35 Burst results for "Associate Director"

"associate director" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:07 min | Last month

"associate director" Discussed on WTOP

"Wheels on those railcars to make sure they aren't moving out of alignment. That was the issue that caused the derailment. And to prove to its safety watchdog, the Washington metro rail safety commission that these railcars are in fact safe. There's about 16 of those trains running right now across parts of the system, metro needs to increase that number to expand the system out here at the silver line. And so basically if they want to carry more passengers out to Dallas international airport and continue to loudon county, well, they're going to need more trains and the only way to do that is to get more of those troubled 7000 series railcars back on the tracks. Metro says it's been doing everything it needs to do in terms of showing the data to the safety watchdog group to make sure that these trains are okay. But there's a disagreement. The Washington metro rail safety commission is saying metro has not been showing enough data to prove that these railcars can come back to the tracks and then carry passengers. So with all of the hang ups and all of the delays with the silver line, if you had on your bingo scorecard that we wouldn't have trains to run out to the airport, it's pretty unbelievable. And that's what we're talking about. Adam, there's been so much controversy about metro in the past few years from your vantage point covering this extensively. Is this something that could be solved in a few days or could we be disappointed that the silver line won't be ready for Thanksgiving travel holiday? It's very complicated, Sean. It's very technical. The two teams have to get down and sit at a table and figure out a way to either say yes, we're going to trust that trains we put back out on the tracks are in fact safe. And we're going to come up with a plan to make sure that that happens. But it's really difficult. And I will tell you that there has been this kind of really rough back and forth between metro and this safety watchdog group since it came online NBC four's Adam tuss on WTO fee. It's four 56. Here's Mario orsini associate director of security with Raytheon intelligence and space. October is cybersecurity awareness month when we focus on safer, trusted, and more secure online experiences. At Raytheon intelligence

Washington metro rail safety c Dallas international airport loudon county Metro Adam Sean Adam tuss Mario orsini WTO NBC Raytheon
"associate director" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:48 min | 2 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on WTOP

"Park in Fort Myers. I'm 86 years old and I'm homeless. It's just crazy. I mean, never in my life did I dream I wouldn't have a home. She's trying to save what she can like family photos while worrying about what comes next. And now my daughter's with me, so I don't know what we're gonna do. For some, the recovery has been fairly quick. It residents of low lying homes and mobile home parks are still shoveling mud that was left behind by floodwaters. I'm Julie Walker. The FBI is out with its crime report for 2021. While homicides rose, it also shows a drop in other violent crimes last year. But there are questions since police departments in some huge cities didn't submit data. The FBI switched to a new reporting system. And the idea is to get better data to get more granular data and to get more specific about what these crimes are and who they affect. Meredith Wilson with emergent risk international says based on the information the FBI did have overall violent crime fell 1% last year. Carjacking assaults and that kind of thing. But when it comes to homicides, we have almost reached that peak that we were at in the 90s, and that is working. However, preliminary numbers from the first half of 2022. Suggests that we may be trending back towards where we were pre-pandemic. So that might be some good news out of all of that. Los Anderson WTO news. Coming up traffic and weather and then some residents and Rockville are not pleased with county plans for a plot of land. It's 9 36. Associate director ray Blanchard on how Montgomery county helped qiagen expedite its life sciences growth. We're working within Montgomery county allowed us to build out rather quickly. The manufacturing facility that we had, the county was very understanding and the urgency

FBI Julie Walker Meredith Wilson Fort Myers Los Anderson ray Blanchard qiagen WTO Montgomery county Rockville
"associate director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 2 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"An influx of new arrivals from the Caribbean began to move into the area that would become San Juan hill. Nestled between West End and Columbus avenues from 58th to 70th street, it thrived as a neighborhood for creative black people well until the 1930s. Julia golia is the associate director of manuscripts archives and rare books at the New York public library. She says some of the most significant artists in music lived in the neighborhood. You have early pianists like James P Johnson developing the song that eventually came to launch the dance the Charleston on American culture, which is one of the most iconic, I think, dance moves of our nation's history. And then legacies of other eventually jazz pianists like Thelonious Monk, all people who lived in that neighborhood and worked and played in that neighborhood. And I think we associate these things with American jazz culture writ large, but we don't often remember that they were very rooted in a particular space in a particular city. Things began to change for San Juan hill when urban planner Robert Moses took an interest in changing the vision of how New York should look and how residents should live. He didn't have titles like what we associate with power today like mayor or governor. He had titles like the chairman of the mayor's committee on slum clearance, or the chairman of the triborough bridge authority. These don't sound very sexy, but they come with enormous power and they come with enormous money. Moses anchored the Lincoln square renewal project, which brought displacement in the destruction of communities that had been there for generations. Historian Julia folk says, it's hard to make sense of where people relocate it to. They claim to make a commitment they would only move people into places that were better than what they were leaving. Maybe, maybe not. And I think regardless of that, what happened was a loss of the community, right? A loss of people loss of neighbors, loss of people that they knew. So I have to start over again. During the weeks leading up to the grand reopening and premiere, Lincoln Center hosted a series of events aimed at discussing issues like gentrification and connecting Lincoln Center's history to the present. Lincoln Center's chief artistic officer shante fake explains why. I think the beauty of art is to complicate that narrative to bring multiple perspectives into a space. And I think the more we learn through ATMs piece, the more we learned about this neighborhood, the more it really required us telling not just a few

Julia golia James P Johnson San Juan hill New York public library mayor's committee on slum clea triborough bridge authority Thelonious Monk West End Columbus Caribbean Robert Moses Julia folk Charleston San Juan Lincoln square Lincoln Center Moses New York shante fake
The Disloyal Culture of the Republican Party

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 5 months ago

The Disloyal Culture of the Republican Party

"But it's the culture of the Republican Party I want to address this evening What is the culture I have never seen so many disloyal people in any organization Corporate labor clubs associations what have you The Republican Party is filled With so many So many disloyal individuals it's unbelievable They write these books if you're having served close to the president of the United States in this case I'll say Donald Trump They leak they they and grand eyes themselves enrich themselves they want to be celebrated by the people who have attacked their boss and the bosses have administration or the boss's office or what have you And there's so many examples I don't have enough time to cite them all And it's an amazing thing I watch this having served 8 years in the Reagan administration Several years his chief of staff to attorney general meese As deputy solicitor the interior department as associate director of presidential personnel as principal deputy assistant secretary of elementary and secondary education I never leaked against any of my bosses I never wrote essays or books anonymously or with my name against any of them

Republican Party Donald Trump Attorney General Meese United States Reagan Administration Interior Department
"associate director" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:30 min | 6 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Majority of <Speech_Female> new cases nationwide <Speech_Female> since <Speech_Female> mid may. <Speech_Female> Data <Speech_Female> from helix, <Speech_Female> a genomics <Speech_Female> and viral surveillance <Speech_Female> company <Speech_Female> also <Speech_Female> show BA <Speech_Female> four BA 5 <Speech_Female> and BA <Speech_Female> 2.12 <Speech_Female> .1 <Speech_Female> gaining <Speech_Female> ground <Speech_Female> while older versions <Speech_Female> of omicron <Speech_Female> decline. <Speech_Female> The U.S. already <Speech_Female> had a BA <Speech_Female> one <SpeakerChange> wave <Speech_Female> and is now in the middle <Speech_Female> of a BA <Speech_Female> two wave, <Speech_Female> says she she <Speech_Female> Luo <Speech_Female> associate director <Speech_Female> of bioinformatics <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> infectious diseases <Speech_Female> at helix. <Speech_Female> BA four <Speech_Female> and BA 5 <Speech_Female> could cause <Speech_Female> a new wave <Speech_Female> on top of <Speech_Female> this BA two <Speech_Female> surge. She <Speech_Female> says. <Speech_Female> It's unclear <Speech_Female> which <Speech_Female> strain will dominate <Speech_Female> the U.S. next. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Luo and other <Speech_Female> experts are <Speech_Female> watching to identify <Speech_Female> whether <Speech_Female> one or two of <Speech_Female> these concerning <Speech_Female> omicron sub <Speech_Female> variants will <Speech_Female> outcompete the <Speech_Female> others. <Speech_Female> While BA four and <Speech_Female> BA 5 <Speech_Female> have driven new <Speech_Female> COVID-19 <Speech_Female> surges in other <Speech_Female> countries, <Speech_Female> these sub variants <Speech_Female> have yet to compete <Speech_Female> directly <Speech_Female> with BA 2.12 <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> .1. <Speech_Female> Early <Speech_Female> data from the UK <Speech_Female> suggests <Speech_Female> to be a four and <Speech_Female> BA 5 <Speech_Female> May spread <Speech_Female> slightly faster <Speech_Female> than BA <Speech_Female> 2.12 <Speech_Female> .1, <Speech_Female> but the <Speech_Female> landscape is unclear. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> BA four <Speech_Female> BA 5 <Speech_Female> and BA 2.12 <Speech_Female> .1 <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> all competing <Speech_Female> for the same <Speech_Female> people because <Speech_Female> they kind of have the <Speech_Female> same advantage. <Speech_Female> Johnson says, <Speech_Female> his team's <Speech_Female> Missouri wastewater <Speech_Female> surveillance <Speech_Female> network <Speech_Female> is showing that BA <Speech_Female> four and BA <Speech_Female> 5 are <Speech_Female> causing more cases <Speech_Female> in some places <Speech_Female> while being <Speech_Female> 2.12 <Speech_Female> .1 <Speech_Female> is causing <Speech_Female> more cases than others. <Speech_Female> However, <Speech_Female> the region's <Speech_Female> dominated by <Speech_Female> BA 2.12 <Speech_Female> .1 <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> are showing more of an <Speech_Female> increase in cases <Speech_Female> he says. <Speech_Female> This pattern <Speech_Female> contradicts other <Speech_Female> reports of BA <Speech_Female> four and BA <Speech_Female> 5, taking <Speech_Female> over <Speech_Female> from BA 2.12 <Speech_Female> .1. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Different versions <Speech_Female> of omicron <Speech_Female> could become the dominant <Speech_Female> strains in <Speech_Female> different parts of the <Speech_Female> country. <Speech_Female> Says, <Speech_Female> for example, <Speech_Female> in the northeast, <Speech_Female> where a <Speech_Female> BA 2.12 <Speech_Female> .1 <Speech_Female> driven <Speech_Female> surge appears <Speech_Female> to have already <Speech_Female> reached its peak. <Speech_Female> BA <Speech_Female> four and BA <Speech_Female> 5 may <Speech_Female> gain less of a <Speech_Female> foothold, while <Speech_Female> they become more prevalent <Speech_Female> in the <Speech_Female> south and west. <Speech_Female> People's <Speech_Female> behavior, <Speech_Female> such as the choices <Speech_Female> to hold large <Speech_Female> gatherings or <Speech_Female> travel, can <Speech_Female> also play a role <Speech_Female> in which variant <Speech_Female> comes out on <Speech_Female> top when different <Speech_Female> strains are <Speech_Female> closely matched <Speech_Female> in their fitness, <Speech_Female> he says. <Speech_Female> One <Speech_Female> thing is clear, though, <Speech_Female> a lot of <Speech_Female> Americans are susceptible <Speech_Female> to reinfection <Speech_Female> from these <Speech_Female> sub variants. <Speech_Female> We can <Speech_Female> expect to be reinfected <Speech_Female> Luo <Speech_Female> says, and <Speech_Female> every time we're <Speech_Female> infected, it's <Speech_Female> at best a hassle, <Speech_Female> and at <Speech_Female> worst, it <Speech_Female> can lead to debilitating <Speech_Female> symptoms <Speech_Female> she adds, <Speech_Female> pointing to the <Speech_Female> risk of long COVID, <Speech_Female> which, <Speech_Female> recent studies <Speech_Female> suggest, <Speech_Female> is common even <Speech_Female> among people who have <Speech_Female> been vaccinated. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> didn't really appreciate <Speech_Female> how slippery <Speech_Female> this virus <Speech_Female> would be by <Speech_Female> says. <Speech_Female> He expects <Speech_Female> the coronavirus <Speech_Female> to continue evolving <Speech_Female> around the immune <Speech_Female> system's defenses. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> New vaccine <Speech_Female> candidates like <Speech_Female> the omicron <Speech_Female> specific booster <Speech_Female> developed by <Speech_Female> Moderna may <Speech_Female> be needed to <Speech_Female> increase protection <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> against further <Speech_Music_Male> reinfections.

U.S. Missouri Johnson UK
"associate director" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

Ask The Health Expert

01:56 min | 7 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on Ask The Health Expert

"All right, I just wrapped this interview and I think I might have fallen in love with my guest, have a good big girl crush on her because she is just so fabulous, so brilliant, and it's such great information. So I'm super excited to share this interview with you today and it is about the women's brain. And what we're going to dive into today is really talking about women's brain, how it's different than a man's brain. Duh. But why this is so important, how menopause can impact it, what you can be doing right now to make some differences no matter what age you are and what's going on. What the risks are with Alzheimer's, et cetera. I mean, just amazing, amazing information. And I am interviewing doctor Liza mosconi and she is phenomenal. She is the director of the women's brain initiative at weill Cornell medical center. And let me tell you a little bit more about our associate Professor of neuroscience, neurology and radiology as well. And she is also the associate director of the Alzheimer's prevention clinic. She's the author of brain food and she has her new book coming out depending on when you're listening to this called the XX brain. And honestly, as soon as we were done with this recording, I was like, all right, and you're coming back. So she's so good. I'm really excited to share her with you. She came through my buddy doctor Anna cabeca. And who is just phenomenal too. She wrote the hormone fix the keto greenway. So, you know, great people hang together. Alrighty, I am excited to share this interview with.

Alzheimer's Liza mosconi weill Cornell medical center Alzheimer's prevention clinic Anna cabeca
"associate director" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

03:57 min | 7 months ago

"associate director" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"You're listening to Asian American history one O one, a podcast about Asian American history, from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school. Where your hosts, Jen and Ted, the daughter and father team. Welcome to season two episode 16. This is part of our special interview series. Today our special guest is Brad Jenkins. Brad Jenkins is an award winning creator, and he is the president and CEO of the AAPI victory fund. The first super PAC focused on the Asian Pacific Islander community. He's also the CEO and founder of enfranchisement productions prior to joining funny or die as managing a director and executive producer, Jenkins spent four years serving as president Obama's associate director in The White House office of public engagement. During his time in The White House, Jenkins brought together creative executives thought leaders and some of the world's biggest stars to help educate people about president Obama's multitude of forward thinking initiatives. Culminating in the Emmy Award winning between two ferns interview on the Affordable Care Act..

Brad Jenkins Asian Pacific Islander communi AAPI Jen Ted White House office of public e Jenkins president Obama White House Emmy Award
"associate director" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"No one is anti vaccine, says Lisa Soren, president of The Bronx Chamber of Commerce, but I think the timing of this is atrocious. The city's health department did not respond directly to questions about the timing. But pointed to mayor Bill de Blasio's comments on the day the policy was announced, in which he said parents had, quote, plenty of time to get to a vaccination site, or attend a school based vaccination event. Further, he noted the urgency to launch a preemptive strike against rising COVID-19 cases that threatened another shutdown, if not kept in check. The vaccination rate for young kids in the city rose from about 19% to about 30%. In the week between the announcement and the rollout, an increase likely spurred both by families, wanting to protect against the omicron variant and not wanting to forfeit their nutcracker tickets. A lot of public health leadership believes that the preference is to push people to do the right thing without having to require them to do the right thing, says Stacy kirshner associate director at the center for law, health and society at Georgia state university. But in an emergency situation, we can't wait for people to voluntarily do something. Enforcing vaccinations for children isn't at all new and has withstood legal challenges for decades. But historically, the enforcement has centered around school participation as time has previously reported, not private leisure activities. In New York City, schools are playing a role in enforcing the vaccine mandate as students must be vaccinated to participate in school sponsored activities, including theater and music programs and certain high risk sports. But the mandate doesn't extend into the classroom. To be sure, such school requirements are on their way. California, for instance, will make vaccination a requirement to attend school starting in the enrollment period following the vaccines full FDA approval..

Lisa Soren Bronx Chamber of Commerce mayor Bill de Blasio Stacy kirshner center for law, health and soc Georgia state university New York City California FDA
"associate director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Before a Halloween YC's Alec Hamilton is coming to us this morning with facts about New York City bats We've talked species diet and roosting now on to cold weather behavior That fact four Some bad hibernate some bats migrate Here's Caitlyn parkin's associate director of conservation and science with the New York City Audubon and the local bad expert Some of our species like the little brown bat and the big brown bat and tricolor bat will leave the city in the winter and they will find caves and they will roost in those caves over the winter Other species the eastern red and the silver haired and the hoary bat are migratory bats So you think of them as migrating the same way birds might migrate These that's migrate south and we're at the very top edge of their winter range And so some of these bats actually spend their winters in New York City in leaf piles or under the bark of trees And on warm days in the winter with the insects are out you might actually see these bats out foraging in the frigid cold of January and February Yeah She did just say they hang out in leaf piles So you know romp was cautioned We'll have another backpack coming for you In our next hour on NYC's morning edition Oh my happy childhood in the Carpathian mountain 49 and clear this morning is chilling out there It's going to turn cloudy today It's clear right now but it's going to turn cloudy and with a high of 57 It's going to feel like fall It's definitely in my seat At 7 50 two They taught.

Alec Hamilton Caitlyn parkin New York City Carpathian mountain NYC
Scientists Predict More Extreme Weather Globally After Germany Devastated by Flooding

Here & Now

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Predict More Extreme Weather Globally After Germany Devastated by Flooding

"Chancellor Angela Merkel has been facing tough questions while touring damage from those devastating floods last week that killed at least 196 people. Germans are asking why their country famous for engineering and its leading role in climate change, negotiations could be caught so tragically off guard by the kind of extreme weather that climate scientists have predicted. For years. The past few weeks have also seen a blistering heat wave in the American West and above normal hurricane season is predicted. And the kind of extreme weather events that climate change will make more likely and more severe, are said to be coming. Fredricka Otto is associate director of the Environmental Change Institute at Oxford University in the UK Freddy. Welcome. Thank you very much. Yeah, and start with the flooding. We know that rising temperatures caused by the greenhouse effect of gas emissions means we're living kind of inside a greenhouse, which is holding onto moisture, which then? Rains down on us Now we can never attribute a specific weather event to climate change directly. There are other factors always but these downpours in Germany behind this flooding We're hearing that the rainfall was being called unimaginable volumes of rain more than 18. Gallons of water could pour down. On an area within just a few hours. You know, when you hear this kind of number, that kind of water coming down is that something? That you who studies these, You know, severe weather. Did that click like Oh, yeah, that's that's what we're going to be seeing. It's one of the very well known aspects of climate change that we see more extreme rainfall and also more extreme rainfall coming down in a shorter time. And we know from tropical countries which are hotter about There is a lot more rain coming down in a short amount of time. And when we have higher temperatures in more mid latitudes, we also see This kind of rainfall,

Chancellor Angela Merkel Fredricka Otto Environmental Change Institute American West Oxford University Hurricane UK Germany
"associate director" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on Christ United Methodist Church - Plano, TX

"To the philippians. Almost two thousand years ago now. Those of us who've been able to keep our kids active in our children's and our youth ministries throughout the pandemic have seen how their faith in christ and how their fellowship with one another have helped them to persevere and as the parent a parent of a youth in the loft today. I'm especially grateful this morning for our our youth choir. When brian stinson arrived as our associate director of music for children and youth late last summer he inherited a rich legacy already talked about and then he built upon that legacy in this most unusual year. The kids that you see up here able to gather weekly for rehearsals. They were able to sing regularly for worship. I know we've all been blessed by that. They've been able to prepare for the tour that starts bright and early tomorrow morning and along the way. They've grown in their faith. They've internalized their theology by singing at each week. Got a front row seat to this. So i can attest to it. And they've shared that christian fellowship. That paul is so adamant is so central to the wife of faith. And here's what i want to say about all that. This isn't all about them because all of that is made possible by you by their congregation. Because it's it's you who provides the staff and the space and the encouragement for these kids. It's you who attends fundraisers encourages your kids and your grandkids and your nieces and nephews and all the children in your life to joined choir and participate in our ministries. Which means that you. You have helped these kids bounce back from a tougher year than any of us could have imagined that is the beauty and power of being part of our community. Faith okay we cannot end a study of philippians without one verse in particular. It's a verse you may know. I don't have to open my bible to say it. But i think we're showing on the screen and i would love for us to all status together if you would please join me. I can do all things through him. Who strengthens me. I can do things all things through him. Who strengthens me. I don't know how many times i've said that over the years it's a lot you may or may not be gifted memorizing long passages of scripture. That certainly is go to. Because in a short letter that has lots of memorable quotable versus and this may be the most powerful. I don't know it certainly feels like it..

brian stinson music for children and youth paul
"associate director" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Right rang eleven. Take it away. i love it so dr. Clive is vice. Dean for diversity. Inclusion chief of cardiology in the department of medicine met district professor and professor of medical social sciences and associate director and north western medicines bluhm cardiovascular institute but research interests are heart failure clinical guideline duration outcome sciences personalized medicine and healthcare disparities. He has extensively published well over five hundred peer reviewed publications and has been named annually as one of the most highly cited scientific authors worldwide. Buttering ansi is deputy editor at jama cardiology and senior section editor for heart failure at the journal of american college of cardiology. He served on the editorial boards for circulation circulation heart failure in the american heart journal and jacquard failure battery. Ansi is a master of american college of cardiology fellow. American heart association. A master of the american college of physicians. Nfl of the heart failure society of america. He asserted on innumerable clinical practice. Guideline writing committees as immediate pasture. The acc h heart failure guideline writing committee co chair for the acc. Diversity inclusion taskforce Is a former president the aj and he really needs no introduction up dnc has so many accolades and we are so honored and so privileged to welcome in here on our podcast today. And we're so excited for this conversation. Welcomed yancey so while lasala back a little bit is nobody needs to start any kind of conversation with those generous introductions. I'm humbled by what everyone has said in. You've been so kind to me. But i think analogies like go and login love to others to determine and i won't own that but what i will is battling this opportunity to visit with you but to tell you that was probably cardio nerd before you guys even born. And i say that because you do this predominantly because you've got such passion. This is really a focus. This is the way your dna has fault. You're cardiologists period whether it's hard failure. General interventional. You are cardiologists in. That's been my life's blood for the last thirty years and been counting some delighted to be a part of this number delighted. I have this conversation because what's really important in which reflects a pivot in the narratives that we've heard so far is that this is a moment that we may never have again. This is an opportunity that we need. Finally finally after decades we can have very purposeful conversations about real inclusion. We can think of intentional activities. That went embraced those that are underrepresented chronology. We can be very specific about the wayne which we want our or professional And a hopes about how we want the world which would live to evolve never before have we had such a lineman purpose of motivation of resources and of talent not me but the talented all of you represent youthful talent talent. That is open. Minded talented is tracking towards a singular goal of creating something better. There was a time where Creating something better didn't appeal me because i simply wanted best period but have matured thought more about it. What's cuba better in the reason why the cardinals is so important in your advocacy for better. Because better has no outside. You can just get better and better and better and better and what. I would encourage you to do within this discussion. And as you go into your next discussions let that be your guiding principles in every production every thought process in every engagement the goal should be. How do we merge from this better. Because i tell you every time you wanted these conversations and you end up in a better place. Imagine where will end up and so. Let's let's get going with this conversation. But let's have fun for just one more second so i heard the music in the music was really intended to be familiar men. It was more than familiar. It was very personal very personal because as we were putting this together in kind of going around the table this with each other what i heard you twenty tell me was not your interest in structural heart disease or general chronology or failure but heard you tell man was this is my passion in life. These mind belan members. This is how i spend my time. This is how i experienced life in baltimore the thing that's so important here is it. We're talking about what's our juice would really minx is. What's what feels are tuning in for me for decades Coming from the deep south coming from south louisiana started playing saxophone in fourth grade. Barnett piano keyboard. When i was in fifth grade music. Music is sitting in here last night. Just finish clinical service putting together my What am i doing. Listening to live recordings for new co jazz festival. You gotta have the juice man. You got to have some juice. You can't just be about the data. You can't just be about the science even though i am you gotta have some juice keeps everything in check in so i was so pleased. Victoria pulled out recorded because it does make remover wind. You that whatever you do neverlands you choose metallurgists Said music is good and that was the perfect preface to this conversation. It was music to my years and we to feel that we are in this unique moment of a cultural revolution and we feel driven to better ourselves harness that energy and direct betterment in the world around us. But i have to say that. Was the first time that anyone's introduction on the cardinals podcast receive the serenade and it's so deserved. We are so honored to have you with us today but really was an interesting choice of music victoria. Dr yancey start talking a little bit about his musical talents. But why were you so driven to add that as the background to the introduction. Well i shows that as an hour to dr. enc's routes is. He mentioned but many people do not know about this. He plays the saxophone with a historically black college university southern university marching band at the sugar bowl and one of the conversations i had with dr. Unc i was like our love for hp vans.

department of medicine medical social sciences and as Buttering ansi jama cardiology journal of american college of american heart journal heart failure heart failure society of ameri acc h heart failure guideline lasala american college of physicians american college of cardiology Clive American heart association yancey Ansi dnc acc Nfl belan
Solve Your Biotherapeutic Challenges With Help From Gene Therapy University

GEN Sounds of Science Podcast

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Solve Your Biotherapeutic Challenges With Help From Gene Therapy University

"Thanks for joining us for this. Gen cast today was pretty exciting episode. We have talking about some seller gene therapy and let's get to it but first let's meet our guests for today's podcast. Gentlemen if you could introduce yourself to the jets hi geoff. My name is not christian. I am an associate director Bioprocessing segment had mila poor sigma. My group primarily provides technical bioprocess consultation and the americas region for manufacturing companies in their process development technology transfer in manufacturing journey towards commercialisation of gene therapies. My name is dave bionic and the sound therapy market segment manager at sigma some focused on our strategy development within our bioprocessing business jenan. Thanks for joining us today. Really appreciate it Let's get to the first question and talk about some selling gene therapy things that are going on so Details a little bit more about the gene therapy industry itself in some of the common trends and challenges which other companies are dealing with. Hey jeff i get really excited. Talking about ten apiece after having contributed to the field is a process development scientists and recently before getting into gene. Therapy let's zoom out and talk about red diseases. By definition that diseases affect a very small number of less than about two hundred thousand people here in the united states that is another category called ultra rare diseases which affect fewer people than twenty people in a million. So we're talking about very small numbers here and entering bespoke era or degenerate medicines but collectively speaking. They happen to be pretty common.

Dave Bionic Geoff Jets Americas Sigma Jeff United States
Create Labs "Creator" Abran Maldanado

Voice in Canada

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Create Labs "Creator" Abran Maldanado

"One of the special guests is braun maldonado and he is the co founder for create labs. He is coming on as quote the creator with his quote. The creation clara and that's melt a. I r. a. And that stands for create labs a is rendered assistant yes it is a virtual artificial intelligence robot if you will and it is incredible. It is powered by gibt. And if you don't that is boy you can learn a lot about tonight. But you're going to get the opportunity to ask this article this artificial intelligence actual questions and get to hear clara's response so in this particular podcast episode. We are speaking with abroad. And he explains how he got involved in this all the incredible work he is doing in this area and we talk a little bit about the voice tonight as a little bit of a preview in a little bit of a teaser so let's get into it without any further ado. This is a recording of the voiceless. Our show that was done about a week ago. So you may hear us referring to the voice in a week again. That is today. April twenty first But let's get right into it. Enjoy this podcast episode. Hey there ron how you doing. What's going on how you doing terry. How's everything great great. Great great to have you here. Thanks so much for taking the time to do this. Thank you for having me. It's a lot of fun to talk to you about all this stuff. I love it. That's right that's right. We're gonna have some fun next week when we get you on the show live. We've got people. Ask questions and asking cleric. We're gonna get all that here over the next little bit here but before we get into that. Let me ask you just introduce yourself a little bit to the to the audience and listeners to the viewers and by the way then you've got any questions now live you can put them in the chat and i'm able to to bring those into chat here as well but bryan watt yourself sure ronald natto co founder of Labs ventures associate director for the new york city media lab. I got into this work. Because i am a person of color. Who found himself in the tech space. And i didn't see enough of myself in their nor my counterparts in my peers. Family and i just wanted to make sure that in the underserved community that there was a pipeline in access point in someone on the inside To get them opportunities in second brought me here to the

Braun Maldonado Create Labs Gibt Clara Bryan Watt Ronald Natto Terry RON Labs Ventures New York City Media Lab
"associate director" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on KTOK

"I didn't know that was my protection from sorry about that. And that was my idea. What? What about protect your money, honey? Well, yeah. So Okay. Can I say her name, though? First, this is the newest If you're just joining the newest member of our team, this is Miss Amber Laster. And she is ah Licensed professional insurance professional right here in Chapel would financial. She's also an associative shelling Myatt, she's associate director of client services. Cinci. Of course, we always say the lovely Shelly my it. That's who you talk to about Money movement. Damon and I will talk about the investments. You don't want to smoothen your money. Kelly. You'll make it happen much more efficiently, and she will keep you informed about where you are in the process. If there's things in our lingo called not in good order, or I go, they are in good order. There's just certain ways that we have to Make sure money gets transferred from one place to the other, the most efficient way possible. So that is a very important part of our entire process here in Chapel would And our mission Every single week is always we are advisers to millionaires and aspiring millionaires. Now how to overcome your, You know your wealth. Frustrations. Your challenges your fears. That is our specialty. That's why we're here. And now we've got Miss Amber helping our millennials who want to become their the aspiring millionaires, and she's going to be doing a lot of work to be able to help you achieve those goals as well. So if you if you're joining us, we've been talking about the downside. Of changing a job and there is a downside. It's called your orphaned 401 K accounts, leaving a 41 K with old employer. Why It's really not optimal. It's really bad. Let me just we're trying to be very kind about it, but it's a bad thing. And I always see and I'm very visual. Nice. See these balloons floating around out there. So we want to make sure that You understand? It's not good for you what the problems are and really had a Saab. Um and we've talked about that right now. We want to switch gears a little and discuss to buzz words. That.

associate director Chapel Shelly Miss Amber Saab Damon Kelly
"associate director" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"associate director" Discussed on KTOK

"Our special guest is George Ross, who I have been a huge fan of Four years now. George Ross was a star of the Apprentice for the first I Can't remember how many years like it was like 14 seasons. I thought it was just like four or something. My red. That was 14 seasons. No wonder I just fell in love with George. And it's his attitude and his brains and his. You know I'm a gram a straight shooter, and I love something. This doesn't pussyfoot around. He just tells it like it is. I love that about him and his personality and the way he tells the stories because he lived him. It's very interesting. So he's those of you that don't know him. He was a Star of the apprenticed and he was introduced. I got introduced to him through a new relationship. Last year I Wealth management coach So I'm very delighted that he is gonna be with us, and I promise you it will be very entertaining and very educational. So I really hope that everybody goes to chapel in dot com two piece went out. And make sure you get registered. I'm not sure that we've given them the date so we should probably give them the day. Well, Diamond. That's why that's coming up on Wednesday Wednesday, February the 17th. So Wednesday, February 17th, and it's from 3 30 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon. So it's later in the day. So if you're working, just blow off work, you know, or if you're sitting at the office, you know you can do it because it's all virtual online is everything that you do it on your phone. You could be driving in your car and you can listen to it. I've done that before. Exactly you. Can. You know your fear at the house? Whip up your laptop opening up, booted up. There you go. It's a but I having you know, I have to tell you that when I have been getting some people go, Victoria, but this dentist started Victoria. But it's 3 30 in the afternoon, and I said, I'll tell you what if you register You have a legitimate reason like a doctor's excuse, like from your mom telling made the reason you cannot attend live. Will record it and I will send it to you. That's very generous of you. He was so upset Victoria I'm working Wednesday's Why can't you do it on Friday? And I'm go. I'm going Well, Let's just change that for you. Dr. Great. I'll be happy to do that for you, darling. So anyway, I did promise him in because he missed Charles Payne. And he was just so upset about that. Well, that Zaveri Nice offer. So Yeah, Go ahead, get registered. And if for some reason you cannot make it, but you did register. Then. Yeah, but I want to know from your mom. I'm telling you, Okay, anyway, sort of enforcement, But, yeah, it's coming up and you just go to chapel with dot com and you can get enrolled in that, and it's totally free. Absolutely. And you could. Yeah, we're sponsoring it. Chapel. What is sponsoring it? And if you seen Fridays Paper, those of you that live in nickel sales or take the Friday paper. We put an ad in there about it, so there's information there as well. So in if for risk, whatever reason you don't like registered online. All you have to do is call Shelly at four, or 5348090 and nine Okay, So if you're just joining us we have been talking about for a one case. What? What a 41 k an orphaned for a one K is and it is very Means prevalent people. So many people have them. That's why it's an important topic. But before we do that, what I would like Damon get more talking about the forum. One case before we do that, I would like to welcome in and introduce and this is her inaugural radio show. First time with here is our inauguration. Where is the hats? Where's the balloons? And where is the champagne? Damon? Okay, so I'd like to introduce a Miss Amber and Amber is joined the chapel with team back in December. However, she has been with us. Actually, it seems like Yeah, like a long time seems like a long time. But officially, so she's been to Damon's classes. She's gotten her degree she has been. She was with us at a couple of events, so we feel like she's been around a lot longer. Not when I say what we just but it was official December 1st. So her title with Chapel would is You're an associate director of client services, so Number tell us in our audience. What exactly does that mean? The associate director of client services at Chapel it? Yes. Well, first let me say thank you so much for having me today I will silver excited to be here and even more excited to be part of the chapel with team s o. I am the associate director of client services and what That means is that I am doing a lot of behind the scenes work with our lovely Shelly. We know where we love her. We love Shelly. I'm just fulfilling our wonderful clients needs helping her process paperwork, scheduling appointments, helping Damon get ready for appointments, transferring money and announced that very important. We've got to keep the money moving. I don't like it when their checks don't show up on they do not. So, yeah, among the many, many other things just helping Shelly. And, of course, um, helping the rest of the chapel with team. We know that Shelly is really the glue that keeps us all together. Well, you've also started a really cool video series. You're gonna tell us a little bit more about here later on, tell you about that later on. Yes. Well, I'm excited about that, because I'm so proud, but you're also a licensed professional insurance professional. And working towards becoming a license investment professional as well, Um, you know, and what That means, when your license insurance professional.

Chapel Shelly Damon George Ross associate director Um Victoria Charles Payne investment professional Dr. Great Amber official
"associate director" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Lending. And that goes hand in hand with the other issue. Another issue, and that is financial literacy, which I know a number of credit union's work on We've talked with many of them about that, You know, they talk about what we want to get to kids. We want to get, you know, T the high school kids before they go to college, and then they Sign up for all these high interest credit cards and all that. But beyond that, I mean, everybody needs it like every booster shot a refresher course and financial literacy With the exception of you. No, I could have used this. And I wish it had been in place when I was in high school. So just for your listeners who may not be aware financial literacy and just about teaching about saving and budgeting and investing And that learning about credit, You know, just what you said was true about credit cards because your kids when they go to college, they just get bombarded with All kinds of sex. He offers to take out credit cards and then they get into this kind of debt where they have to go to the predatory lenders. Tonto stave it off. So this is a bill that would go into New Mexico. Right now. It's it is taught. It's an optional course. And we ran the numbers last year and on Lee about 11%. Of high school students up to take financial literacy. But the interesting thing is this is caught on nationally 17 states in the last decades of a third of the country. Has made this a requirement for high school graduation. And when you consider that either, I don't know if it's wallet, hub or Nerdwallet, one of those, too Just drink in Mexico as 47th in the country and financial literacy. So we think this is something that would be highly beneficial and for many Mexicans, not not just high school students, but But adults as well. But let's start. Let's start young and so we've got a bill. It's being carried by Mo My Estes, who who first introduced a bill 10 years ago that led to the optional course. In the Senate. It's going to be carried by SIA Hemphill, a freshman Democrat from Silver 70, right. And basically that the interesting thing just from a political standpoint is you have a set number of prints that you need to graduate. So it's a zero sum game. If you add something like financial literacy, you gotta take something out. And coincidently. We're hearing from a lot of legislators that they regret the decision to make algebra to a requirement. And so they're thinking of making that optional for those students that are going on to college or to engineering. That's a that's a really important course. But for many kids It's really not necessary that they take that they're just not going to use appalling all meals in anything that they do, and it might make more sense to make financial literacy. Requirements. So that's where we're headed with that film and thank you for plugging. Our website of people are interested in this legislation. They only have to go to our action center on the Thank you Mexico website. And they can find out more information and contact their legislators and support these bills. You know, a lot of things were in talk about today, Fred on guy think we're going to probably keeping most of the hour you get with that. Yes, I loved him. What's the lots of things to talk about a lot of these things, and I like it When things overlap. We're talking about banking. Well, that takes a math, which takes him financial literacy or the other way around financial literacy. Takes a little bit understanding of arithmetic or math. And then we have Capital Alley, which is about money. Adding up, subtracting, dividing and then double taxes on Social Security. So all these things have numbers attached to him. On if I have time and much if we will today, But I will ask the Super 10 education if financial literacy could be added to the curriculum is Santa Fe public schools. Hands and CNN. See if she see if she can get behind that more people than marry her. All right. Let me know what you said. Yeah. OK, well, you could always listen in its it to 30 today, friend. Mm hmm. All right. I'm gonna take a break here at the bottom of the hour. But before we do that, tell us kind of how the organization chart and the mission and the finances and all of that run for your nonprofit. So we are completely dependent on the kindness of strangers. And last year they were extremely generous. We've raised a little over $700,000. Mostly from individuals. The majority of our sport comes from over 1000 people located all over the state. And then there's about 40 local foundations. The fund US. And of course that helps us well and I've got a fantastic staff. Andre, Let me give them a couple of shout outs. So Christina Fisher is our associate director. And I love bragging on her. She graduated number one in her class it you end up in law school with the highest G p a in the history of that school, and she is just a godsend. And she also supervises our interns who are terrific and we get more time later in the show. I can talk about them and our field Directors. Oh, Tomba, Who me? He's great, who's also a recovering attorney like me. And, like Christina, he used to be in the district attorney's office in Albuquerque. And he's our field organizer.

Christina Fisher New Mexico Mo My Estes SIA Hemphill CNN Senate Capital Alley Tomba Lee Nerdwallet Mexico Albuquerque US attorney Fred associate director Andre
"associate director" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Madeleine brand. The Department of Homeland Security issued a warning yesterday that the violence we saw during the January 6th insurrection at the capital could persist for weeks or maybe months. DHS bulletin said that domestic extremists quote fueled by false narratives could continue to mobilize to incite or commit violence. Well. Handful of Californians has been charged with violent entry into the capital and other federal crimes. Separately, we learned a man from Napa County was arrested two weeks ago in charged with possessing five homemade pipe bombs. He also had dozens of firearms. Thousands of rounds of ammo and text messages indicate he may have been targeting social media companies in the Bay Area and Governor Gavin Newsom and other Democratic lawmakers all in a desperate attempt to keep President Trump in office. We're going to talk about this now with Kevin Grisham, he's the associate director. Of the center for the Study of Hate and Extremism have Cal State San Bernadino Welcome. Thank you for having me. Well. They just warned that there may be continued violence related to the election. But the agency said back in September well before the election that white supremacists Are the biggest threat to this country, so didn't do anything back then to try to crack down on them. Well, as far as we know, I mean, it was brought to the attention of both acting Secretary Wolf asses. Well, Azaz, of course, FBI Director Ray And even though was brought to the attention. There was some more focus on it to what degree that focus was. I couldn't tell you, but it definitely seems like based in the outcome of January 6. There was not as much focus is that probably should have them. Right, Well, then we saw what happened with transpired earlier this month at the Capitol. There were a number of Californians involved in this insurrection, most notably Ashley Babbitt, who was shot and killed our force veteran from the San Diego area. A couple of people from here in in Los Angeles and Beverly Hills salon owner For example, a doctor, um So Bree, surprised by the number of Californians involved. Not really. I mean, for really two reasons. I mean one California, obviously being the largest populous state in the United States. Just the numbers are very good possibility that there would be Californians there, but also For some time, And actually, for so many years we've been tracking a growing number of people who were involved either and pay groups have defined by the Southern poverty Law Center of anti definition Lee. Aziz, well as movements within California like your non and the book of the movement, some of these other sort of more extremist, some of which have actually involved in violence. So didn't completely surprise us that we'd see some Californians as they started to do arrest and looking into the background of people who had actually been in the protest and the siege on the capital. How many people in California are involved in these movements and this far right extremism? Well, you know, we can't really tell you fully because obviously a lot of it is, uh, you know, A lot of it is people who maybe, uh simply sympathizers or supporters of some of these movements and groups but are not actively engaged in the activities of those groups. And then you have core group members, of course, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center currently, as of 2019, we had 88 8 groups that were today we're tracking with in California, and that doesn't even include some of the newer movement sort of dealt developed, like the book of the movements were like your non who do have violent elements within that movement is Wyatt knows the conspiracy movement. S so there's not really a really secure number that we would have. But just looking at the number of post you see online, a different platforms. I mean, it could be, you know, more than well over a few 1000 people in California alone and probably even higher than that. Have some sort of use that mane of line themselves with this sort of merit of extremist and extremist ideology that's out there. And what do you know about the man who was arrested who allegedly was targeting Governor Newsome, The man from Napa. Well, trust somebody who'd actually showed up obviously on our radar at the center and the track. A lot of this thing's increasingly have been for some time online and chat rooms and things like that, but Just looking at what has come out in the affidavit of his arrest by the federal government. It's pretty obvious that maybe he was associate ID in some form or fashion with their three percenters, which is a well known extremist organization. Some of the members have been involved in violence. There were more than a few three percenters as far as I know. That we're at the protest in the siege on the capital s o the fact that he was leaving, at least from the visuals there, including that after day there may suggest that he had extremist ideologies and I'm sure more will come out as a zoo. More comes out during the court case concerning is what he was involved with. Who are the three percenters? What's their ideology? And what is the name in reference to So the so the three percenters are basically group. They've actually been around for some time and the best way for people to understand it is, they're basically a militia. In a militia in the sense that centered around this idea there believes that only 3% of the population the time of the mayor of the Revolutionary War were actually Americans who fought so they see themselves themselves as sort of this elite..

California Southern poverty Law Center DHS Department of Homeland Securit Napa County Governor Gavin Newsom Madeleine San Bernadino Welcome Ray And Kevin Grisham associate director Bay Area Secretary Wolf San Diego Ashley Babbitt Governor Newsome United States FBI Los Angeles Aziz
"associate director" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on KTOK

"Katie. Okay, We're gonna try again. Hello, George McDowell. Are you there now? Yes. Well, how are you, Brother? Oh, welcome, And it's so good to hear your voice. I appreciate the opportunity to talk about up from the city Town Hall lecture. Syriza's I'm pumped about it. Yes, And what have you been able to do about the lectures versus Cove? It? Well, you know, Ordinarily we have three lectures in the fall September, October November and we have three in the spring, February, March and April, but Due to the pandemic. We had to postpone everything and rearrange all our speakers, so Now we're starting off next this coming Thursday at 11 A.m. at the Church of the servant. And we're gonna have the speakers in January, February March, April and May. One of the exciting things about it is We've never done this before. But do here again. Toe pandemic. We're gonna live stream every lecture so you don't have to come and therefore anybody anywhere in the world pedigree could listen to these great speakers that we have and And I guess we're all pretty pumped about that. I am so excited. Yes, You're exactly right, because these speakers are important people that have done some incredible things in our lifetime and are continuing to do them. So, uh, how about you tantalize us with a couple of the names? Okay, well, the start off with We're gonna have James Pepper Henry, who is the executive director and CEO of the First Americans Museum. Which is due to open next September, and some people in Arkham City of thought about is the Indian cultural Center. But it's the building has been going on for some time on the Oklahoma River. Where I 35 I 40 meat is just on is just on the south side of the river. It in person. I think it's probably the most important thing we've ever done is the city. The state in the city together have are putting this together, and it's actually designed to Promote the cultures of the 39 tribes that air Indian tribes that air domiciled in Oakland in Oklahoma, and, uh, they're gonna have art and they're gonna have artifacts. And it's something a lot of people don't know. In fact, James Pepper Henry was an associate director of the Smithsonian when this contract was made, But But the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D. C. The state of Oklahoma and The American. The first American Museum signed a contract that makes about 600 million and artifacts available to the museum when it opens. And therefore they're going to be showing these artifacts and art throughout the different time periods for people that come see and understand better the cultures of these tribes. I mean, it's a It's a phenomenal opportunity for people to see things they otherwise that's going to Washington, D C or Some other city to say, and he's going to be talking on January 21st. What time of day are these lectures stream? Well, the lectures are 11, A.m. and It's the physical attendants. They're going to be a church of the servant, which is MacArthur and just north of the Kirkpatrick Turnpike on Memorial. It's right across from Gloria and you could be there for an 11 o'clock lecture. Or you can live streaming it 11 and something else that we're doing different this year. Is in the past. We've always had a luncheon after the lecture for those who wanted to attend, and that's when we had the question and answer period and this year since we're not allowed to serve lunch. We're gonna have the Q and a right after the lecture. And people who are online or at the lecture will be of the text their questions in and then we're gonna have a moderator asked the lecture the questions at the end of that, so no matter where you are, If you have questions of the lecture, you could text the question. It will be asking that last about another 30 minutes past when because they usually talk about 45 50 minutes, And then there's about 23 minute break, and then we go right into Q and a And that last about 30 minutes, So will their outta hand. Did you say there will be people in attendance at the church of the servant? That's correct, That's correct. And how? How, who determines who those people are. Well, actually, uh, we have Other words, everyone who hears what that everyone who's bought a season ticket will receive tickets in the mail, and I've already received those in most cases. They have the right to attend the lecture. Uh, on if you buy a livestream single ticket online. You would just be able to live streaming. There are single tickets available at the door. All those single ticket to $25. In the season tickets or $90. Uh so we're doing a first come first serve basis we could seek 400. But with People who've indicated will come. We think it will be probably under that. So we should be okay. As far as physical attendants this month and next month, we may have to do I A situation where you reserve a seat. Okay, Talking to George McDowell. He is the marketing and board member.

George McDowell James Pepper Henry Oklahoma River Washington Oklahoma American Museum city Town Hall Katie. Smithsonian Institute Syriza First Americans Museum Arkham Kirkpatrick Turnpike on Memori Indian cultural Center Oakland Gloria MacArthur associate director executive director CEO
"associate director" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:08 min | 2 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News. I'm Michelle Martin. Happy New Year we are going to start again with a battle against the coronavirus. We are sorry to say, starting the new year with some of the same daunting challenges that marked the end of last year. With a virus continuing to spread the hospitals in many places becoming overwhelmed and there is a new challenge getting millions of Americans vaccinated. The Trump Administration had set a goal of distributing 20 million vaccine doses to be administered around the country by the end of 2020, but so far fewer than three million people have been vaccinated nationwide. That, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, So we're gonna begin by trying to figure out what's going on with that distribution effort for that. We are joined now. But Joshua Michelle, he is associate director of global health policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation. He's been following distribution efforts closely, and I do want to mention he has advanced degrees and health policy, economics and infectious disease epidemiology. So He knows whereof he speaks Joshua a show welcome. Thank you for joining us. Thank you. It's great to be with you. Well, first of all, the federal government says it's distributed more than 12 million vaccine doses to the states, but it's leaving it up to each state. Actually get those shots into people's arms. So it seems that the effort is pretty slow and chaotic. I mean, how are the states doing And why? Why are we seeing these problems? Yeah, I think what we're seeing now is what we expected to see, which is A lot of variation in how states have been able to roll out their vaccine programs. Some states are doing quite well on you could look at examples like West Virginia where they've actually Completed, vaccinating their nursing home residents and are close to completing their first priority populations. Um and the other states that have doing, you know, less vaccination and have had a harder time. Sailing up the vaccines. So, um, part of the issue here is that we know that the two groups have been targeted for initial vaccination are The health care workers, especially those working directly at the front lines and persons in nursing homes, staff and residents and the health care workers piece has been Moving up along a little bit faster. But really, I think much of the discrepancy between the number of doses that have been distributed and the number that have been administered, Um Comes from the fact that the federal pharmacy Partnership, which is responsible for doing a lot of the vaccination of nursing home residents, has gotten off to a real slow start. In a lot of states. We're talking about that federal partnership with CVS and Walgreens that's supposed to be tackling. Immunizations for long term care facilities. Is that what you're talking about? That's right. Yeah, The name of the program is the Federal Pharmacy partnership. And it's the program where the federal government through its interagency program, operation works speed. Delivers doses of vaccines directly to CVS and Walgreens, who are responsible for going to nursing homes and vaccinating people there on On the order of 2.2 million doses distributed but have only been able to vaccinate about 280,000 people through that program, at least according to the numbers that are on the CDC website. Well, I'm sorry. We don't have more time to discuss this, but I just want to sort of see if we can get some clarity about what would improve this. I mean, the UK government announced a few days ago, it's prioritizing. Giving as many people as possible their first dose of a covert vaccine rather than providing the required second dose as quickly as possible. Some say the U. S. Should do the same. I take it. You're not a fan of that suggestion. So what? What would make a difference here? What would improve things? Well, the UK is in these different circumstance because they're talking about doing that approach with the new vaccine that they've just approved for use on the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine. Of course, they have access to some of the fires of vaccine, which is one of the vaccines we have here, But I think that here in the United States, there's no real movements, at least that I can see. Towards doing something similar. We are experiencing problems with our rollout. It's gotten slower than we had hoped. But there's really no talk about getting one dose out to everybody right now. Sorry, Dr Michelle. We have to leave it there For now. That's Dr Joshua Michaud is associate director of global health policy at the Kaiser family. Foundation. Thanks so much for talking to us today. All right, Thank you. As officials try to improve vaccine distribution. A new strain of Corona virus has shown up in at least two states this week. Scientists say that while the variant does not appear to be more dangerous, it does seem to be more contagious. And of course, all this is happening as hospitals across the country operate at or near capacity and brace for what might be another post holiday, Serge He wanted to know more about how this virus is mutating and how we should think about it. So we've called that McCarthy. He is a physician and authority on infectious disease and professor of medicine at Cornell University, and he's the author of Superbugs The Race to Stop an epidemic. Dr McCarthy. It's nice to have you back with us on the program. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. Before we jump into the specifics of this new strain. I just would like a refresher on how a virus mutates. I mean, how exactly does this happen? And how do we know that this virus has mutated right? So Corona viruses in RNA virus and these types of viruses are prone to mutate Because every time they replicate there's a chance for a new introduction of something new into its genetic code. And we were expecting it to mutate. You know, this is not a surprise. It's just like influenza or measles or some other virus. These things all mutate, usually with what we call selective pressure, So if there is some reason for it to mutate, it will such as the introduction of new drugs or vaccines or convalescent plasma. Anything that attacks the virus will cause it to change. Well, I was going to ask you about that. How should we think about the fact that there are at least a couple of states of rope? Sordid cases of this new strain, and so far as we know, because we know that people have had a hard time with contact tracing, but so far as we know the individuals weren't traveling didn't have contact with folks who were in places where we knew this. New strain had developed. I mean, how should we think about that is that is concerning or is this something that to be expected in a pandemic of this size? Where this this many people are infected? Yeah, we've known about this variant since the summer. And we've been keeping track of it. And what card our attention is that it started to become the dominant strain in certain parts of the United Kingdom. And the expectation is that if it was in the United Kingdom back in the summer, and people were flying to the United States, as they have been for for a while, that it was certainly going to be here. Now what we know about it is that based on modeling it looks to be more transmissible. And it looks to cause a bit of a higher viral load, meaning that when you cough this variant You may be expelling more of the virus, which could be the way that it's more transmissible. Now there's no evidence it's more deadly or that it's resistant to our vaccines or that it's resistant to our treatments. But the fact that it could spread more quickly and that this is a potentially deadly virus is cause for concern. The fact that it could go through a community more quickly is enough to get all of us to pay very close attention to it. You were on this program to talk about your book on so called superbugs these air, drug resistant bacteria that are different, You know they're dangerous, difficult to treat. And in that interview, you talked about the relationship between the government and pharmaceutical companies. And you said there should be more cooperation and drug developments that medical professionals can better handle outbreaks. Now that was in 2019. Has this whole experience that we've all been living through. Changed your view on the relationship between Big Pharma and the government at all. Is anything working the way you think it should be? Yes. So the short answer is that operation Warp speed has been a tremendous success and the reason it was successful. Is that the federal government removed risk from these companies from taking on a very risky project, which was a vaccine for a new virus and taking on such an important problem. You know the greatest pandemic of our lives. Now what we need to do after this pandemic is behind us is we need to put renewed attention on the antibiotic crisis. The fact that these pharmaceutical companies don't want to make new antibiotics because it's very expensive and it's very risky. We can use operation warp speed as a model to attack superbugs and to attack the fact that there are going to be Drug resistant pathogens that are going to be attacking us for the remainder of our lives and for generations to come..

federal government Joshua Michelle United Kingdom Centers for Disease Control an United States federal pharmacy Partnership CVS Dr McCarthy associate director Walgreens Michelle Martin Kaiser Family Foundation Trump Administration West Virginia Serge He Dr Joshua Michaud
"associate director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"associate director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Michelle Martin. Happy New Year we are going to start again. With the battle against the coronavirus. We are sorry to say, starting the new year with some of the same daunting challenges that marked the end of last year. With the virus continuing to spread the hospitals in many places becoming overwhelmed and there is a new challenge getting millions of Americans vaccinated. The Trump Administration had set a goal of distributing 20 million vaccine doses to be administered around the country by the end of 2020, but so far fewer than three million people have been vaccinated nationwide. That, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, So we're gonna begin by trying to figure out what's going on with that distribution effort for that. We are joined now. But Joshua Michelle, he is associate director of global health policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation. He's been following distribution efforts closely, and I do want to mention he has advanced degrees and health policy, economics and infectious disease epidemiology. So He knows whereof he speaks Joshua show. Welcome. Thank you for joining us. Thank you. It's great to be with you. Well, first of all, the federal government says it's distributed more than 12 million vaccine doses to the states, but it's leaving it up to each state. Actually get those shots into people's arms. So it seems that the effort is pretty slow and chaotic. I mean, how are the states doing and why? Why are we seeing these problems? Yeah, I think what we're seeing now is what we expected to see, which is ah, lot of variation in how states have been able to roll out their vaccine programs. Some states are doing quite well on you could look at examples like West Virginia, where they've actually completed vaccinating their nursing home residents and are close to completing their First priority populations, Um and the other states that have doing, you know, less vaccination and have had a harder time. Sailing up the vaccines. So, um, part of the issue here is that we know that the two groups have been targeted for initial vaccination are The health care workers, especially those working directly at the front lines and persons in nursing homes, staff and residents and the health care workers piece has been Moving along a little bit faster. But really, I think much of the discrepancy between the number of doses that have been distributed and the number that have been administered, Um Comes from the fact that the federal pharmacy Partnership, which is responsible for doing a lot of the vaccination of nursing home residents, has gotten off to a real slow start in a lot of states. We're talking about that federal partnership with CVS and Walgreens that's supposed to be tackling immunizations for long term care facilities. Is that what you're talking about? That's right. Yeah, The name of the program is the Federal Pharmacy partnership. And it's the program where the federal government through its interagency program, operation works speed. Delivers doses of vaccines directly to CVS and Walgreens, who are responsible for going to nursing homes and vaccinating people there on Has received on the order of 2.2 million doses distributed but have only been able to vaccinate about 280,000 people through that program, at least according to the numbers that are on the CDC website. Well, I'm sorry, Don't we don't have more time to discuss this, but I just want to sort of see if we can get some clarity about what would improve this. I mean, the U. K government announced a few days ago it's prioritizing. Giving as many people as possible their first dose of a covert vaccine rather than providing the required second dose as quickly as possible. Some say the U. S. Should do the same. I take it. You're not a fan of that suggestion. So what? What would make a difference here? What would improve things? Well, the U. K is in the different circumstance because they're talking about doing that approach with the new vaccine that they've just approved for use on the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine. Of course, they have access to some of the fives of vaccine, which is one of the vaccines we have here, but they are really worried about this new strain of the virus. The new of Aryan Which is potentially has increased transmissibility and would cause a surge upon the surgeons already facing on so they're really pulling out all the stops and one of the ways that they're doing that is by using all available doses that they have. At least according to their plan in vaccinating many people as possible. I think that here in the United States There's no real movements, at least that I can see towards doing something similar. We are experiencing problems with our rollout. It's gotten slower than We had hoped, But there's really no talk about getting one dose out. Everybody right now. Sorry, Dr Michelle. We have to leave it there For now. That's Dr Joshua Michaud is associate director of global health policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation. Thanks so much for talking to us today. All right. Thank you. As officials try to improve vaccine distribution, A new strain of Corona virus has shown up in at least two states this week. Scientists say that while the variant does not appear to be more dangerous, it does seem to be more contagious. And of course, all this is happening as hospitals across the country operate at or near capacity and brace for what might be another post holiday, Serge. He wanted to know more about how this virus is mutating and how we should think about it. So we've called Matt McCarthy. He is a physician and authority on infectious disease and professor of medicine at Cornell University. And he's the author of Superbugs..

Joshua Michelle federal government federal pharmacy Partnership Kaiser Family Foundation Walgreens CVS associate director Centers for Disease Control an Michelle Martin United States Trump Administration Matt McCarthy West Virginia Dr Joshua Michaud Superbugs Cornell University professor of medicine AstraZeneca Oxford
As Burning Man Goes Virtual, Organizers Try To Capture The Communal Aspect

Morning Edition

03:28 min | 2 years ago

As Burning Man Goes Virtual, Organizers Try To Capture The Communal Aspect

"Is an experience. Yes, 70,000 people gathered for whimsical art and music in the Nevada desert, but also body paint and bartering and communal living. It is not the kind of thing that's easy to recreate virtually, but the pandemic has forced organizers to try. NPR's Elizabeth Blair has a story. At burning man. Thousands of volunteers usually work together to help artists build enormous sculptures out of glass, metal wood, the chaos and creativity of building the festival's temple in 2018 was captured in a recent documentary. Go Climbers Go! Go! This one knows Good Burning Man Temple is typically a place spacious enough for people to walk into and reflect or grieve. This year. You can sort of do that with a mobile device desktop or virtual reality headset in alive, Webinar burning man. Associate director Katie Hazard invited viewers to imagine they were entering the temple. It will walk forward metaphorically together, all of us here on the col and see this picture this gate in front of you. And together, let's all move through that gate together. Burners are true believers in participation in this year's theme is multi verse. Different teams have created to D and three D virtual experiences. Turn on your webcam and you can attend an art class or join a virtual group hug or go to a party. Welcome, everybody. And thank you so much for coming along. Talk of us. Ed Cook and a team created the sparkle verse, he says. To recreate the desert experience. People have set up tents in their living rooms and dressed up in costumes. Radical self expression is one of burning man's 10 principals getting up and dancing from your screen, bothering to put on a costume jumping around these things extraordinarily powerful for kind of taking into new realms of experience, Cook admits online. He doesn't experience the sense of Ah, he gets in the desert, but he's convinced you can create the kind of joyful communal experience he's had there. Other burners are having none of it. It's not the same thing. Douglas Wolk has been going to burning man for 20 years, he says. He keeps going back because of the principles like no advertising and being off the grid. What's so special about burning man for me? Is that It's really immediate, and it's not like anything else. All kinds of people come and meet up there in this bizarre difficulty, sometimes frustrating environment and they're pretty much all there to help each other. It's really not the same thing to be sitting in front of your computer. I think the multiverse is a very interesting experiment. Artist Jennifer Lewin has mixed feelings about this year's virtual festival. Burning man is where she goes to test the limits of her work enormous interactive public sculptures that need to survive all kinds of weather. And lots of people playing on them. The sculpture can survive at burning man. It can survive everywhere. Computer drawings of her work cosmos are in one of the multiverse is the culmination of the festival is the burning of the giant sculpture of the burning man. This year. They're streaming videos of people doing burns in their backyards or even just lighting candles. Elizabeth Blair NPR news

Burning Man Temple Ed Cook Elizabeth Blair Nevada Desert NPR Douglas Wolk Associate Director Katie Hazard Jennifer Lewin
Census to Halt Operations a Month Early Amid Growing Fears of a Population Undercount

Here & Now

04:58 min | 2 years ago

Census to Halt Operations a Month Early Amid Growing Fears of a Population Undercount

"Bureau has confirmed it will wrap up its count a month early. It's a move that many fear could reduce the accuracy of the population. Tout NPR national correspondent has alone. Juan broke this story last week, and the bureau confirmed it last night in hand. The census happens as we know every 10 years. The end date was initially postponed until late October because of the pandemic. Now the bureau is saying that it will wrap up on September 30th. What reasons has the sense is given According to a statement, the Census Bureau director Stephen Dealing Ham posted on the sense sphere is website last night. The Commerce secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, has directed the bureau to speed up counting to end it cut it short a month early in order to meet current legal deadline. There's a deadline set by federal fall, it says the Census Bureau via the Commerce secretary has to present to the president the latest state pop. Elation counts by December 31st of this year, and those are the numbers that are used to redistribute seats in Congress among the states, and that was a deadline The bureau had said in April that it could no longer meet because of the pandemic needed more time has asked Congress to give it more time by extending the deadline into 2021. Sir from Congress has not extend that deadline. Democrats have introduced legislation, but Republicans have not regarding those deadlines. And so the Commerce secretary apparently is saying it is time to make this change to make sure we can meet that deadline. Okay, let's break this down a little bit. NPR first reported that the agency had decided to cut short door knocking efforts. What is the impact, though of finishing early like this and what populations Could be most impacted by an undercount. One thing to keep in mind here is that you know, through all this back and forth career officials from the Census Bureau, including associate director for the 2020 cents is an associate director for field operations has publicly stated that the bureau as early as May, they've said, can no longer meet this federal deadline of December 31st And by rushing to do it at this point by not continue to count through October 30 1st there are concerns here that there would be great and accuracy and the data that are collected because we're at a point in the senses, with roughly four out of 10 households that have not yet responded to the senses, those four out of 10 whole household's roughly our representative of historically under counter groups who are Less likely to respond on the census around their own and are really probably only get counted if a door knocker gets to meet them and tries to essentially convinced them to do an in person interview outside their home for about five minutes, trying to collect that information and otherwise the bureau if it rides up, finding homes that are vacant or or seemed to be vacant or unresponsive here has to rely on government records and That way of rely on government records using statistical methods The bear has used before, but the bureau might have to use it at a much, much greater extent. And that could really hurt theocracy because those methods tend to over represent the white population while under representing people of color. Yeah, as we know, the Trump administration tried last year to get a citizenship question added to the census. The Supreme Court rejected that attempt. How does this week's news that the census will wrap up early fit into the bigger picture? I mean, the question everyone is asking is, Is this change? Politically motivated? You know, I've been covering the 2020 cents is all the lead up to it for three more than three years now, and it has been a Siri's Of attempts by the Trump administration to have a very direct hand and how the senses is carried out to be very clear. There is no citizenship question on the 2020 cents is, even though the Trump Administration tried very hard to get one onto the forms, and that on now, you know, just just recently Last Last month, President Trump released a presidential memo calling for unauthorized immigrants to be excluded. From the census numbers used to redistribute seats in Congress. Even though the Constitution says the counting of the whole number of persons in each state that's the that's how that's the people that should be counted nor determine how many states how many seats in Congress each state gets. So this latest move here a lot of Democrats a lot of sense its advocates, given what career officials have said about the need for more time or really questioning. Why is there this push to not extend counting and what happens with Congress? That's NPR's national correspondent. Hotsy Low long hands. Thank you so much for joining us. You're welcome, Tanya.

Census Bureau Congress NPR Trump Administration President Trump Juan Wilbur Ross Associate Director Director Stephen Dealing Ham Tanya Supreme Court Siri Representative Field Operations
Sam Feder: Trans Lives On Screen (ft. Alex Schmider)

LGBTQ&A

05:06 min | 2 years ago

Sam Feder: Trans Lives On Screen (ft. Alex Schmider)

"I wanted to talk to you today because we're about to hear an interview with Sam Feder the director of the new. Disclosure and you are one of the associate producers on the movie. You're also the associate director of transgender representation at glad, and maybe most importantly you're my friend and I've heard you talk about this movie for maybe like two years, so tell me why has movie meant so much to you? I think working at glad and understanding the significance of representation, having an ability to conceptualize our history in terms of TV and film representation is crucial for the majority of the public everything. People have come to know about this community has been informed by TV and film, and so if we have no historical context or Lens to look through to understand how these images have contributed to our cultural understanding, than we don't fully understand the power of media and the power of storytelling and begun Netflix's not best case scenario, right? It doesn't get much better in terms of visibility, but I think. What our film also proposes to say is that visibility is only a means to an end it has to lead to material and real world cultural change so in that way it is critical and granted that in in different countries there are different cultural contexts, different legal systems, but for the first time in many cases I think a lot of people are getting to hear from transpeople ourselves about the media that we have grown up on in addition to the rest of the world. In you know one of those people. We see a lot as Laverne Cox and you know she she's a star. We see her red carpets and I think it's really easy for people who are not as familiar with the Trans Experience to see someone like her, and not not know that for someone in her identity group of Black Trans Woman that it can be a really dangerous world to live in, and in that sense like there's real urgency with this movie. Yeah, absolutely I mean, and it's also about the paradox of visibility, so the more that we are known the more that we are seen. The more likely that people may be enraged by our existence, and so we always have to sort of toe the line and understand that again. Visibility is not the end goal. Representation is not the end goal, but it helps us to get to a place of cultural understanding and acceptance, so that people can live their lives as they are safely with the paradox of visibility I think it's. It's such a nuance conversation to talk about, but do you think I'm wrong in I? Don't WanNa just I don't accept the violence, obviously for anybody in or out of our community, but do you think I'm wrong to think that all of the issues that come the visibility? Those are necessary hurdles that we have to deal with comes with visibility in there. There's no way around that. I disagree in some ways because I think when visibility is tied to responsible, accurate and authentic storytelling. Then we can actually counter. Cultural Backlash that is often tied to stories about us that don't involve us. The disability community coined this phrase that I use all the time. There can be nothing about us without us, and historically all the stories that have been told about transgender people have not actually involved us and so I don't believe that it's pure in black and white. That's such a good point, so you're saying and rightfully so that we are seeing issues. Come out of all this increased visibility, because the representation has been poor, it's been bad I mean when you watch disclosure, you will see a hundred plus years of what I would argue as misrepresentation. I really now that I've started really thinking about and looking critically at this history, most of it has been misrepresentation and inaccurately reflecting who trans people are who this community? Community is and also only focusing on the extremes of our experiences, whether it's Trans people only dying, and only being the victims of violence or only being on red carpets, and only being celebrated to the extremes, because there's a spectrum of experiences and I think when we're, we talk about representation, we want a the richness and the depth, and as Richard, said what we need is more so that when those clumsy or trope ish or stereotypical or shared representations show up. They're not the only thing we have to rely on not only for the public to see and understand who we are for. We ourselves as Trans people to see and understand who we

Laverne Cox Associate Director Sam Feder Netflix Director Richard
Here's Who Really Benefits From The Dominance Of The U.S. Dollar

Odd Lots

07:13 min | 2 years ago

Here's Who Really Benefits From The Dominance Of The U.S. Dollar

"So Tracy. I hate to say that brought this whole crisis. There has been sort of one John of article or one genre of discussion. And I've never really been comfortable with. And that is people making really big picture forecasts or statements about sort of the future of the world. I Yeah I mean it feels like a little bit early to be jumping to discussing the second order effects right like there's so much to talk about right now as these things are actually unfolded. Yeah exactly and of course one of the big questions that's out there and that everyone wants you on and I'm GonNa give it to and I've written about it and I've talked about. It is what happens was sort of globalisation. What happens with future of the dollar the US's Preeminent role in the global financial system? We sort of talked about it a little bit with Adam to talk about it with other Other people as well and it's of course incredibly intriguing to discuss we still We just don't know anything. Yeah I think that's true and it definitely falls into one of those sort of big picture. Things that people are talking about at the moment. And it's something that we've sort of discussed on various episodes before right. Dollar dominance has definitely been a theme for the past year or so on our show. You little skeptical when I was like all. I don't think we should have these big picture. Future conversations. You seem a little skeptical of my now. I get it I mean. I don't think anyone really knows at the moment so a lot of it is speculation but also markets are always looking so I kind of get why people are naturally template to be looking at the big picture topics true. Yeah I guess you'd have to do so anyway. We're not going to make a big. We're not trying to make a big forecast here today. But as we talk about globalization as we talk about the dollar I do think it is useful to at least understand how it got to the current system what the current setup is. And what's actually yeah? Basically understand the the current world order and how we got her. Yeah I think that's a great idea and the dollar is so much a heart of the global financial system that we sort of take for granted. But it's definitely worthwhile to step back for a second and things like all. How did we get into a position? Where emerging markets are all like rushing to issue billions of dollars worth of dollar denominated debt? How did we get to a position? Where all of trade finances basically denominated in dollars. Why has that happened right exactly right and you know. There's a lot of misconceptions about all of this. How TRADE WORKS. Who benefits from the strong dollar or who benefits from the dollar permanent role we often hear of. Us ability to issue dollars as a privilege. But it's not. It's not really that a clear. We talked about this a little bit recently on an episode with met climb but the sort of the preference of different actors within the global economy regarding current arrangement is not as as clean as one might one might right and there is an argument that POPs up every once in a while but having the dollar so enmeshed in the financial system can actually be a negative for the US. And we've seen that crop recently with you know people talk about the Fed being the world's central banker does that sort of constrain. What it can do at times like this even before then so yeah definitely worth talking up okay. So today we are going to talk about that and we have a recent get. We actually talked about talk with him. Several weeks ago about Municipal debt when he is the CO author of a recent essay titled the Class Politics of the dollar system for the website. Phenomenal world is Yaacov Fagin. He's the associate director of the future. Capitalism program at the Berggruen Institute. And we're GONNA talk about how we got to this a the state how the dollar got to the state who really benefits from it. Who gets hurt from it and what it really means to preserve it so knockoff. Thank you very much for joining us. I should note that your co author. Dominick make it unfortunately today by glad we have you. What are you? Start by telling us what you The big picture of what your goal was with his essay. The class all its dollar system in sort of this essay was kind of a really long time coming And I really the person the two peop- The three people. I should probably think the most for kind of this happened are dominic who kind of got us to. Right. It's And the James Institute obviously for publishing yet but there's also someone else in the background of this essay. Is Nils Gilman? Who is my boss at the Berggruen Institute in over the years I've worked with him. We've had this very long conversation about we know. Why does the world use the dollar? And why is it a problem and he you know he's not specialist in international finance and this stuff is really technical and I spent like quite a long time kind of in a conversation with him like kind of pouring this stuff out right eventually told me you need to write this essay up right. You need to write an essay that just gives a literature review essentially of this kind of point of view of what the dollar system is politically. And why it's not necessarily you know very clear cut America versus the world story and so eventually this got written up right and that's the kind of story we're trying to tell is. It's very hard to pin down a national interest in the world that's hybrid as Perry Languid. Say Right it's a world in which there is a private system that's yearly inter mediating on an international level an a national in the system in which nations are essentially creating public goods called units of account right and that this international system mediates this hierarchy is of these units of account just as much as national power dynamics do so lucas through useless. Then talk about. The political system are around the dollar. What is that exactly? So argument is that it's actually class. Right is almost a or at least like social stratification as a kind of Meta politics right that the dollar is actually pretty good for a large cross section of people no matter what their position in the global value chain or where they're located and it's pretty bad for another other across sections again without considering international boundaries. That they are. It's pretty bad for a lot of people no matter where they're located or what part of the global value chain there

United States Berggruen Institute Tracy National Power John Trade FED Yaacov Fagin Perry Languid Adam Associate Director Nils Gilman Dominick James Institute Dominic America Lucas
NASA satellites help scientists understand climate change

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 years ago

NASA satellites help scientists understand climate change

"For much of human history. It's been hard for scientists to learn about remote areas of the earth that they cannot observe directly. Jack Kay is associate director for Research in Nasr's earth. Science Division was really hard to know. What's going on out in the middle of the ocean or on polarized sheets. Tropical forest forest but modern technology has changed that NASA now operates a fleet of satellites that orbit the earth. They make it possible to see the whole planet and observe how is changing as the climate warms. Satellites can help measure ocean temperatures sea levels and forest cover on a global scale and monitor changes over time. We can see the way that we are changing the surface of our planet. We can look things like the changing of the mass of the ice sheets in Greenland and tell people really seeing this. We know what's going on K. Says along with rigorous data satellites provide images that help people realize what at stake as the climate warms? You can see the earth so the suspended in the darkness of space and the imagery I think gives us a clear sense of this is our planet and this is where we live and we have to manage it.

Jack Kay Associate Director For Researc Nasr Greenland Science Division Nasa
Collaborating to Cure Dementia

Sounds of Science

08:35 min | 2 years ago

Collaborating to Cure Dementia

"Many of us will have to deal with dementia at some point in our lives whether as a patient or caregiver this terrible range of conditions affects five to eight percent of the sixty and older population at any given time. According to the World Health Organization the Dementia Consortium of Private Charity Partnership that Charles River joined last year is one of the organizations leading promising research on dementia treatments in order to discuss this condition and the research to treat it. I am joined by Sarah Almond Associate Director of integrated biology. Welcome Sarah Hi. Can you explain the purpose and organization of the DEMENTIA CONSORTIUM DEMENTIA Is SETUP BOY A? K. or outside research she k. Is a charity that focuses on. Alzheimer's disease it brings together. Active research is Pharma partners. Sarah's including Chelsea River in order to bring forward novel treatments dementia including outlines disease outside reset she. Kabc this research is invited to come forward with ideas for novel targets in Europe. Degeneration Your Inflammation Way. Them work with them to put together. What packages the funded by the partners? Anti Kate to prosecute he's talk and hopefully lead to novel treatments for Dementia. What do you think of the way? They've set up their organization. I think this is a great way to stop the organization because it brings together such a broad range of experience From academic researchers may have spent years really understanding the biology of targets to pharmaceutical companies. That know how to bring targets three two treatments actually effective in the clinic and also is a CRI where we have a broad range of so biology and chemistry capability so we cannot provide the word packages also have extremely experienced. Research is catchy. Help develop the molecules to treat these young coupled with the charitable input of the Vale Uk. He Project managed but also do so much to bring forward research in this area. Yeah absolutely cut covering all the bases. So what is Charles Rivers role in this group? You mentioned a little bit and you go into a little more detail. Charleston is WANNA to Communist with capabilities and drug discovery expertise. We provide strategic input into plans to de risk these targets and how to generate tool molecule suitable testing the hypothesis. We went with Alzheimer's Research K. And the principal investigator to proposals together. That income dreams that executed by then the appeal and US working closely together. They may do the basics. Hogging island allergy and we bring medicinal chemistry or HD CAPABILITIES. That actually will enable us to find a joke against that tailgate. We meet with the foul partners to finalize plans. And then once funded. We actually execute the work. Okay awesome I understand that a couple of research projects from the consortium have already been green lit Can you explain those proposals? She'll you're correct to Russia in progress of the two targets. One is fine as the Scott appears to link to Tau Accumulation ear inflammation. We aren't sure whether we need to be selective over a closely related kind as the. Pi is looking at whether ACHSAF. You've reduced this target. That doesn't indeed impact Taufel are. They should be China in Vivo. Mostly of onto molecule and vacation and which is a specific type of dementia or Alzheimer's. Or is that just a general Assignments towel face but particularly Alzheimer's disease at the eventual Gulf one is to the impact of the tour the killer produce on time phosphorylation. In an in Vivo model than the second project is two gene mutation I l s from tempo dementia the courses of pathogenic Rene to be produced. And we're aiming to block the expo this RNA. By targeting his with the protein takes out the Chris into the cell. When this new mix and Rene is exploited toxic repeat protein produced which then up today so responses and Kohl's neurodegenerative disease so the talk if allegations. This is actually already fairly strong. So we'll focus on producing told molecule capable of testing the hypothesis drug ability in Viva. And this is quite interesting that uses Zebra Fish Assay which is as a Pi Out Annika's scrap. The compounds can reduce the interaction between the protein. And the mutant. Aren a over So vice projects Charles River going to rub in Asia screen and then performed medicinal chemistry. Touchy try and get the molecules to kind of test with the viable targets. So how exactly is the consortium supporting this work on on these two proposals? So the consortium consists of Pharma Partners K. And they weren't. She formed kind of equal partners within that and they provide funding the project so they've also provided their expertise in kind of defining the key risks that we need to address in our plans and also technically hurt entice for example as I was research to see progress against small Stein's out payroll Consult here as a whole. I understand our work on dementia has increased substantially over the last year or. So is this because of a higher demand for treatment or is it more promising research avenues. Or is it both. I think by This been advances in understanding of neurons. Lemay tion in particular so this is triggered research projects. But also there's a shift away from the amyloid focused approaches for outside disease due to a lack of clinical success but equally dementia is still highly prevalent in and loss of US. Know people that'd be personally affected by this August. Just it's very hard Eric Tree but not one which people are going to give them. What is the importance of collaboration for researching these neurological diseases? They understand that. Probably the REAL STRENGTH OF THE CONSORTIUM. I think just touches found that there are Kiama nays area The SIS for those lost focus hasn't been successful in the clinic so it's clear that novel therapeutic approaches and needed and this takes time so rarely. We need different people to work together. Different functions work together so farmer actually reduce what they do in house and choose to those complex in return. Viva studies take years to fully establish in Zeros and so when academic academia follow charities and see arose all have complementary skill sets the they they research can be three to benefit the patient in the minimum time possible. Is it also a matter of the fact that CNN diseases are so complicated? And there's so many different factors going into the Mike. No one can be an expert in enough of the different areas of research to really do absolves ex exactly not. Yeah you know. And and so just by the nature of scientific institution you may get more time to focus on specific disease mechanisms. That PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY. Just doesn't have the kind of time to dedicate starved to really building that level understanding but they may have a much broader range of complex models. That can actually help advance. This yet come has been unfortunately so we can you tell me about the psychiatry consortium which I guess is kind of an offshoot of the dementia consortium. Yeah it's it's basically has the same structures dimensions. Timonen is formed in consultation with a K. Who a kind of had a stake in his on. Psychiatry example schizophrenia or autism and this is obscene medicines discovery cats who are not for profit and are there the cats ponant which was set innovate UK to support innovation and use by UK business? So the psychiatry console is one of the indicates which is accelerating drug discovery and psychiatric

Dementia Dementia Consortium Dementia Consortium Of Private Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Charles River United States Rene Sarah Hi Sarah Almond Associate Director Of Integrat World Health Organization Europe Chelsea River Charleston Neurodegenerative Disease Vale Uk Russia Charles Rivers
Missed lessons from the Ebola Outbreak

Second Opinion

03:49 min | 2 years ago

Missed lessons from the Ebola Outbreak

"This is Dr Michael Wilks. With a second opinion history in general and the history of medicine in particular is greatly underappreciated. For the lessons it can teach US scholars. Tell us that those who cannot remember. The past are condemned to repeat it. Well it seems that valuable lessons learned in the recent past around epidemics have been ignored and disregarded for example although there are differences between the novel Corona Virus Cova Nineteen and the abol outbreak. There are valuable lessons that we missed. What's similar between the two diseases is the fear the distrust of government recommendations the role of the family and spreading the disease the importance of social distancing and the lack of a plan to attack the illness. Dr Brian Bird is a leading veterinarian. An infectious disease epidemiologist and the associate director of UC Davis one health institute. He's worked on the front lines of the Bulla epidemic and other epidemics round the world. He says the major lesson we might have learned was simply to have a plan being prepared or at least having a plan to be prepared is is the key doctor Bert. Also points out that. When Ebola was first recognized in west Africa the concept of a spreadable lethal virus was a totally new concept. That virus was a completely new disease to the people living in that region. They had no experience with the boulevard versus much like the job. Now for Cove it just like with Corona early in the Ebola outbreak. There was also fear no testing and a huge need for socialized relation that tore families apart. There were no treatments or vaccines for either a bowl or Cova and there was a fragmented healthcare system required to care for a large number of sick people and there was no trust in the public health response to prevent the healthy from getting sick West Africa. Bola was a warning to the world. Bit viruses will emerge from relatively distant and remote places. But what we've done no places remote and distant anymore because of the transportation networks whether it'd be roads airplanes in disease management it is essential that people trust their government and believe that they are telling them the truth you look in West Africa. There was a period of time when there was a lot of mistrust and disbelief that the disease was real so in the early months there were large campaigns that just to say a bola is real. There were many opportunities to learn from the Ebola outbreak. That were missed. A lot of those lessons learned have been laid by the wayside because it was appeared that that diseases the disease over there not here. Dr Bird explains the health of the people depends on a strong and coordinated government response during the Ebola outbreak governments in west Africa. Were eventually very heavy handed. But communities came to understand that self isolation was in their own self interest governments need NBC Straw and have a consistent and thoughtful approach to how they want to tackle the emergencies of the day. Today there are important lessons. That could be learned. Some countries and states and cities that could greatly benefit others it requires a willingness to learn and an openness to recognize that. We are all very much in this together. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second

West Africa Dr Brian Bird Ebola Dr Michael Wilks United States Cova Associate Director Bola Uc Davis Nbc Straw Cove
Disease patterns and planetary health

Second Opinion

03:27 min | 2 years ago

Disease patterns and planetary health

"Sars and Moore's Ebola in now corona link with animals what we call zoonosis. It's more complicated than animals simply spreading viruses and pathogens to humans. This bread is often less direct and can involve intermediate hosts and behaviors. But as I've talked this week with disease ecology experts they have increasingly blamed humans for our destruction of biodiversity this then creates ripe conditions for pathogens to come into contact with humans building roads deforestation mining logging farming with heavy water use population growth exotic vacations and heavy hunting have all played a role in these emerging epidemics around the world. Densely packed populations increasingly live in close proximity to bats and rats and birds and pets. This creates new opportunities for interactions for things to move from one species to another so does our tendency to capture exotic animals and put them in cages and ship them around the world to be used as pets or sold in wet markets and eventually be consumed as food all these activities disperse viruses that have existed for eons in one species often in one location and then spread them globally. Dr Brian Bird is a leading veterinarian. Epidemiologist and the associate director of UC Davis is one health institute he has worked on the front lines of the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone and other epidemics around the world. He has thought a great deal about these emerging epidemics at it quite clear that land use change and changing the environment chopping forest to plant crops. Things things of that nature are one of the leading risk factors for spillover buyers spillover of viruses from one species to another is increasingly common the CDC estimates that three quarters of new or emerging diseases that infect humans originating animals. It's not just exotic diseases like Corona Ebola and h one n one look at how we've destroyed forests to build American suburbs. This development disrupts the ecosystems enforces deer and rats and other animals to live in more densely packed areas or to venture outside of their normal habitat. This means that insects like ticks can more easily passed between animals. And then the ticks spread the bacteria borelli A- Bergdorf Ri- and there is a huge increase in line disease. Dr Bird reminds us that these changes have been going on since the industrial revolution. But he says that. Our interactions with that risk must change. We have to start to recognize that what we're doing as humanity in these wild areas is detrimental or taking the system out of balance into viruses. That all the other wildlife live in that ECO system and a sense of balance. It is this balance that has been ignored over the longer term solutions will start with awareness and hopefully that will lead to reason to action and more careful

Dr Brian Bird Zoonosis Ebola Sars Corona CDC A- Bergdorf Ri Associate Director Moore Uc Davis Sierra Leone
Protesters rally across world to mark International Women's Day

Skimm This

03:12 min | 2 years ago

Protesters rally across world to mark International Women's Day

"Women around the world took to the streets yesterday saying loudly and proudly this is my fights on March. Eighth is known as International Women's Day. You probably saw lots of bad ass. Women and their inspirational quotes highlighted on your INSTA- feed but a big point of the day is really to put a spotlight on women's rights and gender equality so a ton of women also turned out to protest from Chile. One of the largest demonstrations of the day where women protested violence against women to Paris where they protested. The quote. Virus of the Patriarch. No matter where you looked there was something to protest. Here's one protester in the UK. This country is much better than other countries around the world. But we're still not completely fine with like cheap. Despite you they are in Pakistan. Women again rallied around the slogan. My Body my choice. They're basically just trying to say women should be protected from sexual assault and should be able to make the reproductive and medical decisions that they think are best. This chant isn't new. It actually angered a lot of people in Pakistan last year. You See Pakistan has a pretty conservative country so that message of autonomy doesn't exactly fly in a sign of what these women's Day marches are up against when it comes to changing minds. They were met by crowds of counter protesters this year including people who threw stones shoes and mud at them in the capital of Islamabad. The backlash didn't keep the celebrations and protests from happening though. These protesters are calling on women to wake up. Meanwhile in Mexico City protesters spoke out against the increasing numbers of domestic violence victims last year. The government estimated that about thirty eight hundred Mexican women were killed. That's more than ten deaths every day. Many of them involve sexual assault. Those protests continued today. But they sounded more like this. That's right silence. Today is being called a quote day without us because women across the country just disappeared. Maria Fernanda Peres. Arguello is the associate director of the Atlantic. Council's Latin America Center amounts ability or invisibility. They're not going to go to work. They're not going to take any public transportation. They're not gonNA make any purchases and they're also going to be invisible in the digital space so they won't post they won't text they. WanNa make this visible. They're showing what the country would look like without women like if we don't do anything to stop these murders. This is how our country is GonNa be surprise. It turns out we need women around. Mexico has about twenty one million registered female workers and one Employers Association estimated that the Women's one day strike could end up costing the economy about six billion pesos. Or nearly three hundred million. Us dollars and that's just in the capital of Mexico City and for just one day without women which just goes to show how crucial women are who run the world on International Women's Day and everyday women are making their case

International Women Pakistan Mexico City Assault Maria Fernanda Peres Mexico Chile Islamabad UK Paris United States Arguello Latin America Center Associate Director Employers Association Atlantic
A good new home

Native America Calling

09:36 min | 3 years ago

A good new home

"Tara Gatewood in here with me on the program today out of Saint Paul Minnesota. Is Angela go theor the associate director of Minoshe key and a young and also here too with the with the group is executive director. deb Foster her and she is a Saint Croix Ojibway from Eagle Clan. My pleasure to have both of them here with US and Andromeda turn turn to you. You've done a lot of work. I'm looking at your bio and see That you have worked with the county in family services and just knowing along the repetition or how many times young people are entering into foster care and then they age out and then there's no place to turn talk to me about how being there air at this critical time and offering them a space to not only the rest of their head but also gained a job development skills as well as even just I have to be self sustaining talked me about this critical time period. In what some of the things that the center is working on I I always ask people to reflect on the young people that they have in their personal lives and the natural support systems. That are there error. And how many times when you're C Eighteen nineteen twenty one. Twenty two year olds in your personal life that When they have love family to fall back on at times when they're having a hard time or they've They need a place to stay. Or they've transitioned positioned in their jobs or they're you know. They're struggling in some way when they have a natural place to go back to a lot of the youth that we are working with because as they have spent such extended time in foster care that they've been moved around a lot through their youth. They don't have those places to land The one thing with young and his dad was saying having been Serving the community since nineteen eighty. Three is that it is become that place for a lot of youth and families that they know when they're having a hard time that this is kind of their soft place to land that there are people here that can help and and so this expands our ability to do that for this youth in this age group is that this is a critical time when you are learning learning to live independently when they're wanting to you know find employment and look for career pass and go back to college and when you don't have how those supports Built in because you've been in foster care because you've had time and placement or been homeless this gives you more of that time name and all of the services That you could need as a jumping off point are here for you and we're here to build those relationships and to help them take that next step I'm just excited that we have an opportunity now to work with these US more closely for a more extended period. Take time to help them. Get through this point of transition and so tell me a little bit more about how it works. How permanent is the housing and some some of the support services that are going on Angeles? START US off yeah so youth enter the program Between the ages of eighteen to twenty twenty four years old The youth that are coming in have different backgrounds of homelessness and Foster Care The nature permanent supportive housing is that they could live in this housing forever if they wanted. There isn't a timeframe I'm in which they would need to leave. They just need to enter between the ages of eighteen to twenty four and they have to continue to qualify for the subsidies that are or a helping to assist with their rent During the time that they are there the support services that we have we have to transition coaches that start working with the youth rate rate at the point of referral. And they're the ones who are working with you to collect their housing history. All their vital documents they information that they need in order to you. Qualify for the housing and those transition coaches continue to work with those youth to help them. That goal plans navigate resources and everything that they need on that and they're like housing goals we have a full time youth and family therapists. That is dedicated to the building and that therapists can do individual work Couples therapy family therapy is needed really to really meet. Whatever the needs are for that youth To help them be healthy in their community and their personal relationships. We also have a fulltime cultural specialist. Who is is trained in suicide prevention and post mention that is dedicated to the building? And he's there to help work with the youth To you meet their cultural needs and to help them. Connect back with their own communities as well We have the ability to have ceremonies. We have a cultural cultural activities center. We have medicine gardens and sweat lodge on site and so he's really the coordinator of that for all of the youth We are also adding a safe harbor case manager which is dedicated to working with you who are at risk of or have been involved in sexual exploitation and so the case management will be dedicated Just to that kind of aspect and helping them navigate gate through the resources and the sensitive nature of that and then there's property management that's onsite with our partners that help them with their lease and like the money portion portion of everything and then the We're also staff twenty four hours a day so there's always some support staff here for the residents when they need it into my turn to. Oh you balancing all of this because it sounds like a lot and it sounds like the things that often are left out of the equation win A lot of times we start trying trying to help our youth Trying to get them going faster. Start on life. How is all of this being balanced or is this part of the blueprint to make sure that all of these things were there Not only supplying a place to live. But supplying a place to thrive tell me more dip. Yes we In addition to what Angela has said we have the building was built around The the all of the needs of the young people. So for instance we have Circular gathering centers on each floor where Kids will be able to gather We have the purposely did efficiency apartments because we wanted at their full apartments full kitchen refrigerator. Everything bathroom beds living area but we wanted them to network with new folks And have an opportunity to establish new networks and We also have a workforce training center so A Complete Computer Center Training Center. Where kids can do everything? I'm from working on covering letters Building resumes doing job search learning technical skills And and types of activities. That are involved in building those opportunities for young people We also have a Fitness Center down in the lower level providing opportunities for young people to strengthen their health and and wellbeing physically physically and also the teaching kitchens that you mentioned on each floor to Help kids learn how to cook. And how to cook healthy We also have as mentioned a cultural activities center. So that is where all the kids can learn how to make their own regalia and do beadwork and make their own drums. But more importantly learned the history behind all of these things We have an entrepreneurship program that We have for young people that were putting together that will allow you to work onsite. We have a credit store which which I like to describe as kind of like a mini walgreens and so Use can earn vouchers that they can use in these stores and it has everything a walgreens would have but it also provides an opportunity for young people to work there and they can learn some Shaath work skills such as profit and loss and stocking talking and ordering cashiering things like that Also we have a food shelf and we also have a clothing store so these are all opportunities for young people to garner some software skills And we have numerous or as partners throughout our community. That are going to be working with us as well. And providing internships and workforce skills and Places where they can establish a ged or finish high school learn about post secondary education. If that's what they WANNA

United States Angela Deb Foster Tara Gatewood Computer Center Training Cente Saint Croix Ojibway Angeles Saint Paul Minnesota Associate Director Executive Director. Fitness Center Coordinator
Harassment in Online Gaming

Good Code

08:58 min | 3 years ago

Harassment in Online Gaming

"Over two billion people play games globally in the US sixty four percent of online population play video games in games a much more than just games live. MULTIPLAYER Games are social platforms forms where people interact chat and sometimes get harassed. According to a poll made for the Untidy Formation League in two thousand eighteen Americans reported only gaming as the fifth place where the experienced harassment online just after facebook. Luke twitter youtube an instagram. Welcome to good code the weekly podcast on ethics in our digital lives. My name is Sheila Eh. I'm a visiting journalist at Cornell Tax Digital Life Initiative and I'm your host a few weeks ago. I sat down with Daniel Kelly in his office office in New York City. He's the associate director of the Center for Technology and society within the Anti Defamation League he leads the center's work to fight hate bias and harassment in online gaming to be clear he's job is not to look at the contents of video games he studied side conversations. That gamers have with one another wild plane. I began by asking him to explain where exactly these conversations happen. This is a question that I get a lot especially for people who aren't familiar with these kinds of conversations which is sometimes Parents right right when you're talking about communications online games. They can happen usually in two places so the one place would be an text chat so that would be a chat box that usually lives at the bottom of your screen and you can type in different words and you know dialogue. Often people communicate that way. They're playing playing as they're playing. They are if they're on a PC. They're typing if they're if they're on an xbox or playstation they could be there could be shortcuts or there or they could be typing in with their with their control or other things and for those cotton's of communications. You can use the same. A well trod techniques for detecting Abuse that you can use on facebook twitter you have the same model of being able to use machine learning or AI and human review to we able to flag content. There's sort of a baseline to start from in terms of the content. Moderation that happens there the area which is much more of a wild west which exists in games and and in some maybe perhaps live streamed social media But is a big part of games is voice chat so in addition to people typing in some things that they say to people people are actually speaking to each other stranger. They're speaking to each other again as they're playing as they're playing commencing on what's happening. Yeah exactly commenting on what's happening openings. Sometimes being competitive sometimes crossing the line into being hateful and sometimes being you know supportive and encouraging and engaging with with the people as as they're playing the game but when we talk about voice chat the methods to do content moderation in live voice chat are super nascent. And and so. There's a real need. I think to push research and advocacy forward for that because as bad as things can be in the text environments we don't even have the framework to address them in or the tools to address them in voice chat. And so yeah. We'll get back to that. That's something I want to ask. Ask You about Just to understand do most gamers take part in these chatrooms Whether text are vocal is that is that like a wide. I practice the AARP which is an organization that is geared towards Folks who are fifty plus did a survey of Gamers who are art fifty plus and they've found that thirty three percent of Gamers who are fifty plus who play online play with other adults play in in a way that they're communicating with the people they're playing with and so if you can imagine that you know a third of Of older adults are are communicating. When they're playing these games? I don't know there's been a similar measurements of other age groups but I could imagine that the the amount the degree to which if it's part of their game plan part of the way they interact in and see the platform would would be significantly more. I think at the game developers conference in March of last year the CEO of epoch which makes fortnight which is a very popular game talked talked about fortnight and games like it being sort of forms of social media that the folks who are playing these are playing them as games in of themselves but they also are means to build community and to connect with one another. And you know these sort of continuous free to play. Online Games are a form form of social media social platform yet social platforms. And they're places where people are communicating regularly. Our focus right now is really Focused on games as social platforms there. I think there's been a lot of good work in Games as media looking at games in the same way that you you might look at movies in terms of a representation. whose stories are being told? How has that story being told but I at least in the sort of NGOs space this and certainly in the sort of traditional historical civil rights organization space? There hasn't been as much work looking at games as social spaces. uh-huh you were at rights con last year. Which is one of the biggest Tree conferences on human rights and technology and there was no workshop on gaming and that you were surprised prices. Do you think that's changing that people are realizing that Games are social platforms. Is that slowly taking into consideration thing. I I think you know. I think it is starting to become more of a consideration. There's just a lot of educating on both on both sides from the gaming industry and from civil society about how how do we find a way to work together But I think yeah. I think it's urgent. A game industry is larger than film and music combined In terms of the amount out of money that it makes so this is a an urgent space for folks to be looking at there are people who are specifically in the game space. That are focused on us. But it hasn't yet. I think permeated the larger discourse in the same with the social media has for large NGOs. I share. Let's get into the report you rotor a report in July two thousand nineteen. That was cold free to play hate harassment and positive social experiences in line gaming. And you we'll get into the details of it. I you start your report by saying something quite positive which was surprising. The first result that you shares at eighty eighty eight percents of adults who play online those multi-player Games In the US report positive social experiences while playing online and there is even a non trivial amount of US adults who report positive experiences in online should gain so probably some of the most violent when so this is sort of counter intuitive even silver lining to start a report on harassment Shuzo. Why why why was it important to have that at the beginning? We're still in kind of a moral panic place with games James In the way that perhaps we were with comic books in the fifties where something terrible happens in the world that everyone wants to blame it on video games and so my experience talking to folks about these issues has been that when you start from this place of video games are bad. People who are are working in the space with Love Games who games are part of their identity part of how they interact socially it just shuts them down and I. I don't think it's a path towards change. If if you just say that x form of media all books are terrible right. Miguel necessarily say that and so it was important for me. The report port is focused on games as social spaces so both the positive side of things and and I think it was unclear as when we ask these questions rate we we wanted to get to some level of understanding of our game online game spaces are are they as bad as you know people the worst of the worst say hey they are right. I think some folks pleasantly surprised that that there were so many people who had positive experiences is no measurement and because there is this a reactive mode to video games. I wanted to start from a place of like. There are many positive experiences that people have in online games and there's also reality of negative experiences that need to be engaged with be dressed because then it opens the conversation of. How can we fix this? Not just get rid of those

Harassment United States Facebook Cornell Tax Digital Life Initi Sheila Eh Untidy Formation League Luke Daniel Kelly New York City Aarp Center For Technology And Soci Associate Director Miguel CEO
Colorado’s red-flag law invoked, likely for the first time, in Denver case

Mike Rosen

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Colorado’s red-flag law invoked, likely for the first time, in Denver case

"The Denver police department is the first in Colorado to utilize the red flag law they filed the order against a man involved in a domestic violence situation and there were suicidal statements no one was injured in the incident which started out as an argument what we do know is that where there is a fire are involved a victim is five times more likely to end up dead as a result that's violence free Colorado's associate director any poll talk to fox thirty one in this case a judge granted a temporary filing in fourteen days there will be a hearing to determine if a continuing order is

Denver Police Department Colorado Associate Director
Impeachment updates: Congress braces for historic vote

The Glenn Beck Show

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

Impeachment updates: Congress braces for historic vote

"I will be voting yes on obstruction of Congress that from congresswoman Alyssa Slotkin a Democrat from a swing district in Michigan that went to trump in twenty sixteen the house Judiciary Committee releasing this report on impeachment just days before the full house vote on the two articles abuse of power and obstruction of Congress as the vote approaches impeachment in the house appears inevitable now some lawmakers are shifting their focus to the Senate and a likely trial in January conducting an impeachment trial in the Senate is enormously weighty and solemn responsibility Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer says he'd like to hear testimony from at least four people tied to the Ukraine scandal acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney Mulvaney aid Robert Blair former national security adviser John Bolton and Michael Duffy associate director for national security at the office of management and budget fox's

John Bolton Robert Blair Mick Mulvaney Chief Of Staff White House Ukraine FOX Associate Director Michael Duffy Congress Chuck Schumer Senate House Judiciary Committee Michigan Alyssa Slotkin
Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

Museum Archipelago

08:36 min | 3 years ago

Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

"The field of conservation was created to fight change to prevent objects from becoming dusty broken or rusted but fighting to keep cultural objects preserved creates a certain mindset the mindset of protector a mindset. It's too easy to imagine objects and cultures. In the state of stasis. This is how it always was and will be forever. Often I mean just given the colonial oneal had an imperial histories of museums. It was because people were going to be gone forever. That culture was gone. And so this is the last trace but in fact. That's not how cultural heritage works it. It's transformed it's changed. It continues on in different forms and a lot of the way the Conservatives think about cultural heritage is is about out mitigating that change. which makes it a little bit fossilized but to me that changes where things are really vibrant exciting and people are so closely connected to cultural cultural heritage that it really feels alive? This is since Cheetah Bala Chandran Associate Director of the John Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Hello my name is Cinci Bala Alexander. I'm conservative and I'm trained in the conservation of archaeological materials in particular and my day job is the associate director of the Archaeological Theological Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Bala Chandran founded untold stories a project that pursues conservation profession that represents and preserves a full spectrum of human cultural heritage for the past few years. The project has been hosting public events at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation Conservation Untold Stories emerged of bollocks hundreds frustration with how narrowly the field of conservation has been defined at felt that there were literally early too many untold stories in the field of conservation. I wanted to find ways to actually start to think about what else cultural heritage could mean other than say the things we typically think of as belonging in a museum or many of us cultural heritage means going to this important looking building that has paintings and sculpture and has labels labels next to it and I think we kind of decided in some ways at that's cultural heritage and preservation means taking care of those things and really I've become more and more aware error and curious about the fact that cultural heritage is much more complicated and diverse set of practices. It's often not necessarily about a single object or a thing but rather how that thing might function within a community or communities as as part of a series of practices and exchanges and storytelling and I just wanted to have a way to kind of work with people who are really doing that work outside the museum and doing it in ways that I think preserved Europe but also change cultural practices since untold stories takes place at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation. A lot of professionals in the field Are already gathered there. The meetings attract over one thousand conservators blake many professional conferences. The meetings are often held in a nondescript hotel how setting but untold stories makes it a practice to conceptualize where attendees are sitting and the history that preceded them an example of this is the twentieth nineteen eighteen untold stories event titled Indigenous Futures and Collaborative Conservation. How many times have you been to a conference and you could be anywhere right? I mean you're in this big room and you never leave the hotel or the conference center and part of what I was interested in was trying to actually place a somewhere so twenty one thousand nine since we were actually meeting at the Mohegan Sun which is a Mohegan owned casino. We were on native land. It seemed like a really important opportunity. -tunities to talk about native sovereignty kind of history of genocide in our own country. The fact that anyone who's non-indigenous in this country is a settler settler colonialist but to really think about what this means in terms of how we take care of collections that have come to us as a result of historical happenstance stance but also a very violent past and to acknowledge the fact that museums which for most of us who work in museums are very safe. Welcoming and joyful places uses are evidence of this history of of pain and removal so the opportunity to work with the commod educational initiative was really exciting. Because because it's a partly native co-founded and they do a lot of educational work around questions of how even think about the history of this country story and to me. That was really important to be able to say in native space as opposed to you know in a place somewhere else. Part of of Bala. Hundreds point is that there isn't such a thing as a textualist cultural material. The intentionally nondescript conference ballroom has a lot in common with deliberately sterile museum environment episode. Sixty eight of this show features an interview with Ed Wanda's spears director of programming and outreach at the adamant educational initiative and one of the convenors of the twenty nineteen untold stories event in the episode. She discusses her presentation about how native native narratives are violently presented through White Lens in museums. It was in Donna spheres of Who suggested the title she had worked in museums? She's very familiar with these questions. And she's the one who suggested indigenous futures which forces you to recognize that this is not something of the past. We really wanted to do something. The thing that felt like we were going to push. This had to be uncomfortable but it also had to be aspirational. Where do we go now? And how can as conservatives servers we actually be part of this very kind of collaborative supportive mission to ensure futures. We can't make it happen by ourselves. It's it's not like we're saving anybody and that's another big concern of mine. There's a real sort of savior mentality that I think conservation has ask we save objects and I certainly came out of graduate school thinking that I was going to save everything and to me. That's a very problematic way to think about it because frankly if the objects still survives it didn't need me it made it thousands of years without me somehow. We've decided that we're the ones that making the that make these things live live forever which is pure arrogance so part of this event was really to think about how as conservatives can come up with action items and by action items. It was practices but more than anything of kind of Shipton in a mental framework for working much more equitably and more humbly to really have a sense of respect for this notion that there has already been a history before you and so when you enter into this hopefully collaborative relationship you need to acknowledge alleged. Things have survived for a long time without your intervention. And they don't need you but you could actually provide some sort of service some sort of benefit that could actually really help the untold stories team. True to their mission is careful not to present the workshop as a single solution or even a set of solutions. The team wants wants to counter the assumption within the profession. That all you need to do is go to one workshop and then you're all done you know. Unfortunately this doesn't change the working working practices it doesn't change the mindset. It doesn't change the way an organization functions and what happens is then marginalized people are called upon again and again to kind of keep performing this vulnerability and this discomfort for themselves in order to educate people who are unwilling to do the work that consistent like every single day for the rest of their lives work that will be required to make transformative change possible part of what in the twenty nineteen in conversation we. We felt very strongly we had to say is if if you really believe in equality if you really want to do something that is truly collaborative that does not assume some sort of hierarchy. It means being really uncomfortable the entire time and maybe at the end of it things will change but you you still have to kind of follow through on it when it gets really uncomfortable. And the fact is most marginalized communities. People have done this entire lives so it it just feels like it's time for you. Know I think in general the museum community to say we're willing to engage in these kinds of difficult ongoing perpetual natural

American Institute For Conserv Collaborative Conservation Cheetah Bala Chandran American Institute For Conserv Bala Chandran Bala Cinci Bala Alexander John Hopkins Archaeological Mu Archaeological Theological Mus Mohegan Sun Johns Hopkins University Associate Director Europe Blake Ed Wanda Shipton Director