31 Burst results for "Associate Editor"

Streaming music services fighting for your ears

Morning Edition

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Streaming music services fighting for your ears

"Has never been more important. You see in the new world of streaming If an artist can create that perfect single, their song will be streamed billions and billions of times, making them anywhere from 2 to $3. Welcome back to for my Mariana Trail that was comedian Trevor Noah, making a music streaming joke while hosting last month's Grammy Awards ceremony. This hour. We've been talking about artist compensation in the age of music streaming and in the age of the pandemic, I'm talking with Cody Fitzgerald and Josephine Shetty, both co founders of the Union of musicians and Allied Workers. And both musicians themselves. Josh can the CEO at Band Camp and not still going? Oh Sky associate editor here at KQED for KQED Arts So Trevor Noah joke on a stage like the Grammy shows that there's pop culture level awareness enough to make a joke that you know the audience will get nasty. Do you think this could be an inflection point? Culturally, where organizing efforts can maybe move the needle on artist? Compensation? Is this movement that will gain momentum? You think Radio. I think for so long music and art in general, such an individualistic pursue and then also not to mention artist kind of a lot of the time feel pressure to project this image of financial success, which makes it really hard to transparently talk about the economic realities of music. So I think just the fact that artists are building collective power and just talking about how much they make out in the open and identifying as workers is actually a big cultural shift, But I think we'll make this Conversation. Keep progressing. And Eric

Trevor Noah Mariana Trail Cody Fitzgerald Josephine Shetty Union Of Musicians And Allied Kqed Arts Grammy Awards Band Camp Grammy Josh Eric
Trump to attend GOP's spring donor retreat

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Trump to attend GOP's spring donor retreat

"Trump is scheduled to speak at the cpac conference on sunday while americans go about living their lives. Political reports trump is expected to attend the rnc upcoming spring donor. Retreat in april quote. The rnc's donor. Retreats are a prime stop for future presidential candidates who use the events to establish relationships with wait for it. Major contributors Back with us tonight. Abc veteran washington journalists and associate editor and columnist over a real clear politics and matthew. Dowd he is the founder of country over party. We should point out. He is a texan. Who has a new appreciation for a hot shower. Since the cold dark outage of late and in the past matthew was chief strategist for the bush. Cheney presidential effort Back in oh four Welcome to you both. Ab you right with your usual candor and clarity quote just six weeks. After a deadly insurrection against the us government republicans are past their horror and hopping eagerly back on the trump train. The new twenty twenty one ticket price. They must buy into his big lie. That brings us to the question a. b. if trump is the banner under which they all must run under which they all must try to raise money he lost. How can that be a winning strategy. Whatever he says goes so you saw that. Nothing made it more clear than the house. Gop whip steve scalise going on tv. The sunday after his visit mar-a-lago where apparently they just talked about their families and how chill and relaxed. The president has been in his post presidency period at his resort and he just could not bring himself to say that this was a free and fair election. He said yes. Legitimately biden one when he was pressed by jonathan karl of abc news because elector said that on december fourteenth basically. He said a lot of sing. Swing states just didn't follow their own state laws and a lot of people are very concerned so what you do is instead of spreading the big lie. You never defy trump. You never disavow it and you never spell it you sit and you never discuss. How pernicious and dangerous. It is liz cheney and adam her and others have you just sort of try to circle around it because quote your constituents buy into it. And that's what's gonna keep you in trump's orbit if you want to keep your job in twenty twenty two. Matt voters have a funny way of kind of market testing ideas on their own and figuring out what. And what's gonna fly. How is this gonna fly especially in republican tightly contested suburban races two years from now. Well i think it does well in republican primaries. So i think that's the issue and that's the real problem for the republicans right now. They know that. Donald trump tests eighty eighty five percent popularity among the voters at will participate in republican primaries even in republican primaries in purple states or in suburban districts. That are swing districts. The problem is every time they venture into capturing that republican primary voth it more and more offense the people in the general election so it gets okay in a red state or deep red district to do that but when you start to try to win in suburban areas around houston suburban areas around dallas suburban areas in michigan suburban areas in california. It becomes exceedingly problematic. An i think that's the problem there in though it doesn't seem like they're in any way trying to confront that general election problem that they just keep pushing that often it's somehow they think is going to solve itself. It's almost as if they're going through this primary. They did in two thousand fifteen in twenty sixteen where they thought that donald trump problem would salve itself or he would peter out or nobody would deal within or somebody else would handle it and they didn't have to and then what they ended up having donald trump the republican nominee and then donald trump the republican president and now donald trump the republican president. So i do think it's his party. I don't think there's any question anymore that it's donald. The drill pay party is now the trump party and everything that donald trump does from town to what he cares about to. The conspiracy pushes is the republican party.

Donald Trump RNC Steve Scalise Matthew Jonathan Karl Cpac Liz Cheney Dowd Cheney Us Government ABC Elector Abc News GOP Biden Washington Bush Adam
Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

Techmeme Ride Home

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

"What is the gaming industry and by that. I mostly mean developers. What what does the industry think about developing and just the market is it clearly a sliver compared to other things. But do they think like. It's maybe on the cusp of being something. That is interesting. Yeah so. I don't. I don't have numbers obviously but like so to get into my background and just in case your listeners. Don't really know me. I wrote for game informer magazine for eight years as there for a long time until i was we had like right when right when the oculus rift came out like we had an issue like vr issue. Right and we. I remember getting test kits into the office and playing early games and stuff like that and at that time we kind of went in with the mindset of like okay. Well this is like a new. This dobie xbox. They'll be nintendo and they'll be oculus that's kind of how we felt about it like it would just be this other competitive corner of video gaming and now all this time later which is a. We're going to maybe like four or five. Six years later feel like it has found its spot and like you said like beat sabre. Which is the fantastic i played. I almost literally played every day. I love beat sabre Has sold gangbusters There's like i think facebook released a blog that said something like thought they had five other. Vr titles at it sold a million copies which was cool. And so where we're at now is it's interesting because it's not what i thought it would be. Where would be like just as competitive as like the switch. You know what i mean. It would just be another platform that you know hardcore gamers like me would have in their home but it's increasingly kind of become this like weird separate thing that even non gamers are kind of getting into like i've i'm like i've heard of people have met people who aren't really big video gamers but they do have a headset. And they like vr because it does have kind of like what you were talking about earlier. It has practical applications beyond video games. You know you can kind of around the world and see things. I use it to work out like. That's my main exercise purpose lately as i tried to play oculus like at least once a day for thirty minutes played exercise games and beat because they're very movement centered so it's it's closer to like the mobile market. I feel like we're there's a lot of disparate things floating around that are trying to find their niche as opposed to like someone like me. Who's like i have an xbox series s x. I have a playstation five and i got my oculus rift like that's not super common. It's almost treated as like you know gamers like it but it's not like it's not it's more than a video game machine you know. It's like ninety percent of video game machine but like that ten percent is really lifting it up and people are finding that way. Well so this is gets into my sort of disappointment with what i what is out there. Obviously this would have been one of the times where. Vr should have had its breakthrough moment like a lot of things including video conferencing of had The pandemic times now. There are apps on their from companies. That are clearly the eight even says. It's like we'll use this to remote work with your teams and you can all meet in a space and you know whiteboard together and you know. Even you know sketch things and and in a three d. environment especially frano architects and things like that. I can see that but none of it's very good that i've sampled like i would think there'd be more of that. There's also there's also a handful of things that are like we'll watch a movie with your friends and you go into a virtual Sort of movie theater and by the way. All of the like netflix and and prime video they all have apps that essentially you can watch anything you want on a virtual big screen which is very nice for lying down in bed and stuff. But i'm wondering if like they missed a trick like there is nothing that was like a breakthrough during pandemic times for just being virtually with other people. Yeah right when the pandemic started. I remember i think it was fun. Mation was selling tickets to go. Watch a cure with an audience in oculus and i love cura is like one of my favorite movies and i like we are but even i was like i look at that mike. I want to do that like yeah. The resolution on the headset just isn't there like it's basically like shoving a like a switch. Well let me take them. It's better than a switch screen. It's like it's a higher resolution switch green but like it. Just can't look as good as your desktop for work or your four k tv in your living room. It's just it's like you have to accept that limitation in order to participate like i saw this Which i had never seen until today. Maybe because you are emailing me about vr. Google is like oh let's send this guy. vr ads but it was like it was like. Yeah what will like. Let's let's have a workspace. You can have as many monitors as you want and you can have a virtual keyboard. Obviously it'll be but there'll be a virtual keyboard and it's like that's a really interesting idea. But i'm not gonna take that resolution downgrade in visuals. I'm not going to be able to see that. Virtual computer monitor. As well as i can't if i'm just looking at my standard computer monitor and it's not worth that dive and

Nintendo Facebook Netflix Cura Mike Google
In Biden’s White House, surprise visits with staff replace late-night tweets

The Daily Dive

03:35 min | 1 year ago

In Biden’s White House, surprise visits with staff replace late-night tweets

"Us now is anita kumar. White house correspondent and associate editor at politico. Thanks for joining us. Anita thanks for having me. I always like these stories. A little peek into the white house the governing styles behind the scenes president. Joe biden has been in there a couple of weeks now and we're seeing how he's operating in there. We're hearing that. He likes to stroll around the white house in the east wing. He pops into other people's offices he's a very much an extrovert. A people person wants to talk to people face to face the pandemic kind of puts a little crunch on some of that sometimes. But tell us how it's going so far in a kind of in contrast to the way president trump operated in there. Yeah well you're exactly right about that. I mean he has been known his whole life. I think for being an extrovert very outgoing and wants to see people talk to people in and as you mentioned that really hard during corona virus. So he's not getting out of the white house very often. He's not traveling. The country like we might expect during non cova time so what we are. Seeing is him strolling around the white house popping into different offices just to say hello and checking with staff or for particular occasion or particular meeting. We are seeing him doing a good number of some of the meetings he would be doing anyway with outside experts but he those by video instead of you know by phone so he can see those people even if he can't be in the same room with them so we're seeing a lot of that you know you asked about donald trump. I think donald trump also like to talk to people and see people and be seen and so there's a little bit of a similarity beyond that. Their style is completely different about how they get information and talk to people and try to make those decisions. I mean obviously. Joe biden a politician for many many years. He's definitely more of that. Traditional style president trump a businessman. So he kind of has that fast moving pace but even the way their time is structured and access to them is different. Joe biden has a very strict schedule of phone calls that that are scheduled for him. You know people that control access to the oval office and it was a little different for president trump. There was a lot more people that he welcomed in and out of the office. He'll wideness taking much more traditional way to govern but this is sort of how he's done things so you know he will have a set list of calls to make that his staff will set up for him. He will have scheduled meetings. We know that he's doing a national intelligence briefing every day. He's also getting corona virus update every single day those. Are you know from staffers. But how he makes the decision is he'll get You know sort of briefing paper. He likes to read something but he doesn't want it to be hugely long. President obama like to read a lot. He he he'll be all there and he wanted to read sometimes after he read. He didn't wanna talk about it. 'cause he'd already read it he he knew what it said president biden. He likes to read it. You want something concise. And then he wants to talk about it. He wants to talk about it with his aides. And then he wants to talk to these outside experts which could be someone that deals with the policy but it could also be a local official or a state official. So he's having those kinds of calls and meeting with his aides and making decisions that way you know. President trump really didn't like to have those briefing papers. He didn't want to read something. He would sort of famously have his aides debate an issue right in front of him. He wanted them to kind of go out a little bit so the style is very different but something that joe biden has brought from you know he's decades in public life. Before

Joe Biden Anita Kumar White House Donald Trump Politico Anita Oval Office President Biden United States President Obama President Trump
"associate editor" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"associate editor" Discussed on KGO 810

"History at Auburn. He's also the associate editor of Black Perspectives. That's an online magazine of the African American intellect. History society. I am thrilled that you are joining us Professor Mount. Thank you for being here today. Thank you, Pat. And I wish it was under better circumstances. This is really something isn't it will tell us. First of all, just broadly. How accurate How Historically accurate is the report that this project put together? Well, it's strange, because first of all, it's really not a work of history. I mean, people need to read this kind of as just a work of propaganda. It's a pretty classic polemic that if we look back at this as a primary document, you know a couple 100 years from now, No one's going to imagine this as a work of history. I mean, there's no footnotes. One of my colleagues put the thing through a, You know, one of the, uh Plagiarism tests that we would use online to see if students of plagiarize anything probably 20% of this has been just outright plagiarized and plagiarized from Wikipedia, right. Nothing's going to get the ire of professional historians up more than no footnotes and 20% of its plagiarized and part of it from Wikipedia, So it's not a work of history. I mean, I wouldn't have expected. It was announced some time ago, and historians rolled our eyes then and took to Twitter and like we know what's coming, it's what we expect. Dude, that's kind of predictable disaster. I think that in some ways, a fitting capstone torto, the disastrous regime that was initiated under, You know, it's gonna go down in history, and it's not even a scholarly work. Then you know it's.

associate editor Wikipedia Auburn Black Perspectives Professor Mount Twitter Pat
"associate editor" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"associate editor" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"Of their pupils to serve. Those needs. cuba's also arrested in a reciprocating contribution. Caring relationship similar nursing between nurses and their patients sustained tension interest motivational displacement. And and. i think we're starting to see that. Some coaches have caring relationships for like yeah and that brings us up to date. Yeah yeah yeah. I think my next question was going to be that when you talked about using this this framework or theoretical approach to understanding different contexts. Like the classroom for example. What are your reflections so far. That's can you apply that in sports. Coaching context or other. Some some kind of problems or something. You need to adjust in your thinking. Yes so we now have. A series of case studies were researchers examined and spoken to coaches to understand how they go about these practices. I coaches will often share practices consistent with nodding not pay attention. I served the athletes needs. Yeah things contribute back. It's coaching athletes. Family environment almost Case studies on from the coaches perspective. Coppola things really on that one is that we haven't got much research from the athlete perspective of being cared for which is ironic giving nodding emphasis that actually has the voice are cared for voices reading born now. Fortunately sports coaching review journal. I'm an associate editor on has a special issue and some of that work would be coming out over the next few months. Hopefully remove on on the other thing is that because we've mainly done these cases of these by listening to coaches dot. we also have to treat those views critically. I'm we started to see some critical problems that maybe need further exploring. Have we got to go through two or three. I think we have the time. So yeah apart so You know there's recent paper john olsen out and talked about. How sustainable is accusing relationship. And i think that's really for two points and caring is a form of labor to form of emotionally demanding streaming. This takes us back to your point about if we put too much pair in caring labor on coaches. Is it sustainable. Are we going to burn coaches.

cuba associate editor Coppola john olsen
"associate editor" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

Physical Activity Researcher

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"associate editor" Discussed on Physical Activity Researcher

"This is the second part of our discussion on sport. Coaching and care. We dr column cronin in the first part which i recommend you to check out. We explored columns phenomena logical work on what it means to be. Sport coach care was one of the. Snc's he identified in that work in research that followed. He has developed the notion of care in sport coaching and moved from phenomena logical to a more feminist sociological perspective. On care today we are these ideas and discuss how care fits into the picture of coaching. In elliott sport context which is known to be result oriented an tough world not only for athletes but also for coach is dr column. Cronin is a senior lecturer in sport. Coaching and physical education at liverpool. John moores university and serves as an associate editor for sport coaching review. He's research has explored what it means to be. A coach asked recently focused on understanding. How coaches can develop caring relationships. We'd athletes in his work. He often uses phenomena logical and narrative research approaches and qualitative methodologies. I hope you enjoy today's discussion. I think this is the point that we will move to caring but what you said about caring for the athlete like beyond season. That's one of the things that often comes when you look at studies on athletic retirement and and what former athletes find the one of the very difficult things for them. Is that the relationship with the coach and completely and the coach doesn't seem to be interested in them anymore when they are not at late. So the coaches not calling Making contact not asking how you are doing. And that leaves. The athlete with the sense of kind of the relationship was just Fully conditional them being athletes and that's difficult for a lot of athletes when they stop. Yeah i think. That's that's really interesting just before i get into that dan. I think it's important to remember so at this point in my research i was coming at this with you. Know some interest in kind of phenomena logical philosophy. So as i said my care. Was this idea of kind of concern interest. Initially and this. I gained a part of being human is a concern you know. Otherwise why would you get out of bed. You know you might through the south interests are you might do for an interest in your family or your work with you know. Part of being human is concerned. So.

dr column cronin John moores university Snc liverpool senior lecturer associate editor
Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

06:46 min | 1 year ago

Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

"Well, hey everybody, welcome back to the dr. Jockers functional nutrition podcast and you guys know that one of my favorite topics to talk about is blood sugar insulin and metabolic health and we had a great interview recently with Dodge van Dyckman. We went in depth on that and this is almost like a follow-up to it because we're going to talk about really the personalized approach to really looking at your blood sugar and how it's responding to the foods that you're consuming and so my guess is dr. Casey means she is the chief medical officer at levels and she is a Stanford trained physician again, chief medical officer and co-founder of the metabolic whole company levels, and she's the associate editor of the international Journal of disease reversal and prevention and he can find more information about her at levels health.com and we're going to talk about what the best food. Are for blood sugar management for metabolic health and how that could be variable depending on how your body is responding to the foods that you consume. We're talking about personalized medicine. So dr. Casey that joining us here. Thank you so much for having me. Dr. Jockers. So happy to be here. Well, yes for sure and I've heard of several of your interviews on other podcasts and you really do a great job of explaining how important blood sugar stability is and you know, this this new technology that we have now continuous blood glucose monitoring. And so what I love to do is start with your story and you know how you went from Stamford and trained in in medicine to now kind of branching out into a functional nutrition Integrative Medicine approach. Yeah. Absolutely. So like you mentioned I trained as a medical doctor conventional medicine. I trained at Stamford did my undergrad and Med medical school there and then I went on to become a head and neck surgeon. So I was deep in the surgical birth. Hold for about five years and in my role as a head and neck surgeon, which is really treating the conditions of the like your nose and throat. So an ENT surgeon something I noticed was sort of hitting me back, you know after about five years, like wow pretty much all of the conditions that I'm treating are inflammatory in nature. They're all related in some way to chronic inflammation. So some of the things you think about are like sinus infection, which is inflammation of the sinuses and chronic ear disease, which is inflammation of the eustachian tube the tube that connects the nose to the ear you get, you know inflammation in that tube and you get past building up in the ear, you've got Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which is inflammation of the thyroid you've got things like vocal cord granulomas which are inflammatory masses of the vocal chords and then lots of head and neck cancer, of course, which we know cancer has very much relationship between inflammation. So it was really interesting to me sort of step back and say wow. This is sort of a very common theme between a lot of the conditions that I'm treating and in some way it didn't make total sense wage. That we would be treating those conditions with surgery because chronic inflammation is fundamentally a issue with how our immune system is responding to perceived or real threats in in the environment in our bodies and thoughts were more were learning about how chronic inflammation is in many ways really rooted in our everyday exposures. So what we eat the toxins were exposed to in our food air and water, you know, how much sleep we get the stress in our lives how much or how little exercise were getting our microbiome all of these things have a direct relationship to chronic inflammation. So I'm treating it with this sort of very reactionary invasive more anatomic approach with surgery, you know, there was some sort of missing missing link there and certainly surgeries are really important in beautiful art but phone no other conditions really rooted in chronic inflammation. It kind of got me thinking there might be a better way to approach us. What could we be doing what sort of really personalized dietary and lifestyle interventions really foundational help to really quell bath. Chronic immune response. Well that threat the body is sensing and potentially keep Patients Out of the operating room. You're not going to prevent all surgeries, but I certainly think there's some low-hanging fruit we can do to help minimize the severity of the disease is and hopefully never have to get have them get that really end of the line where they see me in the or going under the knife, which is a really serious serious thing. So that really got me on this journey of trying to understand the root cause of disease and that led me to functional medicine and so I actually stepped away from the operating room got training with Institute for functional medicine and really started thinking of disease a lot differently. I started seeing things much more as symptoms and diseases often being the branches on a very similar true and that tree that we that that sort of route that that connects a lot of seemingly disparate diseases often comes down to things like inflammation and even deeper Inflammation metabolic dysfunction this was talked about so beautifully on your episode recently with dr. Bed big man who is talking about metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, but was so interesting is that you know in our country. It's it's not that about 88% of Americans have met have signs of metabolic dysfunction that was shown in a study a couple of years ago from UNC that 88% of adult Americans have at least one biomarker of metabolic dysfunction and metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, which are kind of two sides of the same coin really can directly feed into inflammation. So it's all really created and what's sort of hopeful about this is that those are things that are readily modifiable with smart choices in and how we live and what we expose ourselves to so became really interested in that and and really this system the network biology movement, which is really stepping back and saying, you know, we've we've conventionally looked at diseases in in conventional medicine. As isolated silos, you've got depression. You've got obesity. You've got diabetes. You've got prostate cancer. You've got IBS and these are all things that are different and we treat them separately with totally different with medications a totally different mechanisms. But when you step back and you use sort of more advanced research techniques, like whole genome sequencing and proteomics, how can we actually see? What are the molecular links between diseases and you create a web a network a system and that's really the root of systems and network biology. And when you start doing that you see these connections and I think the future of Iraq and its really treating conditions at that level at the connections between diseases cuz when you do that you can you know, hit a lot more birds with one stone that's sort of a negative metaphor, but you know what, I mean, it's it's it's got instead of playing whack-a-mole. You're really you can have multiple various effects with with some single interventions effect that root cause physiology. So my career really moved

Inflammation Dodge Van Dyckman International Journal Dr. Jockers Stamford Casey Chronic Ear Disease Neck Cancer Stanford Hashimoto Inflammation Metabolic Dysfunc Metabolic Dysfunction Cancer UNC Prostate Cancer Obesity Depression Diabetes
Right To Repair

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:53 min | 1 year ago

Right To Repair

"Hey, everyone. Welcome to the gadget lab I'm lowering good I'm a senior writer at wired and I'm joined remotely by my Co host wired's editor Michael Kouri, Hey Mike. and. We're also joined by wired senior associate editor Julian Takata who's dialing in from new. York Hey Julian. All right. Thanks for joining me today. Today, we're talking about the right to repair. So right to repair something that can be pretty personal to people because a lot of us have stories about trying to get our. Ix or appliances fixed in later in the show, we're going to talk about our own repairability gripes and experiences. But first we're GONNA go to Massachusetts virtually because there's a ballot measure there that could have far reaching consequences. So I'm going to give a quick synopsis of what's going on and then I'll ask Mike and Julian for their takes back in two thousand twelve Massachusetts passed a law that would give car owners and independent repair shops access to mechanical information from your Cards on-board-diagnostics Port, you used to have to go to a dealership for a lot of repairs and now anyone could plug it dangle into the OB, deport and diagnose the problems with your car. Now, this was seen as a big win for the Little Guy Consumers and India repair shops, and it was a landmark law the first of its kind in the United States. But a lot has changed technologically since then cars have basically become computers on wheels. So repair coalitions started pushing a new law that would update the existing law, and now this year that is questioned one on the Massachusetts ballot. It expands the kind of data that consumers and repair shops would have access to to include wireless telematics. So telematics, what is that? We'll telematics. Broadly, it can mean mileage entire pressure and things like that. But it can also encompass a pretty significant amount of data can refer to location speed idling time harsh acceleration or braking. It could mean a lot and as the ballot measures written now it's kind of unclear what it's referring to. So we now have right to repair advocates voting pretty much fever of this update to the law to keep up with the times and make sure that consumers have access to or ownership of the data from their car but opponents to this measure. Particularly, this one group that's got a lot of money from the big automakers is saying. nope. They have a lot of concerns with ballot measure. In this summer they unleashed. We'll just call it a fudd campaign, which we're GONNA talk about. Okay. So I want to get your thoughts and Mike I'm going to go to you first because you're from Massachusetts right. Genetically I'm from Massachusetts yes. I was born in Boston. Okay. So what's your take on this? Well I think it is kind of interesting that. The major opponents here for GM and Toyota, they have been citing safety issues as the reason why third parties should not be able to access the data in their car in in a customer's car so like you took it to an independent repair shop, they wouldn't be able to access this data. You'd have to go to the dealership to access this data. And they're citing these. Weird Safety and security issues like they're saying that this could cause increases in cyber stalking or in cyber attacks like you can. You know roll up next to somebody on the freeway and then turn their car off wirelessly using a hacking method and yes, you can do that but the actual. Chance of that happening is really really slim. Same thing with cyber stalking they say that you know if a third party can wirelessly access your your car's data, bake can find out where you live. They can find out where you work they can see. And they can you know follow you around and follow to your home? Some people have. A code to open the gate to their house or a code open their garage door stored in their cars. They don't have to carry a separate clicker for it and you know the the as the argument goes the hacker able to access that, and then they'd be able to break into your home and. This is why they're telling people not to vote for it and those arguments feel pretty flimsy. Yeah we saw that this summer when ads were released by a group called the Coalition for safe and secure data, and this is a coalition that's funded by automakers that you mentioned and they put out a series of ads. By the way those ads are now listed as private on youtube because they were criticized for the ads that showed a woman being stocked in a garage she approached her car or a man. Wirelessly entering someone's home presumably through the. Garage data. And and this is kind of fun that I was getting out before that these are the concerns that are not technically impossible. But. Many on the repair side of the argument saw these concerns as overblown Mike what's the parallel between what we're seeing with this argument over cars and consumer electronics appliances more broadly. Well, the argument that makes a little bit more sense than the. Cyberattack. Is the same argument that the big tech companies make when they argue against right to repair legislation. They say that we can't let you fix your gadget because you might hurt yourself or you'll make it vulnerable to failure vulnerable to hacks. To. A certain extent that is a little bit true like if you I just want to replace the battery in my iphone well I'll. I'll go to the Internet and I'll buy replacement battery I'll crack open my iphone I'll put the new battery in and then that battery is like some you know weird off brandon explodes and then I have an exploding iphone that's harmful to me it's also bad pr for the company that made the phone same thing with like even something simple like a replacement screen you buy replacement screen maybe that's not an official part in you didn't have it officially installed and it doesn't work exactly right your experiences in that gadget goes down and your customer satisfaction goes down it ends up. Leading to this sort of polluted. market devices, and for replacement parts and companies don't like to see that they like to have control over those things. Also, there is a big business in repairs. So repairing things and doing those repairs yourself, you can charge whatever you want because you're locking everybody else out and it sort of those two things that I think are the the sort of the most interesting parallels with the broader consumer technology industry and the most interesting arguments against rights repair.

Massachusetts Julian Takata Stalking York Editor Wired Senior Associate Michael Kouri Writer Mike What Boston Mike I Mike United States Youtube Toyota India GM
Election Science Stakes: Climate

60-Second Science

04:13 min | 1 year ago

Election Science Stakes: Climate

"This installment of our pre election podcast series I spoke to the Thompson. She's a scientific American associate editor covering issues in sustainability and the environment with an emphasis on climate. I think there's probably a pretty clear difference between the contestants in this election regarding climate science. Yeah. There definitely is president trump has called into question a lot of You know well established climate science. He has denigrated the federal government's own national climate assessments as well as the work put out for years by the Intergovernmental Panel on climate change which are sort of the. The two documents that really bring together and summarize and synthesize all of climate research that's being done whereas former vice president Biden has made it clear on that he understands and respects climate science and that he thinks that climate change is a really existential threat and specifics. So one of the key things that president trump did was last year he put in a request to. Remove the United States from the Paris climate agreement which is the global agreement to for countries to gradually reduce Sarah greenhouse gas emissions. If Biden wins, he has said, he will immediately bring us back into that agreement. The national climate assessment that I needed to earlier that comes out every four years mandated by Congress. There's multiple federal agencies that put that together and the last one that came out came out during the trump administration, and it was very different from the one that came out during the Obama Administration, the trump administration it out very quietly. To minimize attention to it. So now we're at the prosper at the beginning of the process for the next one. But I think it would be pretty clear that Biden administration would reprioritize that report whereas trump administration could be expected to affect what science gets included in it and what conclusions are and how those are communicated and the reason that's such an important document is because. It sort of synthesizes all of this climate information about the changes we have observed and expect in the future across the whole United States and that's really valuable information for state and local governments to have as they try to figure out how to respond to climate threats today, and also plan for them in the future because it's not you know information, you can necessarily get on your own if you're a city government So that's kind of the resource that cities and states can use. So it's really critically important document. What about the scientists themselves? And how they have been either supported or interfered with yeah. Not that's one at various I think from agency to agency. I think in part because of where the trump administration sort of put its energies. So just like NASA, I think have seen probably a little less interference than others versus the Environmental Protection Agency which has been main focus of the trump administration to date and where they have done. Of rollbacks and sort of overruling of agency scientists in terms of rulemaking, and they've also changed some of the rulemaking to. Limit what science can actually be included in some of those regulations and rules processes. I think Noah, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration has probably been a little bit in the middle. They're still doing a lot of fair traditional climate work. They do a lot of work with satellites there. The main entity does our record keeping on weather and climate, and so they've been continuing that. Have Been. Some appointments to that agency very recently that has scientists and environmental concerned because the people appointed in the past have made statements Showing that they don't accept climate science, and so there's some concern you know and if there's a second trump administration that could undercut some of the science and scientists at Noah.

Donald Trump Biden National Oceanic Atmospheric A Environmental Protection Agenc Obama Administration United States President Trump Associate Editor Vice President Congress Noah Intergovernmental Panel Nasa Paris
The iPhones 12

Gadget Lab Podcast

05:30 min | 2 years ago

The iPhones 12

"Mike, yes Lauren Mike, are you going to upgrade your iphone? Well have an iphone. But it has five gene. Yeah, who cares? Let's see if we can answer that on this week's show. Hi Everyone. Welcome to gadget lab. I'm lauren good. I'm a senior writer at wired and I'm joined remotely by my Co host wired senior editor Michael Cholerae. He who does not have an iphone hello from Pixel land. And we're also joined by wired senior associate editor. Julian Chicago to who has like seventeen different phones on him right now. Hey Julie in below my desk has like six phones on right now so. So today we are talking about yet another apple event this week apple announced a new iphone twelve, actually four of them and a tiny smart speaker, and these are the first iphones with five G. which matters doesn't matter doesn't matter yet. We're GONNA talk about five G. later on in the show what you need to know about it the challenges and rolling it out across the US and whether you'll even be able to connect to five G. With the new IPHONE are calling. We'll night is going to join us later on for that but first, let's talk about the phones themselves. Jillian. Phone has championed edges. Let's get that out of the way. That's probably the most important thing here, right? Okay. But obviously, there's more than that what stood out to you most about the new iphones twelve as someone who takes a lot of photos and tests the cameras on phones a lot. A. Lot of their camera upgrades. We're the most exciting thing for me and and I really like how a lot of those camera upgrades are kind of for the most part. All across the entire lineup from the 699 iphone twelve mini, you're getting the same main camera that they improve the aperture on as the iphone twelve pro. But for the most part that iphone twelve pro, you get these new features like pro raw, which gives you the ability to edit. Raw photos and also get the benefits of apples, computational photography, and that is just someone something that's really exciting for someone who takes a lot of raw photos with my camera just gives you more granular control over photo editing and also the other thing is they're bringing night mode to every single lens that's on this phone. So finally, you can take a Selfie, at night and not have to worry about it being too terrible, looking or grainy. So overall I think the entire suite of camera features on the entire range is pretty exciting and pretty dramatically better than what you had last year on the iphone eleven. And tell us about some of the video improvements to yes. For the improvements, they added the ability to shoot HDR with Dolby Vision, which is you know apparently the only phone that can do this and basically lets you get this program cinematic looking effector or look. You could say with all of your videos at ten bits of it's like super high quality. It just looks really good. With the option to edit the colors and have really good cinematic looking video as well with the iphone twelve pro you there have this improved stabilization system that moves the sensor itself. So basically, in fact, you're getting something that feels and looks much more high quality than ever before, and again, this is somewhere where apple leads compared to every other phone manufacturer except maybe Samsung is pretty close. No one else does the ability to shoot video quality this well, and it's just every year. It just seems to be getting further and further away from other companies even like you. Google. Pixel phones that take really great photos Mike what did you make the event? You know my favorite thing that I saw this week was the mini, the small phone small phones in general are exciting to me. Our colleague Brian Barrett wrote this week that the arrival of the iphone twelve mini is a harbinger of good for the small phone community I think you know fabulous when they came out what was it like eight years ago or so we started seeing these gigantic phones and then. People really liked them and they started them in huge numbers. So phones just kept getting bigger and bigger and bigger. We've all been waiting for phones to get small again, phones have gotten smaller, but they haven't really gotten small enough, and now this year I think phones are starting to get just about small enough to satisfy the people who are looking for small phone I was out last week two weeks ago at A. Socially distanced event and I saw a guy with a Sony experience x to compact, which is like a really tiny. It's even smaller than the iphone mini android phone and I asked him about it. I went over to him six feet away and I said, Hey, what is that and he started going on and on about it and the way that he was talking about it was so passionate and I realize that. Like okay. You know what? There is a huge market. People are really really passionate about smartphones and people are GonNa flip when they see the mini I think coming until November So I, think for people who really want it. They're going to have to resist clicking that buy button for a couple of weeks

Phone Apple Lauren Mike United States Michael Cholerae Senior Editor Julian Chicago Senior Associate Jillian Julie Brian Barrett Google Dolby Vision Writer Samsung Editor
"associate editor" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WTOP

"And it is by far the biggest development yet in a campaign season that has been unlike any other course. Last night, President Trump announced he and first Lady Melania have tests Good, positive Corona virus. The development came after hours after the news that close aide hope Hicks had tested positive president and first lady reportedly have mild symptoms. But given the viruses, unpredictability surely adds another element of chaos to what's already been a chaotic election year. Joining us now on Skype to talk about it. Anita Kumar, political White House correspondent, an associate editor. Thanks so much for being with us. Anita, can you tell us what the scene is like in the White House and whether or not people are preparing for more positive infections? Yeah, It's just a very odd day where basically, people are trying to figure out if they've been in close contact with The president, First lady or other AIDS you knowwho picks you mentioned has been tested, You know, has that was infected, so they're doing contact tracing and notifying people. People can get go ahead and get tests today, But you're exactly right. There is some sense that people are testing. And coming back negative today, But you know, there's this period where it could not show up for a few more days, so people will have to be tested again. And it's not just at the White House. It's also at the Trump campaign because, as you know, he did a lot of campaigning this week. And there's a mix of White House staff and campaign staff that are with him and past the White House addressed why Mr Trump traveled to a fundraiser in New Jersey despite knowing that hope Hicks had tested positive. Yeah, It's really unclear about what happened Wednesday, and that's the day you're talking about where he tries. He's me Thursday where he traveled. She started feeling sick on Wednesday, and there's some Confusion or there's you know, they haven't shared with us Exactly. Who knew what When, um, at that situation, there are a lot of people saying that the press secretary do but she's pushing back and saying she didn't know at the time when she when she briefed reporters, so we don't have the full time line exactly What happened. There are people saying today why is the president not come out and And spoken. Obviously, he can't appear in public and he self isolated. We haven't even seen him really tweet today much We haven't seen him talk there their AIDS that wish he would go get out there in front of the camera and even talk about what happened. I need a you know, this is an administration that has scoffed at the seriousness of Corona virus and covert 19. Is there a sense that the attitude has shifted now that the president's infected? Well, I don't know. I think it's a little early to say, But there is something to be said today for White House staff are wearing masks and anyone who's been over there recently in recent months knows that they have not been wearing masks. For months now, and when you travel aboard Air Force one, the staff is not wearing masks. So they are doing that today. They are getting tested. I think there's a more serious nature from the staff. You know what that looks like with the president as it goes forward, I think it really just depends on how What he's like, You know, we hear he has mild symptoms. What? We haven't seen him or heard from him today. And if those symptoms get more severe, I think there might be a shift. But if if he you know it's mild, he may not. So I really think it depends on what happens in these coming days. I need a good to talk to you again. Thank you so much. Sure, thank you. Anita Kumar Politico White House correspondent and associate editor. Let's see how Wall Street's doing right before the close. Geoff Clay via the Dow is down 48 points. The S and P 500 index is down a half percent of the Aztecs down 1.8% money news in 10 minutes on W GOP sports at 15 and 45 brought to you by your local Honda dealer. Don't settle for less than 3 45. We've got George Wallace. All right. Shawn Ron Rivera back in the building today at practice after missing a little bit earlier this week due to his treatment, his team getting ready to face the Ravens, and he's feeling how I'm really good at today. The last two days the last three days, actually, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, we're a bit of a bear. Kind of tough, You know, I was able to get in on on Wednesday for a little bit more little bit of tape got in on Thursday and watch portion of practice and they got the wash little bit of tape of that. Today. I have actually felt pretty good, so I was able to be around went through the whole practice with guys and it was good to see him. I thought they had great Temple Great Energy and he continue expects to coach on Sunday says he's feeling pretty good. That's good news. Call hokum. Steven Sims Chase Young out for Sunday. Ryan Anderson, Terry McLaurin, Morgan Moses All questionable embrace love Place on I R Running backs Gnaeus swelling up a bit, says the coach to be a 3 to 4 week injury. Steelers Titans game will now be played October 25th, which is week seven. Steelers Ravens will move from that day to a week later week Number eight, as both teams would have would have had to buy that day. So that's after two more Titans players testing positive. Major league Baseball now 33 straight days that a positive test that's good news and 41 of the last 42 Cubs Marlins. No score right now. In the fifth, they're playing game two of their serious cardinals Padres winner take all Game three later and the N ba Finals tonight. Game number two Lakers up one, Nothing. And How about this stat Over the last 25 post seasons? The Lakers 29 ano when taking a 10 lead? Wow! Yeah. George whilst every TV sports Thanks so much, George. It's 3 47. You've put off taking care of your dental health long enough because of your fear of the dentist at.

president White House President Trump White House correspondent George Wallace Hicks Anita Kumar associate editor Lakers Ravens Lady Melania Skype Anita Kumar Politico Steelers AIDS Anita Shawn Ron Rivera New Jersey Air Force
Trump admits to ‘playing down’ coronavirus threat in taped Woodward interviews

Tony Katz Today

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Trump admits to ‘playing down’ coronavirus threat in taped Woodward interviews

"President Trump addressing new recordings from Washington Post associate editor Bob Woodward. That seemed to convey that the president knew weeks before the first confirmed US Corona virus death that the virus was dangerous, Airborne and highly contagious. Fox's John Decker president Trump on Hannity, explaining why he told Bob Woodward in a recorded conversation that he knew Corona virus was deadly and worse than the flu. But according tto Woodward intentionally did not level with the American public that said Don't paddock. We don't want to be jumping up and down and going while don't panic, a cheerleader for this country, and I don't want to see panic. The president admitted to Woodward on March 19th that he deliberately minimize the danger, saying I wanted to always play it down. Woodward's new book is based in part on 18. On the record interviews Woodward conducted with the president between December and July

Bob Woodward President Trump Washington Post Associate Editor Corona United States Hannity John Decker FOX
"associate editor" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Woodward, The Washington Post associate editor, taped interviews of the president for his new book in a February 7th call the president describes the virus is being passed through the air and deadlier than the seasonal flu. So this's deadly stuff. Joe Biden seizing on this during a campaign event in Michigan, he knew how deadly it was. It was much more deadly than the flu. He knew and purposely played it down. Worse, he lied to the American people. White House spokeswoman Kayleigh Mcenany denies that the president has never lied to the American public on covert. The president's been very president was expressing calm and his actions reflect that. And the president himself just talking about this moments ago, saying that he has acted in ways that sought to reduce any potential panic. Over the pandemic at a Senate hearing. Top government scientists say the public should trust the process for the fast track vaccine effort known is Operation Warp Speed. Surgeon General Dr Jerome Adam says he's not saying political influence of the vaccine process from the administration's Corona virus Task force. We have a process in place. That I trust as a doctor as a dad, Adams and National Institute of Health director Dr Francis Collins told the Senate Health Committee. The safety and efficacy of the vaccine won't be compromised. I'm reassured and I hope it will be reassuring to you that there are a number of steps in terms of how vaccines they're going to be evaluated that are going to give that kind of sense of scientific objectivity. AstraZeneca announced the pause in a late stage trial this week after a suspected serious side effect of a participant. Boxes Your helper and on Capitol Hill America is listening to Fox. These four kind Scot Governor Tim Walz today announcing he will convene a special legislative session beginning on Friday. September 11th walls intends to extend the Koven 19 peacetime emergency by 30 days to quote ensure the state can continue to quickly. And effectively respond to the Cova 19 pandemic. It's the fourth special session to occur amid Corona virus. Senate Republicans are calling on walls to put an end to his peace time executive orders, But the Democrat controlled House supports the governor's decision to extend his powers. The special session set to convene Friday at noon, Donald Trump Jr in Duluth this afternoon on the campaign trail for his father ahead of the November election. State, DFL Chair Ken Martin says Donald Trump Jr is visiting Minnesota today in an attempt to distract from his father's epic failure in responding to Corona virus that's infected over 80,000 Minnesotans and left thousands more out of work. State GOP chair Jennifer Kernaghan counters that Martin pushes and promote and blames.

president Joe Biden Senate Donald Trump Jr Scot Governor Tim Walz Dr Jerome Adam AstraZeneca Senate Health Committee Woodward associate editor Dr Francis Collins Kayleigh Mcenany Ken Martin Corona White House Duluth Michigan Capitol Hill America Cova National Institute of Health
"associate editor" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Hinton, Post associate editor taped interviews of the president for his new book In a February 7th call the president describes the virus is being passed through the air and deadlier than the seasonal flu. So this's deadly stuff. Joe Biden seizing on this during a campaign event in Michigan, he knew how deadly it was. It was much more deadly than the flu. He knew and purposely played it down. Worse, he lied to the American people might have spokeswoman Kayleigh Mcenany denies that the president has never lied to the American public on covert. The president's been very the president was expressing calm, and his actions reflect that. And the president himself just talking about this moments ago, saying that he has acted in ways that sought to reduce any potential panic. Over the pandemic at a Senate hearing. Top government scientists say the public should trust the process for the fast track vaccine effort known as Operation Warps Be Surgeon General, Dr Jerome Adam says he's not saying political influence of the vaccine process from the administration's Corona virus past force. We have a process in place. That I trust as a doctor as a dad, Adams and National Institute of Health director Dr Francis Collins told the Senate Health Committee. The safety and efficacy of the vaccine won't be compromised. I'm reassured, and I hope it will be reassuring to you that there are a number of steps in terms of how vaccines are going to be evaluated that are going to give that kind of sense of scientific objectivity. AstraZeneca announced the pause in a late stage trial this week after a suspected serious side effect of a participant. Boxes. Jared Helper and on Capitol Hill. America is listening to Bach's These news brought to you by the Ad Council from McKay l i f Soda Weight Loss News Desk. This is real music information. 5 70 K. L I. Body outside 83 degrees 5 70 Kale I, After news and information. I'm Jed Dixon. Election officials are assuring voters that precautions are in place to prevent potential double voting this November. Collin County Election Administration, Bruce Sherbert says the voting system won't allow person to vote twice the systems will catch if there's a mail ballot, or e mailed out and given opportunity to vote, what we call a provisional about which is not a regular ballot. It's one that is not counted unless it's reviewed and accepted by a ballot board so there are catches election administrators are reminding voters. The double voting is against the law. The Super Bowl of rodeos is coming to North Texas. The Wrangler National Finals Rodeo is moving from Las Vegas to Arlington's global I Field this December. Arlington Mayor Jeff Williams says he's excited to have fans in the new ballpark. Global Field is the next generation of Major League baseball. But it also Is the next generation of Special events center and of course, it is going to create an incredible atmosphere for the rodeo. The event will take place from December 3rd two December 12th. News and information. Time is three or four. Let's get looking right now. Traffic.

president Joe Biden Collin County Election Adminis Senate Arlington Dr Jerome Adam AstraZeneca Hinton Global Field Dr Francis Collins Kayleigh Mcenany Senate Health Committee Jared Helper Jed Dixon Post associate National Institute of Health Michigan Bruce Sherbert Ad Council Las Vegas
Feds clash with Portland protesters again

AM Joy

05:34 min | 2 years ago

Feds clash with Portland protesters again

"Now we all know that Donald trump has a thing for dictators and each time he praises leaders men who he has called. Good friends trump exposed and apparent autocratic envied that foreshadowed what we are seeing happening right now in Portland, Oregon we're on Friday thousands of protesters, including the wall of MOMS and a wall of. Of veterans standing in solidarity with black lives matter we're met by federal agents who fired pepper balls and deployed tear gas to disperse the crowds for two weeks now federal officers wearing military style, camouflage and helmets have been patrolling Portland with batons and tear-gas, driving around in unmarked vehicles, sweeping up and detaining protesters in a way that Oregon's own attorney general says resembles abductions. This ladies and gentlemen is trump's secret police. Federal agents igniting chaos in the city led by a democratic mayor who was also tear-gas by US agents this week. According to trump, he's simply trying to quell unrest. In other words, he is clinging to the image of the law and order president as his approval ratings continued tank borrowing from the playbook of the dictators. He's so admires. will go into all of the city's Eddie of the cities we're ready will put in fifty thousand and sixty thousand people that really know what they're doing. Then they're strong tough, and we could solve these problems so fast. Joining me now is in Applebaum staff writer at the Atlantic and author of twilight of Democracy Renee, Graham columnist and associate editor at the Boston Globe. Sarah Kinzir scholar, authoritarian states, and all of hiding in plain sites and Philip he goes of the center for Policing Equity Thank you guys for joining me and I'm going to start with you. We are living in a world where secret police are detaining protesters without probable. So. If you look out on the nation, you will note across the chasm a lot of steering thing we try to tell you and you really touch on some interesting things in your piece in the Atlantic I loved it and you say that Donald Trump's authoritarianism is a form of politics that reached new heights. And you compare this what we're seeing in the landscape to Russia explain that to me. So. Thanks I think the important thing to understand about what trump is doing is that these are not tactics designed to solve the problem? Why is he sending customs and Border Patrol Coastguard Tsa. Officers into American cities these are people who don't have training and riot control who aren't used to dealing with political protests, and whose main goal seems to be to create more chaos. Of course, this isn't full on dictatorship. Resting the mayor or conducting mass arrests are putting thousands of people in jail for what he is doing is creating pictures. That are designed to show other Americans. How tough he is! So the fact that these men are wearing men and women maybe are wearing camouflage. They look heavily armed. They're wearing. Face Masks this is designed to show and kind of act out dominance. Look were pushing back against the liberal America the. Urban America the chaotic in America that. You're all afraid of and this is how we're going to win the argument. This way of using troops and using photographs of violence is something that we have seen in other authoritarian states. particularly in Russia where. Putin in twenty, thousand fourteen. Used pictures of violence to imply that the democracy movement in Ukraine was really some kind of Nazi fascist uprising, and that he was then putting it. Is, this is a tactic. We've seen US in other parts of the world, and we've already seen the photographs and footage of this be used in campaign. So that really punctuates your Article Philip. I want to turn to you because one thing that concerns me about. This is the experience that black and Brown people have when we encounter police so attorney general bill bar has said that in these new cities that the police officers are going to be clearly identifiable. I don't know that that makes it better. Considering that when black people encounter police there three times more likely to be killed in Chicago there six times more likely to be killed whether you make this. Yeah amp put it exactly right. These are not here. These troops are not here to make anything better. They're set up. In camouflage, which by the way they're not blending into any urban environment with those uniforms. To make the folks who are protesting who had been almost entirely peaceful important up until this point. Make them fear that there's going to be some kind of forceful, physical violent, a reaction to their peaceful expression of their rights and the thing I want to understand is this is over the objection, not only of the mayor of the US Attorney Attorney General the governor of local law enforcement as local law enforcement has been trying for the last seven eight to figure out how dare legitimacy at trust of New York, and this is explicitly not helping

Donald Trump America Atlantic Russia Attorney Oregon Portland Putin Border Patrol Coastguard Tsa Philip Sarah Kinzir Us Attorney Applebaum Chicago President Trump Center For Policing Equity New York
"associate editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The skyline studio here until four o'clock joining us after midnight Aimee Levitt will be here she is an associate editor with the take out which is a really great food website we got a lot of food news talk about and we would love to hear from you three one two nine eight one seven two hundred did you go out for father's day did you did you have a good time three one two nine eight one seven two hundred is the phone number for the team Hochberg phone line so as we were talking about some of the Chicago restaurants and bars are gonna open to limited indoor seating starting on Friday June twenty sixth but some other places have been opening up over the over the time here and this is an interesting one from the U. K. I'm new rules have been published for hairdressers as they prepare to reopen salons next month including cutting the small talk the national hair and beauty federation I wasn't even aware that that was the thing those those the people at the very top at the very top this is in the U. K. yes do we have a national hair and beauty federation here in America yeah who who controls the barbers and hairdressers and stylists that's what we need to find out I think investigation needs to be done so the national hair and beauty federation or the N. H. B. S. has advised members to keep the chat to a minimum to protect both staff and customers it comes as the federation is urging the government to publish full guidance as salons will need two weeks to redesign this report is from the mirror one hairdressing group meanwhile has already told staff not to talk to customers while they're having their hair washed and head massaged I you know I want to find out more about this national hair and beauty federation what exactly do they do what do you think they do down well I you know I feel like they maintain some sort of memberships or make sure everybody's using barber cider tough hello there the blue stuff up I'm dead serious I'm dead it's scary I've always been terrified of Barbara side I think it's a terrifying name for the for a product yes it's very not very necessary absolutely no yeah well the national hair and beauty federation is telling everybody that the key to chat to a minimum contemporary salons which has shops throughout the north east and north Yorkshire will make sure that all staff have P. P. E. customers will also take part in a virtual consolation consultation so the length of the appointment can be assessed well that's awfully that's an awful lot of stuff to do just to get your hair cut have you had your hair cut oh boy when was the last time I had my hair cut probably January yeah I can't remember the last time I had Erica yeah I did I have scheduled one you have yeah I had to do it a month in advance July eleventh is my big day we had to schedule a month in advance yeah that's how that's how you know they have to get can only have so many people right right right so I go to a place in uptown it's called the public barber I've been going there for like two years to three years now uhhuh great barbershop because once you have your barber you can I don't want to go anywhere else you know who they are right you know what they're gonna do with your hair all that good stuff yeah but it's a relatively small space very small bar so that's why it's limited yeah there's only a certain only could be a certain number of barbers in their second week of July eleventh to get a haircut yeah it's it's on I literally had to reserve it a month I've reserved it last last week couple weeks ago you know why a month in advance to get a hair cut I guess that makes sense considering you know of the demand for it right now and and the fact that we can't get hair cuts or haven't been able to get hair cuts do you want you want the best hair cut right you know if you're going to get if you're gonna get your hat you want your you want your barber or hairdresser whatever you wanna column while the same one every time or at least I do yeah although the lack of small talk be interesting yeah what do you eat when you what do you what do you suppose to do when you're in a hurry because they're usually I mean little chit chat you know what's going on all that kind of stuff that's gonna be kept to a minimum in the U. K. now you can't even don't even talk limit let me give you a fax on the NH B. F. O. okay the national hair in beauty for federation yeah everybody gets a cool hat established in nineteen forty two the napa wow yeah nineteen forty two now here in BC federation so were five thousand members and is the UK's largest trade body for hair beauty and barber wow do we have a similar federation here in America you know I tried to look and I did find the national association of barber boards of America Nabua Nabua Nabua all right that was established in nineteen twenty six one now nineteen twenty six.

associate editor
"associate editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:31 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Eighty Levitt is associate editor with the takeout which sits rific food website we love food stories to talk about and Amy welcome back right so people you know I mean it's it's Memorial Day is coming up so that means the beginning of the beginning of summer it's gonna be a little unusual obviously this year because we're not gonna be doing a lot of the social activities that that we normally do including a county fairs yes but people love food on sticks and they are it better on a stick yeah so the food on sticks but in Ohio they're thinking of a way to actually couldn't continue did have like a drive through county fair just so they can get food on sticks tells about the yes in stark county Ohio it's in northern Ohio that's where canton is such a man they want to have their county fair style so there are having people drive through and then they place their orders I cash I don't know I think it's probably a car hop like situation yeah and then they bring them their food on sticks are not allowed to compete she met the fairgrounds they have to take it home and eat it responsibly like humans I gash yeah but they want yes so they they've got to you got your hot dogs you get your corn dogs you got your cotton candy you got your deep fried oreos well hi L. yeah of course yeah yeah but that sounds pretty good sounds pretty cool a drive through county fair and you can still get your food on sticks my favorite part of this is the tagline there was an announcement of it on Facebook and then the last line is please don't think spent good thing from happening with two exclamation point please don't prevent a good thing from happening people can't handle you know the food out excellent I think they're going to cancel it and then nobody will have food on sticks we can't have that we we have to look at camp you have to have access to food on sticks I wonder how that started how did food on sticks start what a good question I really should look that up yeah that's something that maybe the take out could do it like a history lesson on where did that where I am who was the first food honest now I you know I would I would be my guess would it have to be wouldn't have to be traced back to the corn dog wait I don't know when the corn dog started yeah I don't I don't I'm not really sure either the you know they have now that it had something to do with eighteen ninety three lobster everything start ever asked for who it's funny because they have this thing I don't know if you're aware of this Amy but they have this thing called national corn dog day question which they didn't have this year because of you know because it happens during the NC double a tournament it's when the it's when the what's it's it's the the the longest day of the NC double a tournament on a Saturday that's always or doctors to save yourself you eat corn dogs yeah well I used to I used to because I used to be on on Saturdays my I did but I did not show up on the I was on the weekends and I was on Saturday and I would always cover national corn dog day live on the air by who would have corn dog parties because of the the because the basketball games so what they were saying national corn dog day is a website where you can sign up and they'll send you frozen corn dogs the center bunch corn dogs will give you a care package it's corn dogs it's coupons for for Pabst Blue Ribbon R. anteater truck and coupons for tater tots so the the idea is to eat as many corn dogs tater tots and drink as many beers as you can M. and you keep track of it on a poster at your party to see how many corn dogs and tater tots have been eaten and if you could do a triple double that means I mean that's obviously a basketball term but if you can do if you can do ten corn dogs ten servings of tater tots and ten beers that your triple double if they measure the volume of puke afterwards I use really this is funny Amy that you mention that because at one of the corn dog parties I was like is anybody have any triple doubles going yet and the only person at the party did in it was a girl which was surprising to a lot of people and apparently she was just like very petite and so I was like let me talk to her and she was a couple of sheets to the wind already because she already consumed you know she consumed ten beers she finished her double and the I can't remember how many how many tater tots are I think it's ten tater tots per serving my god your feet a hundred tater tots yeah so she did that we intend corn dogs in ten beers and I was talking to her on the phone she was pretty drunk so I had to have my hand you know covering over the dump button you know in case she yeah she said something that you can't say on the radio it was very entertaining and then I I gotta talk to her for just a couple of minutes you know and I said congratulations on your triple double being the first one of the party to do the triple double and then I get back on on on the phone with the with the host to standing there standing on a balcony and immediately when he get she gave the phone back to him he started talking she leaned over the balcony and threw up oh god no one down there to see if it's like I I heard or two she just heaving and I'm like oh she's thrown a little while he's like yeah if yeah it's it's it's so but yeah I I don't know I don't know how to keep track of the vomit situation but that's that's national corn dog thank you another thing that's another thing that you guys should write about national corn dog day to take out you should be sweet something to look forward to yeah hopefully a look it'll be back next March during the basketball tournaments in a basketball tournament you could think could still happen without basketball I can tell you still haven't sure corn dog national corn dog day and I talked I talked to the guys and the guys who invented national corn dog day on because it all started when they were watching that they were just gonna watch all the basketball games because he's that's what people do during the madness they just sit honest on that first Saturday they just watched nine hundred basketball games and they're they're all day so my dad my dad used to do that that means chair yet not just watched ten basketball games in a row and so the guys who invented that national corn dog day were in the basement at one of their houses I can't member which guy was and their dad the guy's dad came down and had made a corn dogs for them yeah you don't know it I think it's it's just not an hour's like here have some corn dogs while you're watching the basketball game and he's like and they were like that's it that's it we got to have national corn dog day and thus it was born it's beautiful food and see because a lot bothers love that's exactly right the father's love feeding his son in his fund son's best friend some corn dogs so we move on from food that isn't really good for you too the spiritus which I I'm a I know some people don't like us I love asparagus at one thirty at the St it's it's B. U. I. I love it it's it actually will spinach is actually my favorite vegetable but really yeah yeah and all I even like the canned stuff the you know the stuff that could pop out of the can I grew up on that when I was a kid when I was when I was a kid there were a lot of canned food in the house yes shame in the night don't like any of those vegetables now but it's very good has always been as always been one of my favorites and I know it's kind of a divisive vegetable but you got to a woman who reads the future in a spiritist tell us about this yes ma'am Sir she's only caravanserai old she lives in bath England the Hong is her name is Jim I'm attacking him N. B. she takes enormous campuses yes she cash thanks to this program she captioned and they make shakes and she reads them she reads them but the five she's on British TV it which is like a regular now and she's she's the letters a lot Michael workers flooding in the southern English she's but she's got a great name though Jemima Packington that's a fantastic name so what if she's reading experience reading the future what are some of your predictions well she's very interesting predictions like burying the British news yeah so she predicted brexit she predicted the hair and make it would have twins which turned out not to be true but yeah she so far this year she's predicted that there will be another royal baby she predicted there will be a while back she predicts that brexit will go smoothly the United States she predicts that Donald Trump will be reelected but that he will be impeached and forced from office all of this she got all of this from asparagus he said he also predicted that Harry and Meghan would go on ITV this morning that was the show she was on recently mmhm wow okay we're very excited about that she did she did did did do you do we know what kind of a spare guess she is it just the regular green asparagus or yellow regular cleaning spare guess I'll shop the predicted that bail at this young asparagus would be come the world's most prized basketball does anybody know how she started this did anybody ask her how did you start yeah I think it's fair yeah okay he learned he learned from her and she very cheap either but she felt drawn to asparagus she does tea leaves as well well known for it if you believe your intellectual mind left out more who taught her everything she knows about meeting the future king might not help drawn to the asparagus and how often a lead sheet and that she said afterwards so she reads the asparagus talks about the future and then eats the asparagus yes are you gonna do with it yeah that's true well yeah I mean you don't want to waste a spirit is the spirit is a lovely vegetable Huizenga's can we see her online doing this somewhere she like YouTube or anything.

Levitt associate editor Amy
"associate editor" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Associate editor of the hill we say good morning once again always a pleasure to have Jesse burns on the program Jesse welcome back thank you so much how are you I'm doing well thanks are meant to Gavin Newsom has he made a deal with the devil it's it sounds like a billion dollar deal with China yeah California governor announced it was earlier this month that California is partnering with California based company called B. Y. D. N. acronym for build your dreams of the world's largest manufacturer of electric vehicles but it has repurposed some of it plant there in China to make medical masks so this you know nearly billion dollar deal Newsome says you know it will produce two hundred million map bought for California those respirators and surgical masks but there's some questions about the deal itself you know if you if so I matched it on April seventh so several weeks ago at this point in California lawmakers still are complaining they don't have details about the deal and you know half of the the contract is already been wired to this company but they don't have any assurances over how many bass are actually going to be produced and the quality of the massive particulars or something they are raising questions about here several weeks later since five hundred million dollars has already been sent away I mean it I guess I guess at this point now they have to cross our fingers and hope I suppose yeah you know the California governor's office the purchase you could earn a sprint has that you know listen we don't want to compromise deal there been some reports of other state or federal government stepping in zero acquired and basically take some of the equipment that has been ordered by different states so there being an overly conscious thing we don't want to compromise the filibuster but you know the seller California lawmakers including Democrats are saying well you know look very good five hundred million dollars which at least beginning as your quote Coleco branch government getting some details on what we should be expecting for our money at the return on that investment sure sure Hey in in and then some sort of a time line to get to get those and and and be able to have at least all been approved to see what's going on Jesse burns joins us on Memphis morning news and Jesse for for many folks we're basically living through a civics lesson right now all often times many people never got in high school or in college in watching each individual state as they deal with this is kinda how the constitution set this up as a Republican and offering up the state's rights yeah and you're saying kind of the various unpainted creator of action by state you know you know Newsome note these two hundred million mass a month when he announced that a kind of a splashy deal kind of taking a step out on a limb to some extent you know other states are also acquiring you know but protective equipment from overseas you know some are are really kind of putting more emphasis on getting ventilators others pharmacists are getting masks and gloves for hospital workers others are you know maybe not focused they had a had a big circle thank you for the other instead focused on trying to eliminate outbreaks in in areas that trying to keep the economy is a largely open but that you're seeing out the coming days a certain state moved to re open certain businesses and try to get things moving again you know we'll see kind of the corresponding you know if there's any kind of spiking cases and and that's something that these governors across the country are going to be happy to watch very closely are you fascinated with what's going down in in Georgia I I'm I'm the kind of person that you don't have to agree with me on everything but just the fact that president trump and then Georgia governor Brian camp have a disagreement on how to re open Georgia it has caught much of the media's fascination they really have you know the president saying you know re opening has two parlors massage parlors not exactly the financial businesses that I think a lot of people had in mind when it comes to you know what are going to be the first things that re opened that said you know it every governor's prerogative on exactly what they want to kind of reopen when as opposed to federal government but yeah there's definitely a lot of criticism and a lot of concern among public health officials that Georgia has three of the last account but it's just I think the top fifteen or twenty out of state for this virus and so you know its kind of a concern when a state with a good amount of cases kind of re opening as opposed to one that has a how to speak of an outbreak and Jesse are we about forty five seconds left what what should we be keeping an eye on on the hill dot com what some of the stuff that that your your colleagues in your focusing on well yesterday the the house passed the Senate bill that provides another five hundred billion dollars and release a large chunk of that is going to the small business relief program that members of both parties have been really scrutinizing making sure it goes to small businesses and not these kind of bigger restaurant chain chains and conglomerate so so I think looking for continued kind of scrutiny of of that as well as our state the early could be over you know another relief package Republicans trying to pump the brakes a little bit saying look we don't want to further add to our our deficit and debt we party past one point eight our doctor two point eight trillion in relief in the past few weeks and so they're really trying to hold off but I think we're same members of both parties realizing that they're gonna pass another bill but not the exact contours of that remain to be seen yeah Hey Jesse burns five follow him he's associate editor at the hill go to hill the hill dot com and check that out Jesse thank you for being so generous with your time stay safe and have a good weekend Sir absolutely you too thank you there's Jesse burns on Memphis morning news.

Associate editor Jesse burns
"associate editor" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Real estate today hi Stephen thanks for having me on we are so glad you're here no Andrew this is the first time you and I have spoken since this era in which were all sheltering in place in our homes first of all how are you doing my friend I'm a little stir crazy but I'm hanging in there so tell me now being that you've reviewed all the smart home devices and that you keep up with that part of the market every single day for your professional career at scene at what are you doing now in your shelter that's keeping you happy and sane so this is actually a really good time to be using smart home devices using assistants like the Amazon assistant or the Google assistant to touch things last I mean it's good advice you know Andrew I'm a big fan of smart home technology I had never made that one connection that when you say Alexa turn up the thermostat to seventy two you're not touching anything that is such a absolutely obvious and yet hugely important observation right it's also convenient it's also fun to be able to have a voice commands around your house to do the little things like turning on the lights turning the thermostats locking and unlocking the door these are all things you can enable with smart home gadgets and then you know that the touching yourself that is wonderful and you know some people aren't aware that both the Google home and Amazon echo can actually make phone calls for you yes you can use them as speaker phones you can also use smart displays like the Google nest hub which used to be called the Google home or the Amazon echo and then being able to see their face and form that connection could be really nice that's a really good point communication and I think communicating with the people in your world is one of the most important things smart home tech can bring us another whirl sheltering at home because it tells them that you're okay yeah and I also think that spacing out and scheduling the calls is handy if you space the calls out and do you one today and one tomorrow then by the time you get to the end of the list of people you want to catch up with you can start the list over that's a really good point and that scheduling is a really really good observation to Andrew because for instance in my case in the middle of everyday I'm doing interviews in my home studio and my phone is here and if someone called me it would bring so getting an idea of what your schedule is and what the schedule of the people in your life is like is incredibly important right don't just assume that everybody's free just because we're all stuck at home people are still trying to put a routine together but I think that keeping your routine and respecting others and scheduling things can help excellent well entry we still I have a lot more to talk about can you join us again in the next hour a real estate today that sounds perfect thanks Andrew Andrew Gephardt senior associate editor at scenic.

Andrew Stephen
"associate editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Associate editor at Chicago NO hi Catherine thanks for being with us Hey Angie yeah of course and so I am sure that it is not business as usual for all of the Chicago start ups that you guys have been covering throughout the year no I mean you know it the the the situation seems pretty similar to what we're seeing in other industries you know artists that I've talked to have shut down their offices asking all employees to work from home you know changing kind of expectations the normal office operations for a lot of people as you know they try to be a little more I think could do that too you know what people are going through with current Iraqi and Chicago I know this was in the news last week but of course the grub hub is a local Chicago company that started off as a start up and they're going to hang around being on their commission payments for independent restaurants right enter a yeah grow together wait there Lori Lightfoot last week also the mayors of New York San Francisco Boston and Portland on to announce that they're dropping commission payments of up to a hundred billion dollars for independent restaurant so that you know what as we see the shut down of restaurants and bars in the United states like Illinois hopefully this can help kind of offset the damage is done to their bottom line is people are you know staying at home and not eating out okay and there's also a grub hub community relief fund and folks that are using the service can round up and the money will go towards the sad really find that's right you know it's I think it's really interesting to see you grow up you know really trying to get back to the the the the exact industry that allowed it to thrive right you know like grub hub would be kind of the thing without that the restaurant that delivers food on its platform so you know it's nice to see this and I'm sure they will continue with these kind of efforts from other start ups that you know work hand in hand with the you know traditional industries but you know that signed it allows diners to donate you know a certain portion of their their ordered to to court restaurant in the delivery drivers that are impacted by creditors I know this happened last week but if you've been covering GrubHub since the they started are you surprised by the CEO I think it's Matt Maloney right his decision yeah no surprise they mean you know he's someone who's been really active in the not only the tech community returning to Chicago you know business community and you know even beyond that like you know kind of a Chicago guy through and through and he cared about his community any kind of that you know really showing that with this step would you say the overall Catherine that the Chicago tech businesses the start ups that you covered have kind of been ahead of the curve in terms of being airing for this and then also I feel like their business model is one in which they would be more open to working remotely yeah I mean you know a lot of the start up then we know they have really flexible indication policy work from home policies they kind of take a an innovative approach to what workplace culture looks like you know and the other thing is that if you're a tech company most of what you're doing is digital right so you know that is you can't do that on a laptop in the kind of work from anywhere on the industry just kind of went out that naturally you know I think it's far as like you know how did big businesses will stand this is still something that we have yet to see you know corona viruses really impacting economies many of the startups we cover are backed by investors you know in a lot of times you companies are working to be profitable and aren't quite yet profitable and if the economy takes a turn investor money dries up you know it it it will be interesting to see how they're affected right because we could do to shut down because the layoffs neither I think we anticipate with this kind of situation and when the markets are down like this is this when there's a lot less investment in general and feces and start ups yeah absolutely are tied into the sea last week and you know he was like you know we try to get the best advice that we can to our portfolio companies but at the end of the day like the hard decisions are probably going to have to be made people are going to have to pay in expenses you know it'd be more thoughtful about how they are spending if they want to survive Catherine Davis is the associate editor at Chicago NO I know that you're on the polls have you heard anything at all about layoffs or anything so far well so far you know a lot of people reaching out to me just saying like here's how we're trying to manage a stock remotely and you know this is how we've you know come to you know be more flexible with with employees with kids in her parents you know it's kind of the the day to day stuff they were hearing about right now but you know it's it's good to laugh it's going to shut down like this last for a couple weeks or even into a month I think we'll start to see the real impact of on how the text the business's bottom line it's not just the offices that are closed of course a lot of these companies have really big investor meetings and events what have you been hearing about in terms of cancellations yes so you know earlier this month or at the beginning of March when coronavirus which you know still in considered something containable oracle cancelled it the conference that house in Chicago every year sailed over Edward explained that you have a three day conference in may and they have done transformed into a completely virtual experience so there will be no in person event anymore did you know that that connect event that they call it if something happens every year it attracts thousands of people in last year like Gwen Stefani with the performer I mean it's a huge advantage people really look forward to it so you know but at this point I think people are just they can have a vent so that's correct in terms of a roundup of different companies that you're hearing about that are closing offices and working remotely aniya interesting anecdotes yes spy hero on his you know and I started we talked about here on the show before and also when people are pretty familiar with the area how does the parking app that let you find convenient parking spaces around Chicago and other big cities as well and you know they ask their two hundred employees to work from home starting on last Friday you know it was just kind of a safety thing at that point they didn't want to expose their employees Q. you know the virus or you know any other social situation center city at the Chicago babysitter marketplace start up they also asking all their employees to work from home cameo has similarly shut down their office for the next thirty days so you know and even at Chicago and we set down there or office three I I'm working from home today so you know it just kind of across the board intact have you heard any concerns at all about productivity and how to you know make sure that does deadlines and all of that is being met yeah you know I've seen a lot of coverage on this actually for some other publications that are like you know this is the best way to work from home or like the the current setting up my workstation and how I'm staying focused with you know even with kids in the background my partner nearby you know working in a small space when used to its basic opposite them you know I think people are just doing the best that they can I thought anecdote on Twitter about you know thanks bye I've had one of the best the best two weeks or months because if people are in there buying laptops and monitors you're trying to create a home office that home office that they wanna right at tax write off on yeah exactly well okay well I know that you will keep us abreast of everything that's going on we'll check back in with you next week thanks so much to Catherine Davis associate editor at Chicago NO and your website is yeah you can find it at Chicago in dot com and there you can kind of be which is our daily email newsletter all fantastic thanks Catherine stay well and stay healthy okay CS gas used to doing a lot more coming up on WGN radio.

Associate editor Chicago Catherine Angie
House Speaker Pelosi to unveil coronavirus aid package for workers

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

10:45 min | 2 years ago

House Speaker Pelosi to unveil coronavirus aid package for workers

"House speaker. Nancy Pelosi is expected to unveil legislation tomorrow aimed at helping workers who may be at financial risk because of the grow virus outbreak. Nbc News reports. The House will likely pass that bill as for the impact. This crisis is having on our daily lives. There are new developments almost hourly the NC Double A. announced March madness will go on at all venues but without fans in the arenas Seattle public schools will close for a minimum of two weeks beginning tomorrow. Tomorrow is also when the containment zone in the New York City. Suburb of new Rochelle. Officially begins officials. Say They hope that will control the spread of the corona virus in what has become the largest cluster of illness in the United States? So far here for our leadoff discussion on a Wednesday night. Anita Kumar White House correspondent and associate editor for Politico Robert Costa National Political reporter for the Washington Post and moderator of Washington. Week on PBS. And we welcome to the broadcast Austin Goolsbee former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers for President Obama and a professor of economics at the University of Chicago. Welcome to all of you. Anita the president made a number of announcements this evening He did not declare a state of emergency. I do want to remind our viewers. There is a state of emergency that continues to be in effect in America because of the border the southern border. But that's not. As far as the president's gone he also suggested earlier. Today that jared Kushner is is sort of in charge of this and he's studying it more right while the president is expected in the next few days even perhaps next week to declare this emergency of very limited emergency that would basically free up. Forty billion dollars that is sitting there that The government has sitting there for disaster relief so he wants to free up some of that money and and the thinking here is that he wants to go ahead and act quickly He he was on the hill yesterday on Capitol Hill and he didn't hear from Republicans or Democrats Anything that would make him believe that they were going to quickly accept some of his ideas for economic relief and he wanted to bypass them and really just get some funds freed up so he could go ahead and do that Robert. You were reporting this evening about the fact that the president had a bit of a shouting match with his treasury secretary about the measures that the Fed and others have taken. This is his fed chief. Jay Powell who he put into place. Apparently he's very very frustrated with the Fed and things more can be done. He is unhappy with the Federal Reserve Chairman Pal on Monday afternoon while the president was in the Oval Office meeting with top advisers including treasury secretary. Mnuchin he lashed out about pal saying to the Treasury Secretary. You need to try to get him to lower rates if at all possible to try to see if you can have a conversation with him to stimulate the economy. The president knows he's being stymied on Capitol Hill about his payroll tax cut and just a couple of minutes ago house. Democrats formerly released publicly released. Their virus relief. Bill just have been reading it over for the past. Couple of minutes includes paid sick. Leave Food Security It also includes free testing unemployment benefits. You see Speaker Pelosi tonight. A after the president's speech trying to take the lead on the legislative answer to all of this Austin the stock market the Dow was down another fourteen hundred and some odd points. Today we're now off twenty percent from recent highs which puts the Dow into the bear a bear market. The five hundred is not far behind. The president has a what one might say unhealthy preoccupation with both the stock market and interest rates. What do you make of this though? Because the market is responding even after the president's announcement market futures were were lower. What do you make of what has to be done from from the perspective of the government whether it's a stimulus or what? The House is proposing. Well you know I think two things. The first is as we've spoken many times. Vulgar used to tell me over and over and the financial crisis that when crisis hits the only asset you have is your credibility and I think when you see the stock market plunging. The way did today the way it did this evening. It is a judgment about the credibility of the White House that we've had the president of the United States going out and saying people are finding that when they get sick they can still go to work. We only have fourteen cases and pretty soon. That's going to go down to zero when the president himself says that and when people cannot be tested no amount of stimulus is going to be sufficient because the reason that the economy is going into this tailspin because people are afraid and they are withdrawing from the economy and if you gave them a thousand dollar payroll tax cut. They're not going to spend it because the root of the problem when you get into a virus situation is that the greatest economic stimulus comes from slowing the rate of spread of the virus. And we've seen South Korea's succeed at it by having extensive testing and by finding the people who are sick and saying look. Don't go visit your grandma and stay isolated. For fourteen days. They've been able to slow the spread of the virus and their economy is gonNA come rebounding in a rapid basis the longer. We pretend that there aren't cases here and try to blame it on Europe and say. Oh we're going to block cargo boxes from Europe and that's GonNa help us without doing the testing the the more fear is going to be generated in people's minds and the worst the economy's GonNa get Robert this whole issue credibility this. This thing has developed very quickly. I want to just go back to starting really the last week of February the last couple of days of February when the President I started talking about Corona virus compared to what he said tonight. Let's listen together. We're finding very little problem very little pro now. You treat this like a flu. This is the most aggressive and comprehensive effort to confront a foreign virus in modern history. It's going to disappear one day. It's like a miracle it will disappear. We will be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States. For the next thirty days we have thousands or hundreds of thousands of people that get better just by sitting around even going to work. Go to work. If you're sick or not feeling well stay home. Democrats are politicizing the corona virus. This is new hoax. We must put politics aside. Stop the partisanship and unify together. As One Nation Robert this becomes a complicated call to arms for the president because he has been the one saying that the Democrats are politicizing. He and Fox News talking about the media blowing this out of proportion and now the president has got to step up there and do something that is unusual Primetime Oval Office address saying let's come together and take greater action to solve this and there are real world implications for so many the leaders around the country outside of the White House who are dealing with this in an interview. This week with Maryland governor Larry Hogan Republican. He told me that he's deeply concerned about the mixed messages coming out of this administration. He said he had a ninety minute. Meeting with Vice President Pence who said one thing and then he listened to the president who was talking in an entirely different way about the entire crisis. And that's a governor. A sitting governor dealing with cases in his State and when I was on Capitol Hill. There are also expressing concern. Democrats and Republicans about how the president is handling this. There's private concern among some of my top. Gop sources that the president's antennas to attuned to the stock market and his own reelection campaign and Anita in fact the rate cut that the president seemed to be agitating for which occurred last week did not have the desired effect in the market. Nothing the president he's doing is having the desired effect. But at this point you have competing plans the president's plan and then the Republican the Democratic Plan. That's come out who reconciles this. This is not been a White House at a congress. That's managed to come together on many things but at this point is necessary. Who reconciles the fact? That what the president thinks looks like stimulus and success is very different than what Nancy. Pelosi team do right. This is the problem this has been problem on a variety of issues. Obviously we've never been in this place before but on so many policy issues you know the Democrats and sometimes even the Republican Republicans on Capitol Hill can't agree with the White House. And so what happens is they don't do anything. That's not going to be the case this time because everybody believes that something needs to be done. That's why you're seeing the president saying that he's going to act should've unilaterally and then take the you know go ahead with a speech and and call on Congress tact but but you know going back to what Bob said the the president's in this place where he's trying to do two things he's talking about. How this isn't that big of a deal. It's going to go away as you've played but he also has to show that he is doing something tonight. He took a different action showing that he's doing something while he's also trying to downplay parts of it exactly for his reelection and for his popularity. What's going to happen in the future? The trump campaign and some of his allies are very much aware. Now that this is going to probably be the issue that he's going to be judged on in the next few months up until the election Austin during the president's address he said all travel from Europe to the United States will stop not even cargo will go there within correction came out says. Well no cargo is going to go. And then a correction came out to say no. Actually it's just non-americans coming to the United States. I wasn't clear that the virus makes that distinction all that well look this exactly what I mean if the president gets up and says something literally three minutes after he finishes saying it they say no. What he said is not what the policy is. It undermines your credibility the what also undermines the credibility on one hand to say we need a big stimulus and then this afternoon. The secretary of HHS was reached as you know. The president has a plan to cut seven hundred thousand people off of food stamps low income people and they said do you still plan to cut them off of food stamps on April first when those are the very people who are going to be losing their jobs and they say yes they do intend to cut them off of food stamps. So you you've got a we need relief but we're GONNA have a filibuster to hold up paid sick leave for all Americans and I think that I something is going to have to give. They're either going to have to start telling the truth. Doing tests and have a stimulus and an antivirus program or else. They're going to have to just declare. We don't care we all we WANNA do is make. The the problem seems small as possible.

President Trump Democrats United States White House Nancy Pelosi Vice President Europe Anita Kumar White House NBC Robert Costa Seattle New York City FED Anita Chairman
White House impeachment team weighs in on Bolton claims

Fox News Rundown

11:16 min | 2 years ago

White House impeachment team weighs in on Bolton claims

"In the house impeachment inquiry was beginning the White House claimed it wasn't fair and White House attorney said they would not be cooperating with the impeachment process house judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler had said if the president's team wouldn't participate they couldn't claim the process was unfair then things stop house speaker Nancy Pelosi was holding the articles of impeachment saying the house was waiting to hear about the rules of the Senate trial president trump said let's move this along this is Renee a total sham from the beginning everybody knows it I've never seen in the Republican Party so United we got our last about as you know we got a hundred percent of the vote I believe the Senate is equally as well United now the Senate trial has begun discussions over what is fair still loom Republicans say an offer to let the president's team participating committee presentations of evidence came too late Democrats and the White House is blocking documents in preventing key witnesses from testifying Monday the president tweeted that the house never even asked former national security adviser John Bolton to testify but they didn't they didn't issue a subpoena like they did the Boltons aids trials government government filed a lawsuit to force the question should I listen to the president stay quiet or complied with the subpoena the judge dismissed the suit though when the house withdrew the request and moved forward with formal articles of impeachment so the question has been answered Bolton has since said he would testify in the Senate trial if the peanut Democrats do want to call more witnesses before the Senate Republicans say they should have done that during the house inquiry now though Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer notes there's new information Mister Bolton's book is further evidence that a large number of people for a quote in the loop on this scheme and now they are all covering up part of Bolton's book many script leaked over the weekend after it had been sent to the National Security Council for classified information vetting he says the president quote wanted to continue freezing security assistance to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations into Democrats including the bidens I'm sorry about the timing AT standard is an associate editor and columnist at real clear politics because everyone was assuming we're speeding toward a conclusion here of the trial at the end of this week without witnesses but in terms of how long it is that the manuscript has been at the administration whether GM but the National Security Council or both and we know or dare and also distributed to a wider circle of top political people as has been the case with books like this in the past was it always the case that Bolton sort of you know hovered over this defense from the president's team and threaten to weaken it yes it was always the case that we knew he had information the investigation and the impeachment in the house had not yet revealed and it was likely to run counter to what the president's lawyers for saying schools in the tourney said that this clearly is a corruption of the NSC review process and Democrats say you know this surely should serve more as a catalyst to to actually hear from witnesses specifically Bolton when you look at sort of the the broad strokes in the big picture of what everyone saying regardless of any motivation does its way things doesn't change anything well it is a first hand hand the cal and in a way that contradicts the the defense that began over the weekend of of the of the president where lawyers came out on Saturday and said there is no evidence anywhere that this was a a quid pro quo on and that the president intended it to be that withholding of security eight so I think the senators on the Republican side are angry not because they think the John Bolton was squarely in the release of his timing and you know perhaps it's connected to his creed overbooked fails but that the White House might have known since December thirtieth that this is an incredibly damaging development and would poke holes in their defense and would make the argument for witnesses had this information been known earlier I I actually saw some defense from some Republican senators of John Bolton many of them are very close to him they believe his truth teller and that he wouldn't be lying in this book do you foresee a court fight I mean I know the court site really only happens if four Republican senators say yes to witnesses so we have to get there first we think that's gonna happen if John Bolton isn't just going to go on sixty minutes or something I mean I I just don't know just on anyways right he's decided in the eleventh hour that his reputation could be tarnished by the fact that he was holding out but now they're rushing the book to publication and body wants to be a patriot and he didn't wanna look redeem he's clearly conflicted so I don't know what exactly his line of thinking as but he has made it clear to us all along he intends to tell us something that we don't yet know and so if he foresees a court battle does he go into an open media setting I know that nothing can stop the house from trying to subpoena him and he could say yes to a subpoena I don't know but the Senate trial if that's gonna get gummed up this building just sit down in interview that that's I think a big alone looming question here now that he has that publication date since Fulton's many scriptures leak Republican senators who previously expressed interest in possibly hearing from witnesses have said this does strengthen the argument Utah senator Mitt Romney said he thinks it is increasingly likely that other Republicans will join those of them who think they should hear from John Bolton Maine senator Susan Collins said the reporting on Fulton strengthens the case for witnesses it would take a least for Republicans joining Democrats in order for witnesses to be called so wise and Berg is former deputy independent counsel in the whitewater investigation it authorizes the calling of witnesses I would have to believe that Bolton would be one of them the real question is what happens after that do the president's lawyers make a motion in the trial to exclude the testimony under executive privilege and if they do what happened to that one I think most of us are curious about the reach of executive privilege and a lot of articles have been written over the weekend like trying to expound on what seems like untested waters to a certain degree we we don't really know how far executive privilege will will apply do we certainly not in the context of impeachment I don't believe there's any precedent certainly not in the federal appellate precedent gusting executive privilege in the context of an impeachment inquiry or an impeachment trial I should say so we're really operating without without a guide book I will say that if you look at history and particularly the accounting period and the and the first few administrations and congresses after the founding period there is some historical support for the notion that it might not executive privilege might not apply at all in the context of an impeachment trial the first is the very first time a president withheld information didn't called executive privilege then but the very first time I believe that a president withheld information from Congress was when I was in a Washington with held certain papers related to the negotiations of the Jay treaty which was very unpopular and he was asked for old papers and he gave the great majority of them but he did not give over certain papers that he felt were too sensitive and he said at the time this would be different if if we were talking about an impeachment inquiry so I think there is certainly a credible argument that executive privilege either would not apply or would be the standards would be much more difficult for successfully invoking executive privilege in the context of an impeachment inquiry or trial school in your legal mind how does not proceed does it depend on if you have a cooperating witness first is not of just how does the justice department pursue a case against somebody who says you know I'm I'm going to ignore your your invocation of executive privilege and I'm going to go ahead and testify or does it work in the reverse if you say to Congress no I'm going to resist your subpoena who's sort of the authority that that will make that determination ambassador Bolton has already said that if subpoenaed he will testify so I think how it would proceed would be the president's lawyers in the impeachment trial if that happened the boat Mississippi that need to testify will make a motion to the she just this thing the president invokes executive privilege and we we do not agree that this man to justice robbers can do one of two things he can make that determination himself number one do even apply a secular privilege here number two if I'm going to apply it how do we waive the interests of the president versus the interest of the Senate and conducting an impeachment trial now this is David keep justice Roberts says I'm gonna let you invoke executive privilege that would be the easiest for the the majority I think in the Senate because they would have to overturn him by majority vote to overrule but let's say the rules you know what executive privilege simply doesn't apply here it's not very strong here and by the way we do I think the president's already waived whatever in is an interesting situation because we can certainly be overruled but I think we have to think about what you're gonna look like at the two cases in the United States has ruled that Fulton have testified even in the face of an invocation of executive privilege by the president but we're gonna overrule the Chief Justice is what you're saying hold truth the reverse occurs in other words if somebody is resistant unlike Bolton to appearing maybe Samick Mulvaney or a secretary Pompeii or somebody like that and Congress you know the senators say you know excuse me you can't ignore our subpoena is due to the senators then take this to court or petition justice Roberts in much the same way that you you save what happens if the White House felt they were trying to get something through well that would certainly let's say the the the Senate subpoenas and Mulvaney to go into court he could he could make his argument first in front of the net at sitting as a court either thing could happen I don't think it would be bold enough to reassert this the notion of absolute immunity again because it is it is the

White House Attorney Jerry Nadler President Trump Nancy Pelosi Chairman
"associate editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:05 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Bring the fun home welcome back to the winters business luncheon we have associate editor at Chicago in Catherine Davis with us I can't let's talk about some stuff happening right now including a lot of news about sprout first tell us with sprint is yes was pro social their local tech company basically what they do is create kind of a B. to B. platform for companies to manage their social media outlets so you know essentially their dashboard lets you monitor your Facebook your Pinterest feed your Twitter feed schedule posts across them in your have kind of more of a a unified message across all of your social media outlets now I knew about sprout early on because I used to manage a social media okay for at a show that I worked on because when you see live on ABC and in the beginning when we first started in twenty eleven these sort of dashboards didn't exist so you would have to be tied to every platform and in doing that individually so these really have revolutionized how you manage social media yeah I mean it makes it a lot easier you know we use it at Chicago in and I use it every day and I don't know what I'd do without it really has made a difference in social media management really is a full time job it really is exactly and you know they there's some competitors out there like two sweet does something similar but sprout social was in the news last week because they are the latest Chicago tech company to go public and they are local homegrown home grown yeah the offices are right over here in the loop and they price their shares at seventeen dollars at the beginning of the day or anything Thursday evening actually but didn't do quite as well as I think they hoped by the end of Friday their shares were down maybe two percent about sixteen dollars or so but you know what kind of interesting about this recent tech IPO is that it's the first one in five years the first one since GrubHub and you know you usually in Chicago when when we see start ups exiting a lot of times it is acquisitions sometimes that can be kind of a safer bet you know usually you don't have to I mean obviously don't to test the the public Schering waters and see how people react to is that sometimes always the goal I know we talked about the before getting a big buy out and then that way you don't have to worry about at all well yeah you know kind of depends I think depending on the company and the the founders ethos about how they want to grow it you know it it really varies case by case but you know it'll be interesting to see how sprout kind of fairs going this week and even into the next month you know with with the other tech IPOs in other places like we saw with we work in Hoover didn't go so well I know that you work especially have had all sorts of difficulties exactly so I think there's just you know some hesitation from investors out there to kind of buy into these tech companies that aren't as profitable as maybe they say they are not I know you don't have a crystal ball but any projections for you on how sprout will do well I think one interesting thing is that you know when they when they listed on the stock exchange some of their finances came to light and they have been losing money it's not a tons about twenty million dollars but I think you know in light of all the other tech IPO that we've seen it having gone well that can be scary to investors and so I think they got I got to get that together and maybe things will go smoother let's talk about ten I'm I love you dad yes I will veto they are not quite a new start up but maybe been around now for two or three years but they are a life coaching start up and the interesting thing about them is that they're completely bootstrapped so you know sort of different from sprout social or some of the other companies we talked about this morning they haven't raised any venture capital funding they have only been operating on money that they have made themselves well how does that work happened how do you manage to do that yeah well you know I was talking to the founder and she was like you know we just have to be scrapped the we have to be really mindful about how we reinvest any of the money we make so they haven't been expanding super quickly they don't have a giant team I think they only have about fifteen life coaches you know but they're profitable at this point and even though it's a small team it's a sustainable one well life coaching is something I feel like ten years ago people didn't really bring up in their daily conversation and life coaching now is considered a serious said undertaking that many people go to in in order to in addition to therapy or seeking advice from maybe somebody in their clergy it's it's a big deal right now yeah absolutely you know and I think that with platforms like on a live video and then there's some others out there as well that make it easier you can do it digitally you know you don't have to always like make an appointment and go somewhere for the services anymore you can do it on your own time I think that makes it much more you know it's easier to access and people can better make time for it in those ways so now is this life coaching for individuals but is it also for businesses as well that's right so it's both the consumer end of beaded be companies so for on the B. to B. side they say they have about five hundred clients and there's some pretty big ones on their list so they have the university of Chicago McDonald's Verizon the founder was telling me that basically these are generally like C. suite I'm coaching programs that they run with the is B. to B. clients the other thing that I love you did mention that there is virtual online coaching but then of course because this is a business they also have a platform that allows the coaches to document and track clients progress which I think you can't sign up for this and then get away with not doing the work that they assign exactly you know I think like the the one thing that kind of sets on the vita part is that they really have kind of a standardized you know software that allows for every person to get the same kind of coaching assistance that they need and they have a good way of keeping track of our progress looks like Catherine I need some life coaching so excited about this I want to start up to do really well okay so let's talk about Hyde Park adventures yes hi park ventures they are a local a venture capital firm and they were in the news last week because they raise their latest fund at a hundred million dollars this kind of rare especially in the Midwest there's only a few other that have done this and you know with Hyde Park ventures they actually exceeded their target by twenty five million dollars so clearly there's some investors out there that really believe in the Hyde Park venture F. investing ethos and think that there's opportunity there for folks that don't know tell us what Hyde Park venture partners does yeah so they invest in local start up so a lot of Chicago ones but they're also looking around the Midwest as well and I think they even have some coastal companies in their portfolio in Chicago they've invested in companies like GE to crowd for kites ship bomb second kitchen and all those from what I understand are doing pretty well they've been pretty good investments now you have told me that there was a big acquisition and that we should on no account you said that extension has now acquired a Chicago data analytics firm so can you tell us why this is important yes so you know a censure has like a giant Chicago presence in case you didn't already know it may have like sixty five hundred employees here and over the summer they announced plans to add even more and they've also you know in in addition to just hiring a ton of people in Chicago they've been kind of quietly acquiring Chicago tech coming well on the sly and the yeah they acquired one last year called could Jen takes there were based in Schaumburg they're kind of a big data firm but just last week they announced that they were acquiring clarity insights and basically what they do there it's a data science consultant and they specialize in artificial intelligence and machine learning and so what that means I was a lead of influencer ads in media and which ones are doing the best so that they can you know kind of run a more efficient and streamline business going forward when it comes to what's being advertised on their platform and what performs the best with with readers and consumers and eccentricity that this can better equip its clients with enterprise scale a I analytics and automation solutions as well exactly you know because the thing is in Chicago like a I and machine learning talent can be kind of hard to come by a lot of that ends up going to the coasts to go to you know the bigger tech firms and so by acquiring companies like this they wanna get that talent and then they get the the the service that they provide and now a center can provide that to its consulting clients I was gonna end to piggy back off your last statement why is it that we do have so much brain drain and Chicago that is something that you have to worry about yeah well you know I think part of it comes from just the fact that you know silicon valley's kind of become known as a place where you can go there you can work in tech and you can hit it big you can get rich and you know I think there's people you know you graduate from one of the big universities around here and you're like I feel like I had to go to the coast because there's kind of a perception that the same opportunities aren't in Chicago or in the Midwest or the heartland that there really mainly only in New York or Silicon Valley but we're seeing that narrative kind of change because you know with companies like sprout social going public in other ones getting acquired a kind of these bigger tech wins people are realizing Hey you can build a company here and you know build it successfully get too big exit make the money you're looking for etcetera well Catherine Davis says this yet added at Chicago and no thank you so much for being with us today and remind everybody where we can read about all your stories yeah you can find is a Chicago winter dot com.

associate editor Chicago Catherine Davis sprint
#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

The Frame

06:44 min | 2 years ago

#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

"Assistance in the entertainment industry are overworked underpaid and and often have to run personal errands for their bosses even after they leave for the day. That's according to a new survey of more than fifteen hundred assistance. It was released this this week by the grassroots movement called pay up Hollywood. The campaign started as a twitter Hashtag back in October and has been gaining momentum since then Katie kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter where she covers labor and she explains how the Hashtag grew out of an episode of script notes. A podcast asked about screenwriting. A assistant wrote in saying you know I think one of the big issues. That's going to be coming forward in the next few decades in Hollywood is that we're gonna I have to talk about the low pay. That assistance are facing in how that is related to rising cost of living in Los Angeles and from near the hosts which cacus Craig Mason. Who are both really powerful writers in Hollywood? Read that note and ask for more people to talk about their stories of being an assistant in Los Angeles they just got an overwhelming matic. Email and a writer named Alber who is on the board at the Writers Guild of America started Hashtag called Hashtag Champ. Hollywood so a couple of days before Thanksgiving script notes facilitated a pay up Hollywood town hall where assistance had a chance to talk about some of the issues. And here's what one woman who didn't provide. Her name had to say about burnout. We almost have like three jobs at once. Like not only. Are we working our day. The job for forty to sixty hours a week and not making enough and then therefore doing work on the side like babysitting driving etc but we also have the work of our own careers. I and I think that is what leads that burnout. Because we're not only expected to have this day job that puts all these things in place for us to move forward and then on top of that we're expected to have like an hour to write a day or or to fund their own short films and make them on the weekends like that is just like impossible. I think impossible's inaccurate word word for what she's describing. What some of the other issues that came up around the Hashtag and around the town hall so I think a big one is the question of access? Hollywood has been talking talking a lot about its diversity issues wanting to get more folks into the pipeline of diverse backgrounds. But what we're looking at. Here's the situation where you have to to be able to afford to be an assistant in the first place to get that first leg up in the industry and so Paige Hollywood has just released a survey of one thousand thousand five hundred fifty one assistance and they found that seventy percent of the people who were surveyed were white and that fifty two percent were receiving financial -sential aid from family and friends to make ends meet as they were assistance in Hollywood. So I think we're seeing that this industry in order to diversify does have to become more accessible or economically manically accessible to folks who aren't coming in with with that aid so that to me was notable as well as the fact that a lot of assistance were also talking thing about this sort of demeaning conditions that were expected of them. Hollywood has pay your dues culture and I think a lot of folks remember at its in difficult conditions when they or assistance and so sort of expect. There is a lot to go through that as well. But in the survey it showed that one hundred and four respondents had an object thrown at them in the workplace. So I think that we're looking at conditions assistance or not only being pretty badly paid but also they are facing conditions that are pretty rough. We're talking with Katie kilkenny at the Hollywood reporter about pay up. Hollywood there are other things that really jumped out to me. One is that almost ninety three percent of those. The people surveyed said they work more than forty hours a week and fifteen percent said they were working more than sixty hours a week and hero's something that was really troubling. Almost almost a quarter said that they had reported an increase in substance abuse. So it sounds like the job is really taking a terrible terrible toll on the people who are in this line of work completely. I mean I think these numbers sort of show something that assistance have been talking to each other about for a long time and so I think for a lot of this is not a surprise but this survey really shines a light on some of these issues and the fact that things need to change and it sounds like some show runners are actually saying this is unsustainable and maybe even immoral absolutely so I talked to a few folks. We'd been vocal on twitter with their support and basically found out talking to them that they were advocating for higher wages on projects that they're currently developing and these are Adam conifer who Folks might know true. TV's Adam Ruins everything. David H Steinberg. who was a CO show runner? Netflix is no good nick. And the writer producer producer Creator Ayelet Waldman who was an executive producer on Netflix. Unbelievable Waldman in particular told me that she was trying to get her assistance twenty dollars an hour plus benefits and hover was saying that he was trying to just various aspects of the job to make it more. Tenable you said in your story Lori that you had reached out to the major studios and talent agencies for comment and let's just say they weren't flooding the phone lines calling back. have any of them. Had anything anything to say. One Agency is doing something and they didn't provide comment for the story. But you know I heard via sources that for which is the talent agency that represents spoke John August who helped movement as well as Liz Alpert who coined. The HASHTAG has conducted in anonymous pace survey of their assistance. And and I will also be receiving and looking at the results of the pay up Hollywood survey and I imagine that in weeks to come others will speak up more but for now they our remaining mum and even if the hours are horrible. The working conditions aren't great. A lot of people want these jobs right because it's so hard hard to get into the business and this is one possible path for people who want to become creative people in Hollywood definitely. They're extremely competitive jobs and often a line that is used with assistance to speak up about work. Conditions is that you know there were thousands. That will take place but it's gotten to the point where the wages are the same as they were twenty years ago in some cases That's what we're hearing from. These stories while the cost of living in Los Angeles has skyrocketed. And so these assistance missiles argument is that the situation is untenable at the slain. Katie Kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter. Katie thanks so much for coming on the show as much for having me

Hollywood Katie Kilkenny Paige Hollywood Los Angeles Reporter Writer Twitter Associate Editor Writers Guild Of America Unbelievable Waldman Netflix Craig Mason John August Alber Lori David H Steinberg. Adam Liz Alpert Executive Producer
"associate editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Positive effect there's no more more countries whose policy makers are seen the light and are putting well being more the hearts of policy making as well as running the wellbeing research center at Oxford Jana manual do never is the associate editor of the world happiness report I said to never think that the fracturing political conditions we see spreading around the world can be traced back to how happy we feel when we step into a voting booth yes this is a resounding yes because one of the new research frontiers and well being signs is how those changing levels of well paying affect people's voting behavior if electoral districts go negative on well being a oversee her seen come in government and helps populist politicians so the way that people feel so the response to how satisfied are you with your life or you're experiencing joy or worry these data can tell us more about how people are likely to vote than traditional objective measures such as unemployment it also makes the ultimate business case for politicians and policy makers because now suddenly if they are self serving or self interested and want to be reelected they really have to care about the well being of the population because nothing will better predict how they will do at the voting booth next time around as a matter not improving the well being of their county so a good slogan would be the happy vote for me or you may remember Bill Clinton was saying it's the economy stupid in the late nineties instead of one could say it's happiness.

associate editor Bill Clinton Oxford Jana
"associate editor" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Welcome into Friday. President Trump is running for reelection as an outsider candidate, but it's not he challenge for someone who holds the world's most powerful office. That's the take from Nile Stanage, Whitehouse columnist for the hill Nile, how do you see it? Opinion polls. Looks like our number of democratic bits are head to head. Patients really getting the extent to which can still wrong. I'm tired establishment figure. Clearly believed. Earlier this week was very much portraying himself that way in the United States, which is. Usual to proclaim himself cider in. I guess it depends of your definition of outsider two two and a half years into Washington versus some folks who've been there decades. Right. But. How will he position do you think? Position. Bye. Schmidt. I think he believes. Remains. To get them. Property development. He felt they need. Because he was from. So there's an element that is sincere here. But I also think the portrayal of himself. Cider is something that he sees potential dividend from a strategy standpoint. I guess he has to maintain as one person said and your story, the war with the establishment. Trump to be seen, as making nice Washington star Washington per se. Irrespective of their specific ideological. Favor ciders relevant creatures off the establishment. But secondly. Specifically he clearly. Cider as painted themselves. Painted themselves the voice. In his inaugural speech in January twenty seven we're speaking with Nile, Stanage, associate editor and White House columnist for the hill. His piece is called Trump run as an outsider, you said to skeptics point various pieces of evidence that the swamp that he rails against has remained undrained under Mr. Trump explain how. I mean if you look at something like name, which is limited signature policies. Slash the corporate tax rate significant not something that in itself. Working people check into massive corporations. I think so say someone. The EPA. Scandals or controversies. Other issues like for the Trump hotel here in Washington DC, chose drawings consistently. People are staying there are doing so in order to curry favor with the president. Yeah. It was setting your story to that the, the president has a feel more so than others for the cultural moors of blue collar, America. Does he do that? As a as you referenced, you know, billionaire, New York, real estate developer. Great question. The inherent. Because many people as. Tursun bay. Tuesday's before politics. Tower.

President Trump Schmidt Trump Nile Stanage hill Nile Washington president United States Nile Tursun bay White House EPA New York Stanage associate editor America
"associate editor" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Would miss free speech. Spitz is not as fees that's meant to harm to deteriorate. Campus craziness, folks. Got to keep you updated on all the latest. So also, you know that you can go to take back the campus dot org because you have an action item whenever we talk about the campus craziness, and that is that you can donate to my friends at the leadership institute. I've got a crazy story for you here actually, I have somebody who will tell you. They're crazy story about what they wrote up here on reason dot com. A friend Robby suave is on the show. Now, he is an associate editor at reason and also has a new book out, which he will tell you about the first Robbie tell you this piece Williams College had students claiming that free speech harms, but they said, even crazier stuff, like students were screaming that we were trying to kill them. What happened here, my friend? Yeah. They're claiming that people who want free speech on campus that some of the professors. Do they're, they're hoping that the to Williams College will agree to the with pro free speech statement, the university of Chicago started. Many other colleges have signed onto it. You know that we're going to have controversial speakers. We're gonna have feet because we know that make the campus better stronger more intelligent place. These, you know, this is a small subset of an activist minority that is that exists on every campus particularly I leak campuses that they pay. No having these discussions having free speech, it harms. And you are literally trying to kill us. If you're, if you're going to Lao people on campus, who? This is their, this is their ideology student most student, but a radical subset, that have tremendous power influence, and they got some of the professors to sign off on having onto goggle principles because they were so afraid of offending these students. You know, people misuse the term literally a lot in our, in our current discourse, as you know, I literally was doing something that I wasn't literally doing is what you hear from people that, but here they were in fact, saying that, that trying to kill them is what free speech accomplishes. I can you can you walk me through the crazy here because this is this is really the ultimate extension of the speech equals violence, which is something that started on the campus and now his spread into the broader culture. But now it's not just speech equals violence. It's speech equals you're literally trying to kill me. When of course, you're not, how do they rationalize or to the degree, they can explain this thought process?.

associate editor Williams College Spitz leadership institute Lao university of Chicago Robbie
"associate editor" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

"Lindsay garbage associate editor on the poetry magazine podcast. We discuss a poem or two in the current issue. Randall Horton's most recent books are hook a memoir and pitch dark anarchy originally from Birmingham, Alabama he now resides in east Harlem, and as a member of the experimental performance group heroes are gang leaders, the poem two eight nine one to eight property of the state is part of Horton's next manuscript which addresses, mass incarceration and the criminal Justice system. Hopefully, this sort of asked the question a may once asked a question about like, what do we what is our vision of Justice, really, look like the people who hold the keys have a responsibility to right? So was that responsibility Horton s the reader to examine specifically what's being advocated for when people enter the prison industrial comp. Plex is trying to wrestle with the difficult. This sort of unbelievable in the unimaginable in that. Which is a in cost ration- would be the ways in which we allow the sort of things that go on inside to be normalized as it, and that's part of the punishment to while. The palm draws on experiences in Horton's past the series isn't auto biographical focused was not really about me other than to eight nine once eight was must state prison number in in the Maryland correctional system Horton has to consider in a general sense. When metaphor is used in poetry. And why what this poem tries to get to his leg when it says, he slaves fucking risk many slaves. Fucking risk. Yeah. So it's tragic, you know, sometimes that's what just needs to be said, here's Randall Horton, reading two eight nine one to eight property of the state, or this malice thing never to be confused with Justice. Nothing symbolic. Okay. Dark dark cages cage hunted in hunter of both in the literal. Make believe in. What is do not exist ally? Nothing cryptic here. Okay. Rape. Is rape. Pray Mus pray. No minute in the future safe from quiet insertions of shink in masking tape. Okay. Nothing here infinite only time is constant to the merciful and mercilus. There are no allegories to hide behind. He slit his wrist Meany slid as fucking wrist. Okay..

Randall Horton poetry magazine Rape associate editor Harlem Lindsay Birmingham Alabama Plex Meany Maryland
"associate editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:29 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Associate editor at the Washington Post and author of separate the story of plus the Ferguson and America's journey from slavery. Segregation, Steve welcome to. Thanks, bob. Glad to be here. The term separate but equal never actually appeared in the decision. But the case and your book hinge on that idea because in Louisiana as would be the case throughout the south as Jim crow evolved, railroads were permitted to divide the races in separate cars. And this is the reaction in part to reconstruction. And the three reconstruction amendments that expand equal rights provide citizenship for blacks ensure equal protection voting rights. There's a resistance to that among whites in the south who've lost political power lost economic power separate, but equal does not appear in decision as you. You pointed out it does appear in the descent, but it becomes the phrase that the supreme court uses in nineteen fifty four in the Brown decision. And that's how we regard the shorthand today to the particulars of the case. The plaintiff Homer Plessey wasn't some random victim of segregation. Like, Rosa Parks, nearly a century later. He was handpicked for the role and the circumstances were engineered for an arrest. Well, they were trying to create the Plessey team down in New Orleans, which is where the case comes from it isn't unusual city every shade of the spectrum under the sun is there and the group that brings it as a group of mixed race French-Speaking often Creoles that means native born frustrated after more than a century of trying to get their rights. Most of them have never been enslaved. Their parents were enslaved their grandparents were enslaved, and they feel that their best argument is to throw some confusion at the court in part. Plus is. Fair skinned enough to pass for white or to cause that confusion. And so they want to be able to argue that the laws that enforceable. It doesn't define white. It doesn't define mixed race. And so therefore, how can you possibly enforce this law when many people riding the trains in Louisiana are of indeterminate race the case. Was the culmination of decades of activism legislation. The first of those cases is in eighteen forty one in Massachusetts when a slightly built black New York abolitionist named David Ruggles. Decides to bring assault charge against the conductor who tries to separate him at a Massachusetts railroad he loses, but he establishes a very important principle, which is that we can go into court to pursue grievances. Eighteen ninety two they know they're probably going to lose. And yet this is a group of fighters, and they're not going to sit by and take it without bringing in their case. Well, there's no need to withhold the ending of this story that decision was catastrophic for blacks in American society as a whole an utter repudiation of civil rights and an assault on the basic humanity of African Americans and opening the door to other statutes other states an acting separate. Nation laws to separate waiting rooms separate bathrooms separate water, fountains. All of this was intimidated by the only the center in the case, John Marshall Harlan of Kentucky southerner from a slaveholding family. And he says this is what's going to happen. He doesn't predict those specific conditions. But he does talk about separate juries or separate courthouses. And he says this day will one day be regarded as shameful as dread, Scott. That's the ruling before the civil war that blacks free or not could not be citizens. Now, this was the nineteenth century newspapers were wholly aligned and allied with political parties, the Whigs the know nothings, the Democrats, the Republicans the by the way, the Democrats and Republicans kind of flip flop from how we know them today the legality of slavery the path toward the terms of reconstruction. They were all litigated by a highly partisan press. No, absolutely. That's why you have newspapers remaining today that are called the Springfield Republican or the Arkansas democrat where they began as alliances with political parties, and nobody thought that was very unusual reporting in the early part of the century and through probably eighteen eighty or ninety was almost non-existent. It was frustrating for me as a researcher to be reading these newspaper accounts. And they have a lot of opinions and hot air. But they don't have a lot of facts a prefect society wasn't fake news. It was pre- news faction. No facts. It is shocking. How vital appreciative how nakedly racist? The democratic press was particularly in the south well white superiority as opposed to white supremacy, which is also a part of this century is rampant than they reflected that in their newspaper articles in their letters in their conversation. White supremacy does come out of the loss of economic and political power after the civil war which gives rise to the fear and anger that creates the klu Klux Klan in eighteen sixty seven in Tennessee in that it spreads to the other in southern states and violence underpins this era from the eighteen seventies all the way through the mid twentieth century where lynching becomes a way to settle issues that the whites feel that they've lost the political power in the economic power and the press reflects that to read the book because it focuses on. On contemporaneous coverage. You would think that race was like the number one trending story for sixty years. But after all of this foment, you know to say, the very least by the time the ruling came in on Plessey, the press was kind of a wall. The coverage of the decision that would have such brutal ramifications for the site. It was barely even mentioned was it just race fatigue. Well, they're talking about the white press. Remember, you use the term mainstream before the white press saw this as an expected decision winter Jay the lawyer for Plessey showed up from western New York in Washington to give the oral argument, the Washington Post, my newspaper covered it with a column called capital chat in which they said that Jay who had written a novel called a fool's errand about reconstruction south was another fool's errand by trying to litigate this case that everybody knew was going to end with the supreme court ruling in favor of separation. They were right. So in terms of the way, the press operates, what's the news here where there's not a lot of news. So we're not going to give it great attention. The press on the other hand in the Richmond planet says that after this ruling evil days are indeed upon us Albion jai, the lawyer and judge and novelist and newspaper columnist was one of the hero. Does of your story. Another was the author of the sole dissenting opinion on Plessey Justice, John Marshall, Harlan known as the great dissenter. Here's one line from his dissent. Our constitution is color blind. And neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens in respect of civil rights. All citizens are equal before the law. The humblest is the peer of the most powerful Marshall was from Kentucky former slave owner. A former opponent of the reconstruction laws, and he at the time deemed to punitive to the south. But obviously transformed how well it's a remarkable transformation of very hopeful one because it shows that somebody can hold despicable views and then abandoned him, and he does so forthrightly. I don't have any doubt about the genuineness of his transformation. He was a pro slavery candidate for congress at the age of twenty five. Five and eighteen fifty nine he comes from a slaveholding family. But he does raise a union regiment in eighteen sixty one because he believes that the union needs to be preserved both north and south. But he states that he's not going to fight a war against slavery. By the eighteen sixty eight period, Theus, changes mine, and partly it's politically driven. He has no home. You can't believe that. He he should belong to the Democratic Party, which is filled with ex angry confederates who've lost the war and had tried to accomplish by the ballot box with they couldn't accomplish by the war. And so he joins the Republican party that anti-slavery party, and he turns his eyes toward Washington because as a man who wants to make his Mark in the world and ambitious man. It's the only way that he can see that. He's going to have position that's going to give him some influence. Any fortunately is nominated to the coordinating seventy seven, but Steve wanna take note of that phrase in his dissent, equal before the law. Neither Harlan nor any of the advocates black or white who devoted their lives to equal rights are ever heard in your book, espousing, what was called social equality, the ideas that blacks and whites. It's would ever mingle. Well, even Harland in his dissent says that the white racists superior to the black race and will be for all time as long as it continues to respect the idea that everyone is equal before the law. That's an odd way to go after a quality. I think but it reflects the the attitudes of the time and in his arguments, he has quite inventive argument. Which is that your race races your property, and if you could pass for white and white is a better economic position to be black. How can you be prevented from trying to exploit that reputation and robbery and be denied it without due process? Now, if you think about that, it's a terrible argument because it means if they win that there could be a car a railroad car with white and mixed race passengers but still a separate car for those people who can't pass for white. So I tried to wrestle with this. Why would they make that argument and the answer I think is pretty odd. Obvious. He wants to win. And he sees these supreme court justices men of privilege and class who regard property rights as paramount. And so he's giving them a property right argument. I mentioned that the press in institution operated quite differently. And the eighteen fifties than it does today and a lot of the adequacy was basic crusading. It was constant coverage beating the same drum over and over and over sometimes for decades as a modern journalist did that make you feel at all queasy, or did you kind of long for the days when a news organization would put all of its reputation behind an ideal. I think I saw it just didn't its own context is being different. I mean, you have newspaper in Massachusetts, the liberator, which is the arm of the abolition movement of the Massachusetts anti slavery society every week. It's hammering on the issues that matter to that organization. It's a storehouse of information about the times, it's not objective reporting. But I can handle that I wouldn't want to necessarily work in that environment. But if I were living in the eighteen thirties and forties. Maybe I would have who knows. What do the media tend to miss now when we talk about plus Ferguson? They often say that the supreme court has created the doctrine of separate but equal and made it the law of the land. Well, I would argue that it didn't create the doctrine it's been a foot in the country for sixty years supreme court is endorsing it. But more importantly what we do. And we say the supreme court created is we're kind of giving the rest of the country a pass. This is the shame of the north the shame of the south the shame of all of us. It's not proper delay. It only at the feet of the supreme court. Steve. Thank you very much. Well, thanks, bud. Steve Luxembourg is an associate editor at the Washington.

supreme court John Marshall Harlan Massachusetts Washington Louisiana Homer Plessey Washington Post Steve Ferguson Associate editor John Marshall New York Kentucky Rosa Parks bob New Orleans
Outraged by Woodward book, Trump comments on libel laws

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

03:19 min | 4 years ago

Outraged by Woodward book, Trump comments on libel laws

"Certainly plenty of buzz surrounding the upcoming release of Bob Woodward's book that offers an inside look at the Trump White House. In fact, it generated a recent conversation between Woodward and the president name sources, I've been naming the people are just say, you know, people have said I'd say two days following happened. Everyone including yourself. Quoted with the book fear Trump in the White House do out on the eleventh and excerpts already made public. The president is suggesting that libel laws be changed political reporter John Wagner wrote about this for his publication, the Washington Post, and he joins us on the KOMO Newsline. John, we appreciate your time very much. Thanks for having me before we get to this specific issue of libel laws. I wanna talk about someone who obviously is a major influence on your newsroom, and that's Bob Woodward as associate editor at the post, can you give people. An idea exactly what goes into his books. This is not the first one. He's written about a White House in terms of sourcing. Putting it all together before it is made available to the public. You're right. It's certainly not the first one he has written about presidents dating back to Richard Nixon and pretty much everyone in between now up until Donald Trump. The method generally uses is called deep background. He will talk to sources within and around the administration under condition that he can use their material. But most often they are not named. So that gets people to open up a little bit more, his interviews or can taped. So there is a record of everything that is said and from that that really becomes the source material for the book, I just wanted to provide that background because in one of those recorded conversations, we just heard a portion of the president actually praised Mr. Woodward. And of course, that tone has changed since yesterday in those excerpts came out in regards to libel laws. What exactly is the president saying? Tweet this. He said the same article or. Totally make up stories and quoting him here. Now for a picture of a person that is literally the exact opposite of the fact get away with it without your cost. Then he goes on to say, why Washington politicians libel laws? It's an interesting question because otherwise they're actually crafted at the state level, and he doesn't seem to be. You're interested in changing what happens in state legislature? So quickly. This course of action he's actually recommending so on a on a practical front. This is seems to be much more wish than reality. I think that's right. Very similar back in. Michael Wolff, fire and fury came out that also the unflattering picture of the White House, John Wagner. Good enough to join us political reporter with the

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