35 Burst results for "Associate Professor"

Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:57 min | 5 d ago

Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

"You study ones that civil kano eruptions on singular events but can continue with follow up last for thousands of years after the first eruption super volcanic eruptions are among the most catastrophic event in any planet's history then includes the earth they vet tremendous amounts of magma almost instantaneously they impact global climate here on earth that means triggering volcanic winter with abnormally cold temperatures causing widespread feminine population disruptions and e findings reported in the journal nature based on a study of volcanic debris from the turbo eruption indonesia. Seventy five thousand years ago. There's no other way to say it. Tober was the largest volcanic eruption in human history. It had a volcanic explosively index of eight the highest possible score on the chart. The volcanic explosively index is a lot of rhythmic scale for an eruption depend on how much welcoming materials thrown out to what hide it's thrown and how long the eruption lasts. Well people these days talk about events. Such as the famous eighteen eighty three eruption of krakatoa in the sunda strait between the islands of java and sumatra or more recently mount saint helens eruption in washington. State these with thousands of times smaller than tober. Thankfully super volcanoes like turbo. A few and far between the last was new. Zealand's taboo volcano. Some twenty eight thousand five hundred years ago. Should volcanoes often erupt several times with evils of tens of thousands of vs between bigger options. But it's not known what happens. During the dormant periods one of the study's authors associate professor martin denny shake from curtin. University says gani understanding of these lengthy dormant periods hope scientists workout. What to look for an young active sipa volcanoes and help. Scientists prick future eruptions

Tober Sunda Strait Mount Saint Helens Indonesia Sumatra Java Martin Denny Washington Zealand Gani Curtin
Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

Data Skeptic

01:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

"Name is chung show carney associated professor and the southwest johnson university in trump province in china. And can you tell me a little bit about your specific research areas. What do you study my research areas. Congress daytime my machine learning and data analytics gender most specifically focused on forecasting demand focusing in retail and time series focused sich of sees. So the main pay for. I asked you on to discuss. Today is wire arena and serena or s arema not sufficient. You'd mentioned you have a good background in machine learning. I don't necessarily think of a reema as a machine learning technique. How do these two areas fit together in your mind. Actually because the site focused teams all problems and can be served by machinery and when the approached this focusing problem with fines and attorney time service models are very important solutions to forecast team problems. Other side focused is very important in today's areas because you're low many many data so always Focused in problem. We find penser is very important and we also find iron man. Sarah map and armagh. Those are very classic. Run divided news time service motives and when we do couldn't this i remind saruman model. We're fans than actually the classical extre nation or classical. Modern for iran. serena is northern sufficient sarichichekli. Either way actually approach. I remember sarim from elisa angle which is spectral lenzi's digital delivery and in your system theory so we use elisa angle to do countries a romance. I remember motive defines onto loads dench a sufficient from the rich porno view. So this is the whole ground

Southwest Johnson University Carney Chung Penser Sarah Map Congress China Saruman Sarim Elisa Angle Lenzi Serena Iran Elisa
The Life and Loves of Elizabeth Taylor

Even the Rich

02:18 min | Last month

The Life and Loves of Elizabeth Taylor

"Img thank you so much for joining us today. We're really excited to chat with you. Yeah we're super stoked to get into. Elizabeth taylor's filmography thank you so much for inviting me. I'm i'm eager to have this conversation. Yeah so before we start. Mg can you introduce yourself to our listeners. Who are you what he no well. We only have an hour. That's going to be I guess my official title is. I'm an associate professor In the english department at usc. I've written often on popular culture Actually i started out as newsday's political cartoonist. And in there in one thousand nine hundred four. I published forever barbie the unauthorized biography of a real doll. Which did well in enabled me to leave the newspaper And of course the next woke followed logically from forever barbie. It was a cultural history of nasa's jet propulsion laboratory in a way though it is a book. End to forever barbie because forever. Barbie discussed the mid twentieth century. Construction of femininity more. Recently i wrote the accidental feminists tau elizabeth taylor raised our consciousness and we were too distracted by her beauty to notice. The whole book is the subtitle so How did you become a fan of elizabeth taylor. And what drew you to write about her life and career. Thank you about ten years ago. I was dating someone relentlessly inappropriate and yang and her friends and her friends friends and i ended up in a vacation. House in palm springs or the streets are all named after fifties era movie stars frank sinatra drive and so forth and that first night all we had for entertainment was a boxed. Set elizabeth taylor. Dvd's and we thought we were going to have a you know a long evening of champ. You started watching. And we were amazed not just by the quality of the films and her acting but by the actual content the feminist content movies

Elizabeth Taylor USC Nasa Barbie Drew Yang Palm Springs Frank Sinatra
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

04:16 min | Last month

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"Which says that you know. You are not letting your mobility of chairman getting your way but unfortunately society causes you to be disabled when they don't accommodate you if there's no ramp to that building suddenly somebody who uses a wheelchair is a is disabled. If there's a ramp the disability goes away so that's the social model of disability if i all museums all performing spaces all film all television described as appropriate. Well in blind is not a disability one of the needs to be member iron very different channels and tasks so i to say hi to you and thank you for provides you do. We're doing so thank you for that. We have five minutes. I yeah so x ray. Justin new are up next wonderful. Great to be here with everybody again. And i've enjoyed the session. I wanna ask you know. There are ways in our society that we kind of have learned to value certain kinds of things in the media and particularly if we look at sports in announcing in an what sells the values of the people. Like we don't really see ever female sports announcers especially for a sport like football for example you might see color commentators or people down on the field something but not the actual announcers. We don't really see a lot of the the biggest media networks wanting to cover things like women's sports but also covering forceful of folks with disabilities like adaptive adaptive sports and wondering extends also. Tonight just sports but just news talks about disability in disability rights issues. And so what do you think. It's going to take to change the way that we function as a society and what we values news in the major media outlets start wanting to include more disability in their coverage earth. Will i think the as a professor of communication. I have a pet peeve. I hope you won't get angry with me for saying this. I don't like the word disability. Because it presupposes that there's ability and then there's those that don't have ish. I'm sorry most of the people. I know that are blind or death for in a wheelchair. Take just as much ability as i do. You have your just being. Xm by the very language that fish irony on that donna. Back in around nineteen eighty. There was a move this country to get rid of the word handicap and replace it with disability. Isn't that ironic. I now and we're still sorta not there yet. Let me just raise what justin was talking about. Though i just needed to get that out of disability. I think it was well intentioned but i think it's putting people in a little box. I'm not persuaded useful if we can frame the conversation differently because what you think about the other is often how you treat the other if that makes sense a lot of myths and stereotypes about the disabled show up as public policy so i think the first thing that needs to happen is we need to start taking a look at different experiences. Different people by promoting those people. There are really qualified folks out there but there's a tendency in every industry just round up. The usual suspects who of i had on his guests last week. I had on this. We like. I rarely see on any talk shows. And let me tell you. I'm talking television here. I rarely see anyone who's blind or deaf what they have no opinions of our politics really. But i suggest to you that there is a stereotype just like wyatt to so many years for black baseball games get broadcast. It was a stereotype of oh white. People wouldn't be interested that similarly so people that can say what people can't see..

Justin football donna justin wyatt baseball
"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

03:14 min | Last month

"associate professor" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"If you wanna comment that. I grew up in new york like peter did and that's how i knew him but i used to the excellent thanks to john mccain who was also from new york originally. He taught me how to d. Excellent stations and i used to listen to w. e. i n. boston ally so used to hear the game and then i also remember state now not on the subject of stores but it used to be to oldies stations. That went up there to visit my sister when she graduated from harvard in cambridge. And i've got w ara laren tayo p. And i got. They were just fantastic. Could you explain to the listeners. What getting far away stations. At night. That you wouldn't get now. Of course you know that you wouldn't get during the day because the radio waves and the way the radio waves work now of course. Now we have apps like tune in and you know all these different things. Yeah yeah and so. I listened to all those. If you don't can. I give you a little history. Yes because i wrote about this like the term. Dx and also w x hey dx for distance that comes from the phillips code and the phillips code was created by. A guy named walter phillips. He was a telegraf. Telegraph operator very influential guy in telegraphy and he created for the journalists of his day. A whole bunch of abbreviations in the late eighteen eighties eighteen ninety nineties so that when they were typing their morse code they didn't have to type out every single letter of every single word and as a result dismayed faster for them to a certain words that were just used over and over and one of them we still use. Today has lived on as portis resident president of the united states. Still use today by. Broadcasters hosea oh my god what is sipping yeah on siriusxm they have photos you now have the slowly and that is where that comes from. That comes in fill is never heard that speech why you have a media historian on your show. This is fantastic. Donna and i also used to listen to the bbc. And i still impurity yet. A lot of often stations. You busy still comes in thirty eight states and i woke good organ white show. Okay yes and i remind first. Introduction was at a camp which is no longer in existence. But it was camped allen in new hampshire which was a camp for blind girls and then it became coed. And you know non existent now..

new york walter phillips john mccain harvard cambridge peter boston portis united states Donna bbc allen new hampshire
Florida Breaks Record for COVID-19 Hospitalizations

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Florida Breaks Record for COVID-19 Hospitalizations

"Florida sets a new record for covert nineteen hospitalizations on Sunday while an increase in vaccinations will help more immediate measures are needed that's according to Jason so Lamy and associate professor of epidemiology at the university of South Florida we don't start implementing that block transmission we're going to continue to see increased numbers of cases and not just cases but indications of severe illness and while Florida governor Ron DeSantis has resisted mandatory mask mandates other leaders are pushing for the protection there's a lot of people spreading a message that is evidence based and trying to get people you have to do the right thing sadly there is also been a big rise in the number of children with the virus at hospitals in Miami many of them needing intensive care I surely apple

Lamy Florida Ron Desantis University Of South Florida Jason Miami Apple
Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

Data Skeptic

02:10 min | 2 months ago

Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

"My name is elizabeth. Barnes i go by libby an associate professor in the department about miss science here at colorado state university. You told me a little bit. Broadly speaking about your interest research wise and things like that. I guess in broad terms. I'm a climate scientists. I've been studying. Climate dynamics that includes climate change but also the earth's climate as it is today as it wasn't in the past and really probably on this podcast but also might broad interest are in the data science side. So how do we use. Data and analysis tools be at statistics mathematics modeling to understand the system and all of the interacting pieces. Could you go into little depth about the data. You're interested in even what's available as most listeners. Do some data science. Maybe they're used to working on the internet where it's as easy as just tracking something but the earth has been leaving us clues for a while. What do you have access to to study specifically the part of atmospheric science i study. I'd like to say we actually really have data coming out our ears. We have so much data. That's not all good data but one of the reasons. I'm so excited about eight science machine. Learning techniques is how can we utilize the data that we have even when some of it. Maybe isn't perfect. For example we have in science in climate science. We have paleo record so ice cores that tell us what the climate looked like hundreds of thousands of years ago today satellites that are constantly there orbiting the earth or sitting still and staring at one place over and over again and they're pouring data in all of the time sometimes it's hard to just get data and process it once we have it than you know so we can do fun stuff just getting it into a processed form is a lot of work. We have climate model data so we have these big climate models that are being run on supercomputers all over the world to try to help us understand the climate system and they are out putting a lot of data in people need to look at it to try to answer and ask interesting questions about the our system and we have people here my department. I don't do this. Atmospheric scientists say with a weather balloon or radar and actually measuring thinking about the weather and the climate state. Right where you are.

Colorado State University Libby Barnes Elizabeth
ML Innovation in Healthcare With Suchi Saria

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:27 min | 2 months ago

ML Innovation in Healthcare With Suchi Saria

"I am here with suci. Saria succi is the founder and ceo of beijing and health. The john c malone associate professor of computer science statistics and health policy and the director of the machine learning and healthcare lab at the johns hopkins university suci. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks sam the long affiliation. That made me very nervous. It was quite a mouthful. But i'm super excited to have you here on the show. This is a an interview that i've been looking forward to for a very long time. I think i remember seeing one of your very early presentations on machine. Learning for sepsis. This was how long ago was that work. I've been working on it for over six years. Now so i don't know when mitch presentation you saw like. Yeah it's been awhile that's awesome. The podcast has been going strong for five so it probably early days for for both of us so nonetheless excited to have you here on the show and would love to start out by having you introduce yourself to our audience share a bit about your story and kind of give us a sense for how you came to work at this convergence of machine learning. Ai healthcare medicine all these things. Yeah absolutely so. I grew up in india in like a tiny little town in india. And it just so happens you know nerdy place. People are totally encouraged to be engineers in computer. Science nerds young age and i got into computer. Science very early in accuracy got fascinated by field and just really got lucky and trained at a very young age bitten people who are luminaries in the field which means got tons of opportunities that were uncharacteristic. For someone my age and background and in terms of Me actually around twelve years ago thousand. Six two thousand seven eight around. I was kind of going to an early mid life crisis. I realized a lot of the kinds of ideas. You exploring machine. Learning the applications at the time were advertising or like personalization on a phone or personalization on a desktop email filtering and what that made me think about was like is that i wanted to do something with more social immediate social meant i considered everything and around the time also got introduced to colleagues actor stanford who were physicians so these were physicians. Who took care of premature babies.

Saria Succi John C Malone Machine Learning And Healthcar Johns Hopkins University Sepsis Beijing Mitch SAM India Stanford
US Overdose Deaths Hit Record 93,000 in Pandemic Last Year

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

US Overdose Deaths Hit Record 93,000 in Pandemic Last Year

"U. S. overdose deaths hit a record in twenty twenty the centers for disease control and prevention released an estimate that a record ninety three thousand people died of drug overdoses last year that amounts to a twenty nine percent increase over twenty nineteen the nation was already struggling with an opioid epidemic and experts say lockdowns another pandemic restrictions isolated those with drug addictions and may treatment harder to get Shannon mon it is an associate professor of sociology at Syracuse University she says what's really driving the surge in overdoses is increasingly poisoned drug supply contaminated with fentanyl she says her research found increased deaths were more likely to be people who had already been struggling with addiction along with nearly three hundred eighty thousand deaths attributed to cope at nineteen the overdoses contributed to what is overall the deadliest year in U. S. history I'm Jennifer king

Centers For Disease Control An Syracuse University Shannon Jennifer King
What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:35 min | 2 months ago

What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

"Since the launch of sputnik in nineteen fifty seven humans have been sending all sorts of things into space stuff like the serious eight and new satellite just launched by stitchers parent company or cargo space craft bringing supplies to space station's not to mention the most prising stuff like golden records or read tesla's an estimated thirty five thousand bits of Incentives right up to objects at the size of double decker buses up to of course international space station which is said to be the size of american football fields or five bedroom house. That's dr alice. Gorman associate professor at flinders university in south australia and one of the world's leading space archaeologists she studies all sorts of ways. Humans have engaged with space including these tens of thousands of objects rocketing around in earth orbit. And that's just stuff four inches and bigger there's believed to be millions of objects anything smaller than that. They distributed from lois little bit which is about two hundred kilometers above the surface of the us up to maybe about one thousand two thousand kilometers then. You have raged. That's just cold middle or medium business and then you get into. The high as obits. Miss includes Stationary orbit which is where bust of telecommunications satellites used to think of these orbits kind of like three lanes of a running track with satellites and spacecraft as the runners zipping around and around in their respective lanes. But note that for this analogy to work the track would be really really big and runners relatively teeny if we go out there and look at these might only say one object within your field. You so that impression. We have a stuff's closely packed together. Just together that's actually luck. Absolute worst case scenario. Which we're not at yet. There's growing concern about what will happen over. The next few decades as there are a lot of plans to launch way more stuff into orbit. And here's the thing. The vast vast majority of objects orbiting the planet is considered space junk.

Dr Alice Flinders University Tesla Gorman South Australia Lois Football United States
Listen Up: Biden Speaks Volumes in a Whisper to Make a Point

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Listen Up: Biden Speaks Volumes in a Whisper to Make a Point

"President Biden has been using a different strategy to get his point across at certain moments he whispers trump White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany calls it peculiar and crazy I think it's time to give ordinary people a tax break it does look a little bit like and Saturday Night Live skit Vanessa Beasley is an associate professor of communications at Vanderbilt University you can see how frustrated he is or give the appearance of being frustrated right so that breaks the fourth wall if you will the presidency to see what our president really thinks president Biden moves in toward the microphone talks about issues like financial help for families one point two million dollars released so far please leave says usually raising the volume gets the message across it sort of sets everybody back a little bit when you see someone going in a different direction and reducing their body on his talk show Stephen Cole bear said the Biden whispers are a little creepy at Donahue Washington

President Biden Kayleigh Mcenany Vanessa Beasley Vanderbilt University White House Stephen Cole Bear Biden Washington
How Could Lab-Grown Meat Change the Pet Food World?

BrainStuff

01:54 min | 3 months ago

How Could Lab-Grown Meat Change the Pet Food World?

"Do we ensure that what we feed our pets is not only good for them a rich in protein and all the nutrients new to keep them healthy but good for our planet to ask many of us reduce our meat intake or opt for more sustainable animal proteins. Could we do the same for pets for the article. This episode is based on how stuff works. Spoke with greg aldrich a research associate professor in the coordinator of the pet food program the department of grain science and industry at kansas state university. He said it's all doable. I can formulate a vegetarian diet for a dog. I can make a vegan diet for a dog. it's just a lot harder to get it all balanced and then to get them to like it. The pet food institute estimates that more than one hundred and eighty million dogs and cats are living in. us households and the american pet products association reports that americans spent more than forty two billion dollars on pet foods and treats in twenty twenty alone and all of that is rough on the planet a twenty seventeen paper written by ucla researcher. Gregory oaken found that american dogs and cats are responsible through the food. They eat for the release of up to sixty four million tons of harmful greenhouse gases year. But it's not as if we're feeding our pets big slabs of brontosaurus sorace ribs and live chickens pet foods in the. Us generally have plenty of grains included. Corn is in fact. The number one ingredient used overall in cat and dog foods. According to the north american renderers relation but most pet foods do have a huge animal component. The reason for that is simple dogs and cats and you and i need protein and eating meat or meat by products is often the best. I and cheapest source of protein.

Greg Aldrich Pet Food Program Department Of Grain Science An Pet Food Institute American Pet Products Associat Kansas State University Gregory Oaken Ucla United States
"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:13 min | 3 months ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"That's a great question and when we initially started talking about translating this animal model to humans. We have a big group working on this and our general consensus. Was that if we tried to move this to humans. Nobody's ever gonna sign track in. Humans are smarter that if they're in a laboratory situation why were. They signed check and in fact. That is not what we're doing. And so we found that you know. This is all very preliminary unpublished data. But it seems to be that in adult humans and young adult. Humans are young adult meaning actually college students so college students and slightly older humans as well Even under variable conditions. You can see a great tendency of them to sidetrack and we can change a parameter so that we change that distribution of whether or not there sign or goal trackers are. They're tendencies but for the most part. We seem to be able to capture both sign and goal tracking in humans. And what the data starting to look like as we've looked across ages and so we've looked at Five to seven year olds and night to thirteen year olds and then young adult and adult humans and own especially in children. What we saw was was in retrospect should have been predicted but in younger children we see that the population seems to be skewed toward sign trackers and so these are studies where we actually took a very similar apparatus to what we use in rats. In this case it's A big green lego box that these kids are place in front of a new luminated. Lever comes out and it retracts. The kids got an announcement adjacent food cop when we did that. To fight the seven year olds What we saw is that the majority of the population around fifty subjects. Both males and females Were skewed towards sign trackers. So that is we had Zero pure gold trackers in in that task under those conditions without particular population again. In retrospect that makes perfect sense so kids age on the germany. Know that they're more likely to kind of Use their hands to explore things and to approach and interact with things and from a logical perspective. We know that their cortex is not yet developed to inhibit such responses right. And so they're not using. They're not tapping into those kind of mechanisms at that age. I mean yeah. Go ahead if i was also thinking that. Is it any sort of a dog native caused rationale here. I would stipulate have signed tracking is less cognitively. Costly right So yeah in the those. Were our initial hypothesis. Based on what we knew from the classic learning letter was that nicole trackers are using more of this cognitive sort of top down learning processes whereas sign trackers are using more user of bottom up bottom up motivational processes and in fact Studies in my laboratory have shown are are starting to suggest that that is indeed the case in so It seems that while you know these Connections connections from the cortex subcortical structures like the alma or the nucleus accumbens. These critical connections are really important for encoding. That predictive value. So that is Including the predictive value..

thirteen year germany Five seven year both Both around fifty subjects Zero pure gold
"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:29 min | 3 months ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday. three-goal who is an associate professor of psychiatric enter into co director of michigan neuroscience institute at the university of michigan calligraphy studies individual differences in blundell polluted mental illness but the focus of addiction shelley..

Mike yesterday michigan neuroscience institut three-goal university of michigan calligr
"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"associate professor" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

05:29 min | 4 months ago

"associate professor" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"And how you one thing before you know it. You're ready thinking. The earth is flat or the george floyd killing was faked because of how these algorithms with woken have the funnel people into particular way of thinking by the time the time for discussion on this people completely damaged the opposed positions and cannot meet Using facts from both of those positions that nobody as she recognizes as valid. That's something that's quite different and something that we haven't really felt to this. Extreme on a global level is there a particular kind of person that he's more susceptible to being targeted with false information all fake or is more susceptible to getting down the rabbit hole. You talk about with the algorithm cape serving you up a slightly more extreme version of the last thing you looked at so you. You start off inquiring about george floyd skilling and somehow you end up with the extreme propaganda that it was faked they people who are more susceptible to that yes. I mean what we know is an indivisible fantastic research on this on thinking about highly lessons group on the school of hygiene in particular that women older people and minority groups are more likely to be the target of this misinformation and false information in the same way that the algorithms trolls that mean that women politicians more likely to receive really unpleasant messages and the targeted by that on accident. The algorithms exist talk women in. That's been proven women. Older people in minority communities are more likely to receive misinformation false information. And if you go back to the baby. Formula example that i gave that's often because he's a groups who are more likely to try to seek out information or the field information that's available. Is there for them. So if you take. The example of the vaccine covid vaccine. I think he's just been over a month. Since there's been an official government statement that it's safe for pregnant women to be vaccinated. This has been over years Toe the vaccine was going to be available just a six months. Since the official rollout of the vaccine is begun so in that time there's been no targeted no official statement to alleviate concerns of health population around what vaccine is going to do to them their bodies unborn child. It's what we've had. As millions of women in droves thousands going online to try and find out information. precisely abbess. Now what does this vaccine for me. And those women are susceptible to possessive. What you're saying the go lining looking something on a before you know it the information. That's either confusing or or putting them off on giving them real concerns about the vaccine because the people who are addressing those concerns after the first people to giving them misinformation they have a particular agenda and so this is really asking questions when we think about fakes is really asking us. Why is it taking so long what to really think about half of the population what that population needs. You know..

george floyd both six months millions of women first george floyd skilling over a month earth thousands one population over years half of
"associate professor" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

05:23 min | 4 months ago

"associate professor" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"David genuine fakey something us both real and fake at the same time a classic example is some is a synthetic diamond which i had to learn a lot about so synthetic diamond is a diamond has exactly the same chemical properties as a natural diamond but is created in a lab at very difficult to detect. So it's real in the sense of this chemical structure that of a diamond but it's considered fake because it's not mind and so that the loads of examples like this and i'm just really fascinated by. What can we learn about who gets to say. Something's real fake just by using some of these examples. So the podcasts. Really exposed that probably the most famous use of the phrase fake in contemporary times spain attached to fake news and it was donald trump that we used to hear that from constantly in fact he used to used to draw it. Anybody who's simply didn't agree with him. If we move from things like synthetic diamonds to the world of ideas. What do you think the difference is between what donald trump was climbing was fake news. And what you would consider as fake news. I think discussing fake news to me and my reputation of that is important. Because actually what we get into. The holiday is power. Who gets to decide that. Something's really fake. And i think donald trump was touching on when he was discussing. Fake news was a kind of prevailing sense amongst certain groups that the news. We have doesn't really touch them. They consider to be real or that. There's something else that's going on. All of his faults every now and again just to randomness more than anything. Donald trump was able to sometimes touch on some of these feelings that prevailing. And i think what we can save from a sense of marginalization with the news really represent what people believe is it puts us to place his way. We need to think hard about really has not produced whose voice is heard. So i mean take out something. Quite contentious big got in the uk will know south divide in terms of how people think about the news and who the news is full so people in the know. Think you know the news really represents things that people in the south london thinking care about. The news isn't really representing their real concerns of the they would care about so in those situations. It's really easy for them to take this concern that been presented in the media isn't real. It's a fake consensus. He's got nothing to do things with thinking about that kind of marginalisation. From what seen the seats power. Who gets to decide what's important is really off the hall of this Fake news and the way that people think about fake news and another example is the beginning of covid. Nurses were really soft on twitter This fake news around the allocation and the access to pcp. The government was sending was available. Necessary saying isn't available and so there was a sense in which often fake news can give us a accessing to where people think that then the voices are being heard and whether or not being represented now of course as political manipulation as we've seen with donald trump to shut down..

David donald trump twitter Donald trump uk south london both
Strategize for Future Work Success

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Strategize for Future Work Success

"Described them in the previous two episodes. My early career dreams and explorations were both vivid and meaningful as a young teen. I got to explore the world of broadcast media and my college scholarship. Amy toward a career in broadcasting as a news reporter and producer during my junior year in college i engaged with a truly amazing professor of advertising. His name was howard cogan and he helped me to completely alter my career path. Besides being much admired associate professor at the college park school of communications howard was the successful advertising executive who wrote voiced and produced most of the commercials. That ran on ithaca new york radio stations. It is without a doubt that howard cogan was the most important mentor of my professional and personal life from our first meeting. He took a deep personal interest in me and my success and he soon convinced me to refocus my career sites away from broadcast news to advertising and media and specifically towards the fast growing channel advertising called direct marketing so with graduation day in my sights. I focused my job. Search on entry level opportunities at an ad agency focused on direct marketing. But the going wasn't easy and the rejection letters arrived by the day problem was i had graduated into one of the most depressed job. Markets for entry level talent and a generation. Howard's advice to me was cheerful but sobering dan. He said you're going to need to get strategic about your career in direct mail and it looks like you may not find your opportunity on the agency side quickly

Howard Cogan College Park School Of Communi AMY Ithaca Howard New York DAN
How Will Babies Born During the Pandemic Meet the World?

The Big Story

01:41 min | 4 months ago

How Will Babies Born During the Pandemic Meet the World?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Dr sherri madigan associate professor psychology. Department of the university of calgary she holds a candidate research chair in determinants of child development. Hello dr megan. thanks for having me. You are most welcome i will tell you. We got the idea for this episode. from a listener. Who wrote us with a question. Can i begin by asking you that question. Yes sounds great. So this is a listener unnamed. Diana who wrote that. I've had a baby during the pandemic and he is about to start daycare. He has not been held by anyone. Outside of our household no other adults have ever cared for him although my parents would have loved to help travel restrictions during the pandemic prevented them from visiting. I'm worried for what this means for his socialization. So should she worried. Well it's a really good question actually a common one so this has been a topic. I've been asked to actually speak on a few times. Because i know that parents are thinking a lot about this and worried i guess what i would say is that it is going to be a little bit difficult for kids to transition into a daycare environment. Because it's going to be so new and novel to them now. The reality is that kids always find it hard transition into a daycare environment because it's new and novel to them so that's not different than how life was pre pandemic but i think the big difference now when kids are are doing that switch over into day care is that they haven't had a lot of interaction with other people and they're going to be thrusted into an environment where everything is really really knew and the interactions are really new.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Dr Sherri Madigan Department Of The University O Dr Megan Diana
GOP Makes a Choice: Donald Trump Over Liz Cheney

TIME's Top Stories

01:50 min | 5 months ago

GOP Makes a Choice: Donald Trump Over Liz Cheney

"Needle phobia maybe keeping some from getting their covid nineteen vaccine. Here's how to cope by terror. Law alex danley a twenty-three-year-old philisophy doctoral student at the university of illinois. Chicago doesn't seem like someone who would be vaccine hesitant. They're determined to stop covid. Nineteen from spreading and having fallen for any vaccine conspiracy theories however getting the corona virus. Shot was tremendously stressful for danley. They feared it could trigger a terrible panic attack leaving them crumpled on the floor sobbing and shaking in front of a crowd of onlookers. They were also worried about healthcare providers dismissing their fears. I don't want to be treated like a child. Because i have a phobia. I'm not a child. I'm acting like an adult with a phobia says danley. I don't believe that vaccines are particularly painful. It's literally just that for some reason my brain processes this in a way that is really intense and unexpected then lee struggles with blood injection injury phobia also known as needle phobia. Since they were a child they've experienced debilitating. Fear win receiving injections according to studies conducted in different countries as many as one in four have some fear of needles causing symptoms from butterflies in their stomach to debilitating panic attacks and one in ten are so fearful that they refuse vaccination entirely says meghan mcmurtry and associate professor of clinical psychology at the university of wealth in ontario canada. Needle phobia has long been a public health issue. Sixteen percent of adults avoid flu shots at least partly

Danley Alex Danley University Of Illinois Phobia Blood Injection Injury Phobia Needle Phobia Chicago LEE Meghan Mcmurtry University Of Wealth Ontario Canada FLU
Dr. Jean-Christophe Plantin Discusses Digital Media Infrastructures and Tech Platforms

Social Media & Politics

02:33 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Jean-Christophe Plantin Discusses Digital Media Infrastructures and Tech Platforms

"Let me turn it over to dr zone. Christoph plantain again. He's an associate professor in the department of media and communications at the doctor plantain. Thanks so much for taking the time out and welcome to the social media and politics podcast. Thanks for having me really happy to be here so to start out here. Why don't we break down a few of the key concepts that you've been developing in your research and the first one i'd like to discuss is media infrastructures which draws attention to this interplay between digital platforms. Which is kind of the services that we're all familiar with and the physical infrastructures that make those platforms work. And i think. Maybe we're not all familiar with those. So could you outline the concept of media infrastructures for us and why we should even be thinking about media infrastructures in the first place. Absolutely yeah you allow me to be a little idiosyncratic and just tell me a little bit how. I came to these concept. Maybe that would. That would be helpful just because this is a history that i guess we'll be telling on how we can put these different concepts together. My background is in a media. Medication studies and i worked a lot since my phd. On the concept of blood. I worked lots a studied. Participatory mapping google maps. Open street map and we are here. Yeah mid-2000s is still the whip. Two point zero seeking pretty strong and the type of scholarship at the time. Emphasizes the participatory nature off these pot for allowing people to post more easily to create to engage in activism or creative practices. so that was my standpoint. that's what i really started with A post doctoral fellowship at university of michigan and with my colleagues where i became much more more familiar with the concept of infrastructure. I worked a lot with polite words. Carla goes the christian. Send vague and these folks are much more on the stf side of these topics of the study of technolog- and the where of course talking about and they were talking about large distribution systems. They're put together via standards and gateways in these type of things but what was super interesting when we started working together and focusing more on the facebook and google's of the world. Is that what. I was describing. As platform there were describing as infrastructure.

Dr Zone Christoph Plantain Department Of Media And Commun Google University Of Michigan Carla Facebook
Why Small Talk is More Important Than You Think

Here's Something Good

02:08 min | 5 months ago

Why Small Talk is More Important Than You Think

"Remember when you start your day in the office with casual chitchat. How was your weekend. Can you believe this weather planning any trips this summer. It may have seemed trivial but it turns out. There's nothing small about small talk in fact it can be an aid to innovation it can build trust and rapport and just plain happier at work. But what happens to small talk when we're all working from home to learn more about the benefits of small talk and how we can still get them in the now. We went to expert. Dr jessica methods. Dr method is an associate professor of human resource management at rutgers university and a member of the academy of management organizational behavioral division. Here's what dr method had to say. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you for having me. So you recently published a study on small talk in the workplace now that so. Many of us are in virtual workplaces. How have conversations among co workers changed. This is such an incredibly important conversation. And when we conducted this study it was pre pandemic. we could not have anticipated how disruptive this remote work boom could have been so really in the past decade. We have seen that so many companies have adopted a more open office space designed so. They've really been focused on strategically designing their workspaces to promote spontaneous casual collisions where employees can just bump into each other in the hallway or at the microwave to have small talk and the idea. There is that these informal chats can be released serendipitous. They can help build rapport and trust and collaboration and they create opportunities for creativity and innovation because these employees are talking with people that they wouldn't necessarily have interacted with otherwise but the transition to remote work has really narrowed the focus of our networks. And the people we have exposure to and who we can talk to sewer networks have been narrowed really to our closest connections are family members are very close friends and our supervisor's and those out. On the periphery who we weren't as close with are kind of in this period of suspended animation

Dr Jessica Dr Method Academy Of Management Organiza Rutgers University
Navigating the Complexities of Black Indigenous Identity

Unreserved

01:55 min | 5 months ago

Navigating the Complexities of Black Indigenous Identity

"Black and indigenous communities share similar struggles as marginalized people on turtle island that combined. History can be quite complicated. My next guest has dedicated much of his work. As an academic to thinking about these connections robert keith collins is an expert on black indigenous interactions. He's an associate professor of american indian studies at san francisco state university. He's african american and choctaw. And he's here to tell us about a history. Many people know very little about welcome to the show dr collins. Thank you very much for having me. So let's start at the beginning. What is the beginning of indigenous black history. That's a fantastic question. And actually we owe a lot of our understanding about it to a canadian scholar. Alexander francis chamberlain france as in in eighteen. Ninety one wrote one of the most comprehensive analysis that we have today and that was african americans and what we find in that study is that this is actually a history. His later colleague would refer to as the third line of colonization. We've talked about a european and native colonization. We talk about european and african colonization. We seldom talk about american. Interactions during the colonization and this is a history that brings that back to live where we actually see cultural exchanges between people that are taking place within sovereign native communities as well as nations and families we also see interactions taking place especially for like in the united states among the five civilized tribes chuck. Todd's cherokees creeks chickasaw seminoles in slavery were native americans owned slaves and have an cultural impact on africans within their communities on their

Robert Keith Collins Dr Collins Turtle Island Alexander Francis Chamberlain San Francisco State University France Chuck Todd United States
Disaster Medicine and Emergency Care With Dr Mathew Levi

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

02:02 min | 5 months ago

Disaster Medicine and Emergency Care With Dr Mathew Levi

"Well we get an interesting guest. Our special guest. Dr matthew levy is an associate professor at johns hopkins department of emergency medicine. He leads hopkins division of special operations which provides for central command and coordination of emergency medicine. Operation and dr levy is board certified in emergency medicine and a sub specialty certified in ems. He's the guy who sets up the teams and strategies that we don't even know we need until god forbid we need them. Thanks for joining us actor levy. Hey doing okay after greetings. It's wonderful to be here. Thank you so much for having me and for that. Very warm reduction so division of special operations. What exactly is that sounds more military than civilian well. It's structured is what i would say and indeed our division special operations at johns hopkins. The division really got its roots nearly two decades ago in being the central focus for all of the out of hospital medicine activities that johns hopkins emergency medicine overseas and that includes the interval syllabi transport programming includes some of our operational medical programs in support of tactical law enforcement medicine special event medicine and a few other topics and initially had some roots in disaster medicine. Which has also grown into its own unique and blossoming flourishing specialty area or focus area so we were close with some of our colleagues as well nowadays so are you coordinating and training these guys on the line. The guys who show up first. Those first responders that were so appreciative for well. It certainly is a team effort. I would say that. I'm one of the people doing that. Training in my role as an ems medical director. I certainly work very closely with our ems. Educators and helping to design implement and facilitate the delivery of educational content. And yes. i do spend a good portion of my time. An educator not only educating our physician colleagues but also educating our pre hospital emergency medical services clinicians in those lifesaving conditions recognition treatment management

Dr Matthew Levy Johns Hopkins Department Of Em Hopkins Division Of Special Op Dr Levy Johns Hopkins Emergency Medici Levy Johns Hopkins
Diversity of Voices in Journalism With Nicky Usher

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:09 min | 5 months ago

Diversity of Voices in Journalism With Nicky Usher

"Joining us today sneaky. Asha the case associate professor at the university of illinois at college of media. Journalism department keeps work focuses on news production in a changing digital environment blending inside for media sociology in political communications a festive award winning book making news at the time so space a month spent in the new through observing daily conversations meetings and journalists at work. And it's a real study of both the dynamics of a newsroom and power structures within it a second book interactive journalism hackers state-run code focused on the rise of programming and data journalism and her next to be published later this year. It's an incredibly topical. One news for the rich white and blue have placed empower distort american journalism and it examines the challenges facing journalism in terms of place power and crucially inequality while committee. I thank you for being with us today. Thank you so much for having year for that lovely introduction. I'm so delighted to speak with you in your global audience. So thank you thank you. Let's the end. Well the in your new book needs for the rich white and blue touch. Keep touch on a key problem in journalism in that. Sec say large national international outlets of pivoted observing readers. An-and will choose to pay for news and if he end up skewing coverage towards the wealthy white liberal audience in the us and wealthy white publicly less liberal. But i know or the uk could just a bit more about the consequences of that. So what. I really worry about. Is you see essentially The news that's most likely to survive is coming from these extremely large institutions and organizations that help global france right. So you can think of. And i think this is particularly the case when we look at what might be formerly called a newspaper because i don't think the guardian or the new york times of the t- Resembles anything close to a newspaper anymore. It's just kinda archaic name that we call it but what ends up doing. Is that people who can pay for news. In the people producing and writing the content thinking about the content are all members increasingly so of global

University Of Illinois College Of Media Journalism Department Asha SEC UK France United States The New York Times
"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 10 months ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm an associate professor of clinical medicine at the vaginal is college of physicians and surgeons at Columbia University. And I'm a general internist in private practice in Manhattan. We should also say you are our family doctor, And I think you're great. So thank you. Thank you for that. Can you give us a quick overview? Really? What Your typical day was like during the cove in peak in New York City, and how that compared to a typical day pre coded? Yes. So I do predominantly preventive medicine. I do a lot of checkups and things that are done in a fairly routine fashion. What happened at the end of March is I went from having a few conversations with people who were having fever to having 8 to 10 patients a day calling in with symptoms that were concerning when I would say of my practice of about 1000 patients. 50 had covert related illness. So I spent a lot of time basically talking to people on the phone the last two weeks of March and the first two weeks of April where the peak time here in New York City and at what point did you stop going into your office to see people and handling this all? Elektronik, Lee? Well, I never stopped going into my office because I live within walking distance of my office. So my office manager and I worked the entire time. It was also easier for me to be in my office in what I felt was my command central. When I was handling all the phone calls, I had very quick access to my Elektronik health records. I was able to use my office as a reassuring background for any video calls that I had with patients, and it just allowed me to kind of stay focused. So I would do an initial console to a telemedicine consulate and then I would create my list of phone calls of people who I would call and follow up on. Over the next day or two or week or two, So I should say we were on your daily call she for a while. We had illness in the family during that time, which was Pretty concerning, especially because in New York City, you know the big concern is if you go to the hospital, what's going to happen there and So we were talking to you every day for seemed like, typically 20 to 30 minutes. So what happened with Cove it And the hard thing for physicians is that there was so much uncertainty. And there was a sense that there wasn't much we could do other than maybe manage some of the other medications that the patient was taking, or maybe listen and see if on top of a viral infection, they were developing bacterial infections or pneumonias or Sinus infections or ear infection. So every day I felt Follow up phone calls. They were to reassure the patient. But it was also for me to learn more about the illness and what was happening and then to make micro interventions to maybe prevent.

New York City associate professor of clinica office manager Columbia University private practice Manhattan Elektronik Lee
"associate professor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Associate professor at Dallas theological seminary thirty books on end times prophecies what is your take on the front of virus the coronavirus today is a frightening for shadow of what's coming and showing us how quickly something like this an invisible enemy can really go around the globe subscribe and listen now by going to fox news podcasts dot com I think there is a large demonstrations across New York City could mean an uptick in cases of covert nineteen another night of demonstrations in New York that were more peaceful governor Andrew Cuomo drew the line between protesting and looting very very different situations the pro testing is righteous indignation over Mr Floyd's murder and systemic racism and injustice as for the looting and the looting is criminal behavior put urine sample reminding of the need to keep coronavirus numbers down if you're going to protest protest intelligently remember the cold virus is still out there the NYPD says it made about two hundred and eighty protest related arrests last night in New York City Tonya J. powers fox news federal service approved an expansion of its five hundred billion dollar emergency program to support state and local governments it'll allow all states to have at least two cities or counties eligible to tap the fed support program regardless of population a statue of a divisive Philadelphia mayor taken Rizzo's statue will be put in storage for now they've been outside Philadelphia's municipal services building across from city hall ten feet tall bronze crane in the early morning with national and everything that you've been vandalized several times including during the current protest against police violence may result had a reputation for racial discrimination as part of his tough stance on crime the current mayor Jim Kenney had earlier pledged to have it move sometime next year saying he never liked it Chris foster fox news prince Charles has told a virtual meeting of the World Economic Forum the recovery from covert nineteen is a reset moment for the world and is an opportunity to prioritize sustainability the prince has recovered from the virus after suffering a mild symptoms.

Associate professor New York City Andrew Cuomo Mr Floyd murder NYPD Tonya J. powers Rizzo Philadelphia Jim Kenney Dallas theological seminary fox fed Chris foster prince Charles
"associate professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Associate professor at Duke University out Boris Johnson of course is a world leader but what he and his girlfriend are going through is not all that different from couples all over I mean you can't imagine anything scarier other than you or your family member being infected with corona virus than being pregnant at this time what are you telling expectant moms who you know at this time especially when I was joyous time in their life it's it's really scary cautious reassurance thus far in pregnancy we had not seen that pregnant women tend to do worse than other people in the population who get the virus that said that's based mostly on data from China and it's very limited data so we're very cautiously watching the pregnant population here in the US we know that code is bad for anyone obviously and even young healthy people can get very very ill from this and we have seen pregnant women get quite L. but in terms of population level we haven't seen as significant of illness among pregnant women as we had in past outbreaks for example in H. one N. one back in two thousand nine within out about a month of the disease spreading it became very clear that pregnant women did much worse than the general population and we are now I have over a million co that infections across the globe and we haven't seen that level of concern as a B. acts we do worry a bit about the fact that the American population may have more underlying medical illnesses than some other populations across the world and so like I said we're cautiously watching but thus far cautiously reassuring what about a mom who was tested positive transferring it to the baby yeah that's a great question similarly we have not seen any clear evidence of transmission to the baby while mom is pregnant there are a couple of reports that have raised a little bit of concern and that they've shown some certain markers of infection or inflammation in babies who are born after mom's work good positive but thus far we haven't seen that there is any illness related to that how about this idea that my mom goes to deliver the baby and you know contracts it and then have to be separated from her newborn for you know the very earliest parts of a life that's something that's really scary to a lot of expectant moms sure and very understandably scary one thing I'll say is that the CDC has softened their recommendation language of bets on this and that it is not a mandate that moms be separated from their newborn events but that is B. a shared decision making process with the hospital staff physicians and the patients and that women who may be particularly L. and may be shedding a lot of virus may choose to have their invent separated attention more so than women who have recovered for example and are doing well it really is recommended that this be a case by case decision I've got a friend who is daughter is expecting and she wants to go there and be with her a lot of husbands and partners have said the same thing what are you recommending for those people I mean for in in her instance she's in New York her daughter is in Atlanta should she go and be be self quarantining now the same for a husband I mean it's just so confusing for a lot of people with they don't know what to do the recommendations in general are the people not travel that they stay home if they are able to and if they can not go from city to city to decrease the risk of sharing this virus from city to city in people who are already living in a shared space the recommendations really vary from place to place as we know that we should limit visitors as much as possible on labor and delivery units most labor and delivery units if they are allowing visitors are allowing one support person to help moms do you have anything that you would like to add that you know words of encouragement for expectant moms and you know everybody anybody else who's you know just obviously high levels of anxiety I mean does that stress out the baby as well I think that the important thing for us to remember is that the vast majority of people who get this infection even if they get the infection do well they tend to recover there's a small very small proportion that ends up very L. the things that we are all doing thus far really appear to be working said that continuing to social distance for as long as possible in this area by municipality but as long as they continue to do the things that are recommended they will likely do very well in their babies will likely be very healthy and as I said the the reassuring nature of the information that we have in pregnancy thus far shouldn't give moms and some general peace of mind we actually have one piece of good news that's the silver lining around this infection for moms are going to have babies thank you so much and take care and stay safe and stay healthy thank you so much you too coming.

Associate professor Duke University Boris Johnson
"associate professor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Maternal fetal medicine specialist and associate professor at Duke University out Boris Johnson of course is a world leader but what he and his girlfriend are going through is not all that different from couples all over I mean you can't imagine anything scarier other than you or your family member being infected with corona virus than being pregnant at this time what are you telling expectant moms who you know at this time especially when I was joyous times their life it's it's really scary cautious reassurance thus far in pregnancy we have not seen that pregnant women tend to do worse than other people in the population who get the virus that said that's based mostly on data from China and it's very limited data so we're very cautiously watching that pregnant population here in the US we know that code is bad for anyone obviously and even young healthy people can get very very ill from this and we have seen pregnant women get quite L. but in terms of population level we haven't seen as significant of illness among pregnant women as we have in past outbreaks for example in H. one and won back in two thousand nine within about a month of the disease spreading it became very clear that pregnant women did much worse than the general population and we are now I have over a million co that infections across the globe and we haven't seen that level of concern as of yet we do worry a bit about the fact that the American population may have more underlying medical illnesses that some other populations across the world and so like I said we're cautiously watching but thus far cautiously reassuring what about a mom who is tested positive transferring it to the baby yeah that's a great question similarly we have not seen any clear evidence of transmission to the baby while mom is pregnant there are a couple of reports that have raised a little bit of concern and that they've shown some certain markers and infection or inflammation in babies who are born after bombs were positive but thus far we haven't seen that there is any clear illness related to that how about this idea that my mom goes to deliver the baby and you know contracts it and then have to be separated from her newborn for you know the very earliest parts of a life that's something that's really scary to a lot of expectant moms sure and very understandably scary one thing they'll say is that the CDC has softened their recommendation language of bets on this and that it is not a mandate that moms be separated from their newborn events but that this be a shared decision making process with the hospital staff physicians and their patients in that women who may be particularly L. and may be sending a lot of buyers may choose to have their invent separated attention more so than women who have recovered for example and are doing well it really is recommended that this be a case by case decision I've got a friend who is daughter is expecting and she wants to go there and be with her a lot of husbands and partners have said the same thing what are you recommending for those people I mean for in in her instance she's in New York her daughter is in Atlanta should she go and be be self quarantining now the same for a husband I mean it's just so confusing for a lot of people with they don't know what to do the recommendations in general are the people not travel that they stay home if they are able to and if they can not go from city to city to decrease the risk of sharing this virus from city to city in people who are already living and a shared space the recommendations really vary from place to place as we know that we should limit visitors as much as possible on labor and delivery units most labor and delivery units if they are allowing visitors are allowing one support person to help moms do you have anything that you would like to add that you know words of encouragement for expectant moms and you know everybody anybody else who's you know just obviously high levels of anxiety I mean does that stress out the baby as well I think that the important thing for us to remember is that the vast majority of people who get this infection even if they get the infection do well they tend to recover there's a small very small proportion that ends up very L. the things that we are all doing thus far really appear to be working said that continuing to social distance for as long as possible this will bury by municipality but as long as they continue to do the things that are recommended they will likely do very well in their babies will likely be very healthy and as I said the the reassuring nature of the information that we have in pregnancy thus far shouldn't give moms and some general peace of mind we actually have one piece of good news that's a silver lining around this infection for moms are going to have babies thank you so much.

associate professor Duke University Boris Johnson
"associate professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Maternal fetal medicine specialist and associate professor at Duke University out Boris Johnson of course is a world leader but what he and his girlfriend are going through is not all that different from couples all over I mean you can't imagine anything scarier other than you or your family member being infected with corona virus than being pregnant at this time what are you telling expectant moms who you know at this time especially when I was joyous time in their life it's it's really scary cautious reassurance thus far in pregnancy we had not seen that pregnant women tend to do worse than other people in the population who get the virus that said that's based mostly on data from China and it's very limited data so we're very cautiously watching the pregnant population here in the US we know that code is bad for anyone obviously and even young healthy people can get very very ill from this and we have seen pregnant women get quite L. but in terms of copulation level we haven't seen as significant of illness among pregnant women as we had in past outbreaks for example in H. one N. one back in two thousand nine where they had about a month of the disease spreading it became very clear that pregnant women did much worse than the general population and we are now I have over a million co that infections across the globe and we haven't seen that level of concern as of yet we do worry a bit about the fact that the American population may have more underlying medical illnesses than some other populations across the world and so like I said we're cautiously watching but thus far cautiously reassuring what about a mom who was tested positive transferring it to the baby yeah that's a great question similarly we have not seen any clear evidence of transmission to the baby while mom is pregnant there are a couple of reports that have raised a little bit of concern and that they've shown some certain markers of infection or inflammation in babies who are born after bombs were good positive thus far we haven't seen that there is any clear illness related to that how about this idea that my mom goes to deliver the baby and you know contracts it and then has to be separated from her newborn for you know the very earliest parts of the life that's something that's really scary to a lot of expectant moms sure and very understandably scary one thing that I will say is that the CDC has softened their recommendation language of bets on this and that it is not a mandate that moms be separated from their newborn events but that is B. a shared decision making process with the hospital staff physicians and their patients in that women who may be particularly L. and may be sending a lot of virus may choose to have their invent separated attention more so than women who have recovered for example and are doing well it really is recommended that this be a case by case decision I've got a friend who's daughter is expecting and she wants to go there and be with her a lot of husbands and partners have said the same thing what are you recommending for those people I mean for in in her instance she's in New York her daughter is in Atlanta should she go and be be self quarantining now the same for a husband I mean it's just so confusing for a lot of people with they don't know what to do the recommendations in general are the people not travel that they stay home if they are able to and if they can not go from city to city to decrease the risk of sharing this virus from city to city in people who are already living and a shared space the recommendations really vary from place to place as we know that we should limit visitors as much as possible on labor and delivery units most labor and delivery units if they are allowing visitors are allowing one support person to help moms do you have anything that you would like to add that you know words of encouragement for expectant moms and you know everybody anybody else who's you know just obviously high levels of anxiety I mean does that stress out the baby as well I think that the important thing for us to remember is that the vast majority of people who get this infection even if they get the infection do well they tend to recover there's a small very small proportion that ends up very L. the things that we are all doing thus far really appear to be working so that continuing to social distance for as long as possible this will bury by municipality but as long as they continue to do the things that are recommended they will likely do very well in their babies will likely be very healthy and as I said the the reassuring nature of the information that we have in pregnancy thus far shouldn't give moms and some general peace of mind we actually have one piece of good news that's a silver lining around this infection for moms are going.

associate professor Duke University Boris Johnson
"associate professor" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We are hyper focused. On on value based care and consumerism and healthcare some super excited for a doctor Robinson's perspectives. In addition to to his previous roles he's also an associate professor of medicine at the Thomas Jefferson University Sidney Kimmel Medical College and he's also a practicing physician so It is truly a privilege to have him as not only a health industry leader but also a practicing physician to talk about some of these trends and healthcare with that at Mondo. I WanNa give you a warm welcome. Thanks for joining us being over me. So what is it that got you inspired to do the work that you do that Robinson and had as you said I'm reading my bio a little bit? I had a few different roles and my inspiration has always been consistent. It's I truly want to make a difference. I knew it seems Corny. But you know it's it's one of the drivers I think there's so much opportunity in healthcare to affecting improve people's lives in one of his. Why continue to practice that one on one interaction where you are truly little hospital so literally? Saving someone's life that is inspiring and then even as I think about digital in the opportunity to improve affect people's health across steeled across a large population continues to inspire me. It's it's the the one on one. Interactions the interactions as well as the N. Equals many interactions To me they inspire me in different ways but at the end of the day. We actually truly helping people in that. That's a good reason to get out of bed morning. Totally agree with you and my head and heart are in the same place. I don't think it's Corny. I think it's a great thing to be moved by. And and so I'm curious. Now you know with the work that you're doing there at the cancer center however you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. What's different and better about what you guys are doing is interesting the goals here at MCI designated Comprehensive Cancer Center or nothing less than curing cancer. It's not a ambiguous. Goal is to Jimmy to the provincial tour of cancer. So you know when you when everyone has is is lockstep with that that focus. It's very refreshing right. You know what your goal is my job on the digital side say how do I leverage digital for that same goal right? So what does that look like? And we all have the same goal I bring in digital so you start thinking about those areas like how do I improve outcomes? How do I use things like machine learning and hey I to improve clinical outcomes of those folks that we that we serve? How do I use digital to drive? Cost drive down cost. We can cure cancer cheaper And make it more accessible thinking about robotic process automation. Those kinds of things improving operations. And how do I do all of that? With an even better experience for patients it had delivered digital to skill that improved experience Across the entire population that we serve. So those are those. That's how we how we approach from a digital perspective the opportunity to contribute to the provision cure cancer. I love it and so as as we wrap our heads around this digital theme. How does that translate into? Say The work that you've done in consumerism. And and and you know. How does that translate to the physician level? That's providing care all the way down to the the patients that you guys are taking care of interesting. I like to. It's great great question. I'd like to start with the patients in and go back or go the other way. And actually you mentioned consumer and so there's different ways of defining who we serve honestly even though I've had the title consumer may not be the most comfortable for me but there needs to be some acknowledgement that there are people who are engaging in health and health behaviors and improving their health. They don't see themselves as patients and so we have to figure out. How do we how do we want? How do we engage with them? And then and then what do we call them? So right now the best definition that they have we have the best kind of description that we have is consumer twice until I hear something better than people as a new people so people have said okay. Let's just people which I did but it's a little it's a little loose um so I think I like consumer healthcare to me feels a little bit better than just. Kinda brought people that being said. Now how do you engage with consumers? Well the way everyone else. Every other extreme these consumer digitally right. That's that's the way you engage with them whether it's online or SMS text or or it's mobile APPS and so we're that's how you engage with people it's not complicated conceptually. It's complicated in execution in so anyone disagrees with the idea that you engage with consumers Digitally that's certainly how you skill. Now there's certainly aspects of what we do in healthcare and other industries as well where you need a physical need a physical component to that so now we start talking about the operation talking about the physicians and so forth. So how do you then convert you know? It's almost clicks to bricks. How do you convert those digital interactions into those physical interactions with necessary? And it's not always necessary and you think about things like virtual care and so now he's saying well. How do we optimize our operations so streamline that we can focus on those physical interactions when necessary into a really good job at that and then? How do we bring everyone along? Who's been a traditional healthcare system for decades right? How do we bring those folks along to this digital age? So that's part of that's part of the work that's the work of digital and if you ignore as a digital person as a as a digital innovator ignore the people part of the operations and the clinical piece you will fail Absolutely must focus on those people. Whether it's the frontline staff back the operations and certainly the clinicians physicians nurses pharmacists and so forth that needs to be a high focus. And so you know there's this title of digital in this time of innovation but at the end of the day is it's about people about people and it's about people love it it's a it's a great call out. And and what do you believe makes what you do and what? The Cancer Center does better than what's available today. There are many opportunities to leverage on digital. You think broadly about how do you leverage digital? We've got some really really talented people that are working in the digital realm. And when I when I called JOE FROM FOR MOFFITT IN. Our team includes the entire. It shop Includes Informatics and includes data in here as well as the war to things that people think about digital in terms of you know virtual care and an absence so forth so think about informatics thinking about the opportunity to refine the way that clinicians interact with the electronic medical record. I mean you can have a whole separate broadcasts. I'm a podcast about the electronic medical record the pros and cons and you'll spend more time on the cons by the way and so that's a whole so. Don't just refining right. So you're familiar with his right. I just. We're finding that in Iran finding that interaction and so that you can actually focus on the people Both who are delivering the chairs for the people who are receiving here in receiving those. Those interactions In so there's that piece there's also you know how you leverage data to optimize outcomes whether it's refining your your interaction so you know you have a list of people who potentially could have some kind of intervention. But you're leveraging data big data in this way to say it but it's really this subset of those people who are truly going to benefit can. That's leveraging use use machine learning and in some cases around around that you can do that as well in imaging as well where you actually have a algorithms that are that are looking at your films in supporting the radiologists in optimizing that outcome in you know so. The operations clinical operations. The wins this is interact with the electronic medical record. And then against the way that patients and consumers engage with the system itself whether it's through Piece of portals which I'm not saying by the way so I think I think about the way we engage much more broadly than that you know everyone starts with Dr Google Right. So so what are you doing around that when you're doing an online search what are you doing around our? Seo Sem and all those kinds of concepts as well that entire package right of digital web going from the interactions with a patient and consumers all the way through the clinical operations and operations all the way through to the to the hardcore kind of big data components data. Tighter action is the value that we bring by leveraging digital to improve the ultimately improve outcomes. Yeah I think it's interesting and and then there's the spectrum right Dr Robinson I'm thinking on the one hand folks like yourself that are well versed and understand how to operationalize these these things and then on the other end is folks that don't understand a how to do it. What what advice would you give to other hospitals wanting to take some of this digital up and don't know really where to start? Yeah so it's a great question and there's there actually are levels to that conversation. What are the challenges in? Us Healthcare is you've seen one helsing health system so the answer to your question actually depends on the health system. There are a couple of things I think that are in there though. Is that quite frankly? I can pretty much guarantee that you've probably underinvested in digital. That's that's that's going to be. You know whatever whatever health system I'm talking to you underinvested. And so Just realized that building out digital is going to require an investment. It reminds me of this idea of you. Know we're going to imagine houses and says hey we want to grow our our surgery business we. Let's say we want to grow our joint replacement business And so they say. Hey we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA grow replace. Let's go you know. Maybe let's hire some hire someone or something but they did to build operating rooms in hospitals and or equipment in those kinds of things. We don't need any of that so we just going to hire the docs you. Can't you have to build the infrastructure if you want to grow that business the same is true for digital you actually have to invest in the infrastructure around digital? If you actually want to grow that business you can't just say hey we're digital. How does it work that way? And so again. Almost guaranteed that they underinvested in digital part of the reason is because it's much easier to get money to build a building bonds. You know tons of health is going up for bond rather than the Rachel Crane tons of. It's much easier to do that for buildings to build a digital or it right so that's it so there's reasons fine but quite frankly you've probably already under underinvested until you actually have to have some dedicated resources around..

Dr Robinson Cancer Center associate professor of medicin Thomas Jefferson University Si Comprehensive Cancer Center Mondo Rachel Crane Jimmy MCI Us JOE Iran
"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is an associate professor at the department of history at Columbia University and he joined us in studio to talk about cashmere Monon thanks for joining us thank you India is a secular nation technically but the prime minister mody has been pushing a Hindu nationalist agenda how does that the integration of cashmere which is majority Muslim fit into that historically speaking before this present regime Chris mir was one of the demonstrations of India's secular constitution is a demonstration of the secular nature of India's democracy and it was in such certain ways but it was also a way in which community people were subjugated governed by New Delhi by the state I want to say that the rise of majoritarian politics throughout the world Turkey box on certainly and you know hungry and some might say United States dove tails with the kind of agenda that the BJP has in India and that majoritarian ism in India looks like Hindu majoritarian is somewhere Muslims have been lynched for under the suspicion of eating beef there are violence a lot of violence urban violence of against Muslims who most recently after this election who refused to say Jay street on as a way of kind of a claiming these supremacy of lord around so in this way the majoritarian politics that we see you around the world is very much in control and India as well we mentioned that there were celebrations in some parts of India about Kashmir's integration but we're also seeing protests against the integration can you help us understand those two sides thank you it's very important I mean India is a very large some say the world's largest democracy I would submit however that a lot of times the amount of information that is available about cashmere to Indians is very low and one can imagine if I could make an analogy here that is how many Americans know what is the status of native people on reservations in this country or even how many people know what is happening in Porto Rico and why the people of Puerto Rico are on the streets right now so a typical citizen would have a very a narrow and and perhaps romanticized view of Christian here that they may have gotten for movies or or from their politicians in that sense article three seventy was one of the planks of the B. J. P. as early as late eighties and into the nineties and this part of their political campaign was always to say that if a smear was couldn't could normalized they will be able to as in the Indian state will be able to settle cordon could settle that territory well it's political demand for self recognition our publicized and in that sense I think there I'm sure there are many many people who are very happy that this has happened this is a long held demand this is why B. J. P. was voted into power on the other hand there a conscientious scholars in Indians who recognize that crashed near is under what we make called a severe military occupation there's been I think the word most associated with Chris mir is curfew you know if you're my generation if you were born anytime after nineteen seventy you would know that Chris Mary's have lived their lives under curfew they they have physical checkpoints any Indian troops can enter their house search them and search their possessions commuters can be taken away our our frequently tortured so that is actually the reality and it very well is that many ordinary Indian citizens are just not aware of that and finally what does this do to the relationship between India and Pakistan I think that in the inbox on are and have been you know in great military stress for for much of their existence and have gone to back active war and as you pointed out are nuclear powers I would suggest that you know the the way in which we can say that in the or the in doing state is playing to their majority box on the state box on the service has been largely governed by its military has its own agenda where they've used crush me here as a way to mobilize of right wing politics in their own country there have obviously supplied weapons and terrorists to different parts of cashmere in order to Stoke certain things so there are certainly part of the problem and talks on a still not officially said anything as in they have said that we're formulating a response but I would suggest that we think actually instead of with the thing always thinking about and foregrounding the right the the actions of the states like Indian box than we think about the because many people who have been rendered speechless through this process and what will the Kashmiri people do I think that's the really the key question because the because we demand for self determination is not a new demand has been going on since nineteen thirties it is it's part and parcel of anticolonial movement and because many people have not been heard at any stage of this entire twentieth century and even now in the twenty first century we find them muted and we find their voices silenced and I feel most passionately that that this the voice that we should we should seek we should try to find that voice we should try to enable that boys Indian bugs on are kind of like playing the same playbook they have been playing over and over and over again and you know I can I can certainly provide the box and will say we do not recognize India's right over because we're just media is you know our territory and India will save and Christmas is our territory and so on and so forth and both sets of governments will be very happy to take this belligerence to their vote banks into their supporters and and continue continue to kind of make their politics about that and I think in all of this drama the communities are.

associate professor Columbia University
"associate professor" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WJR 760

"Specialist and associate professor in Michigan state university's department of plant soil microbe eel sciences, Kevin happy spring. Thank you find maybe finally get to some spring weather. So I like the ask your every winters different seems like this one was easy early harsh late. But what kind of winter are we coming out of? And then what challenges that presenting for the spring overall? It wasn't too bad. Because like you said took a while to arrive, and then we suffered through what mid January through mid March least, I mean with cold weather, but throughout most of that period, especially in the lower part of the state. I mean, there wasn't consistent snow cover. I mean, you know, I I played golf over the Christmas holiday in new years. I think. Even in. There's no. So the reason that has some impact for for some of the turf is that some of the different snow mold that you might even see on your line, generally choirs, some pretty good snow cover, especially for the grace noble. Tweet us. You don't see in this part of the state, certainly as you get further north and then into the UP concertedly see more of that gray snowmobile type of of disease because typically will say about three months of snow cover which down here. We haven't had anywhere close to that. So what I've looked at some of the terse, so far as you know, we've gotten rid of the snow in the last week or two. I haven't seen the last show. Mold doesn't doesn't mean. The typical areas aren't gonna look bad. You know near the near the street where the snow plow has been piling, the ice and snow and salt in dirt and everything else that typically looks kind of bad coming out. But overall, I would have to say that the the winner probably was was fairly friendly to our turf grass. So Kevin as you like to remind us when we talk fall is really the best time to fertilize and get things ready for the next season. But people love to get out in the spring and do things too. So maybe two answers, what should someone do who did fertilize and kinda get ready in the fall, and what should someone who didn't do? So..

Kevin Michigan state university associate professor three months
"associate professor" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Ologies

"So yeah just holding like an ice cream cone you could i'll check your levels alary sleeve doctor doctor now what is your title what's your official title associate professor and molecular cellular and developmental biology and dermatology i saw that on the yale website and i was like she has so many words and her title can you explain a little bit about what you do yes so i'm a professor at yale so i wear lots of hats i run a lab which is like running a small business and our product is the science we produce and discover and it's mostly in the region ration of skin and hair and then i teach undergraduates introductory cell biology two hundred sixty of them right now two hundred sixty you know all their names beyond though you don't pretend to know okay today civil they expect you to now okay as a side note yeah quick side note i was in class in college once and i tried not to i i would fall asleep sometimes i'm not saying i would fall asleep in your class this was a different subject so i moved to the front row because i knew if i sat in the front row i wouldn't fall asleep and i fell asleep in the front row does that ever happen to professors do they ever see people sleeping in class and they're like i'm going to shoot you with a water gun falling asleep is not as bad as being on facebook oh in the class like if someone's falling asleep i'm like they're just tired or whatever i don't take you know but being on facebook i it's a special thing that i just i'm like i can't deal.

associate professor professor facebook official yale
"associate professor" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on The Science Show

"Follow the truth for clues starting in burundi largely lescoe associate professor at berkley she of the aaa us meeting and so was pamela turner with her book crows smarts inside the brain of the world brought spurred and you know how fond i am of birds and on the cover is it looks like pity the growth and it shows particularly the crows the corvettes and this book is for children as it yes it's for kids age nine to twelve and it's about new caledonia and crows wild crows eleven island of new caledonia in the pacific and they're very remarkable because they not only use tools but the manufacture a whole crow tool kit the cover is one of them pulling a grub out of a log with a stick and it fashioned carefully yes these a variety of tools they have just regular straight tools that they use they also are the only animals besides humans that may cooked tools so they will actually take a forked branch and trim it trim all the leaves off and break off bids and they'll whittle it into a hook and use the hook to poke in the crevices to pull out spiders and bugs isn't it interesting that they've got a particularly shaped beak as if it's involved to shoot those tools yes scientists believe that this is a very unusual example it's actually evolution of physical characteristics specifically designed for tool use because most crows like the american crow in many crows a roofs in europe have a bit of a downward sloping beak but the new caledonia and crow has a different beak it's very straight it looks almost like a pair of needle nosed pliers it's very good for holding tools.

burundi associate professor pamela turner berkley aaa europe