26 Burst results for "Associate Dean"

"associate dean" Discussed on College Admissions Decoded

College Admissions Decoded

05:30 min | 2 weeks ago

"associate dean" Discussed on College Admissions Decoded

"Through the college admissions process. I'm your host Eddie Pickett and my pronouns are he him and his. I'm a knack act board member and a senior associate dean of admissions and the director of recruitment at Pomona college and Claremont California. I'm joined today by art Coleman, managing partner and cofounder education council, who's worked on issues of equity and college admissions for many years. He provides policy, strategic, and legal counseling services to national nonprofit organizations, school districts, state agencies, and post secondary institutions throughout the country. Hello and welcome art, thank you very much. Glad to be here. I'm really excited for today's conversation because my current major project at school is preparing for the potential implications of this ruling. And so I know that I'm going to learn something new today, and hopefully you all get to learn something new as well. So just to start, can you tell us a little bit about yourself about education council and what draws you to the college access and equity work? Sure. My work focuses mostly on issues of student equity and institutional quality and the whole array of DEI issues reflect really my particular focus now on issues of policy strategy and law. That focus comes after a stand where, as I term it, I'm a recovering litigator. I also worked as deputy assistant secretary for civil rights in the Department of Education during the Clinton administration and helped form education council years ago with former secretary of education, dick Reilly, and it was in essence a quest to establish a mission based enterprise that would help marry good policy practice and law to come up with better decision making and better outcomes for all students with a core focus on equity. And so that's the core of what I do. The vast majority of my particular work in our organization is in the post secondary space in the admissions and enrollment arena. And how did I get here? I think you can look back at my life all the way back to my childhood. My mom was a high school teacher and a school counselor for 30 years. And I grew up with sort of her passion about helping students who are low income students of color, getting to and through post secondary education. College for me was also a transformative experience, gave me confidence and opened my eyes to a new world I had never seen. And my husband and I have two children who are black and living there experienced once a senior in college once just graduated from college living that experience has given me sort of new insight on the perspectives and the nuances and the contextualization around issues of diversity equity inclusion. And so I bring all of that sort of personal history to my professional passion. Can you tell us about your history of involvement with the consideration of race and admissions decisions? Sure, that really began in earnest. I was counting back this morning. It's rather scary. It's almost 30 years ago. But when I was at the department in the office for civil rights, the issues of race conscious admissions in affirmative action more broadly were central to my portfolio. And what I discovered through both outreach and working with institutions around the country was that a lot of very smart people were not connecting the dots between research policy practice and law on the front end and they were creating problems from themselves on the back end.

Eddie Pickett art Coleman cofounder education council Pomona college Clinton administration and hel dick Reilly Claremont Department of Education California office for civil rights
The University of Michigan's Diversity Racket

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:11 min | 3 months ago

The University of Michigan's Diversity Racket

"Yesterday on the podcast, we had we had Kim Johnson, the sociologist, and she sent Debbie and W showed it to me. A remarkable listing of the diversity staff at the University of Michigan. I mean, this is dozens and dozens of people. I mean, you've got, you've got deans and associate deans, and you've got dean lit so you've got bureaucrats, galore. I mean, and so you think to yourself, we know, how do we get all this craziness on the campus? And the answer is hundreds of people are paid to promote it. It's coming from this sort of diversity racket. And by the way, these are not people who are, you know, who are underpaid. When you look at the compensation, there's a vice provost for diversity. Salary $410,000. That's a special adviser to the president who makes $240,000. Program director, $196,000, and down the list you go, you have research fellows. So there are all these people for whom diversity is a full-time job. They're not about education. They're basically in the diversity racket. And this is what they care about. Education is not their business.

Kim Johnson University Of Michigan Debbie
The Brutal Power of Teachers' Unions With Corey DeAngelis

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | 6 months ago

The Brutal Power of Teachers' Unions With Corey DeAngelis

"Talk to us about the role of the unions, how they behave, how they intimidate and also give us a fair picture of the teachers, not all of them want to be pro BLM neo marxists today. Yeah, you can be pro teacher and be anti teachers unions because the teachers union bosses like Randy weingarten often don't push for policies that benefit the great teachers that already exist in the public school and private school classrooms. You have Randy weingarten making over 9 times the average teacher salary in the U.S.. Right, because teachers about 50 grand. Yeah, 50 60 grand on average. Over 500. Owned $570,000. And if you look just at the trends over time, I mean, you've got to look at the data since 1970, per people education expenditures in the United States after adjusting for inflation increased by about a 152% in the U.S.. But average teacher salaries only increased by about 8% in real terms. So we're throwing more and more money into the system. It's going to the superintendents and administrative votes. They're associate deans of diversity in blah, blah, blah, right? And so that's good for teachers union bosses like Randy weingarten because that means more dues paying members. If you just paid the teachers better, especially the ones that are doing a good job, well, you don't get an additional dues paying member. And so that means less money for the teachers that are doing a good job, more money for the union bosses and union leadership. Another report by Ben schaffer at kennesaw state university looked between the years of 1992 and 2014 similarly finding nationwide an increase in about 27 per people education expenditures in real terms, whereas teacher salaries over that period actually dropped by 2% after adjusting for inflation. So again, he said the same thing that there's a staffing surge, they're putting more people into the buildings. We saw this with COVID as well. The latest budget numbers I've seen with Los Angeles public schools, they were planning to increase their perpetual education expenditures over the past couple of years by about 69%,

Randy Weingarten U.S. BLM Ben Schaffer Kennesaw State University Los Angeles
"associate dean" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:33 min | 9 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on WTOP

"CBS News special report I'm Jennifer Kuiper Now one 13 the war in Ukraine has prompted many western companies to stop or scale back their business altogether in Russia That according to Jeff's son info senior associate dean at the Yale school of management who along with his research team but created a running list of which companies are staying and which are going This morning WTO PS Jeff who was first out the door BP was the first leaving about a $40 billion investment on the table to write off in rosneft BP I mean who would have thought followed very quickly by Shell the left around $35 billion And then Exxon around ten $12 billion people were stunned at that You wouldn't have expected the oil industry to be a first mover on a social justice clause like this but also that they would leave so much and we have hard assets It was followed very quickly by people like Michael Dell of Dell and Arvind Krishna I've IBM and HP and Intel and AMD thinking wow technology companies that sell a lot into Russia How could they step away from such a big market for them And then we also saw and this was the shocker of all The professional service community lawyers and accountants would usually rather shoot themselves than get involved in conflict let alone geopolitical conflict it quickly mushroomed to the list keeps growing And it is a gathering storm of voluntary initiatives with not only no government pressure to do so but no trade groups no business roundtable or national association of manufacturers It's been happening through spontaneity and sense of conscience of these firms Weirdly the last people to the party here for the most part were the consumer goods companies With the exception of strangely Adidas and Nike and H and M Apple Dell is most of the consumer product companies were way late here The fashion companies were at very late in the process here cosmetics companies very late They usually on the early edge So the consumers didn't get the information And as a consumers did that had a big impact But why are the professional service firms move so fast It wasn't because of consumer backlash Gen Z makes a difference in a time of this post pandemic if we're there into the pandemic stage where people are so mobile and vocal that the internal messaging was off the charts of partners associates consultants attorneys accountants saying you know we shouldn't be there We know what we're doing We shouldn't be doing it And that led to a revolution.

Jennifer Kuiper rosneft BP Michael Dell Arvind Krishna Jeff Yale school of management Russia CBS News Ukraine WTO Exxon Dell BP Shell AMD info national association of manufa
"associate dean" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:35 min | 9 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on WTOP

"Words of my Irish Catholic grandfather a bunch of malarkey CBS News special report I'm Jennifer Kuiper WTO P of 1212 Thursday morning Hundreds of western companies have either cut back their operations in Russia or stopped altogether in response to Russia's war in Ukraine Jeff sonnenfeld Senior associate dean at the Yale school of management and his research team have a running list right now the first to his surprise was oil giant VP Now McDonald's Coke and Pepsi all joining in Jeff tells us this morning why he thinks those companies took longer They were seen as liberation symbols when they went in in 1990 and they were proud of that legacy that they went in as part of the spirit of one big happy planet McDonald's and Coke and Pepsi were just considered great culture carriers as well as symbols of capitalism and the promise of capitalism and freedom that they felt like how can we abandon that now and their boards held them back because of a time warp and their thinking and they figured it out now But they're still thinking well we can't abandon these people and all the rest and we need a humanitarian paternalistic approach to our employment No that's not the idea of these economic blockades They couldn't understand themselves as wanting to be aggressors economic aggressors when they're trying to build bridges It was misplaced sense of humanitarian concern if you will and not so much their financial entanglements McDonald's and IBM have shuttered their operations and still paying the workforce The idea of course is to introduce suffering in the economy to bring it to a standstill When the South African sanctions succeeded it was with the voluntary cooperation of 200 major businesses which was stunning and historic at that time until this week They worked in concert with the governmental sanctions to paralyzed South African economy Somebody like Putin is not there and positioned based on his sense of legitimacy People know the elections were rigged and he jails his opposition And he's not there because people love him They fear him So one pillar he rests on is the coercive punishment Well we can't take that on with a bloodthirsty killer unless we go into fight him with violence and war But the economic sanctions are the alternative to bullets and bombs if he's no longer effective as a totalitarian that he doesn't control civil society he's revealed to be impotent And the oligarchs and others collapse And that's the goal here is to not have a soft landing for a functional economy with some casual warning shot over the bow.

Jennifer Kuiper Jeff sonnenfeld McDonald Pepsi Coke Russia Yale school of management CBS News Ukraine Jeff IBM Putin
"associate dean" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:52 min | 9 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on WTOP

"Schedule your free estimate today It's 1111 Hundreds of western companies have either cut back their operations in Russia or stop them altogether in response to Russia's war in Ukraine Jeff's sonnenfeld senior associate dean at the Yale school of management and his research team have a running list that's now grown to about 330 companies the first to his surprise was oil giant BP Now McDonald's Coke and Pepsi have joined in and son and fell tells me why he thinks those companies took longer They were seen as liberation symbols when they went in in 1990 and they were proud of that legacy that they went in as part of the spirit of one big happy planet McDonald's and Coke and Pepsi were just considered great culture carriers as well as symbols of capitalism and the promise of capitalism and freedom that they felt like how can we abandon that now and their boards held them back because of a time warp and their thinking and they figured it out now But until just a day ago they're still thinking well we can't abandon these people and all the rest And we need a humanitarian paternalistic approach to our employment No that's not the idea of these economic blockades And they couldn't understand themselves as wanting to be aggressors economic aggressors when they're trying to build bridges It was misplaced sense of humanitarian concern if you will and not so much their financial entanglements McDonald's and IBM have shuttered their operations but still paying the workforce The idea of course is to introduce suffering in the economy to bring it to a standstill When the South African sanctions succeeded it was with the voluntary cooperation of 200 major businesses which was stunning and historic at that time until this week They worked in concert with the governmental sanctions to paralyze South African economy Somebody like Putin is not there and positioned based on his sense of legitimacy People know the elections were rigged and he jails his opposition And he's not there because people love him They fear him So one pillar he rests on is the coercive punishment Well we can't take that on with a bloodthirsty killer unless we go into fight him with violence and war But the economic sanctions are the alternative to bullets and bombs if he's no longer effective as a totalitarian that he doesn't control civil society he's revealed to be impotent And the oligarchs and others collapse And that's the goal here is to not have a soft landing for a functional economy with some casual warning shot over the bow No it's to be much more harsh and aggressive than some of these CEOs and their boards wanted That is Jeff sonnenfeld senior associate dean at the Yale school of management Coming up next on WTO P a sports report bursting at the seams There's so much to talk about We have the caps and wizards in.

McDonald Pepsi Coke Russia Yale school of management Ukraine BP Jeff IBM Putin Jeff sonnenfeld WTO wizards
"associate dean" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:52 min | 9 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on WTOP

"In Ukraine has prompted about 330 western companies to stop or scale back their business in Russia That's according to Jeff's sonnenfeld senior associate dean at the Yale school of management who along with his research team has created a running list of which companies are staying and which are going I spoke with son and felled earlier BP was the first leaving about a $40 billion investment on the table to write off in rosneft BP I mean who would have thought followed very quickly by Shell the left around $35 billion And then Exxon around ten $12 billion people were stunned at that You wouldn't have expected the oil industry to be a first mover on a social justice clause like this but also that they would leave so much and we have hard assets It was followed very quickly by people like Michael Dell of Dell and Arvind Krishna of IBM and HP and Intel and AMD thinking wow technology companies that sell a lot into Russia How could they step away from such a big market for them And then we also saw and this was the shocker of all The professional service community lawyers and accountants would usually rather shoot themselves than get involved in conflict let alone geopolitical conflict it quickly mushroomed into 70 and now it's around 330 The list keeps growing And it is a gathering storm of voluntary initiatives with not only no government pressure to do so but no trade groups no business roundtable or national association to manufacture It's been happening through spontaneity and sense of conscience of these firms Weirdly the last people to the party here for the most part were the consumer goods companies With the exception of strangely Adidas and Nike and H and M Apple Dell is most of the consumer product companies were way late here The fashion companies were at very late in the process here cosmetics companies very late They usually own the early edge So the consumers didn't get the information And as a consumers did they had a big impact but why are the professional service firms move so fast It wasn't because of consumer backlash Gen Z makes a difference in a time of this post pandemic if we're there into the pandemic stage where people are so mobile and vocal that the internal messaging was off the charts of partners associates consultants attorneys accountants saying you know we shouldn't be there We know what we're doing We shouldn't be doing it And that led to a revolution on the inside that we've never seen before in these professional service firms So a separate constituency with the internal workforce outraged That is Jeff's son and felt senior associate dean at the Yale school of management Coming up here on WTO major news from baseball's labor talks and the commanders have reportedly picked a quarterback 9 13 Say big all this month during court for the trout let's $49 or.

rosneft BP Michael Dell Arvind Krishna Yale school of management Russia Dell Ukraine Exxon BP Jeff AMD Shell Intel IBM HP national association Adidas
"associate dean" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:26 min | 9 months ago

"associate dean" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"In 1945 in rural Texas In 1967 she graduated from Dillard university in New Orleans and continued her education at Harvard University where she received her master's and doctorate in romance literature Her academic journey began as an assistant Professor of French at the university of New Orleans in 1973 and continued her career at California state university northridge in 1978 In 1978 she also moved to the University of Southern California and in 1983 she became an assistant and associate dean at Princeton University in 1995 Ruth Simmons became president of Smith college In 2001 she became the first female president of Brown university She was also named America's best college president by Time Magazine At Brown and initiative to raise $1.4 billion was achieved during her tenure It was the largest in brown's history In 2009 Ruth Simmons was appointed to the president's commission on White House fellowships by president Barack Obama Probably sponsored by Goya Koya offers an amazing variety of rice mixes for all your cooking needs visit Goya dot com celebrating black history month 77 WABC WABC traffic and transit in New Jersey Lyndon and accident closing route 27 in both directions between Garfield street and north Park Avenue also in Patterson we have an accident that has closed off route 20 north bound between first avenue maple avenue and Lincoln avenue river street GWB upper okay lower okay I'm bob Brown with your 77 WABC traffic and transit update Nobody says it better than Mark Levin I'll go with what Mark Levin said 'cause nobody could say it better Call in now at 877-381-3811 The best time I had at cpac of course was with my wife on stage And we only have 20 minutes And we got off and people said we wanted to hear him watch So we only have 20 minutes.

Ruth Simmons California state university no Dillard university university of New Orleans Goya Koya Harvard University Smith college University of Southern Califor New Orleans Princeton University Brown university Time Magazine Texas White House Barack Obama Mark Levin America brown Patterson
"associate dean" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"associate dean" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To Bloomberg businessweek Carol and Tim and we're alive here at the Stanford graduate school of business and so great to have back with us Sarah soul she is a professor here of organizational behavior also a senior associate dean of academic affairs You oversee diversity and we want to talk to you about that But how great is it to have things kind of more normal It is absolutely wonderful And it's so great to be here with you both again and seeing our campus come alive as you're seeing now is such a treat in such a gift If you think about where we were two years ago before the pandemic hit is this what it looked like This is pretty much what it looked like I don't think we had very many people wearing masks but this is pretty much our students wearing masks in the classroom Absolutely 100% So what's it been like the last 18 months year I've been saying I got on a plane for the first time in 18 months At an airport the world definitely you know is reopening We're seeing that what are some of the conversations though Over what was a very difficult year Obviously the pandemic kids learning students learning your student body virtually But also some really tough issues whether it was racism diversity This is your world Yes What are some of the conversations that were coming your way Absolutely And it was a very tough year But it was a year of learning You know we were so fortunate to have so many students faculty staff and alums who wanted to help us as an institution get through the pandemic and also get through the divisions that were tearing apart this country with respect to race and systemic racism So we were very fortunate and the conversations that we had with our alums with our students with our faculty and staff were conversations that were geared toward our growth as an institution and towards us being better on the diversity equity and inclusion front You're also a Professor of organizational behavior and I'm wondering how your research how your background how your education helps you communicate with faculty with students and help them facilitate these difficult conversations in the classroom That's such a good question Well and also connected.

Sarah soul Bloomberg businessweek Stanford graduate school of bu Carol Tim
"associate dean" Discussed on Blazing Trails

Blazing Trails

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"associate dean" Discussed on Blazing Trails

"And today were catching up with dr gita. Air salesforce is chief medical officer with an update on the pandemic including what parents need to be thinking about when it comes to sending their kids back to school and how companies can take the lead in fighting the delta variant. The resurgence infections joining us to discuss. This is dr carlos del. Rio executive associate dean of the emory school of medicine and grady health system and niece chopra co founder and president of care journey and formerly the first. Us chief technology officer under.

dr gita Air salesforce dr carlos del emory school of medicine grady health system niece chopra co Rio Us
"associate dean" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"associate dean" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Yes i think anything we can do to encourage reluctant folks to get vaccinated because they'll want to be part of these public events That's a good thing ridiculous. I'm sorry ridiculous. Also francis collins. He adds you know what we should make. The bet vaccinated mouse. Because if you really want pressure people to to say if you want to say people should have a wonderful life wonderful for life the best thing to do is get vaccine and they can live exactly the same way. They were living when their unvaccinated makes perfect sense again. He's zolt self-contradictory. Nonsense here's francis collins. Say something makes no sense. Vaccinated people are capable of getting the virus in their nose and throat and they do seem to have high enough levels virus that they might be contagious enhanced. The reason if you're in a community where this viruses spreading which is about seventy five percent of counties right now. It is prudent to put on a mask even if you're vaccinated just in case You might be somebody who's currently spreading it. What in the world. What in the actual world i mean no no because guess what everyone in the country has had the opportunity at the vaccine and of story and despite all the scare stories vow children are wildly affected by cova. The statistics prove that this is not the case. The overall kids are significantly less likely to be hospitalized or die from colvin than any other subgroup of the population. I a long shot by a really really really long shot and yet here is francis collins saying he doesn't understand why rhonda santa's stopping people from masking in schools and again the real reason that you're trying to mask up. Kids is to prevent them from infecting their teachers. All of whom last. I checked artists who've had the opportunity to get the vaccine. Here's francis collins saying stuff that is not based data. While i don't understand the ban at certainly this seems like something. Local officials ought to be able to decide based on their communities circumstance. And we do know that kids are capable of getting pretty sick. We've lost about four hundred children who have died from cova nineteen since this all started and the kids can also get long it where they maybe that sick with the acute illness but then end up months later with difficulties with brain fog and fatigue that interferes with their school performance so this is not to be just dismissed as zero risk. It's i'm sorry. this is just absurd. It's absurd as carol. Markets points out in the new york. Post there's reason. Much of europe didn't mass kids. Underage twelve at all. It isn't that they care about their kids less than we do here. In a country that starts asking the insane age of to in fact shows europeans care about their kids development so much they won't force them to play bit parts in a grand psycho drama. That is correct. Gabe the this is a recapitulation of what it means to be free human being driven by our public health at this point. That's what this is. And they're making perfectly clear they never want to go back to normal. Here's the associate dean of brown university public school of health on. Cnn is megan ronnie same. We're never going back to pre pandemic reality ever. This is why they would love. They would love this. Can we ever go back to a pre pandemic reality. we are never going to go back to pre pandemic reality..

francis collins rhonda santa cova colvin carol brown university public school Gabe europe new york megan ronnie Cnn
Marjorie Taylor Greene: US House votes to strip Republican of key posts

TIME's Top Stories

05:15 min | 1 year ago

Marjorie Taylor Greene: US House votes to strip Republican of key posts

"Report. That they're covid. Nineteen shot may not only protect against disease but also help to prevent spread of the sars o. V. two virus the news was heralded by policymakers desperate to see a vaccine that can curb the spread of the disease but scientists have been a bit more cautious if confirmed the results would represent a breakthrough in the covid nineteen vaccine race so far the shots authorized or approved around the world have shown strong protection against moderate to severe disease but haven't definitively proven that people who get vaccinated are less likely to spread the covid nineteen virus but the data say. Some experts is confusing. So it's hard to adequately evaluate the companies claim that the shot can actually slow the spread of covid nineteen or not in the study published on the lancet pre print server which means the results have not been peer reviewed a gold standard for ensuring the scientific rigor of the findings astra zeneca and oxford scientists. Report that two doses of their vaccine was overall sixty six point seven percent effective in protecting against covid nineteen disease as part of its analysis. The research team also collected nasal swabs from and unvaccinated study volunteers in the uk every week and tested them for the virus. The scientists found that positive tests were about fifty percent lower among people who got two doses of the vaccine compared to those who weren't vaccinated because people who don't test positive are less likely to spread the virus the researchers extrapolated from those data. The astra zeneca shot can transmission of the covid nineteen virus. However that may be a bit of a stretch says dr carlos. Del rio executive associate dean of emory school of medicine. It's a leap of science. That i think still needs to be proven. He says what they show is that there was either decreased viral shedding or decreased detection a virus however they do not actually show that transmission was decreased. We can say less. Transmission is a possibility but the data on. That needs to come out says del rio. We wanna state the facts and don't want to overstate the facts. That concern was echoed by health officials. In switzerland who decided this week to reject the astra. Zeneca shot the data available and evaluated to date are not yet sufficient for approval. The country's regulatory bodies swiss medic said on february third part of the concern has to do with the fact that the astrazeneca study underwent a number of changes after the phase. Three trial was begun. A fact that some infectious disease expert say makes it difficult to interpret the results for a clinical trial as crucial as this one modifying the setup once it's underway is similar to changing the rules in the middle of a game the study originally set out to investigate a single dose vaccine but was changed to two doses when concurrently conducted early studies show that to set doses of the vaccine produced a stronger immune response further because of what astrazeneca said. Were mistakes in measuring doses. Some people in the study in the uk received a half dose for their first shot and a full dose for the second. one people also got different placebos. Some god benign nina cockles solution and some a saline solution. That could mean nothing. But it's also unusual to have two. Placebos sends that has the potential to introduce con founders into the study and because of limited supplies. Some study participants had to wait more than the three to four weeks originally planned between their doses while others when told they couldn't come back for their second dose at the time they expected chose to simply not get their second shot entirely. Frankly the way they did. These trials was really confusing. Says dr paul off it. Director of the vaccine education center at children's hospital of philadelphia and a member of the us food and drug administration's advisory committee that reviews vaccines for authorization or approval. This is the stuff you figure out in phase one. You don't fool around in phase three and see what works he says. Here's what the researchers report after getting a single shot. Seventy six percent of participants were protected against disease for up to three months. Afterwards from their their levels of antibodies generated against the virus which scientists believe are important to protect against disease began to drop those results suggest that while two doses of the astra. Zeneca vaccine preferable. A single dose could still be useful for about three months in controlling covid. Nineteen that might be especially useful information to act on if vaccines are in. Short supply.

Astrazeneca Dr Carlos Astra Emory School Of Medicine Zeneca Del Rio Oxford UK Infectious Disease Switzerland Dr Paul Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Us Food And Drug Administratio Nina
"associate dean" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Kfbk now trending high above us this morning, there is a space walk of the way of the international space station. Astronauts are installing a new science platform. It will help with Earth Observation and astrophysics Research. California astronaut Victor Glamour is up there leading the mission this morning. How did I know that you would find a space story for us this morning. I'll sniff it out. With all the talk of recalling governor we wanted to go over just how our recall election would work if this does indeed happen, so you're about to hear from Mary Beth boiling. She's the associate dean of academic affairs and George School of Law, and she outlines right now the process once the signatures meet the threshold, and once those signatures are verified, the secretary of state's office We'll make a notice that the number has been met. Then there is a period of time of 30 days in which a voter can actually withdraw a signature that under the elections code during that time frame. Also, the Department of Finance has to do an estimate of the cost and submit that estimate of how much an election will cost to the chair of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee. Also, they send that to the governor, the lieutenant governor in the secretary of state. Now there is a provision that says when the governor is being Called the Lieutenant governor steps him and is the recipient and does all of the ministerial parts that the governor would otherwise do. Short answer here, Kristina. This is not a cut and paste deal. I mean, there's not a one size fit off system that they're likely in. This case would have to be a special election right because we're not in an election year correct. And so it's basically up to the secretary of state to start the thing in motion within about 60 days, no more than a 80 days to at least to start to set the rules as to win the actual election would take place. But Dean Moylan also warns there are many costs associated with the recall election, most of its state funded Even if the attempt to remove Governor Newsome fails. There's some interesting questions that come up about that, too, because obviously there's not a lot of time for campaigning for the people who are trying to replace the recall Day officer. But Article two section 18 of the California Constitution gives permission to if the officer is not recalled. So if this recall effort got enough signatures, But if the vote was no, we do not want to recall Governor Newsome. He could actually be reimbursed by the state for his election expenses. So in addition to the cost that the state would have for putting together a special election, which again the Department of Finance would come up with an estimate of how much it would cost, and the Legislature has to fund there could also be caused if it is Failed a town Okay. Special election not cheap when it will happen, not defined. The ball gets going within 60 to 80 days from the secretary of state following mid March. If indeed they have enough signature, it could all be over by summer. It could be It depends on when the secretary of state determines when we should be holding the special election. Then you have a whole bunch of people were going to get in. I mean, there were more than 20. I think when one Schwarznegger one. They had a little bit longer time, though. Okay? Yeah, it's it's ambiguous. Okay, It's not clear cut, but that's how it will roll out. That's what we know now. Okay, well, we'll have to see if they achieved those those markers for signatures by march. All right, let's get outside and check traffic. Now, my noble standing by with more This report is right by El Grove Honda. We have a tree down on Pharaoh's Boulevard. Fishies want both ways. It's a very and Bryant's thing going on throughout the morning announced cost a little more of a backup. That's on Paradise Boulevard. Siberian drugs Old east of Eastern Avenue. Three ways Well, problematic. 80 from Roosevelt looks good. Nine minutes to the camp City split, Get passes, fled and start to head West Mount across the top count on I 80 and it slows to a crawl due to some roadway. Flooding at Longview Cap City Freeway. Not bad, both ways. Nine minutes, either direction between splitting 50 13. And it gives you infernal Grove on I five in 25 minutes on 99 about halfway between back employees going to hit the slowdown that's due to some roadway flooding causing that I have been both directions at 47 on Highway 99 50 West Ham from Folsom, an 18 minute drive in you Can't get in from woodland on high five. It shut down across the YOLO bypass due to a big rigs overturned the Kenro 22 10. Anyone wanna go to your rabbit off at highway 1 13 down. I 80 and Davis you take that into Sacramento and Davis across the car's weight looks good 16 minutes to downtown. Most of the time. Zero means nothing but it elsewhere. 100 0 is.

Governor Newsome Department of Finance California Victor Glamour Folsom Dean Moylan Mary Beth officer associate dean of academic aff Joint Legislative Budget Commi Davis Kristina Longview Cap City Freeway El Grove Honda California Constitution Sacramento YOLO
"associate dean" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on KOMO

"Coma. 24 7 News Center. The federal government is bringing in more Corona virus vaccine doses to help reach President Biden's goal. The administration's announced moments ago plans to order an extra 200 million total doses from both Fizer and Madeira. Increasing total orders by 50%. The White House would also ramp up state distribution of the vaccine to roughly 10 million doses per week. For the time being. That's up from something like 8.4 doses, and the world has seen over 100 Million Corona virus cases as of today, about a quarter of which are from the United States. The president with a new goal when it comes to getting vaccinated Americans on the Rolls ABC, Stephanie Ramos reports. I think we may be able to get that to 1.5 million a day rather than one million today is gonna be a logistical Challenge that exceeds anything we've ever tried in this country, but I think we can do that. I feel confident that My summer. We're gonna be well on our way to heading toward herd immunity. The president's confident but cautious warning The death toll could top 660,000 before we start turning the corner. We're still going to be talking about this. In the summer. We're still going to be dealing with this issue. In the early fall the race to vaccinate the world as pressing as ever concerns escalating as more variants of the virus reported in the U. S on Monday to state supporting occurrences of the highly contagious UK strain and overnight Minnesota announcing a local resident who had recently traveled to Brazil has the country's first known case of the Brazil variant. Madonna, one of the two vaccines currently used in the U. S. Now looking at how it's shots hold up against these new strains. The company's saying experiments show it protects against the UK variant, but that it provoked a weaker response against the South African variant and is studying a couple new options, including a possible booster shot. We need to keep watching it and testing against it and making sure until we've got it beaten back that we're planning ahead and we're being careful. On Monday, U. S pharmaceutical company Merck announced its ending development of two potential vaccines, saying while both looked safe in clinical trials, immune responses were low. But scientists across the globe are trying to get as many that Sean's approved as possible. According to the World Health Organization. There are more than 60 vaccines around the world currently in human trials, 11 of them in the final testing stages and nearly 200. Others are in pre clinical development. But overnight, Dr Anthony Fauci is saying the disproportionate available doses across the country are of great concern to him. There was some areas of the country with his vaccine. Lying around, and it's not going into people's arms. I just got off the phone with the city and a stage in which they have so many more people lined up. Want to get vaccinated and they don't have vaccine. So that kind of dichotomy and disparity eyes something that we really need to address. Find out how to fix it and fix it. ABC Stephanie Ramos reporting planning a major step up of its response to the virus, the federal agency in charge of emergencies, FEMA says it will be setting up federally administered covert 19 vaccination centers. No word yet where President Biden signaled it last week with the goal of standing up 100 centers within the next month team has been running down state needs and managing supply chain issues. But its role will get bigger. The facilities to store and administer vaccines and more female also says it'll refund money to states spent for use of their National Guard troops to respond to the pandemic. Chuck's Iverson, ABC News From Washington State University students have hit the front lines in the battle against Cove in 19 students from the Wushu School of Pharmacy or helping administer covert vaccines in the Spokane area. Crystal Lewis is among them. I had no idea That I was gonna be able to serve my community this way and kind of be on the front lines and start vaccinating people. Have them make like this. Jennifer Robinson, associate dean for professional education, spoke with our partner station Kxl Y 50 years from now, What are they going to remember? They may remember some of the court.

President Biden president Stephanie Ramos ABC UK Dr Anthony Fauci Brazil federal government United States Crystal Lewis News Center World Health Organization Jennifer Robinson ABC News White House Minnesota Madonna Merck Sean associate dean
"associate dean" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"This is intelligence banners with former acting director of the CIA. Michael Morrell. Broken back to intelligence matters. I'm Michael morale. We're talking with Dr Ken with Kaiser, the associate dean for research and a biochemist at the United States Military Academy. At West Point, so can in the paper. You and your co authors give some examples of where this has already been done. And let me ask you just to describe very briefly. For our listeners a couple of those because I think they're instructive. The first was work. Done in 2000 and two I believe by scientists at the State University of New York at Stony Brook on the polio virus. Talk about that. So it's always been a goal for someone to build a genome from scratch. And so then the question is, you know, using state of the art Chemical synthesis tools. Can you construct something that is functional and s O? That is really where that effort was born out of s O, You know that in and of itself spawned several other efforts that eventually led up to kind of The idea that could you actually create a living cell, you know, from scratch, and that in and of itself goes hand in hand with what do you actually need? Because what we really need to understand this is what is actually needed for a living system. What can you throw away? Take Out of this car every little bit that you don't actually need to make that car run. So if you don't decide the mirrors to get it out of there, if you don't need this, the seat warmers get it out of there and whatnot. Just give me the very minimal system that I need for that car to actually function. And that's what has been a major goal in in synthetic biology efforts. You know, across the globe because once you have that kind of minimal structure that minimal scaffold that biological scaffold You can then add in. Ah, very, you know, whatever you want, And it's less of a load s O. You and I were going out for a run. If you if you add a large backpack onto your self, you're gonna slow yourself down. It's gonna be much more exerting. Well, the same thing happens when you engineer a a small micro, But you know this, you increase the metabolic load and you slow it down and you make it struggle. But if you can get rid of all the non essential requirements, then when you actually loaded up with that new system, whatever again for good or for bad Even have a chassis, a biological system that that's not gonna be loaded down as much as a natural one s so so that that's been kind of the progression is going from construct construct of the virus to construct of an actual living system of living cell. Another piece that we really wanted to bring up here is again on the good part. We have these amazing contests like the international genetically engineered machine contest Born out of M I T Um and and you have this incredibly rich international group of young men and women? Primarily, it was it was college students. That's how they kind of envision this. And so there was some undergraduates in some graduates that kind of got into it. But recently they've kind of lowered the bar of of entry because so many young high school students are really interested in this kind of work, and I'm just taking a look right now at the eye Jim team list in 2019. There was 360 teams from across the world about pushing 50% of them came from Asia. About 20% were from North America. But I'm just taking a look at the high school here. There was about Looks like about one third. One quarter to one third of the teams were at the high school level. So these air, young men and women in in high school who are who are engaging in synthetic biology projects. And about 60 65% of them are are from Asia and predominately there from China. So again, you know, the great thing about synthetic biology is that they're no borders. But then again, you know that then that apply that today to the context of threat and apply that to the context of force protection amongst the American population and the D O D and there might be something here of concern. Yeah, And and And then no borders become a bad thing. Right? So it Zzyzx. Interesting dichotomy. So can you just raised an issue that really caught my attention when I read it, because when people used to ask me about this threat I would say yes. Terrorist groups have shown interest. But doing this is very, very difficult and the one of the things that really jumped out to me and you're in your article. Is that your point that this is getting easier and easier and let me read? Maybe a couple of sentences that I highlighted when I read it the first time on, then get you to react to them. The first is today, the sophistication of high school and undergraduate student research projects. Has matched that of many highly trained personnel who were working in advanced laboratories less than a decade ago. That's the first and this And then the second is these synthetic bio tools are lowering the education training, cost time and equipment threshold required to modify and employ pathogenic organisms as biological weapons. Talk about the extent to which this is getting easier. And obviously why that's important. Sure, I mean, so let's take a look at the eye Jim organization and once again, you know, I'm a huge fan of participated my gym for many years, and you know they have a bio safety and about a security committee on their very much attuned to the potential. I'm issues but for us, say outside of the context of a competition and just going into the general population and then going into perhaps non state actors. Who have you no ill intent toward the United States. You think about this and you say if high school students could do this across Asia across Europe across United States, even if they have An adviser. That then take that threat kind of scenario and apply that to something chemical. Apply that to something, say nuclear and and it just doesn't match up. You're not gonna have high school students, you know, making the next generation a nuclear weapon. That's that's that's not going to happen. But here with the most amazing things about science, and you know, we're all about sharing information while about publishing were all about, you know, planting your flag and generating bragging rights about these great advances that we make and in both basic science and and the and applied science. But that also then provides Ah great recipe a great set of instructions for that next person and that next person can certainly be a young individual that does not have decades of experience in laboratories and and he or she can essentially do garage level science that in the past, I would have taken a lot of very Talented people. Ah, long time and in sophisticated labs going back to our polio example, you know, and talking about. You know how long did that take these experts in the Stony Brook lab. You know how many years was that? How many million American dollars was spent on that? Whereas when you talk about say something like a A young team of students in one of these one of these, I Jim teams whether this is on the thousands of dollars,.

Asia Jim polio United States United States Military Academy Michael Morrell Dr Ken Michael morale CIA acting director associate dean for research Stony Brook Stony Brook lab State University of New York D O D North America engineer China Europe
"associate dean" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on KOMO

"Is doing minor surgery every day, says Dr Sarah Gordon, the associate dean at the University of Washington Dentistry School tells the Times. I don't think any other doctors give more injections than dentist 40 to 50 a day. The idea isn't necessarily that your dentist office would become a vaccine site. Although your dentist might be able to offer one when you come in for a crown. The main point of adding Dennis and hygienist says Dr Gary Choteau is to allow doctors and nurses to focus more on those already sick. He says Dennis could work at mass vaccination sites to help on the preventive side of covert. Ryan Calvert Colonials. You have see pharmacies administering their first doses of the covert 19 vaccine. They ran out within a couple hours. The chain has been inundated with calls about the vaccine. After Governor Inslee announced that anyone over 65 is now eligible to get a shot. Tiffany Sanders with QFC says they got just 400 doses for four different pharmacies and all appointments seven book. It is frustrating for a lot of people, including us, because we're ready and willing to give the vaccine. We've got the pharmacy's petty. We've got the pharmacist who are trained and ready to do it, So we're just waiting to get those vaccines. Expect more doses next week to see if you qualify for Phase one B. Go to find your phase wh dot org Coming up Super High infection Rated What? Come county Now Some students and some inmates have Cove it. I'm Carleen Johnson. Come on Traffic, every 10 minutes on the force and for the Dubin Law Group Traffic center. Once again, it's Kira Jordan. Our heaviest drive right now is in Seattle. It's not on North and I five it's trying to head westbound on Spokane straight between I five and 99. We have a line up a semis. That are trying to work their way onto Harbor Island and everybody's getting caught up in this back up in. This is slowing down North found 95 riders. You're approaching the West Seattle Bridge North five is also going to find some light slowing as you're approaching Seneca. We're also seeing some light slowing on the East side on North found four or five around North East 30th. But checking on some travel times. Lacey to Federal Way. 32 minutes. See Texas Seattle about 16 minutes. Seattle The Bellevue 11 minutes on either like Bridge. Our next coma. Traffic.

Seattle West Seattle Bridge Dr Gary Choteau Dr Sarah Gordon Dubin Law Group Traffic center Dennis Ryan Calvert Colonials associate dean University of Washington Denti Governor Inslee Harbor Island Tiffany Sanders Carleen Johnson Kira Jordan QFC Spokane Lacey Texas Bellevue Seneca
"associate dean" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Pretty refined 6 47 right now on Colorado's morning news congressman Ken Buck, sending a warning to fellow Republicans who plan to object to certifying the electoral college results in an opinion piece in the Washington Post. Congressman says there's no constitutional provision for rejecting electors and adds that while the shares concerns about election irregularities, the actions of the objectors could threaten the future of the Electoral college, but also believes the work of progressives led to the current climate with tactics such as impeachment of the president. Colorado Democrat Congressman Jason Crowe is also weighing in, he says. Any challenge to the vote won't change anything. They have been sent to the house. We will count them on Wednesday. We will determine who won. In this case. It is President Biden and we will move forward. Congress convenes in a joint session today 11 o'clock our time to count those votes. Mary Beth Moylan, associate dean at the Make George School of Law in Sacramento, says any efforts to contest the outcome's going to amount to nothing more than just a long day for lawmakers have to have the House competitive and the Senate voting to reject the slate in order for this late to be rejected. There's not enough votes in either the house or in the Senate. And, as mentioned, dozens of Republicans on Capitol say they plan to contest those election results. Joe Biden is praising Republicans in the Senate who are breaking away from the president, Biden said. There are quote really decent Republicans who quote Don't wanna be part of this Trump Republican Party And then he mentioned Senator Mitt Romney as an example, the release of a single dose covered vaccine on the horizon. Johnson and Johnson is getting closer to rolling on a single dose covert vaccine. Company plans to seek emergency authorization for the vaccine next month. Ah, huge advantages. The vaccine wouldn't be required to be kept in extreme cold storage That is Bob Brown reporting, Jane J. Says. If the final stage of the trial of the vaccine goes well, they were roll out a billion doses. By the end of 2021 coming up, We'll have the latest on the Georgia Senate vote in a live report next that at 6 54 1st traffic.

President Biden Senate Congressman Jason Crowe Congressman Georgia Senate president Colorado Ken Buck Washington Post Senator Mitt Romney Mary Beth Moylan Republican Party Congress Johnson Capitol Bob Brown associate dean Make George School of Law
"associate dean" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Now from the cave. Okay newsroom with Taylor Martin. The Iris is warning Americans of a covert related text scam, which involves tricking people into disclosing their bank account information in order receiving economic impact payment. Iris says they will not contact you to verify personal or financial information before issuing those $600 stimulus checks. Thank you, Taylor and a phone call that President Trump made to the Georgia secretary of State getting a lot of attention. Today we go in depth now with Kate because Joe Michaels, who's here to tell us it may not be the kind of attention that the president is looking for any President Donald Trump, pressuring Georgia election officials to overturn results in the Peach state. Well, I want to do is this I just want to find 11,780 Votes, which is one more that we have Trump spending an hour on the phone Saturday with the office of Brad Rapids Burger. You wouldn't want to have an accurate election and you're a Republican. We believe what we do have an accurate election. No, I know you don't know. You know, you know you don't have you don't have not even plus. Mary Beth Boylan, associate Dean at make George School of Law says the president could be in legal trouble. If he knows his claims are true. Your federal laws and there are state laws. New Georgia that Prohibit someone attempting to change the outcome of an already certified election attempt to be encouraging elections officials to alter vote counts and Boylan says the Georgia secretary of state's office has the legal right to record the call Georgia It's a one party consent state, so only one party needs to know will consent to the recording and the secretary of state's office did know and to consent to the recording. Federal laws. Also one party consent. Democratic Congressman John Garamendi says the phone call is yet another example of President Trump waging war against democracy. Once again, we're seeing the president using the extraordinary power of his office to badger and two, I think corruptly change the legitimate certified vote. In Georgia. Garamendi says Congress isn't likely to take action relating to the call. The Congress of the United States does not charge anybody with crimes we can impeach Is this in a peaceable defense? Well, we've got 15 days and Trump will be no longer president is a federal attorney going to take this into account, Possibly Is a state attorney general and Georgia like Meteo, pursue this. I doubt it. Everybody knows that the election is over that Trump will not be president. Two minutes after 12 on January. 20th Republican Congressman Tom McClintock says Trump didn't do himself any favors by making the call. I don't know exactly what he was getting at words aren't exactly his thing, but I mean, clearly undermines his position by making the suggestion that a secretary of state should just find more votes, even if he was being facetious or figurative. The cure for voter fraud is not Morva odor fraud, and you cannot accuse the opposition in manufacturing votes. If you're suggesting doing the same, even if That's not exactly what he meant. My contact doesn't think that call will have a negative effect on the Republican Party as a whole kitty, But he does say it doesn't reflect well on the president. All right. Keep the case. Joe Michael there. Thanks for 50 and kfbk, traffic.

President Donald Trump president Georgia Congressman John Garamendi Iris Mary Beth Boylan Taylor Martin Republican Party Congress Congressman Tom McClintock tricking Brad Rapids Joe Michael fraud United States associate Dean
"associate dean" Discussed on The Leadership Trap

The Leadership Trap

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on The Leadership Trap

"Have suppliers I have a number of people that My making a personal emotional decision for in my number two would risk those stakeholders. i think. That's a very simple decision for me. However i think the trick is not what it's how and so. I think how that would be done would be really important and i would work. Really hard to negotiate with that investor of how we find a new opportunity for that number to either in the company or outside the company to make it less painful for that number two. And if need be i'll tell you for me personally i would sacrifice some of my personal opportu your interests including salary if i needed to to help that number to get a safe landing Because i think i would personally have an obligation to my number two. But i think as a leader i have a moral obligation to the major stakeholders which are the employees the customers and the suppliers and my other investors and And that's really what would drive my decision again. It's the this how is ax. Import important than the white. And you know I'll talk to a real situation. You know when. I came back to the comp. We had Another round of funding and one of the business the In a term sheet was they wanted us to reduce the headcount. Get this round of the lowest certain number by the end of the year december tenth and i absolutely refused to lay off people at christmas break to the point that it got to exactly what you said david. I had to make the decision of you know where. Where am i wear my moral compass or what. It came down to as i said you know what if that's what you insist on doing. You need another ceo. Because i'm not gonna do it. i will. I refuse to do that. I will step away from the company right now and let the board appoints somebody else to do that because i will do it. And the other board members and investors pushed on the late around ones and they allowed us to move it to the first of the year and we did it in a right. After the first year we are not going to ruin people's holidays and much more importantly do it in a period where they couldn't even have chance of finding opportunity And again we talked about the. How if you remember. We put a lot of work in making sure that we found an outsourcing firm. We used our Our contacts try to get people's jobs people jobs and when we actually got the ability to hire back we went to the people that weren't rehired. That was first place. We went to to bring people back in the company that was matter of fact we had a vp that gave me a wreck for a job when we first opened back hiring and i said what about the people on the list he goes. Oh we have an opportunity here to level the position. I said the people that were here till the end were great people. We're going to hire back off the list. And and he did and honestly that was probably the best of emotional capital. I could've invested in the company because people really that that word got around people appreciate it. So i think moral dilemma. You posed his real. But i think is a very simple answer. Which is you have to think about your role. And the stakeholders you are morally obligated to and determine whether you're making decisions on behalf of your moral obligation to the stakeholders or your personal obligation to an individual. Yeah that's a great anecdote also to wrap up on. There is a shining glaring. Light on senior leadership especially they. Sometimes they need to be reminded by others like their mentors or someone in my capacity. Who's looking at the human capital side of things. People watch you very closely. It is exhausting. You knew that because you have enough empathy within you that you will do the things that you just described. And people recognize that. And that's why they would bend over backwards to stick it out. Because you brought humanity and a sense of genuine interest in the lively hoods People and it's amazing as a result of that. That's just not a nice. Do good thing but people will They'll bring their creative best. They'll take risks. You get better ideas right because they realize you're going to advocate for them so they can make some mistakes and come in with their while. S idea because you're going to give them roam to do that. So i've i've really come to respect You take it. I respect chris to Because i've seen yet action do. Just these sorts of things you balanced. The hard needs of running the business with the interest of Creating a human space for people to to thrive it. So i applaud you for that will. Thanks david i appreciate. I think i've just been fortunate to have worked for really great leaders that That i was able to to learn from and tried to to mimic. Yeah and now your tenure professors so you can lax and you can throw the junior ship back in the face of other. Say listen same whatever you want. But i attend your. I'm no longer pretend academic. I'm real conducted. The you have earned your stripes. Thank you david. L. are having you on the show tonight. We're real real pleasure to get your lessons. Learned in hopefully the listeners of learned quite a bit that they can take away as well. Thanks chris i appreciate the opportunity. This was really fun and it's always great to spend time with david other at a lot from him as well. We don't give him enough credit but he he had battery around and educate me quite a bit early on in my career as a ceo. Saw really appreciate being able to do this. But there's a lot of fun yes thanks. Thanks for listening. You know a leader who could benefit from hearing about the leadership trap but we hope you will share this podcast with them and remembered. Give the of five star rating every rating helps us reach more readers. You can find us at the leadership trap dot org okay. We'll see you next time and until then stay out of those traps..

tonight five star david christmas chris first year first place december tenth year one first leadership trap dot org two end
"associate dean" Discussed on The Leadership Trap

The Leadership Trap

07:30 min | 2 years ago

"associate dean" Discussed on The Leadership Trap

"So i. I thought that was pretty good. I also think it depends on where you were. It does matter what company you're at it depends on where you are. On the organization. Motorola was a top ten employer. When i was there in the early nineties and i know guarded have regarded but depending on where you are in the organization. You know you could be in one sector where it was a really great place to work in another sector. Where was horrible place to work. Because the bigger the organization is the more you're going to have managers have different skill sets but Yeah my experience was i. Thank god for the opportunity to work at dell and work around those people. Every day the lessons. I learned what one thing i've observed from seeing that as organization. Start to grow as it. You might have a culture starts out where a set of core values. The you talk about ready. You described down there. A set of values and high expectations and your other people didn't hold their way. We didn't hang around but as organizations grow if the values don't carry through. I think what you get our people to start mimicking those behaviors and becomes more of a caricature and the net character then starts to instill the bad heart of what we see in some of these big companies were then other just being a jerk. But they're really just trying to mimic what they saw in somebody else. It's really just being tough. I grew that chris. You just triggered it when you said that i think what are the other leadership traps. Is you set those core cultures in if you aren't managing them as a leader throughout your organization all the time the telephone game happens and those mimic irs rewrite those core values in a way that self-serving for them. I'll give you a great example. When i went to compaq in the eighties. Compact is again not that big. A company was growing like crazy. It was about consensus management and consensus. Management was a rod canyon thing. It didn't mean at the time that everybody got a vote emitted. Everybody had input. There was still a decider. By the time i laughed. Consensus management had been reconfigured by middle managers to be. I can stop anything. Because i don't agree and i think one of the problems that the leadership did was they didn't go back in and recalibrate and say that's not what consensus management is and they let that go too far and what happened was product. Scott developed that were team developed instead of being developed by the architects. Or whatever is my impression of being there. We just lost edge Because we trying to get everybody to vote for the right product. We saw this adult to motion to Where we got to that point there was. There was a period where i left to go back to school of the ceo. We had when we started that. I brought on To run the company really wanted much more of a consensus than i had had. I did have. I had the old compaq version of consensus. Which was everybody gets say but at the end of the day. I'll be the decider if we don't get everybody to agree. Matter of fact. I would say to people. I'd say to my to our leaders. I'd say look. If you guys have a disagreement you go work it out with each other. If you can't work it out then come to me. And i promise you i will make a decision whether or not one of you like it or not. We'll be different so you're better off figuring it out yourself but what happened when i was gone was it became more of the traditional of the later stage consensus where anybody could stop and what ended up happening was there were compromises made on features on components on policies. And when i went back in there you know there are things that we did to go back to okay. We decisions were taken forever to be done. We had a thing called The the pdp the product development docs practical plan that we weren't supposed to do products until they got signed off. We were head products. Were coming out of the factory that they never signed off because they could never get agreement and that to me is an example of yup core values. The leaders have to reinforce them. But you gotta be leader gotta be willing to say okay. You get ten more minutes if you can make decisions. Come see me. I'm going to decide and you're all going to live with that. And those are the kind of things that i see a big a big trap that letter stage whether small company or a big. I see in the universities to you see it with. Yeah they want everybody to be happy and they confused happiness with everybody gets a vote and actually happiness is. Everybody gets to say and a decision is made because it's worse to not have a decision have habit decision that people got input in but they don't necessarily agree with having leaders. Underestimate how subtle. Those changes are. I would several. I've i don't know. If i can name one leader that i would say was exceptional at recognizing it and swiftly stepping in and addressing it. We just don't do it until it's too late. And they start to see revenue fall and things started to turn well. And i think one of the reasons that happens. Is that something. That's really bizarre. That happens when you become a leader of an organization is there's a level that gets you know that that gets created just naturally underneath you of people that you turn to to get insights and you start to lose vision. Below the waterline. And i noticed that when came back in and david can attest to this. One of the things that i did to try to get through that was. I'm terrible athlete. But i started playing basketball two days a week on the back deck with the employees senate. Was we test engineers. We had sales support people we had developers and the rule was when i was on the court. You could hack me all you wanted. There was no no titles. I learn more about was really going on the company from the basketball games than i did from the executive meetings because people would talk. They wouldn't be talking to me to be talking to each other. They'd be complaining about this decision complaining about that direction. I was like oh okay well now. I know it's really going on. So i think leaders have to find out how they dig down and get organically. What's going on and and i would say one of the cons is allowed to do. I'm going to a brown bag lunch with my employees. I've done this at the university. But i find is. I don't get the same kind of information from abroad Brown bag lunch. That i do when i play basketball. Yeah this is a bit too staged. yeah isn't it. yeah upon reflection dave. Would you have done anything different or more purposeful when you were growing your leadership team to make it more diverse in every way why. That's a great question david. Well i think given. I mean you know if you look at our team in the early days. It wasn't as diverse because Even though it was not all men it was mostly men But in the later stages of the company majority we had a good really good mix of. There's a gender mixed for sure. Yeah mix for sure for sure. I think diversity mix Is something yeah. I would have liked to have done a better job ad. I think when you're in the When you're in the kind of growth that we were going through and you're a small company you're kind of the mercy of the resources available to you locally. It's a cop out to a.

Scott Motorola eighties early nineties One david two days a week one sector dave one leader compaq ten more minutes one thing one things one of the problems ten
Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

04:05 min | 2 years ago

Medical Residents To Receive Education On Health Effects Of Climate Change

"Teaching doctors about the health effects of climate change is growing from medical schools to the residency programs where new physicians put their skills to the test. But skeptics wonder if it's appropriate for doctors to learn how climate change can affect Human Health Martha Bebinger of member station W. R. in Boston Begins Her story in clinic exam room. I just remember for so many months it was hard for you to walk. There are three people in this exam room doctor Gora. A resident he's training and seventy one year old Steve Kerns who is recovering from West Nile virus, Kerns remembers the mosquito bite on his neck but very little about the brain infection that landed him in the hospital for a week for at least six months after that. I felt like every five minutes I was being run over by a truck I couldn't work. I couldn't walk very well. And I couldn't focus. A wondered for bit if I'd ever get better now, almost two years later Kern says he's back to about five hours a day on the job making windows and doors, and he started reading again the sounds like you've made tremendous progress. Dr. Charlotte Roses is a third year primary care resident at Cambridge Hospital. It seems like tremendous progress. that. It was scary. It was scary. It was it was definitely scary us and I'm not scared anymore although. Can I get worse now over again, Dr seuss sympathizes with the fear West Nile is still rare. There were no cases in Massachusetts before two thousand and two in two, thousand, eighteen year a mosquito bit kerns cases had climbed to forty nine mosquitoes love warm temperatures and so when temperatures increase mosquitoes can have breeding seasons the virus itself West alka replicate faster and they. Bite more more active Basu learned a lot of this while treating, Kerns. He was buses i West Nile case when someone comes in with a fever and his confused, it's not what my mind thinks of as the diagnosis right away. This case has really taught me how much I need to be informed about the ways in which climate change is changing the patterns of infectious. Disease. Around the United States to inform his residence busu added the health impacts of climate change to an elective courses teaches Ross says residents need much more. This is something that needs to be more directly integrated into the curriculum because I think it's going to have such a huge impact on human health. There are no approved curricula for hospitals that might want to tell emerging. Lung specialists about longer pollen seasons as temperatures rise or teach new emergency room physicians to consider more waterborne diseases for patients with fever and diarrhea. But Pediatrician Rebecca Phillips born at Emory University has just published. A framework hospitals can use as a starting point. Patients want physicians to be able to provide guidance on things that affect their individual help. We have this accumulating body of. That climate change does just that it poses harms to our patients Dr Stanley Goldfarb, the former associate dean for curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania's medical school says hospitals trained doctors not. He worries that discussing climate change with patients might create mistrust I. Think there are concerns about getting into the political sphere because I'm against anything that's going to. represent a barrier between patients and physicians being comfortable with each other other physicians. See Wildfires, sweeping western states and hurricanes flooding the Gulf coast and say, we want to impart this information to our residents as fast as we can because it's so important that they gain this information sooner than later advocates say including climate change in residency training won't stick and tell doctors are tested on the health effects before they are licensed to practice medicine for NPR news I'm Martha Bebinger in Boston.

Steve Kerns West Nile Martha Bebinger Boston Kern Dr Stanley Goldfarb Dr Seuss Fever Cambridge Hospital Massachusetts United States University Of Pennsylvania Dr. Charlotte Roses Waterborne Diseases NPR Basu Associate Dean Emory University Rebecca Phillips
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 2 years ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
Trump announces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee for Supreme Court seat

The Boom X Show with Darol Tuttle

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Trump announces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee for Supreme Court seat

"President Trump has formally nominated Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court this afternoon Comas Jeff Pooja has more on what it means for the bench. Amy Kuney Baron has been a federal court judge for only three years. But in that time she's made a name for herself among conservative groups. A devout Catholic and favorite of the religious right. Barrett is expected to be a reliable voice in the effort to overturn Roe v. Wade like Justice Thomas, who's already on the court. Is going to be someone who is going to be prepared to get a fresh look at a lot of presidency, disagrees. That's Andrew Siegel, associate dean of the law school at Seattle University. Her nomination is likely to set up a bitter fight in the U. S. Senate

Amy Cockney Barrett Amy Kuney Baron Supreme Court President Trump Jeff Pooja Andrew Siegel Associate Dean U. S. Senate Justice Thomas ROE Wade Seattle University
Can Whitening Products Really Damage Your Teeth?

Dr. Daliah

02:30 min | 3 years ago

Can Whitening Products Really Damage Your Teeth?

"Well, now, we have a report that ingredient in whitening strips is actually harmful to deep layer of the teeth. They say that hydrogen peroxide in it, the active ingredient in over the counter whitening chips may be harmful to the layer under the name of the teeth. They say the teeth are made up of three layers the outer Anabel, the underlying Dentin layer, and connective tissue that binds to the gum. The middle layer Denton is rich in proteins and has a lot of collagen strong. Most studies on the safety of hydrogen peroxide have focused on the Anabel. Now, the chemical is known to penetrate, the camel and just reached the Denton. Even though in miniscule amounts. According to Dr Hewlett associate dean of dean school of dentistry spokesman for the American dental association. It wasn't volved instead of explain it. Now, the senior author of the study Kelly Keenan and associate professor of chemistry Stockton university of New Jersey said in a statement that she and her colleagues sought to further characterize what your hydrogen peroxide was actually joined to the collagen. Now, I'll whiting Prenton the United States can approximate or carbide peroxide accords the American dental association. So you're tire teeth and artificial saliva. The researchers actually watched the collagen in Denton breakdown. Into smaller proteins when treated with hydrogen, peroxide. So what passed the Anabel into the Denton? They say results show that the trailer without a proxy concentration. Similar to those found of whitening strips is enough to make the original collagen protein disappear. Now, they caution against generalizing the results obtained and teeth that aren't necessarily still the body these were extracted teeth because you know, your teeth in vivo, maybe a little more resilient than in vitro in vivo means in a living body in vitro means in a lab or Petri dish. But I'm not stupid hypoc and peroxide gets broken down into water and oxygen h to to what the hell of Cadillacs an enzyme co Cavalli's breaks down into the H to an haute. Water knocks Jim and the down can be caustic.

Denton Anabel American Dental Association Kelly Keenan Associate Dean Dean School Of Dentistry Associate Professor United States Dr Hewlett Stockton University Of New Jer JIM
Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan steps down amid many scandals

Dr. Daliah

01:45 min | 3 years ago

Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan steps down amid many scandals

"Wells Fargo chief executive Tim Sloan is stepping down effective immediately. It comes after less than four years on the job. And of course, a wave of scandals a longtime insiders Sloan was chosen to replace outgoing CEO, John Stumpf who resigned after Wells Fargo fraudulently opened millions of accounts to meet sales goals. Jeff Sonnenfeld is the senior associate dean of the Yale school of management. He told CNBC sloan's escape goat who went down because of political pressure and the actions of John stop. It's really unfair Wilson as you know. This is coming right off of that great Warren Buffett endorsement of an hour and ten minutes ago that this I think it was a shock to many. I actually had been in touch with Tim through the weekend. We we're going to have him sit next week at our CEO. Right next to Janet Yellen. In Washington also ask if she wanted to apologize for putting him in this situation with this foolish risk. But this is a company where he's delivered. The best earnings Jim motels and the country's companies hundred and sixty one year history. It's really been incredible any bad news, which has come out the last two years. It was not the office of the controller the currency. They're getting a free ride off of this pilot. You know, champion all these great scandals that Tim was bringing out. He was the one who is turning the rocks over not like John Stomas. His predecessor who was apparently deceiving. Even the board is Kim was the guy who was bringing public. But he's not a backslapping cheerleader charismatic guy. He was a CFO that didn't know that. He was put on earth to be the CEO. He rose to the occasion Lake Mary Barra. Sometimes you get insiders that are heroic to take this on. And I think it was a cheap

Tim Sloan CEO Wells Fargo Cnbc Sloan John Stumpf KIM Janet Yellen Jeff Sonnenfeld Warren Buffett Lake Mary Barra Yale School Of Management Chief Executive John Stomas Senior Associate Dean Jim Motels John Washington Wilson Sixty One Year Ten Minutes
Teacher charged with assault after video shows her dragging boy with autism through a Kentucky school

Bill Cunningham

01:08 min | 4 years ago

Teacher charged with assault after video shows her dragging boy with autism through a Kentucky school

"On assault charges today. Dan, ingred county. But it just it just speaks to. I think what is so wrong about a profession that has so much right in it. So I wanted to get a professional perspective on this and standing by the hotline to speak about that right now is Stephen crates. He is an associate professor of special education and an associate dean of education at northern Kentucky university, and it's great to have him. Join us here on seven hundred wwl w Stephen crates. Welcome to the big one. Thanks for joining us. Thank you. I was as I said, I don't know if you heard in my in my intro. I was I was profoundly disturbed and moved by what I saw. And I'm wondering what your reaction was when you saw that video for the first time. Well, it's certainly something that shouldn't have happened. Children with autism can be very very difficult. And in the school situation and people get frustrated, but that's probably not the way it should have

Associate Professor Associate Dean DAN Northern Kentucky University