24 Burst results for "Associate Dean"

Marjorie Taylor Greene: US House votes to strip Republican of key posts

TIME's Top Stories

05:15 min | 4 months ago

Marjorie Taylor Greene: US House votes to strip Republican of key posts

"Report. That they're covid. Nineteen shot may not only protect against disease but also help to prevent spread of the sars o. V. two virus the news was heralded by policymakers desperate to see a vaccine that can curb the spread of the disease but scientists have been a bit more cautious if confirmed the results would represent a breakthrough in the covid nineteen vaccine race so far the shots authorized or approved around the world have shown strong protection against moderate to severe disease but haven't definitively proven that people who get vaccinated are less likely to spread the covid nineteen virus but the data say. Some experts is confusing. So it's hard to adequately evaluate the companies claim that the shot can actually slow the spread of covid nineteen or not in the study published on the lancet pre print server which means the results have not been peer reviewed a gold standard for ensuring the scientific rigor of the findings astra zeneca and oxford scientists. Report that two doses of their vaccine was overall sixty six point seven percent effective in protecting against covid nineteen disease as part of its analysis. The research team also collected nasal swabs from and unvaccinated study volunteers in the uk every week and tested them for the virus. The scientists found that positive tests were about fifty percent lower among people who got two doses of the vaccine compared to those who weren't vaccinated because people who don't test positive are less likely to spread the virus the researchers extrapolated from those data. The astra zeneca shot can transmission of the covid nineteen virus. However that may be a bit of a stretch says dr carlos. Del rio executive associate dean of emory school of medicine. It's a leap of science. That i think still needs to be proven. He says what they show is that there was either decreased viral shedding or decreased detection a virus however they do not actually show that transmission was decreased. We can say less. Transmission is a possibility but the data on. That needs to come out says del rio. We wanna state the facts and don't want to overstate the facts. That concern was echoed by health officials. In switzerland who decided this week to reject the astra. Zeneca shot the data available and evaluated to date are not yet sufficient for approval. The country's regulatory bodies swiss medic said on february third part of the concern has to do with the fact that the astrazeneca study underwent a number of changes after the phase. Three trial was begun. A fact that some infectious disease expert say makes it difficult to interpret the results for a clinical trial as crucial as this one modifying the setup once it's underway is similar to changing the rules in the middle of a game the study originally set out to investigate a single dose vaccine but was changed to two doses when concurrently conducted early studies show that to set doses of the vaccine produced a stronger immune response further because of what astrazeneca said. Were mistakes in measuring doses. Some people in the study in the uk received a half dose for their first shot and a full dose for the second. one people also got different placebos. Some god benign nina cockles solution and some a saline solution. That could mean nothing. But it's also unusual to have two. Placebos sends that has the potential to introduce con founders into the study and because of limited supplies. Some study participants had to wait more than the three to four weeks originally planned between their doses while others when told they couldn't come back for their second dose at the time they expected chose to simply not get their second shot entirely. Frankly the way they did. These trials was really confusing. Says dr paul off it. Director of the vaccine education center at children's hospital of philadelphia and a member of the us food and drug administration's advisory committee that reviews vaccines for authorization or approval. This is the stuff you figure out in phase one. You don't fool around in phase three and see what works he says. Here's what the researchers report after getting a single shot. Seventy six percent of participants were protected against disease for up to three months. Afterwards from their their levels of antibodies generated against the virus which scientists believe are important to protect against disease began to drop those results suggest that while two doses of the astra. Zeneca vaccine preferable. A single dose could still be useful for about three months in controlling covid. Nineteen that might be especially useful information to act on if vaccines are in. Short supply.

Astrazeneca Dr Carlos Astra Emory School Of Medicine Zeneca Del Rio Oxford UK Infectious Disease Switzerland Dr Paul Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Us Food And Drug Administratio Nina
"associate dean" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

Discover Lafayette

03:52 min | 8 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

"No I. Guess the thing that like everyone else in the United States I'm really wondering what the post-election settlement will be. After, the dust clears where we gonNA be of course, is up in the air I know so many people that are walking around holding their breath. And just thinking Oh. My God. Are we gonna you know several are here we're GONNA descend into civil war other people who are Democrats are saying, Oh, my God i WanNa move. If we get four more years of Donald Trump, I'm hearing that a lot from liberals. I'm hearing dire warnings of from. who were talking about? You know what Biden are Harris might do you know pack the core do all these kinds of things So I'm very very hopeful that it that. The temperature drops off a number of notches after this election is over that everybody kinda catches her breath and realizes that we're all Americans and that we need to create the country we want as we move forward and and you have to do that with people who don't believe the same thing. You have to compromise. You have to bring people together not push them apart think if there's any lesson of the trump. Campaign and candidacy is that we do better with a uniter than divider and I have to say if I were to say one thing about Donald Trump I don't think he's a uniter I think Donald Trump, personality wise and focus looks for away to. Bush against conflicts against faults against issues and I. Don't necessarily think that that's a great. Quality in our president some people think that's truth telling. I personally think it's stepping on corns that. People you know we need to be brought together, not driven A. He's done a lot of good things and I think it's mainly overwhelmed by the twitter feed and. The divisiveness as you're saying and it's it's really a shame because he's he's really brought a lot of good things to the table to help people prescription drug issues, and he's new tried to do the right thing but it's just it's overshadowed. I amount by by his personality, the tweeting and the and the kind of thing he can't seem to resist. Consultants tear their hair out. They can't get him imagined. Van has spokesperson he would be running easily to re election. You know had want two things one handle code a little differently I think initially that would be good and and then had he not had the personality trait of adding gasoline to fire. which he just can't seem to help himself. You know and it is what it is. That's why some people love him. You know and it's also why probably a majority is going to vote against him yeah. We'll see it's going to be interested in is how Well, Dr Piercing Cross. Again, Associate Dean of College of Liberal Arts and professor in the Department of Political Science at you'll laugh. I want to thank you for taking time to be on discover Lafayette and reminding people that we can early vote October sixteen through the twenty seventh and you can go vote not just downtown ten, ten, Lafayette Street but there's two other places too early vote the Martin Luther King Recreational Center at three Oh nine chorus street and then the East Regional Library Young's fell to fifteen London Bell Road. So people have more options now and you can vote like eight in the morning till seven at night I read in the papers..

Donald Trump United States twitter Dr Piercing Cross Van Lafayette College of Liberal Arts Martin Luther King Recreationa Biden Associate Dean Bush president East Regional Library Department of Political Scienc professor Harris
"associate dean" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

Discover Lafayette

02:06 min | 8 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

"This is Jan swift and you're listening to discover Lafayette a podcast dedicated to the people and rich. Culture. Lafayette the Gateway to South Louisiana. Are. Taping is made possible with the support of Raider, a hands on it service provider that integrates all of your needs for advanced technical support, effective communication options, and cyber security raiders. Motto is you just wanted to work. We understand please visit reiter solutions DOT, com for more information. Our podcast is also made possible with the support of our premier sponsor Iberia Bank, they support our community in. So many ways in their dynamic team is committed to serving the banking needs of clients in this region and throughout the southeastern United States. Iberia Bank offers the resources of a national bank with the personal touch of a community bank. Please visit, Iberia Bank Dot Com for more information. We're also grateful for the support of Lafayette General help who recently.

Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:05 min | 9 months ago

Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

"Teaching doctors about the health effects of climate change is growing from medical schools to the residency programs where new physicians put their skills to the test. But skeptics wonder if it's appropriate for doctors to learn how climate change can affect Human Health Martha Bebinger of member station W. R. in Boston Begins Her story in clinic exam room. I just remember for so many months it was hard for you to walk. There are three people in this exam room doctor Gora. A resident he's training and seventy one year old Steve Kerns who is recovering from West Nile virus, Kerns remembers the mosquito bite on his neck but very little about the brain infection that landed him in the hospital for a week for at least six months after that. I felt like every five minutes I was being run over by a truck I couldn't work. I couldn't walk very well. And I couldn't focus. A wondered for bit if I'd ever get better now, almost two years later Kern says he's back to about five hours a day on the job making windows and doors, and he started reading again the sounds like you've made tremendous progress. Dr. Charlotte Roses is a third year primary care resident at Cambridge Hospital. It seems like tremendous progress. that. It was scary. It was scary. It was it was definitely scary us and I'm not scared anymore although. Can I get worse now over again, Dr seuss sympathizes with the fear West Nile is still rare. There were no cases in Massachusetts before two thousand and two in two, thousand, eighteen year a mosquito bit kerns cases had climbed to forty nine mosquitoes love warm temperatures and so when temperatures increase mosquitoes can have breeding seasons the virus itself West alka replicate faster and they. Bite more more active Basu learned a lot of this while treating, Kerns. He was buses i West Nile case when someone comes in with a fever and his confused, it's not what my mind thinks of as the diagnosis right away. This case has really taught me how much I need to be informed about the ways in which climate change is changing the patterns of infectious. Disease. Around the United States to inform his residence busu added the health impacts of climate change to an elective courses teaches Ross says residents need much more. This is something that needs to be more directly integrated into the curriculum because I think it's going to have such a huge impact on human health. There are no approved curricula for hospitals that might want to tell emerging. Lung specialists about longer pollen seasons as temperatures rise or teach new emergency room physicians to consider more waterborne diseases for patients with fever and diarrhea. But Pediatrician Rebecca Phillips born at Emory University has just published. A framework hospitals can use as a starting point. Patients want physicians to be able to provide guidance on things that affect their individual help. We have this accumulating body of. That climate change does just that it poses harms to our patients Dr Stanley Goldfarb, the former associate dean for curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania's medical school says hospitals trained doctors not. He worries that discussing climate change with patients might create mistrust I. Think there are concerns about getting into the political sphere because I'm against anything that's going to. represent a barrier between patients and physicians being comfortable with each other other physicians. See Wildfires, sweeping western states and hurricanes flooding the Gulf coast and say, we want to impart this information to our residents as fast as we can because it's so important that they gain this information sooner than later advocates say including climate change in residency training won't stick and tell doctors are tested on the health effects before they are licensed to practice medicine for NPR news I'm Martha Bebinger in Boston.

Steve Kerns West Nile Martha Bebinger Boston Kern Dr Stanley Goldfarb Dr Seuss Fever Cambridge Hospital Massachusetts United States University Of Pennsylvania Dr. Charlotte Roses Waterborne Diseases NPR Basu Associate Dean Emory University Rebecca Phillips
"associate dean" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Kind of wonder just how we end up here? And how all these questions and popping up every two years? Well this year, there's an added rub right. The propositions come set against the dark backdrop, which is, of course, the pandemic out of growing concerns about the deadly Corona virus officially hitting the US Here's what we need and civil unrest in the coffer Rachel just in Washington, D C protestors, setting a large fire just blocks from the White House. Accelerating climate change. We begin tonight with millions of Americans in the path of multiple natural disasters. Economic collapse the Labor Department is out with, of course, one of the most contentious presidential races in history even has a 10 point. National Advantage over President Trump. Some of these questions are going to gain immediacy like you know the repealing of the ban on affirmative action, any cash bail or changing up the structure of property taxes? Other questions? They're a bit harder to understand. For all the noise like changing dialysis, clinic regulations and the reclassification of uber and lyft drivers, or maybe allowing 17 year olds the right to vote, So we're gonna get started here. In this episode, we'll tackle the history of the ballot question in California will dive into the criticism of the process. You know, it's not exactly something that's universally adored. And along with came Alexander. I've said some legal help to kind of guide us through this journey. It's the the grill in the room in California politics, Okay, My name is Michael Salerno Ah, clinical professor emeritus at UC Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, and the California initiative process has long been a process. I've had a great interest in and worked. You might call Salerno Ah, critic of the system and generally opposed to the California initiative process. Because it's the Wild West. I think initiatives could be done in a more Thoughtful way We're gonna be hearing much more from slaughter. No. My name is Mary Beth Moylan, Me associate Dean for academic affairs. An experiential learning at Nick George School of Law were part of the University of the Pacific in Sacramento, California oil. It's got a certain expertise in this subject. I teach a class called The California Initiative Seminar, and the students in that class produced the California Initiative Review, which we produced online every lap. Ction cycle. So every two years we produce the California Initiative Review We provide objective and neutral summaries of each of the statewide ballot measures that appear on the general election ballot. Of course, the election comes here in the cove it age, which complicates our campaigns typically get the word out How we discussed these questions with each other. We don't have the culture right now of Gatherings of spreading the word at farmers markets and at concerts, right. That's not happening so much. Well, I am concerned that people Are not having the chance to interact casually with people who they trust. Normally when we get to election time, you know you have the campaign messages coming at you on TV. If you're a likely voter, you also have people calling you on the phone. You're going to have mail Coming to your home. Isolation tends to be a good breeding.

California California Initiative Review Salerno Ah California Initiative White House Washington President Trump Rachel Mary Beth Moylan Labor Department associate Dean for academic af Wild West Nick George School of Law Alexander San Francisco UC Hastings College University of Sacramento
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 9 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
Trump announces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee for Supreme Court seat

The Boom X Show with Darol Tuttle

00:40 sec | 9 months ago

Trump announces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee for Supreme Court seat

"President Trump has formally nominated Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court this afternoon Comas Jeff Pooja has more on what it means for the bench. Amy Kuney Baron has been a federal court judge for only three years. But in that time she's made a name for herself among conservative groups. A devout Catholic and favorite of the religious right. Barrett is expected to be a reliable voice in the effort to overturn Roe v. Wade like Justice Thomas, who's already on the court. Is going to be someone who is going to be prepared to get a fresh look at a lot of presidency, disagrees. That's Andrew Siegel, associate dean of the law school at Seattle University. Her nomination is likely to set up a bitter fight in the U. S. Senate

Amy Cockney Barrett Amy Kuney Baron Supreme Court President Trump Jeff Pooja Andrew Siegel Associate Dean U. S. Senate Justice Thomas ROE Wade Seattle University
"associate dean" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:39 min | 9 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Of the ACLU of New Hampshire because you're right when you get worked up about something and it's nice and quiet, and you're not sitting in traffic all the time you have time for board service. Sure. Okay. Now you are a law professor. I found a little snippet of footage of you teaching and I dug it. You seem to have some perverse traction to Improv comedians because I saw you do a parallel of why using some of the tools of improvisation. I've been doing it for twenty five years can't say the. Word that's what I say and it's always okay. So you found some some techniques Improv that you thought would be beneficial in the classroom and I kinda Doug that what brought you to that best thing. I. Did in college or even law school for that matter was be a member of an Improv comedy troupe and college I was of media gratification players also known as GP, which is one of at the time was one of two troupes at Harvard there may be more now, but it was us in ot sin ice and we were the cool troop but sort of that underdog way and. I absolutely loved it and hands down if the best thing that I did for law teaching for being an associate Dean for all of the above was learning that yes and mentality and you're saying inherent in law is no because that that's kind of where you start off as a lawyer no because blank and so very analytical. Yes and to that paradigm. And that's one of the things that makes it even more subversive and fund to bring the Improv mentality into the classroom or into anything else that involves law is like that is what lawyers do we get trained how to say no every which way till Sunday and then we say it sideways and we say smile, and then sometimes we say it with a frown bill you a lot of money. Added in six minute increments were really good at that and I love the ability of law to actually solve problems and be creative and iterative, and it is powerful in that regard introduce bonus where we get a boner every time we here in New York. Yeah we love and another aspect, and again having practiced Improv for so many years. One thing you brought up that never even occurred to me I mean clearly.

ACLU New Hampshire associate Dean Doug New York professor Harvard
"associate dean" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"You are will be for many more years to come. You try to convert me though. You know that right? I can always hope you're my easy pass to the next world if I do so Let me just tell you that we're contacted by some government officials. Please fill out that senses form. It's imperative important, so we get proper representation that funding Don't ignore the senses, too They have we got enough. I think an amazing program with two guests who have so much to say. One is a good friend of ours. Right. She's Jeffrey Magarri Community affairs and my P D. A. And the other is Rabbi Abraham Cooper, who's the associate dean of the Simon Reasonable Center, and I was Consider him not only a friend, but he's a role model for so many because he's a proud June, you know, just to be anti anti Semitism just to be anti racism. Doesn't always translate into being a proud person. You know, you take away the negative and also what's left. You've got to be positive in terms of standing up for standards and mingle role models to others. Absolutely. And what I like about both of our guests, their balance in their approach to the issues that we're wrestling throughout the society right now, in their own context and So it's gonna be a great interview. Well, it looked pork blood, So when you come back, we'll have Keith Jeffery Mallory NYPD Community affairs, and he'll be followed by Rabbi Abraham Cooper off the Simon. We Shall all centers for more than 120.

Rabbi Abraham Cooper Jeffrey Magarri Community affa Keith Jeffery Mallory NYPD Com Simon Reasonable Center wrestling associate dean
"associate dean" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"associate dean" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Is associate dean and senior economist at the C. you lead school of business Dr Richard Watkins thanks for the time we appreciate it all my pleasure thanks for having me on checking it right now it's seven twenty nine with John Morris morning on tackling on the phone we're doing pretty good this morning it looks like like traffic again this morning but we have our slow down like that he's bound to seventy drive around York and westbound are right around Vasquez that's pretty jammed up bright sun is in your face is warning that's making that drive off a little bit later than normal on that the six that you drive your I. seventy drive to eighty five C. four seventy all you respond route still make it a pretty tough we got one crash down in the Texan Arapahoe and green plaza Boulevard so expect delays there would you drive really in pretty good shape this one high country snows we up in the high country J. laws drags along on I. seventy at the Eisenhower Johnson tunnels and the veil bass and US six Loveland pass this report is once by rocket mortgage by quicken loans home is more than a house it's a feeling of open roads of blue skies rocket mortgage help millions of Americans finance all their dreams and they can help you to rocket mortgage push button get mortgage next update in ten minutes on gateway newsradio eight fifty A. M. a ninety four one FM to the minute coronavirus information on your radio and at your fingertips find us on Facebook and on Twitter at J. O. a Colorado news time seven thirty here on Colorado's morning news on KOAA news radio April and Marty with you this morning fox thirty one pinpoint whether thirty four right now going to be in the low sixties today looking into the mid to high sixties tomorrow in Thursday now.

associate dean senior economist York Vasquez Eisenhower Johnson tunnels Facebook Twitter Colorado Dr Richard Watkins John Morris US J. O. Marty
"associate dean" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"associate dean" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And this should screw into the door of the refrigerator and this is going to decide and so the screen with a towel and you just pull it out something what's going to prevent the person with autism from taking the dial out the the safety lock on it would be keypad locked so the projects are a collaboration between Yukon service learning program in the school of engineering Dan Berkey an associate dean at UConn says the idea is to bring elegant engineering to underserved consumers when you look at how products are designed and marketed right very often they are not designed to market it with with certain you know volatile demographics in mine Leo they really are targeted towards what we consider the average consumer also on display is an app which helps care givers find family restrooms when they're traveling and a shower and tub guard that would prevent bathroom overflows by connecting to a timer on an iPad and while many of the projects are ideas not full blown prototypes Berkey says the time is right for engineers to help serve niche markets looking at you know what are the needs and how can I bring my expertise and my creative creativity and my passion to bear on that Darlene mores as transforming those ideas into real solutions gives people like her son Ben more independent and more choice and control it's not about containing them it's about understanding their experience and respecting that making life easier for them sometimes all that takes is a design change harnessing technology to assist people especially those for a says who are most in need of help for.

Dan Berkey associate dean UConn Leo Darlene mores Ben
"associate dean" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Talk about their big business idea is TJ Evert's CEO of smart wheel, along with Laura Dunham, associate dean of the school of entrepreneurship. At Saint Thomas, tryst TJ, and Laura. Welcome to Bobby like carton. Glad to have you in the house. Thank you so much to be here. So TJ what inspired you and your team to come up with this idea. Yeah. Definitely. That you sort of started back when my friend, she just starting to learn to drive and around that time with the same time that Amar state of New Hampshire, had an aunt and acted antitax driving law. And I got to witness first hand some of the really crazy distractions that happened behind the wheel of new drivers. We've seen it driving down the highway. We see that person on their phone doing makeup doing something and causing weaving back and forth. And during that time we thought there must be a solution out there, obviously, the statistics are quite sagging their over thirty five hundred people who die each year, due to distracted driving, and over four hundred thousand people are seriously injured and research to always found were recording devices which are only after the fact. So the tell you fast, you're going when you hit the tree, they don't actually do anything prevent it. So we create a solution that would do two things one, it would be able to detect and help with many types of distraction. Not just cell phone use, and also that'd be able to alert drivers before an accident. Help them a date a void danger situation. To begin with. Interesting so share with our car listeners and viewers a little bit about your business. Definitely, so more will Inc. And our product is called smart wheel. It insults just like a regular steering. We'll cover.

TJ Evert Laura Dunham CEO Saint Thomas school of entrepreneurship associate dean Bobby New Hampshire Amar will Inc
Can Whitening Products Really Damage Your Teeth?

Dr. Daliah

02:30 min | 2 years ago

Can Whitening Products Really Damage Your Teeth?

"Well, now, we have a report that ingredient in whitening strips is actually harmful to deep layer of the teeth. They say that hydrogen peroxide in it, the active ingredient in over the counter whitening chips may be harmful to the layer under the name of the teeth. They say the teeth are made up of three layers the outer Anabel, the underlying Dentin layer, and connective tissue that binds to the gum. The middle layer Denton is rich in proteins and has a lot of collagen strong. Most studies on the safety of hydrogen peroxide have focused on the Anabel. Now, the chemical is known to penetrate, the camel and just reached the Denton. Even though in miniscule amounts. According to Dr Hewlett associate dean of dean school of dentistry spokesman for the American dental association. It wasn't volved instead of explain it. Now, the senior author of the study Kelly Keenan and associate professor of chemistry Stockton university of New Jersey said in a statement that she and her colleagues sought to further characterize what your hydrogen peroxide was actually joined to the collagen. Now, I'll whiting Prenton the United States can approximate or carbide peroxide accords the American dental association. So you're tire teeth and artificial saliva. The researchers actually watched the collagen in Denton breakdown. Into smaller proteins when treated with hydrogen, peroxide. So what passed the Anabel into the Denton? They say results show that the trailer without a proxy concentration. Similar to those found of whitening strips is enough to make the original collagen protein disappear. Now, they caution against generalizing the results obtained and teeth that aren't necessarily still the body these were extracted teeth because you know, your teeth in vivo, maybe a little more resilient than in vitro in vivo means in a living body in vitro means in a lab or Petri dish. But I'm not stupid hypoc and peroxide gets broken down into water and oxygen h to to what the hell of Cadillacs an enzyme co Cavalli's breaks down into the H to an haute. Water knocks Jim and the down can be caustic.

Denton Anabel American Dental Association Kelly Keenan Associate Dean Dean School Of Dentistry Associate Professor United States Dr Hewlett Stockton University Of New Jer JIM
Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan steps down amid many scandals

Dr. Daliah

01:45 min | 2 years ago

Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan steps down amid many scandals

"Wells Fargo chief executive Tim Sloan is stepping down effective immediately. It comes after less than four years on the job. And of course, a wave of scandals a longtime insiders Sloan was chosen to replace outgoing CEO, John Stumpf who resigned after Wells Fargo fraudulently opened millions of accounts to meet sales goals. Jeff Sonnenfeld is the senior associate dean of the Yale school of management. He told CNBC sloan's escape goat who went down because of political pressure and the actions of John stop. It's really unfair Wilson as you know. This is coming right off of that great Warren Buffett endorsement of an hour and ten minutes ago that this I think it was a shock to many. I actually had been in touch with Tim through the weekend. We we're going to have him sit next week at our CEO. Right next to Janet Yellen. In Washington also ask if she wanted to apologize for putting him in this situation with this foolish risk. But this is a company where he's delivered. The best earnings Jim motels and the country's companies hundred and sixty one year history. It's really been incredible any bad news, which has come out the last two years. It was not the office of the controller the currency. They're getting a free ride off of this pilot. You know, champion all these great scandals that Tim was bringing out. He was the one who is turning the rocks over not like John Stomas. His predecessor who was apparently deceiving. Even the board is Kim was the guy who was bringing public. But he's not a backslapping cheerleader charismatic guy. He was a CFO that didn't know that. He was put on earth to be the CEO. He rose to the occasion Lake Mary Barra. Sometimes you get insiders that are heroic to take this on. And I think it was a cheap

Tim Sloan CEO Wells Fargo Cnbc Sloan John Stumpf KIM Janet Yellen Jeff Sonnenfeld Warren Buffett Lake Mary Barra Yale School Of Management Chief Executive John Stomas Senior Associate Dean Jim Motels John Washington Wilson Sixty One Year Ten Minutes
Teacher charged with assault after video shows her dragging boy with autism through a Kentucky school

Bill Cunningham

01:08 min | 2 years ago

Teacher charged with assault after video shows her dragging boy with autism through a Kentucky school

"On assault charges today. Dan, ingred county. But it just it just speaks to. I think what is so wrong about a profession that has so much right in it. So I wanted to get a professional perspective on this and standing by the hotline to speak about that right now is Stephen crates. He is an associate professor of special education and an associate dean of education at northern Kentucky university, and it's great to have him. Join us here on seven hundred wwl w Stephen crates. Welcome to the big one. Thanks for joining us. Thank you. I was as I said, I don't know if you heard in my in my intro. I was I was profoundly disturbed and moved by what I saw. And I'm wondering what your reaction was when you saw that video for the first time. Well, it's certainly something that shouldn't have happened. Children with autism can be very very difficult. And in the school situation and people get frustrated, but that's probably not the way it should have

Associate Professor Associate Dean DAN Northern Kentucky University
"associate dean" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"All right, guys. Let's get back to the show. So I've talked to quite a few people on talk nerdy up to this point. Because we're in the like two hundred thirty something forty something numbers of episodes now. And when I talk to people about black holes, for example, I find that. There are similarities across the conversations. But I also find that they're very unique perspectives from different people depending on their field of astronomy. So you, you know, you're currently the distinguished professor in the department of astronomy at the university of Arizona, what type of astronomer are you like, obviously, you are focused on cosmology. But are there I've talked to let's say string theorists, for example of fairy different views on black home. Then, you know, people who are studies of Einstein's equations and things like that. So I mean first of all truth in advertising for a couple of years. I've been in associate dean, so I'm sort of administrative droid for half of my time. So my mom, the pleasurable astronomy part and using telescopes is less than it used to be. But I that makes me enjoy it more, actually. Absolutely. And it it means that you get to make bigger decisions about funding and the people who get to tell these important stories into this important research. So I want to just update right here in my notes that you're the associate dean R I. So yes, so I'm an observer. And I I. Cut my teeth. I'm Brett, and I did my undergrad and grad work in London and Edinburgh. And so I've been an optical infrared observational astronomer, and I got taken by the these very luminous. Oh, we're talking about black holes in their range of masses. So the extreme ones are the are billion or more solar masses? And they're the centers of large galaxies. And the most extreme of them are the ones that are showing down on gas and stars and emitting huge amounts of energy. So that that's another little paradox built into black holes. People think well, they're dark nothing can escape. So how do you see a dark thing? Well, many of them are dark and hard to detect but a small fraction of three percent are very active because they're they're feeding their fuelling through an accretion disk. So it sort of matters falling onto them going into this Equatorial disk and then funding into the black hole, and they end up being incredibly bright. So when they do that, they become quasars this one of the terms for these. The active black holes. And that's an extraordinary thing. So I earlier in my career I was drawn to that. Because what a quasar is is it's a nucleus of a galaxy. It's a the region around a billion solar mass black hole where energy is being pumped out because of Chretien power and shines up two thousand times brighter than the entire galaxy. That contains it so I like to use the analogy of matching you're.

associate dean university of Arizona distinguished professor dean R Einstein Chretien Brett London Edinburgh three percent
"associate dean" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"University of Maryland and Bobby Chesney. Associate dean university of Texas law school sm- earlier remarks by Senator Marco Rubio The Senate majority. Leader Mitch McConnell says the Senate will, vote today on a resolution, opposing the question of US diplomats and. Other American, officials by a foreign government, the Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer sponsored legislation Russian President Vladimir Putin has suggested he wants to interview Americans accused. By, Russia of, unspecified crimes and the White House says the President Trump is weighing the offer really today Republicans blocked to other resolutions, backing intelligence community findings that Russia interfered in two thousand sixteen election and calling for other responses to the. Meddling Meanwhile President Trump again tweeting about. This issue claiming that the fake news media pushing for a major confrontation between the US and Russia even a confrontation that could lead to war The president, also saying he looks forward to a. Second meeting, with the Russian President Vladimir, Putin meanwhile this from NBC news FBI director Christopher Wray suggesting that he has threatened to resign and push back. Against, President Trump's, recent, comments casting doubt on, Russian difference in the election race down with NBC nightly news anchor Lester Holt last night, at the Aspen security forum in Aspen Colorado This, runs about fifty minutes thank you everyone for being here and director Ray have a seat we got to spend a little time together in preparation I find director to be a man of a lot of passion very proud of the FBI the. People, at work under him and I want you, to know how important that is to us because at the end. Of the day we all depend on you and we depend on the work of the FBI, and, I just want to thank you for your willingness to sit, here.

president Senate Trump FBI President Vladimir, Putin Vladimir Putin Russia director Senator Marco Rubio US NBC dean university of Texas University of Maryland Bobby Chesney Mitch McConnell Chuck Schumer Christopher Wray Lester Holt Aspen
"associate dean" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on Science Friday

"We're looking at is there learning gains that's the that's the only thing that really matters who learns more the kids who interacted with the version that builds report or the kids who interacted with the other version that doesn't build our wish you great lock great success and good luck with your work thank you so much just casella associate dean in the school of computer science and former director of the human computer interaction institute at carnegie mellon university here in pittsburgh thank you for taking after the break they look at building robots that we can trust an empathize with and we're art and psychology fit i'm i replayed oh and this is science friday from wnyc studios this science righty podcast is brought to you by goldman sachs for insights from leading thinkers on the state of the markets industries and the global economy listen to their podcasts exchanges at goldman sachs you'll hear discussions on a variety of topics with far reaching implications from how venture capital is fueling innovation to the global shift toward renewable energy to the economic impacts of president trump's legislative agenda and more that's exchanges at goldman sachs available on i tuned spotify stitcher soundcloud and google play and g s dot com slash podcast science friday is supported by wonder capital the easiest way to invest in in large scale solar energy projects across the us experts at bloomberg estimate that two point eight trillion dollars will be invested in solar energy by twenty forty with wonder capital solar investment platform individuals can now take advantage of this economic opportunity in fact people like you have already financed more than one hundred fifty largescale solar projects these solar energy projects create enough electricity to power the equivalent of four thousand homes which helps offset almost seventy five million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions each year visit wonder capital dot com slash science to find out how you can begin investing in solar energy projects while earning up to seven point five percent annually and helping in the fight against climate change again that's wonder capital dot com slash science wonder capital where impact investing meets capitalism.

trump bloomberg spotify president casella us google associate dean goldman sachs wnyc studios pittsburgh carnegie mellon university director
"associate dean" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on WDRC

"Uh david souter he's associate dean four graduate programs at the university of connecticut's school of business he says merging firms are often non commital about location plans in the future but cv as has been very very committed to aetna's presence in hartford and as sodere who has a published papers on merger and acquisition strategy said the decision makes sense given what the combination is trying to accomplish at night ncv as are not in the same business but rather complementary businesses and retaining the knowledge and each firm will be absolutely crucial both for continuing business as usual and for developing new innovations that motivate the merger so that is certainly good news and is a frontpage story very this morning in the hartford current and i'm sure there will be more more about it but uh that's good good knows you know some of the news that we get to isn't that great the other knows his is right on and this is going to help us this is going to help us a great deal there's no question another raw interesting story is about medical pot uh the use may be expanded proposals to allow prescriptions of medical marijuana in connecticut for five additional diseases and disorders including op ed withdrawal will be on the agenda for a state public hearing in hartford today other proposed of medical marijuana conditions on the agenda for the state board of physicians hearing include of many many other diseases and the those should be issued in the near future they hearing actually is scheduled for eight thirty eight thirty this morning at 450 columbus boulevard in in hartford okay twenty.

hartford marijuana connecticut david souter associate dean university of connecticut school of business
"associate dean" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Venus associate dean professor of citizenship in public affairs at tufts university thanks peter for joining us thank you and our other three teenage candidates ethan randall lewis aaron coleman entirely ruzic all candidates for kansas governor thanks to you ethan aaron and thailand thank you thank you good to have you on this program so in a moment we're going to be looking at these survivors of last week's school shooting in florida they're taking their powerful voices to the politicians who are sworn to represent them they want to see something done about gun violence in this country and we're going to be talking about that in a few moments i'm tom gelatin this is on point nia long and and now i'd like to turn to the high school students who are demanding action on gun legislation in florida survivors of the tragic mesh shooting in a parkland florida high school wednesday are headed to tallahassee they are calling for adults to protect them for from gun violence one of the leaders of that movement is cameron caskey a he is one of those who's going to be coming to washington or plans to come to watch in a much 24th for a march for our lives to demand guncontrol reform he is a junior at marjorie stone and douglas high school here he is speaking with cnn on sunday why message for the people in office is you're either with us or against us we are losing our lives while the adults are playing around and we have received endless support from your generation and we thank everybody for that immensely because we we we really appreciate it we don't need you.

aaron coleman kansas florida parkland florida high school marjorie stone cnn associate dean professor peter ethan randall lewis ethan aaron tallahassee cameron caskey washington douglas high school
"associate dean" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"I think he if you think kurds k c nonkurds kurds with a incurred that way wisconsin that i've i've been there are heard about it's it's where my gallagher's home from my daily are always a pleasure my friend tried to tell people kurds and wisconsin amateur the kurds and way wisconsin everyone's or the kurds away was got so that's my gallagher's hometown relief factor dot com let's send mike gallagher and the brewers some relief factor dot com you know my dean chapman law skull matt parallel was the associate dean marquette law school for a long time so i know all the secrets about milwaukee he tells me everything about me away up ever i know about kurds and way wisconsin i know where relief factor oughta go to mike gallagher relief factor dot com is for anyone who hurts every day because of particular problem he had a bad back bad knee bad ankles or you're just old you've got arthritis then you definitely want you try relieffactor dot com the perfectly formulated carefully calibrated combination of the four natural supplements naturally occurring in nature that combined all operate in tandem to provide temporary support for the relief of minor aches and pains and we all have them if your aging or if you're exercising and you should be doing the former and you are definitely do the latter then i mix at up yet the exercise of the former aging as the latter then you need to be taken relief factor that come the starter pack is nineteen dollars ninety five cents all you have to do is go to the website i tell you three times a day relieffactor com i remind you and every day more of you finally say okay warming down try it and then you're happy more than eighty percent of people come back again and again because it works relief factor dot com stay tuned i'll be right back on the hugh hewitt show.

wisconsin mike gallagher brewers dean marquette law school milwaukee hugh hewitt nineteen dollars eighty percent
"associate dean" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on Short Story Long

"It's ikea on our forget when i graduated from harvard business school and then someone raises a hand in international students says the professor great a graduate of harvard business come gone out in the white which i do and you could see this person was just amp like they just had twenty five rebels in the the professor who is also the associate dean said um nothing and he was like what do you mean i'm like ready and he said just just let it merrin it for a minute right you have all these ideas we filled you with all this stuff it's all there but you don't have to call on it all day one and you don't you don't have to go to these seminars and come back and revamp your whole company so i would say just take it in let it let it marinade and then just take action because i think analysis paralysis overcomes a lot of us you can read this and have it all annotated and do all this and that but then if you just sit there and nobody he said you that i mean a lot of things we said in there are like it's a judgment call right it's like things there's there's a balance or bar about to almost everything we say in there and we can't possibly give you prescriptive things for most things it's about your judgments were just trying to give you some things that have worked in our experience and different things so announces paralysis and then i really believe that were in the age of like if you think you're kind of treading water your probably moving backwards so just keep taking steps leftfoot right foot proverbially and take solace in the fact that you definitely do not have to get every decision right just have to not get it so wrong that it syncs anything so just take and being smart about the big decisions and making any decision for a lot of the things that probably soon portent better.

ikea harvard business school professor associate dean harvard
"associate dean" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Of course impatient room associate dean of education doctor say get alamba says one of the new courses the data 2000 training for medication assisted treatment eight hours ago at a training which every single one offer hundred eighty students who are going to be rising in their last and final earlier off medical school will be receiving that training major training starts may fifteen th gender sillo new jersey one a one point five news president trump is considering sharp cuts to the money sent to a un agency for palestinian refugees us officials are the trump administration could make additional donations contingent on changes to the organisation trump appears more likely to send only about sixty million a plant one hundred twenty five million first it what's so great about the garden state every week at this time we profile several groups and individuals of make the garden state a great place to live one of the newest employees at children's specialized hospital is earning rave reviews for being intelligent and lovable but he's not a human burton the twenty two monthold golden retriever who came to the new brunswick facility in november is jersey's only fulltime pediatric hospital therapy dot c s ages bonnie altieri says burton's training included learning words and recognising human facial expressions and demeanor he's had a tremendous impact peter we only very expert at interpreting um you know that communication and kind of thinking up his interaction with our patients and families you know depending on where they are in their practice here children specialized ruppert non board after family said pets were something they missed most about home during extended hospital stays patrick lavery new jersey one at one point five new jersey's first news five twenty six we have cold temperatures this morning we have snow on the way for this week dale have everything you need to know about a couple of period former four minutes on the half hour at 530 also at five thirty three hours or ticking by governor christie leaves office after eight years the ups the downs will have look back on the half hour ed will uptake business news next this new jersey's first news having your finger on the pulse.

governor christie jersey board new brunswick president associate dean time trump administration ups patrick lavery golden retriever un cold
"associate dean" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

FunnelHacker Radio

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on FunnelHacker Radio

"And so the meaning that you give and experience is what you believe it doesn't mean it's true now what so fascinating about this because the brain is a goal achieving machine is you will perpetuate that meaning into reality but you also have you also have the ability to change the meaning that you give something at any point in time and that will change your life because the brain is a goal achieving machine i think it's i love it i such a huge believer in now i've seen that my own life i've seen lots of others i'm fortunate to path 20plus years notch up nor seen any can i'd spy and love everything associate dean an entrepreneur because as you mentioned your exposure to so many more things is just i mean just ten times what most people seat because you're you're out there making stuff happen and i think that's that just fascinates me i i'm a huge leap in fact it the only thing that matters is the means that you give thanks and i i get a switch back gina yes so now so now here's and it can you your seeing work there's sort of a logical step by step process it begs another question if i am misinterpreting reality right now if i'm giving a meaningless something that's not really true and it's limiting me in my life the first question is will what is true and then and then the next question becomes how do i know when i'm limiting myself how do i know wait a limiting belief is active or a pattern of thinking related a limiting belief is active in so here's what we found.

associate dean