Elizabeth taylor's filmography thank you so much for inviting me. I'm i'm eager to have this conversation. Yeah so before we start. Mg can you introduce yourself to our listeners. Who are you what he no well. We only have an hour. That's going to be I guess my official title is. I'm an associate professor In the english department at usc. I've written often on popular culture Actually i started out as newsday's political cartoonist. And in there in one thousand nine hundred four. I published forever barbie the unauthorized biography of a real doll. Which did well in enabled me to leave the newspaper And of course the next woke followed logically from forever barbie. It was a cultural history of nasa's jet propulsion laboratory in a way though it is a book. End to forever barbie because forever. Barbie discussed the mid twentieth century. Construction of femininity more. Recently i wrote the accidental feminists tau elizabeth taylor raised our consciousness and we were too distracted by her beauty to notice. The whole book is the subtitle so How did you become a fan of elizabeth taylor. And what drew you to write about her life and career. Thank you about ten years ago. I was dating someone relentlessly inappropriate and yang and her friends and her friends friends and i ended up in a vacation. House in palm springs or the streets are all named after fifties era movie stars frank sinatra drive and so forth and that first night all we had for entertainment was a boxed. Set elizabeth taylor. Dvd's and we thought we were going to have a you know a long evening of champ. You started watching. And we were amazed not just by the quality of the films and her acting but by the actual content the feminist content movies

Elizabeth Taylor USC Nasa Barbie Drew Yang Palm Springs Frank Sinatra
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"Which says that you know. You are not letting your mobility of chairman getting your way but unfortunately society causes you to be disabled when they don't accommodate you if there's no ramp to that building suddenly somebody who uses a wheelchair is a is disabled. If there's a ramp the disability goes away so that's the social model of disability if i all museums all performing spaces all film all television described as appropriate. Well in blind is not a disability one of the needs to be member iron very different channels and tasks so i to say hi to you and thank you for provides you do. We're doing so thank you for that. We have five minutes. I yeah so x ray. Justin new are up next wonderful. Great to be here with everybody again. And i've enjoyed the session. I wanna ask you know. There are ways in our society that we kind of have learned to value certain kinds of things in the media and particularly if we look at sports in announcing in an what sells the values of the people. Like we don't really see ever female sports announcers especially for a sport like football for example you might see color commentators or people down on the field something but not the actual announcers. We don't really see a lot of the the biggest media networks wanting to cover things like women's sports but also covering forceful of folks with disabilities like adaptive adaptive sports and wondering extends also. Tonight just sports but just news talks about disability in disability rights issues. And so what do you think. It's going to take to change the way that we function as a society and what we values news in the major media outlets start wanting to include more disability in their coverage earth. Will i think the as a professor of communication. I have a pet peeve. I hope you won't get angry with me for saying this. I don't like the word disability. Because it presupposes that there's ability and then there's those that don't have ish. I'm sorry most of the people. I know that are blind or death for in a wheelchair. Take just as much ability as i do. You have your just being. Xm by the very language that fish irony on that donna. Back in around nineteen eighty. There was a move this country to get rid of the word handicap and replace it with disability. Isn't that ironic. I now and we're still sorta not there yet. Let me just raise what justin was talking about. Though i just needed to get that out of disability. I think it was well intentioned but i think it's putting people in a little box. I'm not persuaded useful if we can frame the conversation differently because what you think about the other is often how you treat the other if that makes sense a lot of myths and stereotypes about the disabled show up as public policy so i think the first thing that needs to happen is we need to start taking a look at different experiences. Different people by promoting those people. There are really qualified folks out there but there's a tendency in every industry just round up. The usual suspects who of i had on his guests last week. I had on this. We like. I rarely see on any talk shows. And let me tell you. I'm talking television here. I rarely see anyone who's blind or deaf what they have no opinions of our politics really. But i suggest to you that there is a stereotype just like wyatt to so many years for black baseball games get broadcast. It was a stereotype of oh white. People wouldn't be interested that similarly so people that can say what people can't see..

Justin football donna justin wyatt baseball
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"If you wanna comment that. I grew up in new york like peter did and that's how i knew him but i used to the excellent thanks to john mccain who was also from new york originally. He taught me how to d. Excellent stations and i used to listen to w. e. i n. boston ally so used to hear the game and then i also remember state now not on the subject of stores but it used to be to oldies stations. That went up there to visit my sister when she graduated from harvard in cambridge. And i've got w ara laren tayo p. And i got. They were just fantastic. Could you explain to the listeners. What getting far away stations. At night. That you wouldn't get now. Of course you know that you wouldn't get during the day because the radio waves and the way the radio waves work now of course. Now we have apps like tune in and you know all these different things. Yeah yeah and so. I listened to all those. If you don't can. I give you a little history. Yes because i wrote about this like the term. Dx and also w x hey dx for distance that comes from the phillips code and the phillips code was created by. A guy named walter phillips. He was a telegraf. Telegraph operator very influential guy in telegraphy and he created for the journalists of his day. A whole bunch of abbreviations in the late eighteen eighties eighteen ninety nineties so that when they were typing their morse code they didn't have to type out every single letter of every single word and as a result dismayed faster for them to a certain words that were just used over and over and one of them we still use. Today has lived on as portis resident president of the united states. Still use today by. Broadcasters hosea oh my god what is sipping yeah on siriusxm they have photos you now have the slowly and that is where that comes from. That comes in fill is never heard that speech why you have a media historian on your show. This is fantastic. Donna and i also used to listen to the bbc. And i still impurity yet. A lot of often stations. You busy still comes in thirty eight states and i woke good organ white show. Okay yes and i remind first. Introduction was at a camp which is no longer in existence. But it was camped allen in new hampshire which was a camp for blind girls and then it became coed. And you know non existent now..

new york walter phillips john mccain harvard cambridge peter boston portis united states Donna bbc allen new hampshire
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"Fairness to biden. He tried five on a couple of occasions. He got really verbally manhandled to the point where he couldn't even continue his own advisers said to him like stop interrupting the guy. Let him give his views. You could tell you think he's not like let the guy talk a certain point. The whole debate stopped being a debate. And it just for like each side screaming at the other in giving their talking points. And i didn't come away feeling like i was informed and that's not just trump and by debates of become this performance. We one minute to say this. That and then commercials. I can't explain my views on an issue in one minute really. I can't think of myself as a fairly educated person but we've created a format where nothing really gets. Resolved accept each side tries to get their talking points. And that's the other thing. I wish debates were more out the issues and not about criticizing the person's persona. I remember actual debates voter apathy in the united states enough to remember when they've really had debates where the people got a chance to express themselves not to babble endlessly but to actually express themselves about the issue and then the other person would come back just agree with Friend because you know. But now yes i do but now we have one minute talking points. The other person talking points then comes the name calling then comes more talking points to waste of your time. It's a waste of my time. You know that's the other side of the issue there are public. Relations is this is who who coach officials and athletes and other people out what to say and how to say it and this became really clear to me. Recent interview that i did and i was a very nice guy and was was was folks folk well but em to get beyond surface level was the most impossible and it wasn't. It is best interest to do it. That's that was that was. That was his belief. Obviously he's a smart enough guy to know that if you want to go deeper he could. He just chose not to and i thought that was unbelievably sad. You know that's that was. That was the way he chose to to use his time on on the podcast in question and there were living. We're living in a world where you can use. Any frazier want cancel culture and both sides to this fight away intolerance of any ideas that are different from yours. Okay so athletes vow it. Avai make a comment. They're going to get locked on social media. They're going to get excoriated by one side or the other. It's kind of become in their best interest to these blanda really felt good getting those hit some really glad that up now onto cincinnati. You know we got another game tomorrow. And this is what they're coach to do. The as non offensive as possible so that they won't get either side upset. It almost impossible to do. This is why i understand. Bill checks approach. Even though it drives me crazy sometimes. Cincinnati hardly says anything. All i'm surprised even goes to press conferences anymore. He's reporters. I don't know what they expect. It's like squeezing blood out of a stone. You know the guy's not going to answer you the way you want him. Do i continue to ask him questions. Like who's just starting quarterback. What about tom brady. What bella check is not going to give you an answer. And i think donald you said it best..

biden blanda united states frazier cincinnati Cincinnati tom brady bella donald
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"Us to people all the time. It's like you don't know me. You don't know what i believe and if you wanna put me in a little box you'll miss the whole point because i'm all over the place about issues and kind of like you. So there's some things to make an assumption knowledge you but people are y'all your massachusetts and it's a blue state so therefore i know yep began donna. All you heard. And i'm sure you remember this. All democratic states wanna keep us down so that they can create socialism. Just give us money and have a shut in for the rest of our lives. it's only the republicans wanna open up the country and make us go to. Where is the highest number of deaths from code red states. Okay thank you look irrelevant. What color the state is it. All depends the is. But that's my point. The answer to that was always in the ritz in-in-in-in and then you get but in the blue states and all we heard i don't find any of that terribly productive. What i found now like years ago. Peter will relate to this years ago. I was a counselor. Okay now used to do. Some marriage counseling not a lot. That wasn't my area of expertise to every now and then i'd get called in to consult on a case and you get a with saying you know my husband does this that those and then you get the husband go. Yes i wife. Does that these these that in the end they both have ranted about what the other side has done. And then you say to the bookie. Find a really good okay. The other side is at fault for all your problems. Now what now. What and i never heard of now. It was almost like the complaining about was the end unto itself. Isn't that what political isn't that. What political candidates do ango. Yes that is exactly where we are politically. It's become like well. Let's complain about them. They're this match and let that doesn't tell me. What are you going to do to solve some of the problems. Yeah but they're all religious nuts. But when joe biden and donald trump has their infamous debates last fall. How often did you hear. Either one of the candidates tell you what they going to do. As opposed to what the other person is doing wrong a will be doing wrong.

donna massachusetts Peter joe biden donald trump
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"They almost almost don't care what they're selling. They're trying to show the latest technology or the latest. Whatever and i think often the product trying to sell gets lost in the shuffle. And i just found a starling wasn't just the as a blind person totally confused. It was assigned people totally confused as well. The other thing is. I think there's an assumption because we now live in the internet world with hume to tick talk and et cetera. There assuming that a lot of these ads have been released earlier which is true and people have already seen them and commented on them as recently as a few days before it's almost kind of anti-climactic to have the ads showing on the super bowl game when people are pretty much already seen them so lies investment. Yes my reaction to that is okay. That's fine except that. Allow the folks who were were part of. I sort of informal experiment were people are in their teens and twenties ever just as disinterested as adults were know. Say something and you'll sure design. Sure i still do not understand. Call me crazy go right ahead. I'll severe let you do it. But i still do not understand why in this country we have a million dollars to spend on a super bowl ad and yet all across the country. People can't afford homes. You can't afford apartments. People are getting thrown out into the street. We've got money for super bowl commercials. What am i gauze. Because the most of the money. Donna i think most of the money comes from the monopolies and we all know the rich get richer in this country and the poor get or that's what's happening looking at all these days but look at all these baseball athletes that are now. Make sports athletes in general. Let me correct that. Forty million dollars a year to play a sport and they get away with it because this is a free country. Look how little we pay teachers. So let's see an athlete replace. Thirteen games makes millions in a person who is molding. The lives of children and teaching them to read and write gets in many cases as little as thirty or forty thousand a year. Which in today's world ain't much. Well this brings me to. It's i wanna talk with you. Donna. because is just beyond sports. I mean issues that affect poorer people with less money are hardly covered at all. You know why is it that we we hear so little about what's going on in appalachia for example i. I mentioned it. Because i just finished reading chapter on this in a book i just finished reading where everything is is is is based on stereotypes and the lowest common denominator. And we don't get sense. Lets you really try to find or struggles are unless i really try to find. It can't tell you what the struggles of your average person living in the in the hills of kentucky for example serious issue i think for media coverage in general. I think that you have to go to the print publications. If you wanna get coverage of appalachia. There are some very very good print publications. There are but they're the exception rather than the rules but the point. If you get your news mostly from tv you're even from radio. Npr does a pretty good job. But let's be honest. The underwriters are the ones that pay for. And you can call it. Underwriting it's commercial commercials and the underwriters. They want certain things on the air..

hume Donna super bowl appalachia baseball kentucky Npr
Florida Breaks Record for COVID-19 Hospitalizations

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Florida Breaks Record for COVID-19 Hospitalizations

"Florida sets a new record for covert nineteen hospitalizations on Sunday while an increase in vaccinations will help more immediate measures are needed that's according to Jason so Lamy and associate professor of epidemiology at the university of South Florida we don't start implementing that block transmission we're going to continue to see increased numbers of cases and not just cases but indications of severe illness and while Florida governor Ron DeSantis has resisted mandatory mask mandates other leaders are pushing for the protection there's a lot of people spreading a message that is evidence based and trying to get people you have to do the right thing sadly there is also been a big rise in the number of children with the virus at hospitals in Miami many of them needing intensive care I surely apple

Lamy Florida Ron Desantis University Of South Florida Jason Miami Apple
Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

Data Skeptic

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

"My name is elizabeth. Barnes i go by libby an associate professor in the department about miss science here at colorado state university. You told me a little bit. Broadly speaking about your interest research wise and things like that. I guess in broad terms. I'm a climate scientists. I've been studying. Climate dynamics that includes climate change but also the earth's climate as it is today as it wasn't in the past and really probably on this podcast but also might broad interest are in the data science side. So how do we use. Data and analysis tools be at statistics mathematics modeling to understand the system and all of the interacting pieces. Could you go into little depth about the data. You're interested in even what's available as most listeners. Do some data science. Maybe they're used to working on the internet where it's as easy as just tracking something but the earth has been leaving us clues for a while. What do you have access to to study specifically the part of atmospheric science i study. I'd like to say we actually really have data coming out our ears. We have so much data. That's not all good data but one of the reasons. I'm so excited about eight science machine. Learning techniques is how can we utilize the data that we have even when some of it. Maybe isn't perfect. For example we have in science in climate science. We have paleo record so ice cores that tell us what the climate looked like hundreds of thousands of years ago today satellites that are constantly there orbiting the earth or sitting still and staring at one place over and over again and they're pouring data in all of the time sometimes it's hard to just get data and process it once we have it than you know so we can do fun stuff just getting it into a processed form is a lot of work. We have climate model data so we have these big climate models that are being run on supercomputers all over the world to try to help us understand the climate system and they are out putting a lot of data in people need to look at it to try to answer and ask interesting questions about the our system and we have people here my department. I don't do this. Atmospheric scientists say with a weather balloon or radar and actually measuring thinking about the weather and the climate state. Right where you are.

Colorado State University Libby Barnes Elizabeth
ML Innovation in Healthcare With Suchi Saria

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

ML Innovation in Healthcare With Suchi Saria

"I am here with suci. Saria succi is the founder and ceo of beijing and health. The john c malone associate professor of computer science statistics and health policy and the director of the machine learning and healthcare lab at the johns hopkins university suci. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks sam the long affiliation. That made me very nervous. It was quite a mouthful. But i'm super excited to have you here on the show. This is a an interview that i've been looking forward to for a very long time. I think i remember seeing one of your very early presentations on machine. Learning for sepsis. This was how long ago was that work. I've been working on it for over six years. Now so i don't know when mitch presentation you saw like. Yeah it's been awhile that's awesome. The podcast has been going strong for five so it probably early days for for both of us so nonetheless excited to have you here on the show and would love to start out by having you introduce yourself to our audience share a bit about your story and kind of give us a sense for how you came to work at this convergence of machine learning. Ai healthcare medicine all these things. Yeah absolutely so. I grew up in india in like a tiny little town in india. And it just so happens you know nerdy place. People are totally encouraged to be engineers in computer. Science nerds young age and i got into computer. Science very early in accuracy got fascinated by field and just really got lucky and trained at a very young age bitten people who are luminaries in the field which means got tons of opportunities that were uncharacteristic. For someone my age and background and in terms of Me actually around twelve years ago thousand. Six two thousand seven eight around. I was kind of going to an early mid life crisis. I realized a lot of the kinds of ideas. You exploring machine. Learning the applications at the time were advertising or like personalization on a phone or personalization on a desktop email filtering and what that made me think about was like is that i wanted to do something with more social immediate social meant i considered everything and around the time also got introduced to colleagues actor stanford who were physicians so these were physicians. Who took care of premature babies.

Saria Succi John C Malone Machine Learning And Healthcar Johns Hopkins University Sepsis Beijing Mitch SAM India Stanford
US Overdose Deaths Hit Record 93,000 in Pandemic Last Year

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

US Overdose Deaths Hit Record 93,000 in Pandemic Last Year

"U. S. overdose deaths hit a record in twenty twenty the centers for disease control and prevention released an estimate that a record ninety three thousand people died of drug overdoses last year that amounts to a twenty nine percent increase over twenty nineteen the nation was already struggling with an opioid epidemic and experts say lockdowns another pandemic restrictions isolated those with drug addictions and may treatment harder to get Shannon mon it is an associate professor of sociology at Syracuse University she says what's really driving the surge in overdoses is increasingly poisoned drug supply contaminated with fentanyl she says her research found increased deaths were more likely to be people who had already been struggling with addiction along with nearly three hundred eighty thousand deaths attributed to cope at nineteen the overdoses contributed to what is overall the deadliest year in U. S. history I'm Jennifer king

Centers For Disease Control An Syracuse University Shannon Jennifer King
What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:35 min | 1 year ago

What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

"Since the launch of sputnik in nineteen fifty seven humans have been sending all sorts of things into space stuff like the serious eight and new satellite just launched by stitchers parent company or cargo space craft bringing supplies to space station's not to mention the most prising stuff like golden records or read tesla's an estimated thirty five thousand bits of Incentives right up to objects at the size of double decker buses up to of course international space station which is said to be the size of american football fields or five bedroom house. That's dr alice. Gorman associate professor at flinders university in south australia and one of the world's leading space archaeologists she studies all sorts of ways. Humans have engaged with space including these tens of thousands of objects rocketing around in earth orbit. And that's just stuff four inches and bigger there's believed to be millions of objects anything smaller than that. They distributed from lois little bit which is about two hundred kilometers above the surface of the us up to maybe about one thousand two thousand kilometers then. You have raged. That's just cold middle or medium business and then you get into. The high as obits. Miss includes Stationary orbit which is where bust of telecommunications satellites used to think of these orbits kind of like three lanes of a running track with satellites and spacecraft as the runners zipping around and around in their respective lanes. But note that for this analogy to work the track would be really really big and runners relatively teeny if we go out there and look at these might only say one object within your field. You so that impression. We have a stuff's closely packed together. Just together that's actually luck. Absolute worst case scenario. Which we're not at yet. There's growing concern about what will happen over. The next few decades as there are a lot of plans to launch way more stuff into orbit. And here's the thing. The vast vast majority of objects orbiting the planet is considered space junk.

Dr Alice Flinders University Tesla Gorman South Australia Lois Football United States
Listen Up: Biden Speaks Volumes in a Whisper to Make a Point

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Listen Up: Biden Speaks Volumes in a Whisper to Make a Point

"President Biden has been using a different strategy to get his point across at certain moments he whispers trump White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany calls it peculiar and crazy I think it's time to give ordinary people a tax break it does look a little bit like and Saturday Night Live skit Vanessa Beasley is an associate professor of communications at Vanderbilt University you can see how frustrated he is or give the appearance of being frustrated right so that breaks the fourth wall if you will the presidency to see what our president really thinks president Biden moves in toward the microphone talks about issues like financial help for families one point two million dollars released so far please leave says usually raising the volume gets the message across it sort of sets everybody back a little bit when you see someone going in a different direction and reducing their body on his talk show Stephen Cole bear said the Biden whispers are a little creepy at Donahue Washington

President Biden Kayleigh Mcenany Vanessa Beasley Vanderbilt University White House Stephen Cole Bear Biden Washington
How Could Lab-Grown Meat Change the Pet Food World?

BrainStuff

01:54 min | 1 year ago

How Could Lab-Grown Meat Change the Pet Food World?

"Do we ensure that what we feed our pets is not only good for them a rich in protein and all the nutrients new to keep them healthy but good for our planet to ask many of us reduce our meat intake or opt for more sustainable animal proteins. Could we do the same for pets for the article. This episode is based on how stuff works. Spoke with greg aldrich a research associate professor in the coordinator of the pet food program the department of grain science and industry at kansas state university. He said it's all doable. I can formulate a vegetarian diet for a dog. I can make a vegan diet for a dog. it's just a lot harder to get it all balanced and then to get them to like it. The pet food institute estimates that more than one hundred and eighty million dogs and cats are living in. us households and the american pet products association reports that americans spent more than forty two billion dollars on pet foods and treats in twenty twenty alone and all of that is rough on the planet a twenty seventeen paper written by ucla researcher. Gregory oaken found that american dogs and cats are responsible through the food. They eat for the release of up to sixty four million tons of harmful greenhouse gases year. But it's not as if we're feeding our pets big slabs of brontosaurus sorace ribs and live chickens pet foods in the. Us generally have plenty of grains included. Corn is in fact. The number one ingredient used overall in cat and dog foods. According to the north american renderers relation but most pet foods do have a huge animal component. The reason for that is simple dogs and cats and you and i need protein and eating meat or meat by products is often the best. I and cheapest source of protein.

Greg Aldrich Pet Food Program Department Of Grain Science An Pet Food Institute American Pet Products Associat Kansas State University Gregory Oaken Ucla United States
"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday. three-goal who is an associate professor of psychiatric enter into co director of michigan neuroscience institute at the university of michigan calligraphy studies individual differences in blundell polluted mental illness but the focus of addiction shelley..

Mike yesterday michigan neuroscience institut three-goal university of michigan calligr
"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Strategize for Future Work Success

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Strategize for Future Work Success

"Described them in the previous two episodes. My early career dreams and explorations were both vivid and meaningful as a young teen. I got to explore the world of broadcast media and my college scholarship. Amy toward a career in broadcasting as a news reporter and producer during my junior year in college i engaged with a truly amazing professor of advertising. His name was howard cogan and he helped me to completely alter my career path. Besides being much admired associate professor at the college park school of communications howard was the successful advertising executive who wrote voiced and produced most of the commercials. That ran on ithaca new york radio stations. It is without a doubt that howard cogan was the most important mentor of my professional and personal life from our first meeting. He took a deep personal interest in me and my success and he soon convinced me to refocus my career sites away from broadcast news to advertising and media and specifically towards the fast growing channel advertising called direct marketing so with graduation day in my sights. I focused my job. Search on entry level opportunities at an ad agency focused on direct marketing. But the going wasn't easy and the rejection letters arrived by the day problem was i had graduated into one of the most depressed job. Markets for entry level talent and a generation. Howard's advice to me was cheerful but sobering dan. He said you're going to need to get strategic about your career in direct mail and it looks like you may not find your opportunity on the agency side quickly

Howard Cogan College Park School Of Communi AMY Ithaca Howard New York DAN
How Will Babies Born During the Pandemic Meet the World?

The Big Story

01:41 min | 1 year ago

How Will Babies Born During the Pandemic Meet the World?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Dr sherri madigan associate professor psychology. Department of the university of calgary she holds a candidate research chair in determinants of child development. Hello dr megan. thanks for having me. You are most welcome i will tell you. We got the idea for this episode. from a listener. Who wrote us with a question. Can i begin by asking you that question. Yes sounds great. So this is a listener unnamed. Diana who wrote that. I've had a baby during the pandemic and he is about to start daycare. He has not been held by anyone. Outside of our household no other adults have ever cared for him although my parents would have loved to help travel restrictions during the pandemic prevented them from visiting. I'm worried for what this means for his socialization. So should she worried. Well it's a really good question actually a common one so this has been a topic. I've been asked to actually speak on a few times. Because i know that parents are thinking a lot about this and worried i guess what i would say is that it is going to be a little bit difficult for kids to transition into a daycare environment. Because it's going to be so new and novel to them now. The reality is that kids always find it hard transition into a daycare environment because it's new and novel to them so that's not different than how life was pre pandemic but i think the big difference now when kids are are doing that switch over into day care is that they haven't had a lot of interaction with other people and they're going to be thrusted into an environment where everything is really really knew and the interactions are really new.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Dr Sherri Madigan Department Of The University O Dr Megan Diana
"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Features of.

"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm an associate professor of clinical medicine at the vaginal is college of physicians and surgeons at Columbia University. And I'm a general internist in private practice in Manhattan. We should also say you are our family doctor, And I think you're great. So thank you. Thank you for that. Can you give us a quick overview? Really? What Your typical day was like during the cove in peak in New York City, and how that compared to a typical day pre coded? Yes. So I do predominantly preventive medicine. I do a lot of checkups and things that are done in a fairly routine fashion. What happened at the end of March is I went from having a few conversations with people who were having fever to having 8 to 10 patients a day calling in with symptoms that were concerning when I would say of my practice of about 1000 patients. 50 had covert related illness. So I spent a lot of time basically talking to people on the phone the last two weeks of March and the first two weeks of April where the peak time here in New York City and at what point did you stop going into your office to see people and handling this all? Elektronik, Lee? Well, I never stopped going into my office because I live within walking distance of my office. So my office manager and I worked the entire time. It was also easier for me to be in my office in what I felt was my command central. When I was handling all the phone calls, I had very quick access to my Elektronik health records. I was able to use my office as a reassuring background for any video calls that I had with patients, and it just allowed me to kind of stay focused. So I would do an initial console to a telemedicine consulate and then I would create my list of phone calls of people who I would call and follow up on. Over the next day or two or week or two, So I should say we were on your daily call she for a while. We had illness in the family during that time, which was Pretty concerning, especially because in New York City, you know the big concern is if you go to the hospital, what's going to happen there and So we were talking to you every day for seemed like, typically 20 to 30 minutes. So what happened with Cove it And the hard thing for physicians is that there was so much uncertainty. And there was a sense that there wasn't much we could do other than maybe manage some of the other medications that the patient was taking, or maybe listen and see if on top of a viral infection, they were developing bacterial infections or pneumonias or Sinus infections or ear infection. So every day I felt Follow up phone calls. They were to reassure the patient. But it was also for me to learn more about the illness and what was happening and then to make micro interventions to maybe prevent.

New York City associate professor of clinica office manager Columbia University private practice Manhattan Elektronik Lee
"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"FM to get started. Mike, Yesterday is professor, only Sabet who is the chair. Of Business Administration and an associate professor of finance at the Local University of Jerusalem fees a member of the scientific blowed experimental finance society. She has been awarded several research grants including multiple grants from the Science Foundation Velka Molly. Hi Thank. You for having me is a pleasure. You have done and outdoing lot of research in exploring consumer behavior related to personal finance financial decisions. it has long been established that consumers make many irrational and often inexplicable decisions. Related to their personal finance, some of the recent developments in the Fintech area be useful in correcting such behavior. Perhaps I want to start with one of your one of your working papers. Entitled Using Artificial Intelligence and Behavioral Finance to cope with limited attention and reduce overdraft fees. And I guess you are investigating the speaker mechanisms to reduce overdraft fees from banks. Could you talk a little bit about that paper? Sure this is a joint work. With the neal individually domains the videos from the Hebrew, university in tweets. Any dog is from into it and. Actually we join forces with into, it. With mean to identification in order to sing. How can actually reduce overdraft fees for consumer? It is a large problem. And You know you wonder how come somebody that is buying a starbucks. Coffee is paying city dollar fee for that. Nothing the sanity. This is rationale choice. If they were aware that specific transacting will actually caused them to pay that match. So we joined forces with into it into it head. End Invested in Clinton to invest in Algorithm that. You. That you are close to get into that situation. Given that. We added additional layer of behavior of finance because we thought that the way that the reminders being sent away that the. Is Framed. Their complexity may hit may make a difference may have additional value in reducing these overdraft fees in this is what we find your act to make a long story short. Keep it simple if you want their awareness of the consumers. Make sure that the messages that you send our simple. The are differences whether you frame it. Positive or negative by the biggest effect is actually. We achieved by. Making this message itself much simpler. Much more coherent to the consumers so so in general. Yeah, it is good to send a message. The consumer reacts to it. down from there as it is better if you send a simpler message..

Behavioral Finance associate professor of finance Science Foundation Velka Molly Local University of Jerusalem starbucks Sabet professor Fintech Business Administration Mike Clinton
"associate professor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Associate professor at Dallas theological seminary thirty books on end times prophecies what is your take on the front of virus the coronavirus today is a frightening for shadow of what's coming and showing us how quickly something like this an invisible enemy can really go around the globe subscribe and listen now by going to fox news podcasts dot com I think there is a large demonstrations across New York City could mean an uptick in cases of covert nineteen another night of demonstrations in New York that were more peaceful governor Andrew Cuomo drew the line between protesting and looting very very different situations the pro testing is righteous indignation over Mr Floyd's murder and systemic racism and injustice as for the looting and the looting is criminal behavior put urine sample reminding of the need to keep coronavirus numbers down if you're going to protest protest intelligently remember the cold virus is still out there the NYPD says it made about two hundred and eighty protest related arrests last night in New York City Tonya J. powers fox news federal service approved an expansion of its five hundred billion dollar emergency program to support state and local governments it'll allow all states to have at least two cities or counties eligible to tap the fed support program regardless of population a statue of a divisive Philadelphia mayor taken Rizzo's statue will be put in storage for now they've been outside Philadelphia's municipal services building across from city hall ten feet tall bronze crane in the early morning with national and everything that you've been vandalized several times including during the current protest against police violence may result had a reputation for racial discrimination as part of his tough stance on crime the current mayor Jim Kenney had earlier pledged to have it move sometime next year saying he never liked it Chris foster fox news prince Charles has told a virtual meeting of the World Economic Forum the recovery from covert nineteen is a reset moment for the world and is an opportunity to prioritize sustainability the prince has recovered from the virus after suffering a mild symptoms.

Associate professor New York City Andrew Cuomo Mr Floyd murder NYPD Tonya J. powers Rizzo Philadelphia Jim Kenney Dallas theological seminary fox fed Chris foster prince Charles
"associate professor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Maternal fetal medicine specialist and associate professor at Duke University out Boris Johnson of course is a world leader but what he and his girlfriend are going through is not all that different from couples all over I mean you can't imagine anything scarier other than you or your family member being infected with corona virus than being pregnant at this time what are you telling expectant moms who you know at this time especially when I was joyous times their life it's it's really scary cautious reassurance thus far in pregnancy we have not seen that pregnant women tend to do worse than other people in the population who get the virus that said that's based mostly on data from China and it's very limited data so we're very cautiously watching that pregnant population here in the US we know that code is bad for anyone obviously and even young healthy people can get very very ill from this and we have seen pregnant women get quite L. but in terms of population level we haven't seen as significant of illness among pregnant women as we have in past outbreaks for example in H. one and won back in two thousand nine within about a month of the disease spreading it became very clear that pregnant women did much worse than the general population and we are now I have over a million co that infections across the globe and we haven't seen that level of concern as of yet we do worry a bit about the fact that the American population may have more underlying medical illnesses that some other populations across the world and so like I said we're cautiously watching but thus far cautiously reassuring what about a mom who is tested positive transferring it to the baby yeah that's a great question similarly we have not seen any clear evidence of transmission to the baby while mom is pregnant there are a couple of reports that have raised a little bit of concern and that they've shown some certain markers and infection or inflammation in babies who are born after bombs were positive but thus far we haven't seen that there is any clear illness related to that how about this idea that my mom goes to deliver the baby and you know contracts it and then have to be separated from her newborn for you know the very earliest parts of a life that's something that's really scary to a lot of expectant moms sure and very understandably scary one thing they'll say is that the CDC has softened their recommendation language of bets on this and that it is not a mandate that moms be separated from their newborn events but that this be a shared decision making process with the hospital staff physicians and their patients in that women who may be particularly L. and may be sending a lot of buyers may choose to have their invent separated attention more so than women who have recovered for example and are doing well it really is recommended that this be a case by case decision I've got a friend who is daughter is expecting and she wants to go there and be with her a lot of husbands and partners have said the same thing what are you recommending for those people I mean for in in her instance she's in New York her daughter is in Atlanta should she go and be be self quarantining now the same for a husband I mean it's just so confusing for a lot of people with they don't know what to do the recommendations in general are the people not travel that they stay home if they are able to and if they can not go from city to city to decrease the risk of sharing this virus from city to city in people who are already living and a shared space the recommendations really vary from place to place as we know that we should limit visitors as much as possible on labor and delivery units most labor and delivery units if they are allowing visitors are allowing one support person to help moms do you have anything that you would like to add that you know words of encouragement for expectant moms and you know everybody anybody else who's you know just obviously high levels of anxiety I mean does that stress out the baby as well I think that the important thing for us to remember is that the vast majority of people who get this infection even if they get the infection do well they tend to recover there's a small very small proportion that ends up very L. the things that we are all doing thus far really appear to be working said that continuing to social distance for as long as possible this will bury by municipality but as long as they continue to do the things that are recommended they will likely do very well in their babies will likely be very healthy and as I said the the reassuring nature of the information that we have in pregnancy thus far shouldn't give moms and some general peace of mind we actually have one piece of good news that's a silver lining around this infection for moms are going to have babies thank you so much.

associate professor Duke University Boris Johnson
"associate professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Maternal fetal medicine specialist and associate professor at Duke University out Boris Johnson of course is a world leader but what he and his girlfriend are going through is not all that different from couples all over I mean you can't imagine anything scarier other than you or your family member being infected with corona virus than being pregnant at this time what are you telling expectant moms who you know at this time especially when I was joyous time in their life it's it's really scary cautious reassurance thus far in pregnancy we had not seen that pregnant women tend to do worse than other people in the population who get the virus that said that's based mostly on data from China and it's very limited data so we're very cautiously watching the pregnant population here in the US we know that code is bad for anyone obviously and even young healthy people can get very very ill from this and we have seen pregnant women get quite L. but in terms of copulation level we haven't seen as significant of illness among pregnant women as we had in past outbreaks for example in H. one N. one back in two thousand nine where they had about a month of the disease spreading it became very clear that pregnant women did much worse than the general population and we are now I have over a million co that infections across the globe and we haven't seen that level of concern as of yet we do worry a bit about the fact that the American population may have more underlying medical illnesses than some other populations across the world and so like I said we're cautiously watching but thus far cautiously reassuring what about a mom who was tested positive transferring it to the baby yeah that's a great question similarly we have not seen any clear evidence of transmission to the baby while mom is pregnant there are a couple of reports that have raised a little bit of concern and that they've shown some certain markers of infection or inflammation in babies who are born after bombs were good positive thus far we haven't seen that there is any clear illness related to that how about this idea that my mom goes to deliver the baby and you know contracts it and then has to be separated from her newborn for you know the very earliest parts of the life that's something that's really scary to a lot of expectant moms sure and very understandably scary one thing that I will say is that the CDC has softened their recommendation language of bets on this and that it is not a mandate that moms be separated from their newborn events but that is B. a shared decision making process with the hospital staff physicians and their patients in that women who may be particularly L. and may be sending a lot of virus may choose to have their invent separated attention more so than women who have recovered for example and are doing well it really is recommended that this be a case by case decision I've got a friend who's daughter is expecting and she wants to go there and be with her a lot of husbands and partners have said the same thing what are you recommending for those people I mean for in in her instance she's in New York her daughter is in Atlanta should she go and be be self quarantining now the same for a husband I mean it's just so confusing for a lot of people with they don't know what to do the recommendations in general are the people not travel that they stay home if they are able to and if they can not go from city to city to decrease the risk of sharing this virus from city to city in people who are already living and a shared space the recommendations really vary from place to place as we know that we should limit visitors as much as possible on labor and delivery units most labor and delivery units if they are allowing visitors are allowing one support person to help moms do you have anything that you would like to add that you know words of encouragement for expectant moms and you know everybody anybody else who's you know just obviously high levels of anxiety I mean does that stress out the baby as well I think that the important thing for us to remember is that the vast majority of people who get this infection even if they get the infection do well they tend to recover there's a small very small proportion that ends up very L. the things that we are all doing thus far really appear to be working so that continuing to social distance for as long as possible this will bury by municipality but as long as they continue to do the things that are recommended they will likely do very well in their babies will likely be very healthy and as I said the the reassuring nature of the information that we have in pregnancy thus far shouldn't give moms and some general peace of mind we actually have one piece of good news that's a silver lining around this infection for moms are going.

associate professor Duke University Boris Johnson
"associate professor" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WSB-AM

"An associate professor of psychiatry at Yale school of medicine a specialist in addiction psychiatry and is currently the lead fellowship training programs it helping lead the fellowship training programs and addictions at Yale and doctor we have a lot of addiction going on right now that I think may have been latent for a lot of people it may be you know kids and soccer games in work and life has you know kept people busy and now we're talking for the break about how bored some people have the combat I want to pivot and I want to talk about the children I want to talk about the long term implications on a child's developing brain I during this pandemic and how parents you know can be on the look out for some things that might indicate that their child is struggling with all of this information in the newness of everything and and how we can you know help move them through this process yeah thanks for raising this issue I'm gonna start with just explaining why a child's brain is different than an adult brain and I'm gonna do it hopefully fairly easily so we have this deep structures in our brain that that kind of come online pretty early another the structures called the limbic system are actually what I call the go system this is the system that help desk and to survive alertness of danger if we see a bear with Ryan if you step on a nail at her we do not do that again or to address the issue I for hungry and you know go get food or thirsty go get water these are our parts of the brain that really drive human survival what makes humans quite unique it's actually the front top part of our brain called the frontal lobe and I'm gonna call this the stock system so this is a system that says okay I see a bear I want to run but actually I'm not gonna run because it's behind glass right it's it's part of the brain that help with that process rest going to think about and to measure at the plant and head to choose if you well right and that I would call the stock system and it actually is developing all the way through adolescence and to work out twenty five years old and this is why adolescent specially laid out as well all adolescents often take risks and do things impulsively that adults would not do that because that goes system is fully aligned but that doctors did not fit to be able to look at cove that are the coronavirus into adequately or accurately measure risk is much more difficult for children and adolescents than it is for adults right and so yeah I'm sorry what yeah I would say so if you're tired of being afraid first of all consolidate their feelings but calm down in that you know as I mentioned can pager right I like that well that's alright because I know you have somewhere to say and I really want your input on this because this is really really important I'm hearing from parents all over.

associate professor of psychia Yale school of medicine