18 Burst results for "Associate Clinical Professor"

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Greg Laurie Podcast

Greg Laurie Podcast

03:20 min | 3 months ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Greg Laurie Podcast

"To see the doctor James Dobson is one of the most influential leaders in the world of evangelical ISM is an understatement. Really I would say he's a living legend and a man of God I've had the privilege of getting to know personally, and I can tell you that the private Dr Dobson is the same as the public Dr Dobson, and I'll refer to him as Jim because he's asked me to do that because I always call Dr Dobson said call me Jim. But let me tell you a little bit about his. Background he was born on April twenty first and nineteen, thirty six and three Port Louisiana here in a PhD in child development at USC he was associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the US's School of Medicine for fourteen years. He's been seventeen years on the staff of the Children's Hospital of Los Angeles and the Division of Child Development and medical genetics I, and then he has also served on multiple government advisory. Panels and. Testified at government hearings as well a president or Dr Dobson he has not been elected president yet but maybe That's not a bad idea. I think he'd be a good president.

James Dobson Dr Dobson Jim president Division of Child Development Hospital of Los Angeles associate clinical professor Port Louisiana USC School of Medicine US
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

02:37 min | 7 months ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Complicated issue here, Karen is that the I mean, look at football. It's huge moneymaker, basketball, huge moneymaker and colleges. As we've seen, You know the colleges if they're shut down, and students can't be on campus, and they don't have the revenue from the sports. A lot of them are in trouble. It's devastating, and that's why I'm starting to hear. Some folks revisit the idea of playing season again because at least you could somehow point to. Okay, this is when the revenues air coming in If the uncertainty right now that is really scary for so many people in college athletics because they don't know how they're going to even make the salary payable at the end of the month, But if you were able to say All right. Maybe we should slow down on this fall season and perhaps moving to outdoor activity in the spring. I'm not a favour of having athletes. Typically, football players go backto back spring and fall. But I think there's always time to adjust. Right now. I think the worst thing that could happen would be to start up have a have a run through the campus in terms of all kinds of infections and people getting nearly sick. And and then shut it down again and again. I know you said that to your listeners, but we have to regularly mind all the college athletes that and we all think they're invincible when that age, but anyone could be a carrier of the virus. I'm not showing any symptoms. And someone could be positive for several days before they show symptoms. So it's not just about you. It's about all of us, right? No doubt, Karen last thing before I let you go, Um, favorite memory from the U. Oh, my gosh. I have to say we had such success about purity finally won national championships in men's ice hockey and women's ice hockey. We had national championship in men's doll. We had great swimming team. So many wonderful memories of the U. Yeah, well, it's good to catch up, Karen, and maybe we can. Ah, you know, do this again as sports do or do not ramp up. We can have this conversation again and catch up. That'd be awesome. I'd love to say, Tell Hyde everybody and and go for land for May. We will all right, Karen wrote about Seon. Later, She's Karen Weaver. Former associate A D at the University of Minnesota. She is an associate clinical professor. At Drexel in Philadelphia. Right now she's won multiple national championships and field hockey is a head coach. Good to catch up with her. It's 9 44.

Karen associate clinical professor basketball hockey football Drexel Hyde Philadelphia U. Oh University of Minnesota
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

04:08 min | 7 months ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"What you do sure my name is Esther churn M. and associate clinical professor and the insurance first city and also at the college of medicine at Drexel University and I'm an infectious disease physician I want to start with the basics what role does testing people play in understanding and infectious disease like cove in nineteen and in researching it so no testing is important in infectious diseases because it's it's how we confirm whether a person has the infectious disease or an infectious disease or doesn't have an infection disease and it's important in the context of clinical care because it allows us to initiate treatment measures that are important in control measures that are important and it also allows us in public health to initiate public health interventions that can contain the disease so it's critical to have laboratory testing to know who's infected to initiate those steps right now we're seeing some pretty significant surges of cove in nineteen cases in the U. S. several states are seeing record numbers what do we know about where the virus is right now we know with the virus is in a number of states where it's an increasing rapidly the virus is is pretty much in every state at the moment there are clearly different parts of the country that are that are in different places of the epidemic in the northeast we had a significant transmission in March April and may and now that it appears that at least the peak of of those of transmission in those places particularly in New York state in New Jersey Pennsylvania Connecticut there is much less transmission and it appears that the social distancing and other interventions that more important have worked but we're starting to see significant transmission and we know that because we have many many more cases in southern and western states and in particular North Carolina Georgia Texas Arizona parts of California are experiencing a significant transition and we're seeing many many more cases and we're also seeing greater utilization of hospitals and healthcare facilities because of that one thing I should add by the way but why testing is important in particular for covert nineteen is that we know that a significant percentage of cases perhaps up to forty percent of cases are either a symptomatic meaning that they are infected with the virus and shedding a potentially spreading it without knowing it what what what they are what we call pre symptomatic meaning that they are about to become symptomatic don't know it yet but in the pier in the day or two before they become ill they're shedding the virus and potentially spreading it so testing of cases and even potentially have contacts of cases and testing people who have the mildest of symptoms is also critical from a control measure perspective because the test a positive test maybe the only way we know someone has the virus as you were saying I mean in the beginning of the pandemic health officials in March and April were saying how much we needed to ramp up testing has the United States been able to do that and do we know how much testing is being done right now can cater to the beginning of this get testing has certainly increased since we began experiencing cases of corporate nineteen in January and I think every state has more capacity there's huge there's wide variation in terms of the amount of tests that are done from state to state and in some cases that's appropriate because the case counts are low but in other cases they're still a great need for testing and to ramp up testing particularly cases and particularly in states that are experiencing large numbers of cases now and I think that's the biggest concern is whether or not we have sufficient number of tests within individual states and that and that nationwide to deal with anticipated surges of the virus in the future and it's not at all clear that we have enough tests to deal with what we have now in some states and what we expect.

Esther associate clinical professor
Scramble for virus supplies strains global solidarity

KYW 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 10 months ago

Scramble for virus supplies strains global solidarity

"The supply chain very important itself things get from point a to point B. it's something probably few people gave much thought to besides the experts prior to this phone then dammit but it's very much a topic of conversation these days all around the country they would abuse Matt Leon spoke with an expert to learn more about how it works and how it can break down David curves is an associate clinical professor at Drexel's lebow college of business he says there have been many examples of disruptions with various supply chains however each supply chain with different you know so it's a it's a mistake to say that supply chains are broken that's not true I think that some supply chains have proven to be fairly resilient during this current shock Kerr's breaks down a reason for some of the problems we are experiencing in supply chain we talk about demand forecasting it's a really key part of the supply chain function being able to accurately accurately as possible forecasts demand for certain items and products are demand forecasting models just don't take into consideration dramatic disruptions

Matt Leon Associate Clinical Professor Drexel Kerr David Lebow College Of Business
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Probably Science

"Hey, larry. That's the Mike very. It's warm now. Thank you. Joining us. We this. This episode today is going to be both death on both Bush and themes so I thought terrorism and terrorism and the. Yeah. Yeah. That's try all the fun stuff. Yes. We drove through. Antiabortion protesters today, she put an unintentionally. No, I was over backup. So Laurie night when the same flight they got picked up by the very generous and hospitable all tears for the SF sketch fast and the subtle ride from Oakland to the that hotel should take forty five minutes. Profoundly. Yeah. Hours and a half hours standstill traffic on the bay bridge because we didn't realize today was the day that the what's the word anti-choice people decided to come out they were bussed in from the central valley or something, and they were they all came in on buses, and it's it's people like I already hate anyway. So there was no room for my hate to grow. All ready at ten you mother fuckers. And then I I started yelling at people about what Planned Parenthood really does. And I was yelling at like this eight year old boy, he's like, ooh. You know, you should fuck a no asshole. I was I was so impressed and also embarrassed because I I hate confrontation. I was jealous of the balls that you had in the back seat lawyers. Like, I'm a mom, and I support abortion. You're hurting women on the issues, right? Covering my eyes. No, you're right. You're right. I'm the it. If there's ever a city the crowded level of San Francisco to prove the you don't need that many people being boom. Yes. Yes. Run a tiny. I look if you want to get into this later, but if your goal is to reduce abortions, you would be funding Planned Parenthood in places that give people access to contraception. This is for later in the podcast. Yeah. Should we get? So we we've realized awhile ago, we've not had medical scientists on the show before at any point. You've had all those that true. Never. I think so I called think of anyone we've had it in this sort of medical field. And I happen to know that two people both of raising lived in San Francisco the bay area and reached out to both both of them went. Yeah. We'll do the show. So fucking amazing. So I the author of working stiff two years two hundred sixty bodies in the making of a medical examiner. And also the author of the coming out soon novel, I caught forensic pathologist associate clinical professor at Houston medical center. I and who's done way moral sees than any. Previous. Judy model. Nick, flees note of duty..

San Francisco Bush larry associate clinical professor Mike Houston medical center bay bridge Laurie Nick Oakland forty five minutes eight year two years
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KNSS

"Is a story. I saw over world net daily chime in. This is a Twitter user profiles himself as an associate clinical professor of psychology and sexuality studies for Minnesota. So this guy is trying to me to God. Regarding the New Testament birth of the account of the New Testament Br you know, the account in the New Testament of the virgin virgin birth. So this guy's name is Eric sprinkle sprinkle claims the virgin birth stories about an all knowing all powerful deity, impregnating, humid, teen there is no definition of consent. That would include that scenario, happy holidays. So in other words, this guy's trying to claim that God Cosmair to become pregnant against his will, which by the way is hardly true. Because if you read the account in the New Testament just gonna look chapter one, it's very very clear that there's an angel who comes to marry says, hey, this is going to happen. And then at the very end of the line. She says at the end of this account. She says I am the Lord servant. May your words. I am the Lord serve it may your word to me be fulfilled. And then the angel left her. So she heard what the plan was. And she said, okay, let it be. So. This guy clearly hasn't read the bible, clearly is a provocateur and clearly wanted to make a name from self which he did for about fifteen minutes. So you actually have some idiot out there this trying to meet to God. Then it only gets okay. This. The Kook Kook our more Madison by state of California this time originating at our state university in San Marcos. So this isn't event at state university. California State University San Marcos called the annual white nece forum. The annual whiteness forum. So this is where they get together to bash white people. And as they're bashing white people one person puts together a poster that's privately featured at this forum. It's slamming a Christian cartoon series known as veggietales veggietales now. My kids were raised on vegetate. They're just wonderful humorous clean stories. Let's bring biblical principles case anything wrong with that. Well, I guess at the annual whiteness, there is something that they're saying these veggie, these are, okay. Veggietales their vegetables that are like little characters that talk. Their bed Jetta balls. They're saying that the whiteness form that these veggietales characters are actual racists. They're dangerous they promote racial stereotypes why? Because all the villains. And there's always a bad guy in these stories all the villains. Are colored done don't on? Now, I have a problem with this because yes, you're right. All of the villains all our colored and all the good guys are colored too. In fact, the characters the heroes of the series. Bob, the tomato and Larry the cucumber. Bob. The tomato was read Larry the cucumber screen. They're colored too. And they had this tag light. At the end of every episode. Remember kids, God baking special three loves you very much. That's racism that. Okay. Guys in the control room. Here. I go again, this is the sound of my head on the desk..

California State University Sa Larry state university Eric sprinkle Bob Twitter associate clinical professor San Marcos Minnesota Madison California fifteen minutes
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"But right right now, please do not leave. You think this is just an episode that focused simply on addiction, and you know if that's something that you don't feel like you're interested in or if you feel like this isn't a topic that applies to you because the chances you probably know someone that has struggled with or suffering with addiction, or there's a good put doom and gloom. But I mean that or that you may run into that in the future with someone in your own family. But Rebecca Juliana do an incredible job at talking about what the heck mindfulness really is and how you can implement it in small ways that can immediately help you in your life right now. And it doesn't matter if you are. You don't have to be an colic or addicted to pornography or any of that. I mean, if you're like most people, I'm guessing they're areas of your life that you would like to improve. I mean right now, even small areas and the tools that teach in this book on this podcast, hopefully today can can really help you kinda know what everybody's talking about. They're saying, oh, I just need to be more present and change the relationship with my thoughts and that sort of thing. Again, one of the podcast they did earlier few weeks ago, it's not about just saying our, I know I just have to be happy after grit through it. It's not about that. It's more about just being present and not not chasing a lot of that negative self-talk fallen into the trap of believing all the negative self talk that our brains so often try and get us to believe because again, they want us to our brains wants to stay right here. They know what this feels like right here there little bit afraid of change. So please give this episode of listen and check out their book now quickly bit of background on these two incredible people, Rebecca Williams PHD Dr. Rebecca Williams is a psychologist. She's a teacher. She's an author. She's a mentor and she specializes in recovery from mental illness and addictions. She received a master's degree from Harvard and her PHD from the university of California, Santa Barbara, which I think would just mean incredibly to go at a dot. Go to a camp there one time, and they literally look at the beach, which is crazy at that university. She's currently the clinical director at the veteran affairs, San Diego healthcare system, and addition, she's in associate clinical professor in the department of psychiatry at the university of California, San Diego and an adjunct faculty member at the university of San Diego. Dr Williams's co, author of another book entitled couple therapy for alcoholism, cognitive behavioral treatment manual. And she also she co authored another book with Julie, who is the co, author of this book that was called the mindfulness workbook for addiction guide to coping with grief, stress and anger trigger dictum behaviors. So now.

Dr. Rebecca Williams Rebecca Juliana San Diego university of California clinical director adjunct faculty member Julie Santa Barbara associate clinical professor Harvard
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

09:44 min | 2 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Book changeability changeable and he's also by the way director of think kids in the department of psychiatry at Mass General hospital and associate clinical professor of psychology In the department of psychiatry at at at Harvard Medical School and welcome it's a pleasure to have you with us today Dr Thank you very much I'm pleased to be here appreciate you having me changeable okay tell us the collaborative problem solving or c. p.. S. is what you call it and how it. Works Well the the way it works really it's not simply a set of techniques. It's a mentality a philosophy if you will and then a process that goes along with. It and frankly it's a major shift, in how people, think about challenging behavior in the first place so we had a doctor on last week who wrote a book. Called in my hands he was he's a brilliant, surgical oncologist and he. Said attitude with patients makes. All the difference for the. Outcome. Because he so I can be so brilliant in surgery but if that patient still has depression and fear He will probably ultimately die we're as a patient at has this attitude where I'm going to, survive this no matter what breaks all the odds is that what you're talking about well I think there, are things that are related here but it's a bit different what what. I'm talking about here and, perhaps, this is where you're referring to. Attitude and I would I would say. His attitude and, behavior is shaped by skill, not well and that's the big shift in our. Thinking that, most people think your behavior and how you handle things in the world is really. Just determined by the attitude you bring to it and how hard you try to handle. Things well and there's been about fifty, years of research, actually in the neurosciences that's shown that that's actually not accurate and that what determines our behavior is much more. About Gail not will and when I say skill I'm talking about thinking skills that contribute to humans being able to do things like bef- lexical. And handle frustrations and problem solve? Under, very difficult circumstances and we've we've worked with some, of the toughest people on. The toughest settings in the world and we've shown that if you can shift your thinking and realized that those folks struggle with skill not will some pretty amazing things can, happen and that's really the great news here is that if it's about skill not will skills can be built skills you can build them and as a result who you can change whether you wanna call it your attitude your behavior, etc again we've shown this in the most difficult of setting so we know it can it holds true, anywhere else as well so give us a couple of examples of how. This is working in life Sure well we've applied this with kids and adolescents for couple of decades now and again, I say the toughest of settings with the toughest schools in our nation where school discipline is an. Abysmal failure, to homes that have some of the toughest kids to treatment facilities to first severely. Traumatized kids to hospitals correctional facilities prisons and then up through the the life span so working with adults as well and what we've also found. Is that the same mentality and process when you brace it in practice, it in any interaction you have whether, that's with your partner your spouse your relative your friends your colleague, can have some pretty amazing, results and, so what, we're. Seeing, now is there's great reason to bring this anywhere there's conflict and people struggling. With their behavior in the world and. That includes the workplace where you know people's challenging behavior in the office is A major factor in dissatisfaction. Job in jobs and cost tremendous amount of money and lack of productivity as well So you're saying that this CPS is not just meant for parents and teachers wanting to better handle challenging behaviors it also is, a very effective. Approach for problem solving in the workplace in the workplace or anywhere else, in your personal relationships you. Name it anytime, somebody is, behaving in a way that you're not so wild about or there's conflict. With them and of course you, know this applies even on the world stage and it starts with this philosophy this is about skill not well which puts you in a much more empathic place by the. Way and positions you to be able to try to work. Hard to understand where. That other person's coming from but then we teach a replicable process with really, clear guidepost it's not a. Technique it's not something you can do, to someone, you gotta do it with someone but there's. A clear recipe there's a clear process that we teach and again proven results in the most challenging of circumstances so we know it'll work In your workplace? Or with your mother-in-law father-in-law or partner you name it so the skills that you're teaching are different than the. Results that they've had in the past so this is a hope for for many people this is a whole new world a, whole new paradigm. Correct correct and and again it flows from this basic assumption that you know we're all doing the. Best we can, in the, world believe it or not with the skills we have and what the. World is throwing at us we're, all trying our best nobody wants to have things workouts poorly for them nobody wants to behave in challenging ways and so when we realized that you know we're all doing. The best we can and if we're struggling it's because of. Skill not will it. It completely shifts our mindset and then and only then can you embrace this, process we call collaborative problem. Solving which is a pretty simple way of deciding, are you only got three options to handle. Any problem you have with Somebody which option. Do you want to choose based, upon what, you want to accomplish and if you. Want to solve this, problem together with the person and not. Only reduce the challenging behavior but help that person and yourself build skills there's only? Only one option and that's, the collaborative problem solving process we teach gosh. When you think about this most people are so quick to be reactive Yeah and that out, they call it I think you guys in in psychiatry coffee alligator. Brain right, the. Reptile brain yeah reptile brain, and and so when you have that quick You know obviously. That choice that you make could change your whole life and we hear this from ex-cons talking about if I only, had another alternative I never would have done what. I did I tell a story in the book of I was talking. To somebody who is incarcerated and charged with. Attempted murder and I was, fairly new to this back then and I asked this young man what, proved, to be very dumb question I. Asked him what he was thinking before he shot this, person? Allegedly and this. Guy, looked me. Right in the eyes and said to me That that was the dumbest, question anybody's ever asked him and I pressed on. And asked him what he meant because I'd asked what you what were. You thinking and what he said to me. Was do you think if, I was thinking I would have done this which was just right there And unfortunately, our response to all, this stuff though is sort. Of punitive, stuff that says well next time remember the consequences that we're, going to give you. So that you. Won't do it again but the whole problem is the person's thinking in the first place which is why. You know these punitive responses just frankly on work they make us feel better 'cause we we think we're doing something where extracting a pound of flesh but they don't, work they don't work so this book tell me how you want, people to read the book Well the book is written in narrative form it's you. Know I've been doing this for twenty years and working, in all these settings and. So I tell stories from these different settings to try to clean gauge the reader but it's also, very practical I, mean you read it and you're going to be able to look up and down a. List of skills that all that research has shown is, is where the actions at you're gonna be. Able to think about the people in your life that you're struggling with your to reflect yourself and see what your. Own skill, strengths and struggles are and then it's gonna lay out a very practical roadmap, and, I wanna, be clear it's not now there's no magic working with in tough situations with people who. Are struggling with skills there's no magic but it is a clear, process that gives you a road map for, something to follow and, what people find is that. When they, do that they're able to build much more positive relationships they're, able to drop a, bunch of the. Resentment that they've felt towards people and they're able to help people including Themselves make real changes in their, lives to develop the angels and nobody is, too old to do that I love this I love it what's the best,.

partner Mass General hospital director depression associate clinical professor Harvard Medical School Gail Guy twenty years
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"For judges more sunny that it is Assessment is way sunnier ways hunter Yep Yep no question and, we didn't even get time to get into Tim tebow as you may have heard swinging a bat in double. A., and suffering a, fractured hamate bone in his right. Hand in his season's over yeah and that's a that's a much. More complicated injury that's a little weird post of. Bone that's down in the palm it's common common. And golfers, are hit, a stop not that any of us would hit a stop and also you know, ballplayers who are swinging. The bat and and it's it's a touch to a, ligament and it pulls off, it's in, our, carpal, tunnel out there in the thick meaty part of our palm. And it's it's it's you have to fix those. High level, athletes or removed. Them sometimes we excise and especially if. They've been undiagnosed so it's it's a problem it's set you back for a, while could there be any residual, effects for him I think probably not generally you get you get. Well and, totally fine after. The real problem is that it takes. Longer to come back from them you think Dr Alton Barrett is the associate clinical professor. Of orthopedics at the NYU Langone medical center talking about the injuries to UN which is ended his. Season and we'll affect him through two thousand nineteen the expectation he might get. Back in August of two thousand nineteen and, also on Thursday night at Yankee Stadium Aaron judge struck by ninety three mile an. Hour fastball that has sidelined him the Yankees feel optimistically for about three, weeks but it is the doctor's contention that it could, be a a little bit longer and then we have Tim tebow in AA swing a bat. In suffering a fractured him a bone. In his. Right hand recently and. He, is gone for the season at least in the business of being a great doctor you don't have to worry about this. You're safe So interesting Safe and sound. Exactly doctor thank you so much for being with me as always and dispensing all this very important information for. My audience thank you Thank you so. Much for having me. And thanks. For all, the. Great. Work you do both both at the radio and. And, beyond for all the things you do so it's my. Pleasure thank you thank you sir Dr Alton baron for us on Ed Randall's talking baseball now John with the. Twenty twenty This.

hamate bone Dr Alton Barrett Tim tebow NYU Langone medical center Twenty twenty Dr Alton baron Yankee Stadium associate clinical professor Yankees Ed Randall UN John
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on The RFK Tapes

The RFK Tapes

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on The RFK Tapes

"My name is hand so in team days from today will be sixty seven years old i was born in jerusalem and raised by devoutly christian parents this is her haunts hans beaking to a parole board in two thousand eleven his death sentence was commuted to life in prison in the seventies when california abolished capital punishment everyday my life i have great remorse and deep regret and deeply regret the fact that i participated in a horrible event which took place in the pantry of the embassador tell and then i would senator kennedy was ascended assassinated and five other innocent people were wounded sirhan says he participated in the assassination of kennedy not that he assassinated kennedy because decades later he still claims not to remember so what do you remember about shooting if you're willing to talk about that i was obviously always there but i don't remember the exact moment of remember my gun and i don't remember aiming any human being remember any of that prison and enough second from the getgo okay what have you take it happen i i didn't i didn't know what we nervous at all i don't remember at the hearing there are two lawyers sitting next to on one is laurie do sec there's no doubt after you read the autopsy report that sir hand could not have killed a senator and the other is william f pepper they evidence of his innocence it just hit just to just so powerful boats were powder burn range fired from behind all of the witness statements indicated that he was always in front of the senator never never was behind always in front of lot of evidence was destroyed their numerous holes in the door frames in in the pantry the lapd would like us to think that those holes were there because the trae hit the wall or or somebody's paying hit the wall it's just impossible just impossible in two thousand seven when pepper and do sick took on the case one of the first things they did was hire an expert to analyze their han where you're talking about developing this analysis of sir hanin his behavior conduct and is history and that dan brown would be the ideal guide to do the doctor daniel brown is an associate clinical professor of psychology at harvard medical school he's written multiple textbooks on memory.

jerusalem california sirhan laurie senator dan brown daniel brown associate clinical professor harvard medical school hans beaking senator kennedy william f sixty seven years
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"Was that he has a tattoo of the bowling of a bowling pin for each person he killed and when he comes on parole board they make him show the tattoo and it's got the names of his victims parole denied and today at then it was an acura dealership and i'm not sure what it is now so all these terrible stories come from there actually facts yeah everything everything all this stuff is like you just hear weird stuff and you just write it down you think i'll put that somewhere so i i gotta figure this out i got because people think this ally he's got he's such dark guys he does dark movies and he dork guy you're like me it's like people think i'm you know he's like flew through and they meet me more like looks loser because i'm not like a billionaire brilliant mastermind it's sort of like you know then they meet me like you're really kind of really funny play hockey and you're really into not lex luther it's called acting yeah your dad was a psychiatrist slashed cycle analyst sherri afraid in come on you know it it's it's actually two different things like i was like are what's the difference psychiatrists gives you drugs yes i know analysts kind of this is trained in the freudian method it's a very specific type of psychiatric training like and then my dad became a training analyst and associate clinical professor of schedule at harvard very smart titles i don't even know what i'd be like what do you do it all we knew was that people like our patients dad's patients would come to our house so they had a separate entrance listening you couldn't it was like all double door national we were super like respectful where like my dad would go you know they're paying for college so you'll be nice oh and it was a whole rule of like you don't talk to them you just maybe wave hi you don't play in the drive if you've got your arms to be quiet 'cause my dad's seeing patients but did you ever see them walk out of the house and he weirdos that you were like oh my god no my dad would never let weirdos in the house which was kind of disappointing nobody understood it until growing pains because that's.

hockey analyst associate clinical professor harvard bowling sherri afraid
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"There are also work circumstances as well people who telework for example and who may not be encountering other people whether it's in person or even via the telephone or video conference i they i believe they are also people who are at increased risk offer feeling lonely does that mean to people shouldn't telework no eight telework is actually an important tool that has given so many people especially young families flexibility but what he means is that we have to understand the potential downsides of some of these arrangements just as we have to array understand the potential harmful impacts other technology it has so that we can manage those just as we seek to employ technology and alternative work arrangements for their efficiencies brantley thanks so much for the colony bringing other voice in the conversation now jacqueline an old sokaiya tourist in private practice in cambridge massachusetts and in associate clinical professor of psychiatry at harvard medical school she is also on the faculty at the massachusetts general hospital mclean hospital psychiatric resident see program she and her husband wrote a book in two thousand nine titled the lonely american drifting apart in the twentyfirst century great to have you jackie thanks for coming in thanks so much what led you to write the book the lonely american so we appreciated that uh people like people who are shy would feel embarrassed about the fact that they were naturally sort of uh outside of things and that they felt so bad about being lonely that they would come to us in the office and instead of talking about the loneliness they would talk about what they're thought their diagnosis was in the way of anxiety or depression and so we were always talking around the issue of loneliness because people were embarrassed about it and we thought we should bring it out of the closet so tell us how loneliness and social isolation drive mental health problems.

private practice massachusetts associate clinical professor harvard medical school cambridge massachusetts general hospital social isolation
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And we are back and i am privileged to welcome a friend of mine and uh someone who is an expert uh so sit tight you want to hear about this dr todd hadn't welcome targeting you good to see you can true dr hutton is a boardcertified sokaiya tra's fell the american executive association these associate clinical professor sky the us he kicked school of medicine where he teaches residents in sokaiya tree we've known each other for years and years and years at fat twenty five islamic 25 years don'ts that scares me the frightens me dutch threatens twitter handles at dr todd hutton h e t t o n and the website pertinent to the some of the treatment talking about here is so cal t m s dot com soca yelled tms dot com let's just get right into a what is tms well case team s sanskrit trans cranial magnetic stimulation so they break that down trans cranium unit crusher cream crusher skull magic the magnet that goes across your brain skull nedic in their brain and stimulates were stimulating the brain and the thing about it is so as a psychiatrist at you'll have therapy do a lot of prescribing of farm o'clock pharmacology we'd have another tool a way to stimulate the brain to treat depression and potentially a lot of other things so the way i think about it how do you you know wireless charging all the rage yes how does that happen magnet exactly yet more people the people have not studied electric curie of physics of of electrons is that magnets craig currants they move electrons forward and your brain has a certain amount of which chemical qualities to it so the magnet causes current the break right and we look at it when with so magnetism electricity for the two sides of the same quaint you can turn electricity into a magnetic pulse and magnetism goes straight through things so go straight through your skull unimpeded unlike electricity and then it gets converted back into electricity and the neurons nurse in.

dr hutton american executive association sokaiya tree depression dr todd associate clinical professor twitter dr todd hutton 25 years
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on WJR 760

"And the felling tie in alan hang in there by that's the whole exit you i've been there done that uh the best investment i think i ever made my life was when i bought to the tire and wheel insurance uh for my cars and because i i'd like alan of had the same problem blown on tires and uh if you've got a church pays for its costly but the pace for well they are not the only ones now exactly all going through this at that time of year sowa worst we're seeing and everywhere and uh so we just wish you luck tell you all you can do is is pay attention and a drive carefully yeah causing accidents one you have to swerve around those potholes if you see the men time uh it's not much time to judge whether there's another car right in the lane next to you as you try to avoid this pothole so it's very dangerous all right you know we covered the story about the uh the meeting that a about a dozen congress people uh had and they were all almost all democrats the apparently may have been one republican in the audience and it was run by this dr bandy lee uh she works out of yale and harvard and she was also one of twenty seven people in that field uh who wrote a book last year of that question the the mental capacity of our president they were they thought he was not last year at none of them as ever examined him and then the american psychiatric association came out with a statement that said none of this is not what we do you ache you don't do individual analyses of people's mental health from afar like that that's that's against our practices will they put out another statement yesterday that has urged members to uphold the principle that psychiatrists never offered diagnostic opinions on people they haven't examined and does soul dr larry listening this is this is for you well here's a gentleman who's also a distinguished life fellow the american psychiatric association associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the university of rochester school of medicine in new york dr robert young has been well as before to talk about books he's written where we're happy to have him back on the show dr young good morning good morning francs very happy to talk with your young nice to have you back.

alan dr bandy lee yale harvard president american psychiatric associati associate clinical professor dr robert young dr larry university of rochester school new york
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Biz talk radio aaron joining us now is jock dirt jeffrey korean who is often described as a renaissance man but that really isn't even a part of it he does a lot of things he's a retired cosmetic dentist arms so sorry you're retired it's a former associate clinical professor at nyu in the oral medicine oral facial pain department where he taught for years and years he's a practitioner of spiritual healing and energy work he's been on the board of the association for spirituality and psychotherapy since 1999 where he's lectured he is one of the few doctors with a longstanding career in comedy if i continue to read this we're not gonna have time for our interview but he's also a nationally known comedy writer comic producer author and host of comedy matters tv and internet channel with over four hundred interviews these john with jimmy fallon and chest chelsea handler and it goes on and on and on our jack black m jim karmi he's written for legendary comedians like rodney dangerfield joan rivers jerry lewis he's a frequent guest i kind i missed you how apt i i i this is so silly there i'd missed you in all of these years of i never knew about you and i'm so excited because you're with us today you are also an author and tell us about the book please okay thank you for devoting cone i could be on review m we met when we're supposed to meet that's one of the concept of my book my book of quilt healing johore by changing your mind a lines a spiritual and humorous approach to achieving happiness and it's all about changing the way we think you know from from the time with children we you know every time.

associate clinical professor nyu john jimmy fallon facial pain writer producer rodney dangerfield
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Junk in junk just forms inboxes it doctors are not transcribing they are checking boxes while you talk well and do which razor question about practicing defensive medicine him to what extent are doctors them health systems worried about lawsuits malpractice soon and therefore doing things that may be make the problems you're describing worse but they're doing it to kind of protect themselves that may be part of it the lawyers may have decided that the best way to do it is have the doctor check everything off but in practice what happens is the opposite when to the kaiser actually did a study i heard about informally where they wanted to see how much because doctors leng we have no time anymore we have no time so they actually follow the doctors key strokes to different hospitals for over two months in and they figured out how many seconds each doctor and bubble law it turned out uh they're their doctors in an eighthour day were spending ten hours the computer and when i've been allies work they go home and they spend two hours they spent three to ten innate there are still entering data failed so the doctor to totally frustrated so i've just recently heard that some of the doctors have figured out at his can believe this that if they they can preach check all the box one of the medical students actually told me as i was just shocked just a couple of weeks ago before they see the patient exactly and then she said no we could look at the patient you know we can get it all out of the records which just pre check everything and there you go to the patient and examine them and anything that's not normal we unchecked while exactly exactly talking to return of swede her new book is called of slow medicine the way to heal associate clinical professor of medicine a you see us of also the former physician of san francisco's laguna honda hospital no it isn't just doctors and nurses that don't have enough time patients don't have enough time either and so i'm wondering is this a problem that in part is created by people want to get in and out quickly because they don't have a lot of time to spend with their doctors or they they come in they seen.

health systems san francisco laguna honda hospital associate clinical professor o two months eighthour ten hours two hours
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Which raises a question about practicing defensive minimum to what extent are doctors and health systems worried about lawsuits malpractice suits and therefore doing things that maybe make the problems you're describing worse but they're doing it to kinda protect themselves that may be part of it the lawyers may have decided that the best way to do it is have the doctor check everything off but in practice what happens is the opposite when does the kaiser actually did a study i heard about informally were they wanted to see how much because dr directly we have no time anymore we have no time so they are uh follow the doctors keystroke strokes to different hospitals for over two months and then they figured out how many seconds each doctor and bubble la it turned out there their doctors in an dr day we're spending ten hours the computer and when i been invited to work they go home and they spent two hours they spent from eight to ten in the there are still entering data so the doctor to totally frustrated so i've just recently heard that some of the doctors have figured out i just couldn't believe this that if they they can preach check all the box it's one of the medical students actually told me as i was just shocked just a couple of weeks ago before they see the patient exactly and then she said no we could look at the patient you know we can get it all out of the records which is pre check everything and we go to the patient and examine them and anything that's not normal we unchecked while exactly exactly talking to pretoria swede her a new book is called a slow medicine the way to healing she's an associate clinical professor of medicine at you see as half also.

health systems pretoria associate clinical professor o two months ten hours two hours
"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"associate clinical professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Health services good morning michael kennedy good morning and also with us is a alexa stone she is a mental health clinician a license clinical social worker for this cinema county department of mental health good morning alexa stone good morning also with us as alan segel's psychologist an associate clinical professor it new see berkeley good morning allen's seed on the morning mia well michael kennedy i'd like to start with you you are the behavior health director for the county of cinema what can you tell us about what you've currently doing to provide services to people affected by this yes so again um you know something this affected our our whole county right so you really an incident this really traumatising for everybody and i just wanted to also mentioned that i know are sister agencies in um in lake county in mando napa everybody's really working hard to provide a medical services so for us it started on your early monday um we're we uh we were able to mobilise our staff uh we had to move from our campus um and and moved to a site where we were able to start to provide not only um mel hall services for all of our clients but then mobiliser staff so we could be at all shelters twenty two shelters and all we have staff about fifty staff in the field round around the clock and um to provide support to folks who are being your evacuated or folks who have lost their on lost their homes to years saw very much in crisis mode right now yes weird doley we've been doing this for about six days making sure that our five days making sure that we have staff right now at all the shelters um and then also are on the net health departments or public health has twenty five or twenty six nurses also at shelters with us working um with folks who have either been evacuated or or lost their homes are i just want us also mention that eight of our staff have lost their homes on one of our staff iud the donny dean lost his home and then right away is at shelters of providing support.

Health services michael kennedy alan segel associate clinical professor berkeley allen director lake county donny dean mando napa mel hall public health five days six days