35 Burst results for "Associate Director"

Solve Your Biotherapeutic Challenges With Help From Gene Therapy University

GEN Sounds of Science Podcast

01:49 min | Last week

Solve Your Biotherapeutic Challenges With Help From Gene Therapy University

"Thanks for joining us for this. Gen cast today was pretty exciting episode. We have talking about some seller gene therapy and let's get to it but first let's meet our guests for today's podcast. Gentlemen if you could introduce yourself to the jets hi geoff. My name is not christian. I am an associate director Bioprocessing segment had mila poor sigma. My group primarily provides technical bioprocess consultation and the americas region for manufacturing companies in their process development technology transfer in manufacturing journey towards commercialisation of gene therapies. My name is dave bionic and the sound therapy market segment manager at sigma some focused on our strategy development within our bioprocessing business jenan. Thanks for joining us today. Really appreciate it Let's get to the first question and talk about some selling gene therapy things that are going on so Details a little bit more about the gene therapy industry itself in some of the common trends and challenges which other companies are dealing with. Hey jeff i get really excited. Talking about ten apiece after having contributed to the field is a process development scientists and recently before getting into gene. Therapy let's zoom out and talk about red diseases. By definition that diseases affect a very small number of less than about two hundred thousand people here in the united states that is another category called ultra rare diseases which affect fewer people than twenty people in a million. So we're talking about very small numbers here and entering bespoke era or degenerate medicines but collectively speaking. They happen to be pretty common.

Dave Bionic Geoff Jets Americas Sigma Jeff United States
Create Labs "Creator" Abran Maldanado

Voice in Canada

02:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Create Labs "Creator" Abran Maldanado

"One of the special guests is braun maldonado and he is the co founder for create labs. He is coming on as quote the creator with his quote. The creation clara and that's melt a. I r. a. And that stands for create labs a is rendered assistant yes it is a virtual artificial intelligence robot if you will and it is incredible. It is powered by gibt. And if you don't that is boy you can learn a lot about tonight. But you're going to get the opportunity to ask this article this artificial intelligence actual questions and get to hear clara's response so in this particular podcast episode. We are speaking with abroad. And he explains how he got involved in this all the incredible work he is doing in this area and we talk a little bit about the voice tonight as a little bit of a preview in a little bit of a teaser so let's get into it without any further ado. This is a recording of the voiceless. Our show that was done about a week ago. So you may hear us referring to the voice in a week again. That is today. April twenty first But let's get right into it. Enjoy this podcast episode. Hey there ron how you doing. What's going on how you doing terry. How's everything great great. Great great to have you here. Thanks so much for taking the time to do this. Thank you for having me. It's a lot of fun to talk to you about all this stuff. I love it. That's right that's right. We're gonna have some fun next week when we get you on the show live. We've got people. Ask questions and asking cleric. We're gonna get all that here over the next little bit here but before we get into that. Let me ask you just introduce yourself a little bit to the to the audience and listeners to the viewers and by the way then you've got any questions now live you can put them in the chat and i'm able to to bring those into chat here as well but bryan watt yourself sure ronald natto co founder of Labs ventures associate director for the new york city media lab. I got into this work. Because i am a person of color. Who found himself in the tech space. And i didn't see enough of myself in their nor my counterparts in my peers. Family and i just wanted to make sure that in the underserved community that there was a pipeline in access point in someone on the inside To get them opportunities in second brought me here to the

Braun Maldonado Create Labs Gibt Clara Bryan Watt Ronald Natto Terry RON Labs Ventures New York City Media Lab
"associate director" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

Further Together the ORAU Podcast

03:44 min | 6 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

"Talked about how your career has sort of been marked by all of these firsts and do you know physicians sort of created. You know as you were doing. The work essentially have to imagine that. This is the first time you've started a job in the midst of a pandemic. yes that would be true. That's the first how. How what's it like starting a job as the associate director for an organization like reacts when a you're in san antonio you're staying in san antonio at least for the ninety But having to basically meet everyone remotely as we have today. Sure We often talk about a new job. I'm trying to learn all the the the task and policies and politics ago along with it insert drinking from a fire hose. And it's the same doing it the pandemic it's.

san antonio associate director
"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

08:03 min | 7 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

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"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

01:38 min | 7 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

"To the.

"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

08:18 min | 7 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

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"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

09:16 min | 7 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

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"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

07:43 min | 7 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

"You. Even though he will mean mind. Get do this year now. Embrace alligators to withdraw of aiding a negative you that i haven't read the that you are. I mean molina acosta. Look at the as he cannot study antonio pacheco you're more moot. That's the most a deputy. Dennis gate gonna your clear mooney. Maria was in. If you think that honest aimed democra- biggest Though and i predicted nasty though in nevada most the municipality is the dealers carolis rookie say briefly. Are you see here by britney of passion and when the cake turkey radic. Mika that they make and the militia impo greasy who in the military that he did. I say the you know the the do better. Any the showed a komo. If dr to e mugabe with the news you need. They see business blaming percents. naven dog. Acs annual midday young startup in renewing china's know if it on the media in brinda a day muncy name university domino percent nacional nanu nacional earlier love in laboratory. Obama a chemical almost almost hurry. They're your microbial. Costa who knew holy run the tollway don obesity multi qomolangma lamantia. Russa's bologna's young lady. I was soon enough. Oh gaga akilah quarterback almost year absolute zoned minute as go below macau reality city when they get when you cook. It gives less say media. They'll may we'll start west battery. No own doorstep artists that on on our gonna start canova dayquil. Have you should feel. No he. For pre-med larry your i anymore yet. They okay ladder. Frago democrat be. Ah you're in india garage roscoe's ill and gig look down. Islas more know she goes braless. No evil in infinitely morabito but oh and they look feeling diligent. Enderle in the survey can not by a lot initial maloney. Don't boko april lima avia field in you croquet gay. Lcd you me in these loops young sociale and luckily a mollycoddle la for the komo. They look the finales around the umbrellas. Your studies will show seattle dummying. I'm for market than the mola controlled dora. The that said this. If i'm on. Espn all but a narrow consumer hito sanyo's was put the sailing memorial. Theo now and does it brahima. Ada knows i gotta go columbia rail nobody fortified dna we are sabic established. Underfoot are going through a pretty cool moment dot com of receive zero instead. I preliminary don't they say grad but if you deliang nino bala berlin you're feeling it briefly deliang as i said that when i'm anita a in connecticut the moon though he died in mooney nauseam komo's dot com raphael in. Yes eater i'll be idea wolf you and they'll be us wanna incre nor will say on that satish noah. Vcr's fussy uncle mile domodedovo all that illyria throw. He does know. Tacoma book goes cities it doubled in casanova e met. The london was filthy. Nick they more china it amirkhanov go into this as misano on our up. That is ten india's gay award media sustain india's demand internationally in an inductee indexation hilbert lebanon in the makassar. Enter logan on must in an off your noise the fella for san mateo. I decided i decided on what in know. Osceola it about dementia. They must they must see. I guess but a could add said mcchord understood we on the local linda while monday. Didn't they don't wanna know pricing. I out of me now. What's your yet mobile. Yankee could add in your breath. You're able to kamata door your whole up up. But i feel is if you glendale clinton but notre dame i does you can tell it briefly intriguing is i ended up probably a winter. Dow's our see us coming a on on. Es don't we lose. Diarrhea are a community. You wanna be sad in denham area correctly. And i'll see. I can overcome with his his limousine seep with as much seon in atlantic more with him when he was indoctrinated animal disease procedure made approach. The car. i know asean cowie illawarra notre keep off the than them. Van de nosotros mahindra and mahindra boy van deka regular reoccupied points appointed. Went up unable to you. You look. I'm actually in the cia. They madonna boycotted folk. Greta grenoble to keep away. The md rented provisionary polio. Komo's in the solution is the palace. Intrigue shouldn't put officers in vietnam mustang..

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"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

03:12 min | 7 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

"Bethel's sponge kinik of neither number yuppie yield suggests it at today's import hanging. If the act that murray brisa favorite this esl in belgium.

As Burning Man Goes Virtual, Organizers Try To Capture The Communal Aspect

Morning Edition

03:28 min | 9 months ago

As Burning Man Goes Virtual, Organizers Try To Capture The Communal Aspect

"Is an experience. Yes, 70,000 people gathered for whimsical art and music in the Nevada desert, but also body paint and bartering and communal living. It is not the kind of thing that's easy to recreate virtually, but the pandemic has forced organizers to try. NPR's Elizabeth Blair has a story. At burning man. Thousands of volunteers usually work together to help artists build enormous sculptures out of glass, metal wood, the chaos and creativity of building the festival's temple in 2018 was captured in a recent documentary. Go Climbers Go! Go! This one knows Good Burning Man Temple is typically a place spacious enough for people to walk into and reflect or grieve. This year. You can sort of do that with a mobile device desktop or virtual reality headset in alive, Webinar burning man. Associate director Katie Hazard invited viewers to imagine they were entering the temple. It will walk forward metaphorically together, all of us here on the col and see this picture this gate in front of you. And together, let's all move through that gate together. Burners are true believers in participation in this year's theme is multi verse. Different teams have created to D and three D virtual experiences. Turn on your webcam and you can attend an art class or join a virtual group hug or go to a party. Welcome, everybody. And thank you so much for coming along. Talk of us. Ed Cook and a team created the sparkle verse, he says. To recreate the desert experience. People have set up tents in their living rooms and dressed up in costumes. Radical self expression is one of burning man's 10 principals getting up and dancing from your screen, bothering to put on a costume jumping around these things extraordinarily powerful for kind of taking into new realms of experience, Cook admits online. He doesn't experience the sense of Ah, he gets in the desert, but he's convinced you can create the kind of joyful communal experience he's had there. Other burners are having none of it. It's not the same thing. Douglas Wolk has been going to burning man for 20 years, he says. He keeps going back because of the principles like no advertising and being off the grid. What's so special about burning man for me? Is that It's really immediate, and it's not like anything else. All kinds of people come and meet up there in this bizarre difficulty, sometimes frustrating environment and they're pretty much all there to help each other. It's really not the same thing to be sitting in front of your computer. I think the multiverse is a very interesting experiment. Artist Jennifer Lewin has mixed feelings about this year's virtual festival. Burning man is where she goes to test the limits of her work enormous interactive public sculptures that need to survive all kinds of weather. And lots of people playing on them. The sculpture can survive at burning man. It can survive everywhere. Computer drawings of her work cosmos are in one of the multiverse is the culmination of the festival is the burning of the giant sculpture of the burning man. This year. They're streaming videos of people doing burns in their backyards or even just lighting candles. Elizabeth Blair NPR news

Burning Man Temple Ed Cook Elizabeth Blair Nevada Desert NPR Douglas Wolk Associate Director Katie Hazard Jennifer Lewin
Census to Halt Operations a Month Early Amid Growing Fears of a Population Undercount

Here & Now

04:58 min | 10 months ago

Census to Halt Operations a Month Early Amid Growing Fears of a Population Undercount

"Bureau has confirmed it will wrap up its count a month early. It's a move that many fear could reduce the accuracy of the population. Tout NPR national correspondent has alone. Juan broke this story last week, and the bureau confirmed it last night in hand. The census happens as we know every 10 years. The end date was initially postponed until late October because of the pandemic. Now the bureau is saying that it will wrap up on September 30th. What reasons has the sense is given According to a statement, the Census Bureau director Stephen Dealing Ham posted on the sense sphere is website last night. The Commerce secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, has directed the bureau to speed up counting to end it cut it short a month early in order to meet current legal deadline. There's a deadline set by federal fall, it says the Census Bureau via the Commerce secretary has to present to the president the latest state pop. Elation counts by December 31st of this year, and those are the numbers that are used to redistribute seats in Congress among the states, and that was a deadline The bureau had said in April that it could no longer meet because of the pandemic needed more time has asked Congress to give it more time by extending the deadline into 2021. Sir from Congress has not extend that deadline. Democrats have introduced legislation, but Republicans have not regarding those deadlines. And so the Commerce secretary apparently is saying it is time to make this change to make sure we can meet that deadline. Okay, let's break this down a little bit. NPR first reported that the agency had decided to cut short door knocking efforts. What is the impact, though of finishing early like this and what populations Could be most impacted by an undercount. One thing to keep in mind here is that you know, through all this back and forth career officials from the Census Bureau, including associate director for the 2020 cents is an associate director for field operations has publicly stated that the bureau as early as May, they've said, can no longer meet this federal deadline of December 31st And by rushing to do it at this point by not continue to count through October 30 1st there are concerns here that there would be great and accuracy and the data that are collected because we're at a point in the senses, with roughly four out of 10 households that have not yet responded to the senses, those four out of 10 whole household's roughly our representative of historically under counter groups who are Less likely to respond on the census around their own and are really probably only get counted if a door knocker gets to meet them and tries to essentially convinced them to do an in person interview outside their home for about five minutes, trying to collect that information and otherwise the bureau if it rides up, finding homes that are vacant or or seemed to be vacant or unresponsive here has to rely on government records and That way of rely on government records using statistical methods The bear has used before, but the bureau might have to use it at a much, much greater extent. And that could really hurt theocracy because those methods tend to over represent the white population while under representing people of color. Yeah, as we know, the Trump administration tried last year to get a citizenship question added to the census. The Supreme Court rejected that attempt. How does this week's news that the census will wrap up early fit into the bigger picture? I mean, the question everyone is asking is, Is this change? Politically motivated? You know, I've been covering the 2020 cents is all the lead up to it for three more than three years now, and it has been a Siri's Of attempts by the Trump administration to have a very direct hand and how the senses is carried out to be very clear. There is no citizenship question on the 2020 cents is, even though the Trump Administration tried very hard to get one onto the forms, and that on now, you know, just just recently Last Last month, President Trump released a presidential memo calling for unauthorized immigrants to be excluded. From the census numbers used to redistribute seats in Congress. Even though the Constitution says the counting of the whole number of persons in each state that's the that's how that's the people that should be counted nor determine how many states how many seats in Congress each state gets. So this latest move here a lot of Democrats a lot of sense its advocates, given what career officials have said about the need for more time or really questioning. Why is there this push to not extend counting and what happens with Congress? That's NPR's national correspondent. Hotsy Low long hands. Thank you so much for joining us. You're welcome, Tanya.

Census Bureau Congress NPR Trump Administration President Trump Juan Wilbur Ross Associate Director Director Stephen Dealing Ham Tanya Supreme Court Siri Representative Field Operations
Sam Feder: Trans Lives On Screen (ft. Alex Schmider)

LGBTQ&A

05:06 min | 11 months ago

Sam Feder: Trans Lives On Screen (ft. Alex Schmider)

"I wanted to talk to you today because we're about to hear an interview with Sam Feder the director of the new. Disclosure and you are one of the associate producers on the movie. You're also the associate director of transgender representation at glad, and maybe most importantly you're my friend and I've heard you talk about this movie for maybe like two years, so tell me why has movie meant so much to you? I think working at glad and understanding the significance of representation, having an ability to conceptualize our history in terms of TV and film representation is crucial for the majority of the public everything. People have come to know about this community has been informed by TV and film, and so if we have no historical context or Lens to look through to understand how these images have contributed to our cultural understanding, than we don't fully understand the power of media and the power of storytelling and begun Netflix's not best case scenario, right? It doesn't get much better in terms of visibility, but I think. What our film also proposes to say is that visibility is only a means to an end it has to lead to material and real world cultural change so in that way it is critical and granted that in in different countries there are different cultural contexts, different legal systems, but for the first time in many cases I think a lot of people are getting to hear from transpeople ourselves about the media that we have grown up on in addition to the rest of the world. In you know one of those people. We see a lot as Laverne Cox and you know she she's a star. We see her red carpets and I think it's really easy for people who are not as familiar with the Trans Experience to see someone like her, and not not know that for someone in her identity group of Black Trans Woman that it can be a really dangerous world to live in, and in that sense like there's real urgency with this movie. Yeah, absolutely I mean, and it's also about the paradox of visibility, so the more that we are known the more that we are seen. The more likely that people may be enraged by our existence, and so we always have to sort of toe the line and understand that again. Visibility is not the end goal. Representation is not the end goal, but it helps us to get to a place of cultural understanding and acceptance, so that people can live their lives as they are safely with the paradox of visibility I think it's. It's such a nuance conversation to talk about, but do you think I'm wrong in I? Don't WanNa just I don't accept the violence, obviously for anybody in or out of our community, but do you think I'm wrong to think that all of the issues that come the visibility? Those are necessary hurdles that we have to deal with comes with visibility in there. There's no way around that. I disagree in some ways because I think when visibility is tied to responsible, accurate and authentic storytelling. Then we can actually counter. Cultural Backlash that is often tied to stories about us that don't involve us. The disability community coined this phrase that I use all the time. There can be nothing about us without us, and historically all the stories that have been told about transgender people have not actually involved us and so I don't believe that it's pure in black and white. That's such a good point, so you're saying and rightfully so that we are seeing issues. Come out of all this increased visibility, because the representation has been poor, it's been bad I mean when you watch disclosure, you will see a hundred plus years of what I would argue as misrepresentation. I really now that I've started really thinking about and looking critically at this history, most of it has been misrepresentation and inaccurately reflecting who trans people are who this community? Community is and also only focusing on the extremes of our experiences, whether it's Trans people only dying, and only being the victims of violence or only being on red carpets, and only being celebrated to the extremes, because there's a spectrum of experiences and I think when we're, we talk about representation, we want a the richness and the depth, and as Richard, said what we need is more so that when those clumsy or trope ish or stereotypical or shared representations show up. They're not the only thing we have to rely on not only for the public to see and understand who we are for. We ourselves as Trans people to see and understand who we

Laverne Cox Associate Director Sam Feder Netflix Director Richard
Here's Who Really Benefits From The Dominance Of The U.S. Dollar

Odd Lots

07:13 min | 1 year ago

Here's Who Really Benefits From The Dominance Of The U.S. Dollar

"So Tracy. I hate to say that brought this whole crisis. There has been sort of one John of article or one genre of discussion. And I've never really been comfortable with. And that is people making really big picture forecasts or statements about sort of the future of the world. I Yeah I mean it feels like a little bit early to be jumping to discussing the second order effects right like there's so much to talk about right now as these things are actually unfolded. Yeah exactly and of course one of the big questions that's out there and that everyone wants you on and I'm GonNa give it to and I've written about it and I've talked about. It is what happens was sort of globalisation. What happens with future of the dollar the US's Preeminent role in the global financial system? We sort of talked about it a little bit with Adam to talk about it with other Other people as well and it's of course incredibly intriguing to discuss we still We just don't know anything. Yeah I think that's true and it definitely falls into one of those sort of big picture. Things that people are talking about at the moment. And it's something that we've sort of discussed on various episodes before right. Dollar dominance has definitely been a theme for the past year or so on our show. You little skeptical when I was like all. I don't think we should have these big picture. Future conversations. You seem a little skeptical of my now. I get it I mean. I don't think anyone really knows at the moment so a lot of it is speculation but also markets are always looking so I kind of get why people are naturally template to be looking at the big picture topics true. Yeah I guess you'd have to do so anyway. We're not going to make a big. We're not trying to make a big forecast here today. But as we talk about globalization as we talk about the dollar I do think it is useful to at least understand how it got to the current system what the current setup is. And what's actually yeah? Basically understand the the current world order and how we got her. Yeah I think that's a great idea and the dollar is so much a heart of the global financial system that we sort of take for granted. But it's definitely worthwhile to step back for a second and things like all. How did we get into a position? Where emerging markets are all like rushing to issue billions of dollars worth of dollar denominated debt? How did we get to a position? Where all of trade finances basically denominated in dollars. Why has that happened right exactly right and you know. There's a lot of misconceptions about all of this. How TRADE WORKS. Who benefits from the strong dollar or who benefits from the dollar permanent role we often hear of. Us ability to issue dollars as a privilege. But it's not. It's not really that a clear. We talked about this a little bit recently on an episode with met climb but the sort of the preference of different actors within the global economy regarding current arrangement is not as as clean as one might one might right and there is an argument that POPs up every once in a while but having the dollar so enmeshed in the financial system can actually be a negative for the US. And we've seen that crop recently with you know people talk about the Fed being the world's central banker does that sort of constrain. What it can do at times like this even before then so yeah definitely worth talking up okay. So today we are going to talk about that and we have a recent get. We actually talked about talk with him. Several weeks ago about Municipal debt when he is the CO author of a recent essay titled the Class Politics of the dollar system for the website. Phenomenal world is Yaacov Fagin. He's the associate director of the future. Capitalism program at the Berggruen Institute. And we're GONNA talk about how we got to this a the state how the dollar got to the state who really benefits from it. Who gets hurt from it and what it really means to preserve it so knockoff. Thank you very much for joining us. I should note that your co author. Dominick make it unfortunately today by glad we have you. What are you? Start by telling us what you The big picture of what your goal was with his essay. The class all its dollar system in sort of this essay was kind of a really long time coming And I really the person the two peop- The three people. I should probably think the most for kind of this happened are dominic who kind of got us to. Right. It's And the James Institute obviously for publishing yet but there's also someone else in the background of this essay. Is Nils Gilman? Who is my boss at the Berggruen Institute in over the years I've worked with him. We've had this very long conversation about we know. Why does the world use the dollar? And why is it a problem and he you know he's not specialist in international finance and this stuff is really technical and I spent like quite a long time kind of in a conversation with him like kind of pouring this stuff out right eventually told me you need to write this essay up right. You need to write an essay that just gives a literature review essentially of this kind of point of view of what the dollar system is politically. And why it's not necessarily you know very clear cut America versus the world story and so eventually this got written up right and that's the kind of story we're trying to tell is. It's very hard to pin down a national interest in the world that's hybrid as Perry Languid. Say Right it's a world in which there is a private system that's yearly inter mediating on an international level an a national in the system in which nations are essentially creating public goods called units of account right and that this international system mediates this hierarchy is of these units of account just as much as national power dynamics do so lucas through useless. Then talk about. The political system are around the dollar. What is that exactly? So argument is that it's actually class. Right is almost a or at least like social stratification as a kind of Meta politics right that the dollar is actually pretty good for a large cross section of people no matter what their position in the global value chain or where they're located and it's pretty bad for another other across sections again without considering international boundaries. That they are. It's pretty bad for a lot of people no matter where they're located or what part of the global value chain there

United States Berggruen Institute Tracy National Power John Trade FED Yaacov Fagin Perry Languid Adam Associate Director Nils Gilman Dominick James Institute Dominic America Lucas
NASA satellites help scientists understand climate change

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

NASA satellites help scientists understand climate change

"For much of human history. It's been hard for scientists to learn about remote areas of the earth that they cannot observe directly. Jack Kay is associate director for Research in Nasr's earth. Science Division was really hard to know. What's going on out in the middle of the ocean or on polarized sheets. Tropical forest forest but modern technology has changed that NASA now operates a fleet of satellites that orbit the earth. They make it possible to see the whole planet and observe how is changing as the climate warms. Satellites can help measure ocean temperatures sea levels and forest cover on a global scale and monitor changes over time. We can see the way that we are changing the surface of our planet. We can look things like the changing of the mass of the ice sheets in Greenland and tell people really seeing this. We know what's going on K. Says along with rigorous data satellites provide images that help people realize what at stake as the climate warms? You can see the earth so the suspended in the darkness of space and the imagery I think gives us a clear sense of this is our planet and this is where we live and we have to manage it.

Jack Kay Associate Director For Researc Nasr Greenland Science Division Nasa
Collaborating to Cure Dementia

Sounds of Science

08:35 min | 1 year ago

Collaborating to Cure Dementia

"Many of us will have to deal with dementia at some point in our lives whether as a patient or caregiver this terrible range of conditions affects five to eight percent of the sixty and older population at any given time. According to the World Health Organization the Dementia Consortium of Private Charity Partnership that Charles River joined last year is one of the organizations leading promising research on dementia treatments in order to discuss this condition and the research to treat it. I am joined by Sarah Almond Associate Director of integrated biology. Welcome Sarah Hi. Can you explain the purpose and organization of the DEMENTIA CONSORTIUM DEMENTIA Is SETUP BOY A? K. or outside research she k. Is a charity that focuses on. Alzheimer's disease it brings together. Active research is Pharma partners. Sarah's including Chelsea River in order to bring forward novel treatments dementia including outlines disease outside reset she. Kabc this research is invited to come forward with ideas for novel targets in Europe. Degeneration Your Inflammation Way. Them work with them to put together. What packages the funded by the partners? Anti Kate to prosecute he's talk and hopefully lead to novel treatments for Dementia. What do you think of the way? They've set up their organization. I think this is a great way to stop the organization because it brings together such a broad range of experience From academic researchers may have spent years really understanding the biology of targets to pharmaceutical companies. That know how to bring targets three two treatments actually effective in the clinic and also is a CRI where we have a broad range of so biology and chemistry capability so we cannot provide the word packages also have extremely experienced. Research is catchy. Help develop the molecules to treat these young coupled with the charitable input of the Vale Uk. He Project managed but also do so much to bring forward research in this area. Yeah absolutely cut covering all the bases. So what is Charles Rivers role in this group? You mentioned a little bit and you go into a little more detail. Charleston is WANNA to Communist with capabilities and drug discovery expertise. We provide strategic input into plans to de risk these targets and how to generate tool molecule suitable testing the hypothesis. We went with Alzheimer's Research K. And the principal investigator to proposals together. That income dreams that executed by then the appeal and US working closely together. They may do the basics. Hogging island allergy and we bring medicinal chemistry or HD CAPABILITIES. That actually will enable us to find a joke against that tailgate. We meet with the foul partners to finalize plans. And then once funded. We actually execute the work. Okay awesome I understand that a couple of research projects from the consortium have already been green lit Can you explain those proposals? She'll you're correct to Russia in progress of the two targets. One is fine as the Scott appears to link to Tau Accumulation ear inflammation. We aren't sure whether we need to be selective over a closely related kind as the. Pi is looking at whether ACHSAF. You've reduced this target. That doesn't indeed impact Taufel are. They should be China in Vivo. Mostly of onto molecule and vacation and which is a specific type of dementia or Alzheimer's. Or is that just a general Assignments towel face but particularly Alzheimer's disease at the eventual Gulf one is to the impact of the tour the killer produce on time phosphorylation. In an in Vivo model than the second project is two gene mutation I l s from tempo dementia the courses of pathogenic Rene to be produced. And we're aiming to block the expo this RNA. By targeting his with the protein takes out the Chris into the cell. When this new mix and Rene is exploited toxic repeat protein produced which then up today so responses and Kohl's neurodegenerative disease so the talk if allegations. This is actually already fairly strong. So we'll focus on producing told molecule capable of testing the hypothesis drug ability in Viva. And this is quite interesting that uses Zebra Fish Assay which is as a Pi Out Annika's scrap. The compounds can reduce the interaction between the protein. And the mutant. Aren a over So vice projects Charles River going to rub in Asia screen and then performed medicinal chemistry. Touchy try and get the molecules to kind of test with the viable targets. So how exactly is the consortium supporting this work on on these two proposals? So the consortium consists of Pharma Partners K. And they weren't. She formed kind of equal partners within that and they provide funding the project so they've also provided their expertise in kind of defining the key risks that we need to address in our plans and also technically hurt entice for example as I was research to see progress against small Stein's out payroll Consult here as a whole. I understand our work on dementia has increased substantially over the last year or. So is this because of a higher demand for treatment or is it more promising research avenues. Or is it both. I think by This been advances in understanding of neurons. Lemay tion in particular so this is triggered research projects. But also there's a shift away from the amyloid focused approaches for outside disease due to a lack of clinical success but equally dementia is still highly prevalent in and loss of US. Know people that'd be personally affected by this August. Just it's very hard Eric Tree but not one which people are going to give them. What is the importance of collaboration for researching these neurological diseases? They understand that. Probably the REAL STRENGTH OF THE CONSORTIUM. I think just touches found that there are Kiama nays area The SIS for those lost focus hasn't been successful in the clinic so it's clear that novel therapeutic approaches and needed and this takes time so rarely. We need different people to work together. Different functions work together so farmer actually reduce what they do in house and choose to those complex in return. Viva studies take years to fully establish in Zeros and so when academic academia follow charities and see arose all have complementary skill sets the they they research can be three to benefit the patient in the minimum time possible. Is it also a matter of the fact that CNN diseases are so complicated? And there's so many different factors going into the Mike. No one can be an expert in enough of the different areas of research to really do absolves ex exactly not. Yeah you know. And and so just by the nature of scientific institution you may get more time to focus on specific disease mechanisms. That PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY. Just doesn't have the kind of time to dedicate starved to really building that level understanding but they may have a much broader range of complex models. That can actually help advance. This yet come has been unfortunately so we can you tell me about the psychiatry consortium which I guess is kind of an offshoot of the dementia consortium. Yeah it's it's basically has the same structures dimensions. Timonen is formed in consultation with a K. Who a kind of had a stake in his on. Psychiatry example schizophrenia or autism and this is obscene medicines discovery cats who are not for profit and are there the cats ponant which was set innovate UK to support innovation and use by UK business? So the psychiatry console is one of the indicates which is accelerating drug discovery and psychiatric

Dementia Dementia Consortium Dementia Consortium Of Private Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Charles River United States Rene Sarah Hi Sarah Almond Associate Director Of Integrat World Health Organization Europe Chelsea River Charleston Neurodegenerative Disease Vale Uk Russia Charles Rivers
Missed lessons from the Ebola Outbreak

Second Opinion

03:49 min | 1 year ago

Missed lessons from the Ebola Outbreak

"This is Dr Michael Wilks. With a second opinion history in general and the history of medicine in particular is greatly underappreciated. For the lessons it can teach US scholars. Tell us that those who cannot remember. The past are condemned to repeat it. Well it seems that valuable lessons learned in the recent past around epidemics have been ignored and disregarded for example although there are differences between the novel Corona Virus Cova Nineteen and the abol outbreak. There are valuable lessons that we missed. What's similar between the two diseases is the fear the distrust of government recommendations the role of the family and spreading the disease the importance of social distancing and the lack of a plan to attack the illness. Dr Brian Bird is a leading veterinarian. An infectious disease epidemiologist and the associate director of UC Davis one health institute. He's worked on the front lines of the Bulla epidemic and other epidemics round the world. He says the major lesson we might have learned was simply to have a plan being prepared or at least having a plan to be prepared is is the key doctor Bert. Also points out that. When Ebola was first recognized in west Africa the concept of a spreadable lethal virus was a totally new concept. That virus was a completely new disease to the people living in that region. They had no experience with the boulevard versus much like the job. Now for Cove it just like with Corona early in the Ebola outbreak. There was also fear no testing and a huge need for socialized relation that tore families apart. There were no treatments or vaccines for either a bowl or Cova and there was a fragmented healthcare system required to care for a large number of sick people and there was no trust in the public health response to prevent the healthy from getting sick West Africa. Bola was a warning to the world. Bit viruses will emerge from relatively distant and remote places. But what we've done no places remote and distant anymore because of the transportation networks whether it'd be roads airplanes in disease management it is essential that people trust their government and believe that they are telling them the truth you look in West Africa. There was a period of time when there was a lot of mistrust and disbelief that the disease was real so in the early months there were large campaigns that just to say a bola is real. There were many opportunities to learn from the Ebola outbreak. That were missed. A lot of those lessons learned have been laid by the wayside because it was appeared that that diseases the disease over there not here. Dr Bird explains the health of the people depends on a strong and coordinated government response during the Ebola outbreak governments in west Africa. Were eventually very heavy handed. But communities came to understand that self isolation was in their own self interest governments need NBC Straw and have a consistent and thoughtful approach to how they want to tackle the emergencies of the day. Today there are important lessons. That could be learned. Some countries and states and cities that could greatly benefit others it requires a willingness to learn and an openness to recognize that. We are all very much in this together. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second

West Africa Dr Brian Bird Ebola Dr Michael Wilks United States Cova Associate Director Bola Uc Davis Nbc Straw Cove
Disease patterns and planetary health

Second Opinion

03:27 min | 1 year ago

Disease patterns and planetary health

"Sars and Moore's Ebola in now corona link with animals what we call zoonosis. It's more complicated than animals simply spreading viruses and pathogens to humans. This bread is often less direct and can involve intermediate hosts and behaviors. But as I've talked this week with disease ecology experts they have increasingly blamed humans for our destruction of biodiversity this then creates ripe conditions for pathogens to come into contact with humans building roads deforestation mining logging farming with heavy water use population growth exotic vacations and heavy hunting have all played a role in these emerging epidemics around the world. Densely packed populations increasingly live in close proximity to bats and rats and birds and pets. This creates new opportunities for interactions for things to move from one species to another so does our tendency to capture exotic animals and put them in cages and ship them around the world to be used as pets or sold in wet markets and eventually be consumed as food all these activities disperse viruses that have existed for eons in one species often in one location and then spread them globally. Dr Brian Bird is a leading veterinarian. Epidemiologist and the associate director of UC Davis is one health institute he has worked on the front lines of the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone and other epidemics around the world. He has thought a great deal about these emerging epidemics at it quite clear that land use change and changing the environment chopping forest to plant crops. Things things of that nature are one of the leading risk factors for spillover buyers spillover of viruses from one species to another is increasingly common the CDC estimates that three quarters of new or emerging diseases that infect humans originating animals. It's not just exotic diseases like Corona Ebola and h one n one look at how we've destroyed forests to build American suburbs. This development disrupts the ecosystems enforces deer and rats and other animals to live in more densely packed areas or to venture outside of their normal habitat. This means that insects like ticks can more easily passed between animals. And then the ticks spread the bacteria borelli A- Bergdorf Ri- and there is a huge increase in line disease. Dr Bird reminds us that these changes have been going on since the industrial revolution. But he says that. Our interactions with that risk must change. We have to start to recognize that what we're doing as humanity in these wild areas is detrimental or taking the system out of balance into viruses. That all the other wildlife live in that ECO system and a sense of balance. It is this balance that has been ignored over the longer term solutions will start with awareness and hopefully that will lead to reason to action and more careful

Dr Brian Bird Zoonosis Ebola Sars Corona CDC A- Bergdorf Ri Associate Director Moore Uc Davis Sierra Leone
Protesters rally across world to mark International Women's Day

Skimm This

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Protesters rally across world to mark International Women's Day

"Women around the world took to the streets yesterday saying loudly and proudly this is my fights on March. Eighth is known as International Women's Day. You probably saw lots of bad ass. Women and their inspirational quotes highlighted on your INSTA- feed but a big point of the day is really to put a spotlight on women's rights and gender equality so a ton of women also turned out to protest from Chile. One of the largest demonstrations of the day where women protested violence against women to Paris where they protested. The quote. Virus of the Patriarch. No matter where you looked there was something to protest. Here's one protester in the UK. This country is much better than other countries around the world. But we're still not completely fine with like cheap. Despite you they are in Pakistan. Women again rallied around the slogan. My Body my choice. They're basically just trying to say women should be protected from sexual assault and should be able to make the reproductive and medical decisions that they think are best. This chant isn't new. It actually angered a lot of people in Pakistan last year. You See Pakistan has a pretty conservative country so that message of autonomy doesn't exactly fly in a sign of what these women's Day marches are up against when it comes to changing minds. They were met by crowds of counter protesters this year including people who threw stones shoes and mud at them in the capital of Islamabad. The backlash didn't keep the celebrations and protests from happening though. These protesters are calling on women to wake up. Meanwhile in Mexico City protesters spoke out against the increasing numbers of domestic violence victims last year. The government estimated that about thirty eight hundred Mexican women were killed. That's more than ten deaths every day. Many of them involve sexual assault. Those protests continued today. But they sounded more like this. That's right silence. Today is being called a quote day without us because women across the country just disappeared. Maria Fernanda Peres. Arguello is the associate director of the Atlantic. Council's Latin America Center amounts ability or invisibility. They're not going to go to work. They're not going to take any public transportation. They're not gonNA make any purchases and they're also going to be invisible in the digital space so they won't post they won't text they. WanNa make this visible. They're showing what the country would look like without women like if we don't do anything to stop these murders. This is how our country is GonNa be surprise. It turns out we need women around. Mexico has about twenty one million registered female workers and one Employers Association estimated that the Women's one day strike could end up costing the economy about six billion pesos. Or nearly three hundred million. Us dollars and that's just in the capital of Mexico City and for just one day without women which just goes to show how crucial women are who run the world on International Women's Day and everyday women are making their case

International Women Pakistan Mexico City Assault Maria Fernanda Peres Mexico Chile Islamabad UK Paris United States Arguello Latin America Center Associate Director Employers Association Atlantic
A good new home

Native America Calling

09:36 min | 1 year ago

A good new home

"Tara Gatewood in here with me on the program today out of Saint Paul Minnesota. Is Angela go theor the associate director of Minoshe key and a young and also here too with the with the group is executive director. deb Foster her and she is a Saint Croix Ojibway from Eagle Clan. My pleasure to have both of them here with US and Andromeda turn turn to you. You've done a lot of work. I'm looking at your bio and see That you have worked with the county in family services and just knowing along the repetition or how many times young people are entering into foster care and then they age out and then there's no place to turn talk to me about how being there air at this critical time and offering them a space to not only the rest of their head but also gained a job development skills as well as even just I have to be self sustaining talked me about this critical time period. In what some of the things that the center is working on I I always ask people to reflect on the young people that they have in their personal lives and the natural support systems. That are there error. And how many times when you're C Eighteen nineteen twenty one. Twenty two year olds in your personal life that When they have love family to fall back on at times when they're having a hard time or they've They need a place to stay. Or they've transitioned positioned in their jobs or they're you know. They're struggling in some way when they have a natural place to go back to a lot of the youth that we are working with because as they have spent such extended time in foster care that they've been moved around a lot through their youth. They don't have those places to land The one thing with young and his dad was saying having been Serving the community since nineteen eighty. Three is that it is become that place for a lot of youth and families that they know when they're having a hard time that this is kind of their soft place to land that there are people here that can help and and so this expands our ability to do that for this youth in this age group is that this is a critical time when you are learning learning to live independently when they're wanting to you know find employment and look for career pass and go back to college and when you don't have how those supports Built in because you've been in foster care because you've had time and placement or been homeless this gives you more of that time name and all of the services That you could need as a jumping off point are here for you and we're here to build those relationships and to help them take that next step I'm just excited that we have an opportunity now to work with these US more closely for a more extended period. Take time to help them. Get through this point of transition and so tell me a little bit more about how it works. How permanent is the housing and some some of the support services that are going on Angeles? START US off yeah so youth enter the program Between the ages of eighteen to twenty twenty four years old The youth that are coming in have different backgrounds of homelessness and Foster Care The nature permanent supportive housing is that they could live in this housing forever if they wanted. There isn't a timeframe I'm in which they would need to leave. They just need to enter between the ages of eighteen to twenty four and they have to continue to qualify for the subsidies that are or a helping to assist with their rent During the time that they are there the support services that we have we have to transition coaches that start working with the youth rate rate at the point of referral. And they're the ones who are working with you to collect their housing history. All their vital documents they information that they need in order to you. Qualify for the housing and those transition coaches continue to work with those youth to help them. That goal plans navigate resources and everything that they need on that and they're like housing goals we have a full time youth and family therapists. That is dedicated to the building and that therapists can do individual work Couples therapy family therapy is needed really to really meet. Whatever the needs are for that youth To help them be healthy in their community and their personal relationships. We also have a fulltime cultural specialist. Who is is trained in suicide prevention and post mention that is dedicated to the building? And he's there to help work with the youth To you meet their cultural needs and to help them. Connect back with their own communities as well We have the ability to have ceremonies. We have a cultural cultural activities center. We have medicine gardens and sweat lodge on site and so he's really the coordinator of that for all of the youth We are also adding a safe harbor case manager which is dedicated to working with you who are at risk of or have been involved in sexual exploitation and so the case management will be dedicated Just to that kind of aspect and helping them navigate gate through the resources and the sensitive nature of that and then there's property management that's onsite with our partners that help them with their lease and like the money portion portion of everything and then the We're also staff twenty four hours a day so there's always some support staff here for the residents when they need it into my turn to. Oh you balancing all of this because it sounds like a lot and it sounds like the things that often are left out of the equation win A lot of times we start trying trying to help our youth Trying to get them going faster. Start on life. How is all of this being balanced or is this part of the blueprint to make sure that all of these things were there Not only supplying a place to live. But supplying a place to thrive tell me more dip. Yes we In addition to what Angela has said we have the building was built around The the all of the needs of the young people. So for instance we have Circular gathering centers on each floor where Kids will be able to gather We have the purposely did efficiency apartments because we wanted at their full apartments full kitchen refrigerator. Everything bathroom beds living area but we wanted them to network with new folks And have an opportunity to establish new networks and We also have a workforce training center so A Complete Computer Center Training Center. Where kids can do everything? I'm from working on covering letters Building resumes doing job search learning technical skills And and types of activities. That are involved in building those opportunities for young people We also have a Fitness Center down in the lower level providing opportunities for young people to strengthen their health and and wellbeing physically physically and also the teaching kitchens that you mentioned on each floor to Help kids learn how to cook. And how to cook healthy We also have as mentioned a cultural activities center. So that is where all the kids can learn how to make their own regalia and do beadwork and make their own drums. But more importantly learned the history behind all of these things We have an entrepreneurship program that We have for young people that were putting together that will allow you to work onsite. We have a credit store which which I like to describe as kind of like a mini walgreens and so Use can earn vouchers that they can use in these stores and it has everything a walgreens would have but it also provides an opportunity for young people to work there and they can learn some Shaath work skills such as profit and loss and stocking talking and ordering cashiering things like that Also we have a food shelf and we also have a clothing store so these are all opportunities for young people to garner some software skills And we have numerous or as partners throughout our community. That are going to be working with us as well. And providing internships and workforce skills and Places where they can establish a ged or finish high school learn about post secondary education. If that's what they WANNA

United States Angela Deb Foster Tara Gatewood Computer Center Training Cente Saint Croix Ojibway Angeles Saint Paul Minnesota Associate Director Executive Director. Fitness Center Coordinator
Harassment in Online Gaming

Good Code

08:58 min | 1 year ago

Harassment in Online Gaming

"Over two billion people play games globally in the US sixty four percent of online population play video games in games a much more than just games live. MULTIPLAYER Games are social platforms forms where people interact chat and sometimes get harassed. According to a poll made for the Untidy Formation League in two thousand eighteen Americans reported only gaming as the fifth place where the experienced harassment online just after facebook. Luke twitter youtube an instagram. Welcome to good code the weekly podcast on ethics in our digital lives. My name is Sheila Eh. I'm a visiting journalist at Cornell Tax Digital Life Initiative and I'm your host a few weeks ago. I sat down with Daniel Kelly in his office office in New York City. He's the associate director of the Center for Technology and society within the Anti Defamation League he leads the center's work to fight hate bias and harassment in online gaming to be clear he's job is not to look at the contents of video games he studied side conversations. That gamers have with one another wild plane. I began by asking him to explain where exactly these conversations happen. This is a question that I get a lot especially for people who aren't familiar with these kinds of conversations which is sometimes Parents right right when you're talking about communications online games. They can happen usually in two places so the one place would be an text chat so that would be a chat box that usually lives at the bottom of your screen and you can type in different words and you know dialogue. Often people communicate that way. They're playing playing as they're playing. They are if they're on a PC. They're typing if they're if they're on an xbox or playstation they could be there could be shortcuts or there or they could be typing in with their with their control or other things and for those cotton's of communications. You can use the same. A well trod techniques for detecting Abuse that you can use on facebook twitter you have the same model of being able to use machine learning or AI and human review to we able to flag content. There's sort of a baseline to start from in terms of the content. Moderation that happens there the area which is much more of a wild west which exists in games and and in some maybe perhaps live streamed social media But is a big part of games is voice chat so in addition to people typing in some things that they say to people people are actually speaking to each other stranger. They're speaking to each other again as they're playing as they're playing commencing on what's happening. Yeah exactly commenting on what's happening openings. Sometimes being competitive sometimes crossing the line into being hateful and sometimes being you know supportive and encouraging and engaging with with the people as as they're playing the game but when we talk about voice chat the methods to do content moderation in live voice chat are super nascent. And and so. There's a real need. I think to push research and advocacy forward for that because as bad as things can be in the text environments we don't even have the framework to address them in or the tools to address them in voice chat. And so yeah. We'll get back to that. That's something I want to ask. Ask You about Just to understand do most gamers take part in these chatrooms Whether text are vocal is that is that like a wide. I practice the AARP which is an organization that is geared towards Folks who are fifty plus did a survey of Gamers who are art fifty plus and they've found that thirty three percent of Gamers who are fifty plus who play online play with other adults play in in a way that they're communicating with the people they're playing with and so if you can imagine that you know a third of Of older adults are are communicating. When they're playing these games? I don't know there's been a similar measurements of other age groups but I could imagine that the the amount the degree to which if it's part of their game plan part of the way they interact in and see the platform would would be significantly more. I think at the game developers conference in March of last year the CEO of epoch which makes fortnight which is a very popular game talked talked about fortnight and games like it being sort of forms of social media that the folks who are playing these are playing them as games in of themselves but they also are means to build community and to connect with one another. And you know these sort of continuous free to play. Online Games are a form form of social media social platform yet social platforms. And they're places where people are communicating regularly. Our focus right now is really Focused on games as social platforms there. I think there's been a lot of good work in Games as media looking at games in the same way that you you might look at movies in terms of a representation. whose stories are being told? How has that story being told but I at least in the sort of NGOs space this and certainly in the sort of traditional historical civil rights organization space? There hasn't been as much work looking at games as social spaces. uh-huh you were at rights con last year. Which is one of the biggest Tree conferences on human rights and technology and there was no workshop on gaming and that you were surprised prices. Do you think that's changing that people are realizing that Games are social platforms. Is that slowly taking into consideration thing. I I think you know. I think it is starting to become more of a consideration. There's just a lot of educating on both on both sides from the gaming industry and from civil society about how how do we find a way to work together But I think yeah. I think it's urgent. A game industry is larger than film and music combined In terms of the amount out of money that it makes so this is a an urgent space for folks to be looking at there are people who are specifically in the game space. That are focused on us. But it hasn't yet. I think permeated the larger discourse in the same with the social media has for large NGOs. I share. Let's get into the report you rotor a report in July two thousand nineteen. That was cold free to play hate harassment and positive social experiences in line gaming. And you we'll get into the details of it. I you start your report by saying something quite positive which was surprising. The first result that you shares at eighty eighty eight percents of adults who play online those multi-player Games In the US report positive social experiences while playing online and there is even a non trivial amount of US adults who report positive experiences in online should gain so probably some of the most violent when so this is sort of counter intuitive even silver lining to start a report on harassment Shuzo. Why why why was it important to have that at the beginning? We're still in kind of a moral panic place with games James In the way that perhaps we were with comic books in the fifties where something terrible happens in the world that everyone wants to blame it on video games and so my experience talking to folks about these issues has been that when you start from this place of video games are bad. People who are are working in the space with Love Games who games are part of their identity part of how they interact socially it just shuts them down and I. I don't think it's a path towards change. If if you just say that x form of media all books are terrible right. Miguel necessarily say that and so it was important for me. The report port is focused on games as social spaces so both the positive side of things and and I think it was unclear as when we ask these questions rate we we wanted to get to some level of understanding of our game online game spaces are are they as bad as you know people the worst of the worst say hey they are right. I think some folks pleasantly surprised that that there were so many people who had positive experiences is no measurement and because there is this a reactive mode to video games. I wanted to start from a place of like. There are many positive experiences that people have in online games and there's also reality of negative experiences that need to be engaged with be dressed because then it opens the conversation of. How can we fix this? Not just get rid of those

Harassment United States Facebook Cornell Tax Digital Life Initi Sheila Eh Untidy Formation League Luke Daniel Kelly New York City Aarp Center For Technology And Soci Associate Director Miguel CEO
Colorado’s red-flag law invoked, likely for the first time, in Denver case

Mike Rosen

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Colorado’s red-flag law invoked, likely for the first time, in Denver case

"The Denver police department is the first in Colorado to utilize the red flag law they filed the order against a man involved in a domestic violence situation and there were suicidal statements no one was injured in the incident which started out as an argument what we do know is that where there is a fire are involved a victim is five times more likely to end up dead as a result that's violence free Colorado's associate director any poll talk to fox thirty one in this case a judge granted a temporary filing in fourteen days there will be a hearing to determine if a continuing order is

Denver Police Department Colorado Associate Director
"associate director" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The associate director for national security at the office of management and budget and he happens to be one of the four witnesses we had already asked for meanwhile president trump is not letting Christmas cheer get in the way of his anger toward Nancy Pelosi after wishing the truth happy holidays president trump fielding questions from reporters unleashed a string of insults on house speaker Nancy Pelosi she hates all of the people that voted for me and the Republican Party she's doing a tremendous disservice to the country lawmakers spending the holiday recess entrenched in a partisan stalemate the president firing UP tweets going after pelo C. for fusing to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate and the Republicans reveal how the trial would be structure that's A. B. C.'s Rachel Scott reporting from Mar a Lago it's seven thirty eight time now for a check on business with Bloomberg this holiday shopping season has seen a battle in the toy Isle in this corner in this corner frozen sequel coming to theaters could be little girls will be clamoring for a new Elsa or on a princess doll once again frozen took the world by storm six years ago Bloomberg global business reporter Matt Townsend basically knocked Barbie the biggest all brand the world owned by Mattel off its peg and there's even more competition this time around LOL surprises the new brand of unbox double dolls from M. G. A. entertainment the maker of Bratz dolls unlike many other toy categories Townsend says fashion dolls are a growth industry so a lot more than bragging rights may be at stake the markets about three billion dollars which is a lot of money and it's a very competitive market and this holiday season season will probably be the most competitive we've seen in years I'm Nathan Hager Bloomberg business on WBZ Boston's news radio sports with Brian and Cinelli just ahead just.

toy Isle Nathan Hager M. G. reporter Cinelli Brian Boston Mattel Barbie Matt Townsend associate director Bloomberg Lago Rachel Scott A. B. C. Senate Republican Party
"associate director" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The associate director for national security at the office of management and budget and he happens to be one of the four witnesses we had already asked for meanwhile president trump is not letting Christmas cheer get in the way of his anger toward Nancy Pelosi after wishing the troops happy holidays president trump fielding questions from reporters a least a string of insults on house speaker Nancy Pelosi she hates all of the people that voted for me and the Republican Party she's doing a tremendous disservice to the country lawmakers spending the holiday recess entrenched in a partisan stalemate the president firing off tweets going after pelo see refusing to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate and the Republicans reveal how the trial would be structure ABC's Rachel Scott reporting from Mar a Lago well an associate of president trump's personal attorney apparently can no longer afford both of his lawyers since he was charged with campaign finance violations left part of his ability to fund his defense has an attorney said diminished Edward McMahon a Virginia based criminal defense attorney asked in a Christmas Eve court filing to withdraw from the case Joseph Bondi who is based here in New York will continue to represent part ask who's pleaded not guilty to illegally funneling campaign cash to a pro trump super PAC Bondi said on Twitter the legal strategy has not changed part S. and co defendant Igor Froman assisted Rudy guiliani in investigating Joan hunter Biden in Ukraine Aron Kader ski ABC news New York for ballot questions for next year's vote are on their way to state lawmakers the four have gotten the number of required voter signatures needed to.

Edward McMahon ABC Aron Kader Ukraine Joseph Bondi Joan hunter Biden Rudy guiliani Igor Froman Twitter New York Virginia associate director attorney Lago Rachel Scott Senate Republican Party
Impeachment updates: Congress braces for historic vote

The Glenn Beck Show

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Impeachment updates: Congress braces for historic vote

"I will be voting yes on obstruction of Congress that from congresswoman Alyssa Slotkin a Democrat from a swing district in Michigan that went to trump in twenty sixteen the house Judiciary Committee releasing this report on impeachment just days before the full house vote on the two articles abuse of power and obstruction of Congress as the vote approaches impeachment in the house appears inevitable now some lawmakers are shifting their focus to the Senate and a likely trial in January conducting an impeachment trial in the Senate is enormously weighty and solemn responsibility Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer says he'd like to hear testimony from at least four people tied to the Ukraine scandal acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney Mulvaney aid Robert Blair former national security adviser John Bolton and Michael Duffy associate director for national security at the office of management and budget fox's

John Bolton Robert Blair Mick Mulvaney Chief Of Staff White House Ukraine FOX Associate Director Michael Duffy Congress Chuck Schumer Senate House Judiciary Committee Michigan Alyssa Slotkin
Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

Museum Archipelago

08:36 min | 1 year ago

Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

"The field of conservation was created to fight change to prevent objects from becoming dusty broken or rusted but fighting to keep cultural objects preserved creates a certain mindset the mindset of protector a mindset. It's too easy to imagine objects and cultures. In the state of stasis. This is how it always was and will be forever. Often I mean just given the colonial oneal had an imperial histories of museums. It was because people were going to be gone forever. That culture was gone. And so this is the last trace but in fact. That's not how cultural heritage works it. It's transformed it's changed. It continues on in different forms and a lot of the way the Conservatives think about cultural heritage is is about out mitigating that change. which makes it a little bit fossilized but to me that changes where things are really vibrant exciting and people are so closely connected to cultural cultural heritage that it really feels alive? This is since Cheetah Bala Chandran Associate Director of the John Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Hello my name is Cinci Bala Alexander. I'm conservative and I'm trained in the conservation of archaeological materials in particular and my day job is the associate director of the Archaeological Theological Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Bala Chandran founded untold stories a project that pursues conservation profession that represents and preserves a full spectrum of human cultural heritage for the past few years. The project has been hosting public events at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation Conservation Untold Stories emerged of bollocks hundreds frustration with how narrowly the field of conservation has been defined at felt that there were literally early too many untold stories in the field of conservation. I wanted to find ways to actually start to think about what else cultural heritage could mean other than say the things we typically think of as belonging in a museum or many of us cultural heritage means going to this important looking building that has paintings and sculpture and has labels labels next to it and I think we kind of decided in some ways at that's cultural heritage and preservation means taking care of those things and really I've become more and more aware error and curious about the fact that cultural heritage is much more complicated and diverse set of practices. It's often not necessarily about a single object or a thing but rather how that thing might function within a community or communities as as part of a series of practices and exchanges and storytelling and I just wanted to have a way to kind of work with people who are really doing that work outside the museum and doing it in ways that I think preserved Europe but also change cultural practices since untold stories takes place at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation. A lot of professionals in the field Are already gathered there. The meetings attract over one thousand conservators blake many professional conferences. The meetings are often held in a nondescript hotel how setting but untold stories makes it a practice to conceptualize where attendees are sitting and the history that preceded them an example of this is the twentieth nineteen eighteen untold stories event titled Indigenous Futures and Collaborative Conservation. How many times have you been to a conference and you could be anywhere right? I mean you're in this big room and you never leave the hotel or the conference center and part of what I was interested in was trying to actually place a somewhere so twenty one thousand nine since we were actually meeting at the Mohegan Sun which is a Mohegan owned casino. We were on native land. It seemed like a really important opportunity. -tunities to talk about native sovereignty kind of history of genocide in our own country. The fact that anyone who's non-indigenous in this country is a settler settler colonialist but to really think about what this means in terms of how we take care of collections that have come to us as a result of historical happenstance stance but also a very violent past and to acknowledge the fact that museums which for most of us who work in museums are very safe. Welcoming and joyful places uses are evidence of this history of of pain and removal so the opportunity to work with the commod educational initiative was really exciting. Because because it's a partly native co-founded and they do a lot of educational work around questions of how even think about the history of this country story and to me. That was really important to be able to say in native space as opposed to you know in a place somewhere else. Part of of Bala. Hundreds point is that there isn't such a thing as a textualist cultural material. The intentionally nondescript conference ballroom has a lot in common with deliberately sterile museum environment episode. Sixty eight of this show features an interview with Ed Wanda's spears director of programming and outreach at the adamant educational initiative and one of the convenors of the twenty nineteen untold stories event in the episode. She discusses her presentation about how native native narratives are violently presented through White Lens in museums. It was in Donna spheres of Who suggested the title she had worked in museums? She's very familiar with these questions. And she's the one who suggested indigenous futures which forces you to recognize that this is not something of the past. We really wanted to do something. The thing that felt like we were going to push. This had to be uncomfortable but it also had to be aspirational. Where do we go now? And how can as conservatives servers we actually be part of this very kind of collaborative supportive mission to ensure futures. We can't make it happen by ourselves. It's it's not like we're saving anybody and that's another big concern of mine. There's a real sort of savior mentality that I think conservation has ask we save objects and I certainly came out of graduate school thinking that I was going to save everything and to me. That's a very problematic way to think about it because frankly if the objects still survives it didn't need me it made it thousands of years without me somehow. We've decided that we're the ones that making the that make these things live live forever which is pure arrogance so part of this event was really to think about how as conservatives can come up with action items and by action items. It was practices but more than anything of kind of Shipton in a mental framework for working much more equitably and more humbly to really have a sense of respect for this notion that there has already been a history before you and so when you enter into this hopefully collaborative relationship you need to acknowledge alleged. Things have survived for a long time without your intervention. And they don't need you but you could actually provide some sort of service some sort of benefit that could actually really help the untold stories team. True to their mission is careful not to present the workshop as a single solution or even a set of solutions. The team wants wants to counter the assumption within the profession. That all you need to do is go to one workshop and then you're all done you know. Unfortunately this doesn't change the working working practices it doesn't change the mindset. It doesn't change the way an organization functions and what happens is then marginalized people are called upon again and again to kind of keep performing this vulnerability and this discomfort for themselves in order to educate people who are unwilling to do the work that consistent like every single day for the rest of their lives work that will be required to make transformative change possible part of what in the twenty nineteen in conversation we. We felt very strongly we had to say is if if you really believe in equality if you really want to do something that is truly collaborative that does not assume some sort of hierarchy. It means being really uncomfortable the entire time and maybe at the end of it things will change but you you still have to kind of follow through on it when it gets really uncomfortable. And the fact is most marginalized communities. People have done this entire lives so it it just feels like it's time for you. Know I think in general the museum community to say we're willing to engage in these kinds of difficult ongoing perpetual natural

American Institute For Conserv Collaborative Conservation Cheetah Bala Chandran American Institute For Conserv Bala Chandran Bala Cinci Bala Alexander John Hopkins Archaeological Mu Archaeological Theological Mus Mohegan Sun Johns Hopkins University Associate Director Europe Blake Ed Wanda Shipton Director
"associate director" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"Problem. There's a lot of overlap the designer might work directly with the Front Front engineers to define how your experience is going to work. The product manager may not be able to be in that discussion because maybe they're in a go to market meetings for something else that they're working on on or they're dealing with some sort of escalation or a bug some sort of triage thing so there's a lot of overlap and there's a lot of fuzziness as far as WHO's responsible for what it but at the core of it I think the designer to your point they care about the user they care about the user experience they care about everything about that experience so not necessarily just the software air but all the things that are happening around the user wall. That person is trying to complete a task do something delightful so anything. That's happening happening sort of adjacent to the user while they try to get something done. That's interacting with that product said versus. The product manager cares about the user from the perspective of what what are they trying to accomplish. What are the barriers that in the way of that task being completed and how can I sort of rally a group of engineers you ex team and the business around it kind of unblocking that user to complete that task all right so I'm GonNa talk a little bit and I'm sorry the font didn't really translate super great here about how we organize things at toast and this has been my experience at most companies. I've worked at barring a few economies of scale. When you're working at a smaller organization you may not have all of these resources says and your team may not be structured in this way so product manager. That's me we often have a US researcher for projects that are sort of large enough or the problems are thorny enough that we really want to do a big upfront research initiative before we actually do anything around a user story or requirement or anything of that sort we have a product designer who handles all of the interaction design things about the user's experience and and including things that might be happening around the user while they're we're actually interacting with the product and we are engineering and Qa org so sort of lake over here to the left of the product manager or all of the additional people that the product manager typically has to interact with. I don't have them here. I think it's important to call out so they're often talking to customer success or whoever your services and support organization are they're talking to other teams about their roadmaps dependencies or sort of cross functional pollination that needs to happen in order to meet you know accompany wide objective. Let's say you're all sort of marching towards the same drum so there's a bunch of other stuff on the left hand side of the product manager. I like to think of them as the person who sort of runs defense and sort of keeps those interfering forces from impacting the product designer the researcher and the engineering during team right so they handle all of that stuff so that the US researcher on the product designer can collaborate on user testing or work on a journey map figure out all of that stuff and the engineering. Qa team can sort of continue iterating on the code base and sort of get us into an architectural place where we can execute on a feature so this is how we organize things at toast a lot of times you'll have groups where you don't have a US researcher that's sort of a new emerging part of the US landscape not title companies have those sometimes a product designer and the product manager might be the same person. Sometimes you have a product manager and a visual designer or an architect tact and they just like apply a style guide after that so really there's a ton of overlap in what you're expected to do as a product manager which are expected to understand as a US designer Zainur that really creates some strong collaboration between those two they really they need to be in sync those two roles and that sort of I'm I'm trying to to to hone in on here. Is that the better you are at collaborating with your team and your US resource whoever's on your your product the better your products going to be and the happy you're going to be as a product manager because you're GONNA have more time to do strategic thinking to plan additional roadmap items. It's just going to allow you to have a lot more economy in the work that you're doing so what does that give you the more that you can collaborate with their. US Partner and the more you can sort of clearly defined who's responsible for what upfront and how you're going to sorta organize your work the better the first official phase of your projects are going to be that's discovery and this should be like an ongoing process that you go through as you're building ending a roadmap especially. If you're sort of inheriting a roadmap from you know perhaps an established product or leadership you know it's not always that everyone gets to start with the blank slate and sort of like figure out what to build half the time you're sort of given a list of things that someone thought was important at some point so the discovery visit the critical starting point for any team who needs to look deeply into a problem the better your discovery the better development process the more. You're going to be able to scale that successfully all right. Has Anyone seen this this image before sort of a standard editor of release process and I was a little bit challenging the that they just use but what I really like about does it. `lustration is the dual track that it shows right so discovery is in Malaga Waterfall Environment where you start a project and we're like great. We're going to build this thing and we're going to build it and then we're gonNA release it when that's done. We're going to move onto the next thing you see up here. Just make sure I don't trip and fall here you can see up here in the discovery goverry fees it's continuous and the US and the product manager other people driving that discovery process. It's continual and it's cyclical not everything everything makes it to the much larger blue circles down on the bottom which represents actual development effort where you know. Someone's actually building something. A lot of stuff is getting getting thrown into the recycling bin up top and that represents testing and that represents you coming up with ideas quickly finding away to get data to support those arguments mansor discard them and then moving forward and actually wish this had a little bit more overlap between the development circles and the discovery circles because I do think there's a place for input in this process and I don't think this does a great job of representing that but it's sort of the best best one I could find and did you see that the bottom the circles are larger because there's significantly more effort. You know that's that's representing. You know whole team of people building something making sure. It works on any number of devices. This is a bunch of different browsers. There's a lot of work there so no more careful you are and the more you can collaborate with your you ex team in the green circle area and the more prescriptive you are about what you're actually trying to solve for the better those blue circles are gonna go okay okay so how does discovery work best particularly when you're working with you know a US designer which hopefully at this point is sort of your partner in this effort understanding your users and meeting the meeting them where they are so it toasts we use the example actually going and watching restaurant owners restaurant operators front of House staff use is the product in a restaurant because there's often and I think this touches on the empathy part of you know. Having engineers aren't always aware of what is happening in a restaurant that might make the product harder to use than they expect like. Oh yeah you can just do. XYZ thing and it's fine if maybe an error message is there air for a second and then disappears and if you've ever been in a busy restaurant someone's going to turn away from the screen. Something else is happening. People have ten things on their plate. You know you need to be really really clear about what the user needs to do next because they've probably done ten different things in between the steps that you're trying to get them to complete so actually going going to wear your users are at using your product. If at all possible.

product manager US researcher Front Front Partner Malaga Waterfall editor official
"associate director" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"I worked on sort of our core platform right so my career this far. I'm a non traditional product manager. type of career paths come from an engineering background. I don't come from a business school background. none of that is part of my story. I went to be new for English and Anthropology Liberal Arts degree which has not been super useful except for the robust communication skills and sort of organizing your thoughts and having some critical thinking which I think is very helpful above and beyond some of the things that you know the technical space focuses on today. these areas are things that I've worked on my past so when when I first started out I worked at a startup called buzzer agent doing social media word of mouth marketing campaign back in the early two thousands. I then actually worked in the restaurant industry for a little while which you know you can see how that would segue into my career at toast and I got a little burnt out on the restaurant. Industry wanted to get back into the technology space. I really missed it so I transitioned back in and started working at staples business advantage which is their corporate sort of be a portal working on their search engine so the first the first project I had as a young manager was working on sort of re platforming the search engine for that ecommerce website after that I worked on a ton none of like initiatives primarily at staples and then I moved over into cvs where I worked on their mobile APP in their curbside sort of Omni channel experience which essentially allows you. I don't know if anyone's ever done a curbside pickup experience. A lot of restaurants are starting to move into the space but allows your phone to order head. have items brought to your car. The items just sort of show up automatically in theory. I'm today what do I do. I work at toasts which you guys are probably probably familiar with. We're in a ton of restaurants where you see the little orange icon on the P. O. S. system which is the point of sale that little box right there behind the bar. That's the toast platform sort of empowering restaurants to do what they love. delight their guests in thrive. That's our mission statement. That's sort of what we care about as an organization and the ideal is that we can support restaurants be successful and at the same time sort of Meld into the background as a product suite. We don't actually want to be in their way. We want to let some sort of just get on with their day to day tasks and move forward with their their daily operations right so a couple of things that I'm going to cover and again since most of you. You seem to have some experience in this. This may be kind of foundational but I wanted to talk a little bit about the dynamic between the product manager and the U. X. designer or the product designer or the U. X. architect. Whatever terminology your particular organization is using? There's a lot of different terms thrown out there and there's a lot of Sir Sir overlap between what a lot of organizations expect a product manager or product owner and you X. designer or a product designer to do on a day-to-day basis and there's definitely some efficiencies and some really great reasons to sort of have that role overlap work to your advantage because as a product manager you're going to be really busy doing a bunch of things things that you X. Designer probably shouldn't and probably does not want to be involved in on the marketing side on sort of the more strategic side dealing with esscalation. 's All sorts of fun day to day stuff that can be a distraction for someone who needs to do deep work on the interaction side so talking a little bit about discovery was the area that I started sorta honing on when I was looking at this topic and thinking about what I wanted to cover and the idea of a problem statement using a Google designed sprint if you guys are familiar with that we're GonNa talk a little bit about the Times that I failed working with you. X. Designers the thing that we run into more and more often is that particularly when you're working in sort of a a a small group environment where there's a pod who sort of all TAT tasked with working on the same.

product manager product manager. Anthropology Liberal Arts Google
How Would Authorities Handle a Murder in Space?

BrainStuff

06:58 min | 1 year ago

How Would Authorities Handle a Murder in Space?

"Maybe it it will be a jealous astronaut who decides to eliminate a rival in an orbital love triangle or maybe being cooped up in a spacecraft on an interplanetary flight will cause one crew member member to finally lose it at a colleagues annoying throat clearing or maybe it will be a killing made to look like an accident for some kind of nefarious space plot but sooner or later it seems likely to happen given humans propensity for committing homicidal violence against one another all over the world. Somebody is going to commit burder in space or on another planet or moon and when it happens authorities we'll have to figure out how to catch the perpetrator and restore justice but it's not going to be easy. Investigating a murder in space would be vastly more complicated and difficult then probing a crime on earth and law enforcement agencies and courts quartz may have to deal with tricky jurisdictional issues that end up requiring negotiations among spacefaring companies in until the laws are rewritten judges will have to take Hick Statutes and legal standards that were developed to deal with murder allegations on earth and figure out how to apply them to accusations of lethal violence in space. You might be surprised to learn that nations already have legal jurisdiction that stretches outside the confines of this planet that's covered in article eight of the Nineteen Sixty seven treaty on principles governing the activities of states in the exploration and use of outer space including the moon and other celestial bodies it it specifies that whenever one of the nation's that's a party to the treaty launches an object spacecraft satellite or space station into space or builds one honest less Joe Body Body Not Nation Retains Jurisdiction and control over it thus according to legal experts if a US astronaut is accused of killing another American while traveling travelling in a NASA spacecraft or on a commercial space vehicle launched from the United States the FBI and federal prosecutors would be within their authority to arrest the alleged killer and bring back to Earth for trial in federal court. Things might get a little more complicated if the murder occurs on the International Space Station in the alleged killer and end victim our citizens of different countries but yes there are experts in this we spoke by email with Frans g vulgar dunk the oatmeal how professor of space law at the University of Nebraska Lincoln's College of Law they said Article Twenty Two of the nineteen ninety eight intergovernmental agreement concluded between the parties deviates from the aforementioned international treaty clauses and by contract concedes jurisdiction to the State of nationality of the offender but there's a caveat quote if the life or safety of persons with other nationalities and or the safety of the space station is at stake consultation should take place with these other countries countries concerned on which countries should actually initiate prosecution which may result country of nationality of the victim doing that but this this only covers the international space station or ISS. Things could get even more complicated jurisdiction. Only if there's a killing on a future private-sector orbital hotel tell the sort of place where this is probably more likely to occur we also spoke by email with Michelle Hanlin associate director of the air and space law program at the university city of Mississippi School of law. She said if you have four hundred civilians in space you know crime inevitably is going to happen we send the most disciplined and fit people the best of humanity to the ISS with a hotel. You're not going to be able to impose the same standards. You need to make money. You're going to get a lot greater. Variety of people and you know I know there is going to be crime. Possibly from stealing a watch all the way to murder coup actually qualifies as the Hotels Launching State with jurisdiction fiction under the nineteen sixty seven treaty could be murky to could be nation A. which is home to the company that operates the hotel or it could be nation be where the installations components components were manufactured or Nation see where the launch pad for the rocket that transported the parts in space was located or Nation d home to the company that rented the Launch Pad Hamlin said arguably any of these states could have jurisdiction as a result crimes in space particularly incidents involving nationals from different countries trees most likely would lead to diplomatic negotiations to see who gets to take charge and what if an astronaut on a spacewalk decides to say cut another astronauts tether who would have jurisdiction then since the act would have occurred outside of an object controlled by a nation we also spoke by email with Henry are Herzfeld a a research professor and director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University's Elliott School of international affairs he said although there is no sovereignty outside spacecraft there are analogies to the law on ships in international waters and also issues that might occur in Antarctica both places with no national sovereignty. Any person in space has a national citizenship is the responsibility of the launching state or the person state of citizenship for their activities in space and would be tried for a violation the law in the appropriate state. Let's assume that the US takes jurisdiction over space murder investigating the crime and building a case is going to be tricky considering considering that the crime scene and potential witnesses are outside the earth him and said you might have to add a whole new profession space cop. There's going to be a tremendous cost. Cost Simpson went into space. Just to investigate a murder and gathering evidence in space or on another planet or moon might be especially difficult. Dna Ed which is increasingly a key means identifying perpetrators would age differently on Mars than on earth because of the increased exposure to solar radiation due to the Red Planet's atmosphere additionally lower gravity would lead to such things as different splatter patterns from stab wounds on the plus side the ubiquitous Martian dust clinging to the exteriors of space suits and other surfaces might provide a valuable new sort of evidence hidden figures that investigators and prosecutors will find a way to deal with it. She said our law law developed for fingerprints and DNA. When you prosecute a criminal case you do what you can with what you're given space murderer may also require the courts to grapple with fourth commitment issues since are continually being monitored in myriad ways including on video. Helen said there's value to having cameras in every room of spacecraft craft but do you have an expectation of privacy. She expects that many of these questions will be resolved by wise judges and lawyers but should also like to see spacefaring communities communities come together and work out new international agreement on how to collaborate on handling future crimes in space. She said what we don't want is an international space regime team that has very different concepts from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Hopefully we can explore space together as a species and have common

Murder International Space Station Space Policy Institute United States ISS Throat Clearing Spacefaring University Of Nebraska Lincoln Mississippi School Of Law Michelle Hanlin FBI Nasa Helen Associate Director Simpson Professor Frans
Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:26 min | 1 year ago

Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply u._s. Immigration and customs enforcement needs more space to house undocumented immigrants and increasingly the agency is finding it in rural regions and new analysis by n._p._r. Indicates a majority of detainees are held in rural areas but as n._p._r.'s yuki noguchi reports those detained in far flung places also have a much harder time finding lawyers and are far more likely to be deported. It took ten and a half months for you. L. alonzo to meet with a lawyer alonzo had turned himself over to immigration officials in laredo texas seeking asylum from cuba last october since then he's been detained in two rural facilities i in louisiana and now in adams tmz county mississippi about a two hour drive from baton rouge alonzo's wife. Madonna's rodriguez is a permanent u._s. resident. She lives in southern florida with their two children the n._b._a. N._b._a. leary very far from anything. She says too far to afford hiring. A private attorney. Lack of legal help is one of many challenges for undocumented undocumented immigrants and an even bigger problem for those detained in remote locations yet. Ice is adding detention facilities far from cities over half fifty. The two percent of detainees are held in rural areas according to n._p._r.'s analysis of ice data and that rate is increasing. Liz martinez is a board member of advocacy z. Group freedom for immigrants. It's very concerning trend that immigration detention is moving to rural areas remote areas where it makes it so much harder for a person in detention to get the support that they need detainees in urban areas or at least four times more likely to find attorneys to represent them. According to a two thousand fifteen university of pennsylvania ovadia law review study last year the southern poverty law center sudeiss and its parent agency the department of homeland security the civil rights group alleges the government is deliberately liberally detaining people in rural areas far from legal resources is which currently detains nearly fifty six thousand people declined comment on that case in in an emailed statement an ice spokesman says the agency looks at airports healthcare and legal resources when selecting facilities he also says detainees have access to phones and video teleconferencing and can meet with lawyers during visiting hours but many immigration attorneys complained rural facilities lack necessary resources there aren't enough. The phones are translators. Call connections are poor. Visiting hours are too restrictive and it's simply too far to travel. You'll alonzo's wife has been able to visit him. Only only once alonzo was recently diagnosed with lung cancer which makes the weight more excruciating. He eventually found a lawyer one of the rare detainees with free three representation but his wife says his asylum request and to request for parole have been denied grumpy what more could a wife with a sick husband one other seven to be with him at the very least i want to offer him my support and for my children's offer support one of the key reasons detainees are held in remote regions appears to be the money cheap labor cheap land. Lauren rich eisen is acting director of the brennan center justice program. She says many rural areas viewed prisons as job. Engines hundreds hundreds of new facilities were built in the nineteen ninety. S inmate population peaked then declined leaving lots of empty beds. Ice is now contracting with those rural prisons. It needs those beds as it continues to detain more immigrants. Just last week is arrested. Nearly seven hundred workers at food processing plants in mississippi loyola university law professor andrew armstrong says she sees that happening across louisiana win. The criminal justice reforms were enacted that left empty not beds that were ripe for contracting with ice. Those contracts can be lucrative. The state pays local sheriff's twenty four dollars and thirty nine cents a day to house an inmate eight by comparison ice pays five times that an average daily rate of more than one hundred twenty six dollars is confirmed it recently opened eight new detention and facilities seven of which are in louisiana all but one of them are in sparsely-populated areas. Lisa lehner is director of americans for immigrant justice. She represents detainees in glades county florida about one hundred miles from miami. Glades is the state's fourth least populated county surrounded by acres of sugarcane infield. I've never seen immigration attorney up there. You've never seen one never detainees there. She says are tweeted like hardened. Criminals glades aids has been the subject of a number of complaints and lawsuits they allege everything from misuse of pepper spray and solitary confinement to religious persecution later argues conditions are worse in rural facilities in part because fewer people can observe what's happening by contrast. She says when a brooklyn new york ice facility lost not for a week during a cold snap in january there was an outcry and if there's going in and out you would imagine that the people who are detaining immigrants are going to behave in a more careful way. It's not just that treatment might differ immigration courts in rural areas denied. Many more asylum cases sending detainees back back to their home countries. N._p._r.'s analysis of research from syracuse university found judges in rural immigration courts denied eighty seven percent of asylum cases compared to just over half an urban courts. Romi learner is associate director of the immigration clinic at the university of miami's law school. It is an issue because it means if you got a bad bucks. I think the team isn't a certain facility then you're almost guaranteed to be deported mississippi detainee. You'll alonzo hopes to beat those odds. He's appealing feeling his case for asylum and hopes to reunite with his family. You can gucci n._p._r. News this message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor comcast business gig fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary ordinary comcast business beyond fast learn more at comcast business dot com.

L. Alonzo Louisiana N._P._R. Comcast Attorney Florida Lauren Rich Eisen Glades County Florida Adams Tmz County Mississippi Yuki Noguchi Liz Martinez Leary Mississippi University Of Pennsylvania Texas Mississippi Loyola University Religious Persecution Miami Madonna
"associate director" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Where is the associate director for policy and markets solutions. Dave, thanks so much for joining us on the program. Thanks appreciate the opportunity, you know, especially in periods like this where we've had a resurgence of market volatility. We saw the stock market a couple of weeks ago fall eight hundred points one day five hundred points another day, and then just as fast recover. Yeah. It's a pretty remarkable result in this day and age of digital finance and being able to check on your your portfolio every minute of every day. But it is true that millions of Americans are leaving behind their 4._0._1._K's or other retirement accounts at old jobs and often forgetting about them, so because our employer based system people are saving through through their work when. They'd change jobs. They have to remember to bring the money with them or to keep tabs on that money as they go out throughout their career. And we know that that's just not happening for something like twenty five million Americans between two thousand four and two thousand thirteen they left an account behind at an old employer. It's just crazy. I mean, we spend so much effort and helping people pay attention to the need for saving for their future. And in fact, people are that's why they've got money in their retirement accounts in the first place and yet because of the trauma the stress the amount of effort involved of leaving one job going to another job sometimes relocating to another city. It's just something that literally people forget all about and you mentioned there are twenty five million Americans that have done this and the money gone forever. If you suddenly wake up one day and say golly, I just realized I had a job five years ago. And I've now forgotten all about it. Is there something they can do about that? Yeah. So I mean, I guess what makes it even more confusing. Is that it depends how much money in that account when you left that that determined where you should go looking for it. So the employer, you know, if your money, so the employer has an obligation to keep it in your name. And if you are to go back, and you know, to that employer even at five ten fifteen years later that money will still be there if the balance was over five thousand dollars when you left if it was less than five thousand dollars, we give the employer the right to force transfer it to an IRA under your name. So it's still your money, but it becomes much harder to track down if it's a small dollar account and for the low and moderate income workers that at least we at the Aspen institute are very interested in trying to help build up a retirement savings or even emergency savings. You know, five thousand dollars is a lot of. Money. It can really help them. But what happens if it gets transferred to an IRA, you have to go, you know, find which custodian is responsible for that IRA, and you'd have to hope that the fees that are usually built into those IRA's hasn't cannibalized the entire ballot. You also have to hope that the custodian going to maintain that account because typically when an account remains dormant for a number of years, the custodian often considers that abandoned, and they turn it over then to the state do they not? Yes. In some cases, there's the unclaimed property databases within each state that usually run by the state treasurer that that that could be a potential additional staff that you have to take. And one thing I didn't mention is. You know, employers are bought by other companies. They are restructurings restructurings happen. There's mergers. So it can actually be more complicated than even I'm making it out to be defined that old a counter that old employer because as you know, you know, corporate. Corporate structures are changing all the time your own name and address may have changed over time. If you got married or you've moved making it hard to prove that you are in fact, the person who left money behind the bureaucratic nightmare. So what steps would you recommend? I'm sure there are people listening to us right now. Who are saying? Yeah, I changed jobs several times over the past twenty years. And and now, you know, what I think left money at one back at one of my old employers. What's the first thing? Someone should do. The first thing is to contact that employer. So they should still have the money or know where the money is if you can contact the old HR department at your old employer. That's probably the best first step, and it doesn't hurt to check. I mean, even if you don't remember if you had accumulated savings at an old job. I mean, part of what I think has been a really great innovation in the workplace retirement space is the advent of automatic enrollment. Right. So the first day. They on a new job, your employer is automatically enrolling you in the 4._0._1._K in the retirement plan, and you have to take the initiative you have to opt out if you don't wanna be saving. But what that means? Is that a lot of folks, maybe we're saving without really knowing it, you know, we we want them to set it and forget it the we don't want them to forget it when they move jobs because then they might never see that money's so failing that as you said, if you're implores itself out of business that you have that account with and potentially then go to the state where you lived at the time and see if they have a record of it and they're abandoned accounts. File yes, you can check with with state treasures usually have unclaimed property databases. You can check with the social security administration. There are a few other government agencies that are trying to information, but they're not particularly reliable sources. And when you add up all of these accounts, there's something like sixteen million. Counts over a ten year period that had five that were abandoned and had five thousand dollars or less than them which amounts to over eight and a half billion dollars. So it's serious money. And there have been some calculation done, and it's kind of more the broader point that if our system was just a little bit more rational and the money seamlessly transferred from your old job to your current job to your next job. We're talking about trillions more in the retirement system. David, I really appreciate your sharing all this with us. Thanks so much for your time. Thanks, rick. I appreciate the opportunity. I'm Rick Edelman if you'd like to learn more about the Aspen institute.

Aspen institute Rick Edelman associate director Dave treasurer David five thousand dollars one day five ten fifteen years billion dollars twenty years five years ten year
"associate director" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Yeah. This is a super fun interview. I should stress. This was an in-studio interview. Yeah. One of a couple of interviews recorded about a month ago, where we said, hey, let's let's reach out to some local experts on some various topics we don't necessarily we enjoyed jumping on the phone with with folks. But when I'd have some some local talent come into. The studio, and that's what we did here. It was a lot of fun. And I think you will really enjoy it. So I'd say without any further ado, let's go straight to our conversation with Dietrich stout. Eight dietrich. Thank you so much for joining us on the podcast today. Can you start by telling our listeners a little bit about who you are? And what you do. Yeah. Well, I'm an associate professor of anthropology at Emory University. I'm also the associate director of the center for mind, brain and culture at Emory as well, which is a center that promotes interdisciplinary research on mind brain in culture, and those are basically my interests, I come at it from the direction of archaeology, and the hope that we can learn something from the past about a what made us the way we are today. So how did you first get interested in stone-age technology? Well, it's not something that you typically encounter in most high schools around the country. So you know, when I went to to college, I really had no idea of the possibilities that were they are for anthropology for the archaeology of human origins. I did know that I was interested in the way the human mind works and the nature of human experience. And at the time, I thought that meant that I wanted to be a philosopher when I got to school. I I realized what I said before that a lot of the way we can understand how we are today in the nature of human experiences understand the evolutionary processes that brought us to where we are. And I had a really great professor as a freshman and a freshman seminar told me to take some archeology classes, I did. And I still remember one lecture that my professor gave. And who she was talking about these ancient stone, tools, and a particular kind called the little. Ow technique. And he was pointing out that you could see every individual action, and and blow against the core that this person had done something like fifty or one hundred thousand years ago, and you could reconstruct what they were thinking the plans that they made on that just struck me as an incredible window on the past. And how our minds became the way they are today. And that's what got me started on it like seeing into a dead person's imagination. Yeah. To be able to capture that. And now I've worked at sites there are half a million years old where you can literally trace individual decision making processes, it's it's it's pretty incredible actually held a core at one of these sites. I was looking at it. And I was wondering why they didn't do something that that I would have done with that corps that piece of rock, and I twisted it around to look at where I was thinking about and I that they actually had tried..

professor Emory University associate professor of anthrop Dietrich stout associate director one hundred thousand years million years
"associate director" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on WGN Radio

"That authors of new research of set out to answer graham mcdonald is associate director at the urban institute and co author of the urban institute report chicago's segregated neighborhoods translated to segregated social media networks graham good morning walk through the opening bell the data have me i would imagine the first to vote challenge for you and your fellow researchers on this was to sort of get a get a get a sample you could study because it's pretty hard to study twitter users isn't it yeah that's right i mean one of the major challenges is collecting twitter data and you know what's what's what's what's really interesting is that twitter does allow around a a one percent sample of all public tweets which is quite a lot somewhere around three to five million a day that we were able to collect over about a nine month period so tell us why you wanted to study in what your findings are sure so i think you know what was really interesting is that you know research has shown that when you look at the black white residential segregation across the country chicago is one of the most segregated metros in fact is about number three in the country by some studies just behind milwaukee at number one in new york and number two so you know in our new study really wanted to understand whether people social media use was similar to or different than these segregated pattern in chicago you know in other words the social media just an extension of how he's residential patterns in front of networks looked before these new technologies came about or in the changing the way we move bad cities and interact with others and really we had two main uh research questions and findings the first is that you know the places the people tweeted at they moved around the city so he went your we went home we went to work went shopping around the city and you were tweeting you know we would urge these patterns would reflect be segregated neighborhoods in chicago so if you lived in a way neighborhood you might largely tweet from that neighborhood and if you're going to black neighborhood you might largely tweet from those neighborhood as you're moving around your day and we down at this was largely the case that the way people tweeted as they moved around the city tended to be similar to.

graham mcdonald associate director urban institute chicago twitter milwaukee new york one percent nine month
"associate director" Discussed on KWAM 990 Talk Radio

KWAM 990 Talk Radio

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on KWAM 990 Talk Radio

"The responsibilities and pressures that come with teaching on its best day teaching as a tough game and we need to remember them join us at the kindness revolution in saying that key teachers you're looking good to learn more check us out at the kind the shriveled proud to be a part of the mid south for over fifty years we are the voice for the mid sell at them 1079 and pay a nine navy and welcome back to guys at the movies with kevin car we have a lot of movies to cover this week so let's jump right into the movie remains the first one i want to talk about is mark felt the man who brought down the white house a look at the hand that the fbi associate director mark felt had any watergate investigation ma'am or corner morning in washington hand corners of the democratic national committee the man who broke into the watergate or not the end of this thing to begin more interviews with the wind homes one the investigation to demand and today director of the fbi or the fbi of his holiness this who mind who luke who would we be the most critical who was in his his this one stars liam neeson is mark felt added ashes a really good cast to it it also has people josh lucas it has diane lane in it i it's it's a very powerful film told from the perspective of the fbi the reason that there are several things are you break down at his first of all this happened is obviously the watergate early 70s nineteen 72 through 1974 so it's about forty five years old the material and everybody knows watergate is but half the population i'm in my forty thousand diapers back that i wasn't following has so it's an interesting perspective to look back at what was topical of that day in in in this constitutional crisis our country was going through in on top of it there's certain parallels you can draw to today where you've got an fbi investigation over a sitting president and pressure from the white house in internal pressure in the fbi a different the did the power struggle that goes on and in government to partly to keep the branch separate but to add depoliticise actual investigation so this is kind of weirdly relevant today but the.

democratic national committee director fbi liam neeson diane lane watergate president kevin associate director washington josh lucas forty five years fifty years
"associate director" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on WJR 760

"How can we not believe in the greatness of america how can we not do what is right needed to preserve this last dished will manner from wall street main street we believe freemarket capitalism is the best path to prosperity larry kudlow show money meets polit a former associate director with president reagan's office of management and budget hanley seen exhaust and right now he's author call one eight how swearing harry very very have uh this is the larry kudlow show as always wonderful to be with you really has signed today actually we're gonna try experimenting a couple of minutes to of my closest friends and economic icons steve forbes the forbes media empire a cardcarrying free market progrowth supplyside sound money a dear friend going back many decades and we will bring together with our laugher arthur laffer who is actually one of the founders ply side movement i've known art since the late 1970s both those guys on together and we're gonna really run the table again ford in five minutes 'cause i always runs short forty five minutes to talk about everything life liberty and the pursuit of happiness as they see it much chime in with authority to with their two miles friends economic mentors and i might add good people very good people who focus on ideas not attacking personalities so there is a degree of civility and you will hear it if you are kind enough to stay with us and go through the art laugher steve forbes sessions could come up very soon by opening it's going to be more truncated couple things today worth pas a pondering gets all this during the show the economy looks had pretty sluggish of us stocks are still rising budget director mick mulvaney omb director mick mulvaney he's got a new peace out called mag maggie nymex magon phnom accepts trump's economic.

america associate director president reagan hanley arthur laffer mick mulvaney trump larry kudlow harry steve forbes free market ford budget director director forty five minutes five minutes
"associate director" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:54 min | 4 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on KKAT

"How can we not believe in the greatness of america how can we not do what is right and needed to preserve this last dish to men on earth from wall street leaves we believe freemarket capitalism is the best path to prosperity low larry kudlow show money politics is a former associate director with president reagan's office of management and budget cnbc news i oh call one how about larry kudlow this is the lack of our show haven't read any tweets coz my tweet thing on the form of working but now it's working so peru's it and see if that but if you want call tweet me very underscore kudlow now we're talking stocks in the last segment we had to pretty good balls on i talked about the overall economy and i'm just wondering out loud whether it is or it's made up to be okay is there a recession is there and our word out there we haven't had one in eight years i guess some such thing and so why is the fed tightening if the economy look soft or is it softening or maybe a missing all bigpicture would be the first tom anyway to distinguished experts michelle gerard managing director and us chief economist at natwest markets and jim murio managing director of tj i'm institutional services on the cme trading tradingfloor embassy contributor all right michelle there's no one knows no one's is using the our word at least i have no a serious that using our there may be somebody i don't know about but i don't see it on the other hand on nine in the recession camp either yet but these numbers coming in abacha them yesterday sales production cpi i'm glad for low cpr but an even consumer confidence down a bed last month was no better i notice michelle the atlanta fed gdp now has been mark down again what two point four percent at the beginning of the quarter that was it about four we at one point four percent gdp in the first quarter revised sort of on a twopercent trajectory but i want to ask you what do you make of these lousy numbers that's all i guess i don't think their lousy larry i mean i think you're right noone talking about recession and yet but people are very watch her he noted were eight years entity attention and people are worried pat tapping.

america associate director president reagan larry kudlow tom managing director chief economist natwest markets tj atlanta cnbc peru michelle gerard jim murio four percent eight years twopercent