35 Burst results for "Assistant Professor"

The Pandemics Ending Here. And Almost Nowhere Else.

The Big Story

01:40 min | 2 weeks ago

The Pandemics Ending Here. And Almost Nowhere Else.

"Rowling's. This is the big story dr yet. Tina banerjee is an assistant professor at mcgill university and the school of population and global health. She's an expert in global and public health equity as well as social justice. Hello dr benedict hydrated. Thanks for having me on this show. Oh you're so welcome. Thank you for your expertise today. Do you want to start maybe Giving us perspective. I think from outside. Canada from an equity point of view on when we worry about our vaccine wrote in canada. How are we doing compared to everyone else so as canadians. We need to be very grateful that more than fifty percent of our population has received the first fox nation. And that is extremely high when you compare it to low middle income countries if you are living in high income countries such as canada the likelihood is that you have already got your cove in nineteen vaccine or will soon get one sadly this is not the reality for millions of people living in several low and middle income countries more than half a billion vaccine doses have been administered so far guess what three quarters of them have been used by the world's richest countries which means that only zero point one percent of covid nineteen vaccine does have been administered in low income countries. And at this rate in might take many years for low middle income countries to reach a high level vaccine coverage

Tina Banerjee School Of Population And Globa Dr Benedict Canada Mcgill University Rowling
Meat Producer JBS Says Expects Most Plants Working Wednesday

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Meat Producer JBS Says Expects Most Plants Working Wednesday

"The world's largest meat processing company is getting back online after production around the world was disrupted by a cyber attack just weeks after a similar incident shut down a U. S. oil pipeline Brazil's JBS the second largest supplier of beef pork and chicken in the U. S. says it's made significant progress in dealing with the cyber attack and expected the best majority of its plans to be operating today the White House said JBS notified the US of a ransom demand from a criminal organization likely based in Russia trama loan an assistant professor of agriculture at Michigan State University says a JBS were to shut down for even one day the U. S. would lose almost a quarter of its beef processing capacity that's the equivalent of twenty thousand beef cows I'm Julie Walker

JBS Russia Trama Brazil U. White House Michigan State University United States Julie Walker
The Wild Woman of Brooklyn, and the Peabody Bones

Science Friction

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

The Wild Woman of Brooklyn, and the Peabody Bones

"Starts with a container of bones. I actually didn't know about them before. This project started there in the collection. Of the peyote museum of anthropology and death. -nology anthropology as we know it really in the united states began at just a few institutions in harvard. Being one of them and the peabody museum has really been the center of anthropology at harvard. For over one hundred years and it's collection ease huge in the collections of the museum. There are about one and a quarter million objects works archaeological artifacts cultural objects. It's quite large. I my name's lowering. I am an osteology at the peabody museum of archaeology and ethnology with is also lots of bones right. that's what osteology. It's like lowering investigate in the collections of human and other primate remains and bones. Also what this evolutionary anthropologist wanted to get access to the collection. My name is ian wallace. I'm an assistant professor in the department of anthropology at the university of new mexico. United states and works alongside modern hunter gatherer communities like the tarahumara indigenous to mexico to study. How the way we used our bodies today is at all with how bodies evolved to move. I mean you've just got to look at how much time we spend sitting on our bums in front of screens. Yeah that's that's definitely part of it. As well as the beds that we sleep in and even the ways that we are physically inactive are sort of fascinating because other hunter-gatherers and our ancestors also occasionally physically inactive but they did it in different ways by squatting and not necessarily sitting in these a super comfy chairs that shut off our muscles and that has all sorts of

Peyote Museum Of Anthropology Center Of Anthropology Harvard Peabody Museum Of Archaeology Peabody Museum United States Ian Wallace Department Of Anthropology University Of New Mexico Mexico
Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:04 min | Last month

Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

"Is of course the one year anniversary of the murder of floyd in a year of protests and reckoning there have been signs of hope even during a pandemic that hit black americans particularly hard and closed many black owned businesses new data suggests that people in black communities started new businesses over the last year in cities like new york and atlanta the study from the national bureau of economic research says. Black americans were more likely than white americans to take steps toward entrepreneurship. during the pandemic marketplace's euler has more on. Why so the study found that. After a relief package is passed last year. There was a big surge in registered business formations in the following weeks. Catherine facia teaches business at boston university and helped write the study. She says that's despite the cares. Act not directly infusing. Any money into new businesses are passed not to pat is a lot of start up formation so it was very interesting for us to see that cares out had that ripple of fat another reason for the surgeon. Black entrepreneurship could be the americans. Now have a better understanding of historic inequality or he goes. Mom is an assistant professor of management at columbia university and a co author of the study. There's being clear intends in banks and government to make sure all the financial reports out this year. Which is wachner hurts. And andre perry says that speaks to a bigger lesson to be learned from this study about access to capital. He's a senior fellow at the brookings institution. If you really want to see the economy grow figure out two ways to invest in the under appreciated assets in our community in that happens to be black and brown communities it happens to be black and brown entrepreneurs he says black people represent about fourteen percent of the population in the us but only two percent of all businesses with more than one employee this investment and black businesses. He says shouldn't be a pandemic induced

Catherine Facia National Bureau Of Economic Re Floyd Boston University Wachner Andre Perry Atlanta New York Columbia University United States
What the Human Brain Can Tell Us About NLP Models

The TWIML AI Podcast

01:22 min | Last month

What the Human Brain Can Tell Us About NLP Models

"Are everyone. I am here with allison. Injure allison is an assistant professor at the university of chicago. Alison welcome to the tuomo. Podcasts thank you hi. I'm looking forward to digging into our conversation. We'll be talking a little. Bit about your research and computational linguistics and nlp at a bunch of cool things but before we dig into those topics i love to have you share a little bit about your background and how you came to work in the field. Great yeah so i Originally came from a background in linguistics and psychology interested in language in humans. And how language works in the brain. So i Worked in a a cognitive neuroscience lab looking at processing of language in the brain for awhile began a phd in linguistics with a bit of a focus on psycholinguistics. But fairly early on. I took a strong interest. In the promise of computational linguistics as a way both to use methods to continue exploring questions about the brain but also to ask interesting questions about how to apply puzzles in language to engineering applications and to design of artificial intelligence. And so this was what sent me in this direction of being what i am today which is simultaneously someone who works on natural language processing and artificial intelligence and also someone who continues to work on modeling of cognitive processes pretentious language.

Allison University Of Chicago Alison
"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:16 min | Last month

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Yesterday's omar awkward who is assistant professor of psychology neuroscience empire medicating at the university of michigan. He's lapsed studies. The euro signs of spatial navigation in memory in these newer systems are offered it. Alzheimer's disease parkinson's disease lipsey local. Bomar much guilt for having me here. Yeah thanks for doing this. So i want to start to twenty nineteen paper. The noodle circuitry supporting successful spatial navigation despite vaguely movement speeds You study and in here so hands who have successfully navigated the long distance between the foraging spot at the nest. Dozens of times drastically overshoot destination. If the size of the legs has doubled but conditional stills this observation deflects a navigational strategy caught path integration strategy by mammals This is an interesting interesting study almost so so you just essentially elongating the legs of ads and then that confuses them yes so this was a review article every had written summing up the state of the field in how mammals navigate their environments. And the study that you referred to there was a beautiful Work by matisse whitlinger and colleagues in germany so let's start with the basics of spatial variation. And why we should even care so across evolution successful. Spatial navigation is as you can imagine absolutely critical for every single behavior that animals carry out so if you need to go find food water shelter reproduce and then you need to find your way home but along the way you might encounter predators or perhaps unexpected that make you take an unexpected left turn and take longer path yet these animals such as and some mice and rats and many most of the species will then turn around once they have their food people make a beeline essentially a straight line back for their nest and they are constantly calculating their brains somehow including how many left turns if they can. How many right turns they've taken how fast they've gone. How when they were stopped. Were says moving..

germany matisse whitlinger twenty nineteen paper Alzheimer's disease Yesterday Dozens of times university of michigan parkinson's disease single behavior
Radio Spectrum and Transmission Art With Amanda Dawn Christie

Radio Survivor Podcast

01:51 min | Last month

Radio Spectrum and Transmission Art With Amanda Dawn Christie

"Today we're speaking with amanda don christie assistant professor studio arts at concordia university in montreal canada and a transmission artist. And you were recently in alaska doing a transmission art piece called ghosts in the air flow. And i wanted to learn more about what initially attracted you to transmission arts and and radio generally. Okay well it. All started in kind of a weird Spot so my background Is interdisciplinary work of film. Contemporary dad's experimental sound. And back in. Guess it would be two thousand nine. I built my first radio. Receiver was just like a foxhole radio some wire wrapped around a toilet paper to the built. A workshop in a town called sackville new brunswick. It's a small town of three thousand people and my radio picked up italian radio. No yeah so. I thought i did a great job i was like. Wow i did fantastic and it turned out. I did not do a great job. I just happened to be next to a very large international short radio station. The radio canada international shortwave towers which broadcast all around the world to europe africa. Australia the arctic south america. And so i was really close to them. And then i found out that some people in the area Her if they had copper pipes in their host the pike would act as an antenna and they the radio. And they're sick. Yeah so. I was jealous because i didn't have radius inc and you can't just go buy a sony siegman so i decided to try and make my own radio

Amanda Don Christie Concordia University Montreal Canada Alaska New Brunswick Arctic South America Africa Europe Australia Radius Inc Sony
A Record-Breaking Flare From Sun's Nearest Stellar Neighbour

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:18 min | Last month

A Record-Breaking Flare From Sun's Nearest Stellar Neighbour

"Astronomers have detected one of the most violent still aflame ever recorded in the galaxy exploding out of proxima centauri the nearest star system that the sun the massive flare reported in the estra physical journal is the largest ever recorded coming from proxima centauri a small special tie. Game red dwarf star located just four point two five light years away. Proxima centauri has twelve percent the mass and fourteen percent the radius of the sun. It is a surface temperature of thousand seven hundred and seventy seven degrees celsius and is better thousand times less luminous than the sun. it's known to have. At least two orbiting planets one of which proxima b. is similar in size to the earth and orbits within the star's habitable zone. That's the region around a star with temperatures would allow liquid water central for life as we know it to exist on the planet. Surface red dwarfs are the most common type of star in the milky way galaxy making up about three quarters of all the stars in the galaxy. And because they're relatively dim it's easy to find orbiting except planets around them consequently the most common known source of exoplanets. And for this reason proximus story has long been a target for scientists have been defined life beyond the solar system. However there's always been a problem with red dwarf stars and that includes proxima centauri. They produce violent flares spilling out huge amounts of energy and plasma into the surrounding space. Eventually this would erode away any atmosphere around by planet. A would also radiate anything on the planet surface and that includes any hope of finding life on the surface of proxima b. The study's lead author assistant professor mcgregor from the university of colorado. Boulder says red dwarfs flare a lot more than stars like the sun and astronomers are only now beginning to understand the magnitude and character of their flays mcgregor and colleagues observed proxima centauri for forty hours using nine ground and space based telescopes including the square kilometer. Ray pathfinder as gap nassar's hubble space telescope the atacama large millimeter submillimeter array radio telescope alma and nasa transiting exoplanet survey satellite tests. This marked the first time. Astronomers have had this kind of multi wavelength coverage of a stellar flare.

Estra Physical Journal University Of Colorado Mcgregor Ray Pathfinder Gap Nassar Boulder Nasa
Addicted or Dependent?  What Is the Difference?

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

02:04 min | Last month

Addicted or Dependent? What Is the Difference?

"Today. I want to talk about clarifying some things. There has been a big discussion of late around kelly. Sober for those of you. Who don't know it means that you might be addicted to alcohol or cocaine or another drug and you decide that you're going to stop using that one drug but you choose to actually continue smoking pot or if you're a pot smoker and you stop smoking pot you choose to continue drinking alcohol you know. I have my opinions about this. But i like to return to more basic stuff if you know me. I'm much more into okay. What are the definitions of certain things. And why are we so frigging confused about them. Is there really a difference between addiction and dependence for instance and what are the differences between like having a habit or miscues zine or me using something for today. I'm going to be drawing from a lot of kind of clinical stuff that i've done research on most predominantly from an article written by jonathan stevia. Who is a registered practicing clinical psychologists and calgary and he also is an adjunct assistant. Professor at the university of calgary this for scientific america. And i think it does such a good job of at least putting down some facts about the differences that there is so much misinformation out there about in regard to the language of addiction. What is a substance. Use disorder versus. Am i just sober curious. Do i really have a problem. All of that stuff on instagram and facebook. That gets me confused. And i'm in the business.

Jonathan Stevia Kelly University Of Calgary Calgary America Instagram Facebook
Screens: Are They Ruining Our Brains, Mental Health and Eyes?

Science Vs

01:45 min | Last month

Screens: Are They Ruining Our Brains, Mental Health and Eyes?

"So people pretty worried about screens taking over our lives. And there's been a lot of hand-wringing recently. About what screen. Time is doing to the keats. Some say it's ruining their attention span. Language skills might even messing with their ability to read. So how do we need to be here. And what's the right amount of screen time before it's time for the little ones to switch off to find out. We called up brennan a desk. She's an assistant professor of psychology at pace university and brennan studies. How kids interact with these nasty beasts screens. Yes screen and brennan doesn't just steady this. She lives it. She's got a seven year old son and they've been pandemic together. I'm living the situation now. At home i have a child at home. Who's doing school. And if i need to get some work done and he's done with school is it. Is he gonna spend more time on a screen. Maybe and yeah brennan says it can feel kinda to watch a kid getting sucked in by screen but is it really that bad. The best worry we're going to tackle is whether these screens are screwing up. Kids attention spans. Making it harder for them to concentrate. 'cause looking at what's sunscreens these days brennan's like it kinda makes sense that they wouldn't be great for focus a screen. You know you go on a screen. You can watch whatever you want. You know when you want it and you can switch between all kinds of things you could go on tired of the show. I'm gonna play an app. They're looking for that next. Hit

Brennan Pace University
Creating Robust Language Representations With Jamie Macbeth

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:14 min | 2 months ago

Creating Robust Language Representations With Jamie Macbeth

"Are everyone. I am here with jamie macbeth. Jamie is an assistant professor in the department of computer science at smith college. Jamie welcome to the podcast. Thank you thanks for having me. And i'm super excited to dig into our conversation and learn a bit about your research what you're up to. Let's get started by having you share a bit about your background with our audience. How did you come to work in a and cognitive systems in particular. Sure so originally i was. I would say a physicist actually a mathematician physicist as an undergraduate in also sometimes a grad student. I then fell in love with computer. Scientists said in computer science in graduate school and towards the end of my career in graduate school. I also fell in love with the specific topic that i work on now which is artificial intelligence systems and cognitive systems for performing language understanding and the issues associated. With that. we're chatting earlier. You spoke a little bit more about the way you think about cognitive systems and kind of how that's different from a lot of the contemporary application of machine learning and ai loved eighty elaborate on that a bit for audience. Sure sure yeah. So those of us in the cognitive systems community were a part of the artificial intelligence community but people in the cognitive systems community are focused quite a bit more on using artificial intelligence as a vehicle for a better understanding of human intelligence and not particularly of using a i to just score well at particular tasks when do on the leaderboard i think some of the negative things that have been associated with artificial intelligence these days such as via season things like that have to do with there being a little bit too much hype around the systems. That people are building in the way. You're able to show good numbers at these tests problems and focusing less on the actual science. Okay what really can these systems do. So yeah in the congress distance community. Or i care much more about building that have a human like

Jamie Macbeth Jamie Department Of Computer Science Smith College Congress
Keep Breathing: Avoiding Hypoxia with the McMurray Enhanced Airway

Outcomes Rocket

02:15 min | 2 months ago

Keep Breathing: Avoiding Hypoxia with the McMurray Enhanced Airway

"I have to magnificent nurse leaders with us. I i've got roxanne mcmurray. She has been a nurse for thirty five years in practicing anesthesia around thirty. She is the inventor of the mcmurray enhanced airway and also the co founder of mcmurray. Medical group mcmurray is a retired. Clinical assistant professor insistent program director in the nurse anesthesia program in the graduate school of nursing at the university of minnesota mcmurray. I also have on the podcast today. Noah hendler he is a nurse practitioner healthcare technologist and strategist who helped value-based episodic care models initiating some of the nation's first bundled payment programs he served on the front lines in busy urban trauma centers lead clinical informatics work through post acute settings and helped deliver new levels of transparency for both medication. Reconciliation anna hearings. Noah's co founder of sun sale and roxanne is also very involved in the organization. And today i am just privileged to have both of you on the podcast. It's a pleasure to have you both and so nurses are at the center of everything we do. This campaign has been such an education for me and i know for the listeners. To over fifty percent of care provided to everyone is from a nurse cova shots are coming from nurses. You guys are so important and we appreciate and love and value us. I want to start by saying that. Also wanna know what is it that inspires you in this work so go ahead. Let us know what that is actually saw. I think it's important to underscore your point. That nurses really are the largest workforce healthcare and. That's something that is overlooked off and something that has definitely become central to my work. I entered healthcare as the second career after the death. Good friend that he wasn't when he died cernan. Apart of meeting meagerly. I felt address. Nothing releasing to much and i kind of drifted further away from where i begun my career working directly with people actually photographing looked at rhonda. Kids were survivors of the genocide. Hasn't success evolving software but in the wake my friends death. I just felt like i needed to contribute in a more direct

Roxanne Mcmurray Mcmurray Graduate School Of Nursing Noah Hendler Anna Hearings Noah's Co Sun Sale University Of Minnesota Roxanne Cernan Rhonda
The COVID Vaccine With Dr. Alex Greninger

Outcomes Rocket

02:15 min | 2 months ago

The COVID Vaccine With Dr. Alex Greninger

"I have the privilege of hosting dr grandeur. He is the assistant director of the uw. Medicine clinical virology lab and the uw assistant professor of laboratory medicine. Doctor grandeur focuses on genomic and proteome characterization of a variety of human viruses and bacteria with a focus on respiratory viruses and human herpes viruses. He has discovered a number of new human animal viruses. His basic science lab at south lake union uses genetically informed approaches to understand human infectious diseases. Dr greenwich you're got his. Md and phd from uc. San francisco is master and scientists immunology from stanford and his masters in philosophy in epidemiology from cambridge in england he has many clinical interests in facilitating clinical trial testing for respiratory viruses and human herpes viruses and because of his expertise. I'm just thrilled and excited to have a conversation about the corona virus. The vaccine and a lot of questions that. Maybe you're thinking about that just going to be very interesting today. So thank you so much for joining me today. Alex thanks for having me. It's good to be here And so before we get started and kind of diving deep into the work that you do in research talk to us a little bit about what inspires your work and yet i got interested in going to medical school early early on Had a pediatrician. That i really liked and sort of do my career day in high school with Not kind of random way but it was a great entry to realize you could be a physician and deal with a lot of science and then from there just not able to make a ton of decisions so doing the mvp hd route and. I think i got really excited about. I think what's really. I was inspired. You know some of the work is initially. It was enviro discovery. This idea that there are lots of viruses out there to be found in people that could be the causes of diseases and then you would be able to cure them right and that sort of as more is that you know hypothesis only almost not turn out not to be true. There are a ton of other viruses that we've known about for quite a long time where the same thing is true. We can cure or we can prevent them with vaccines. And it's just about executing that vision over and over and over

Dr Grandeur UW Human Infectious Diseases Dr Greenwich South Lake Union UC Stanford Cambridge San Francisco England Alex
Dr. Rubin Naiman - Perspectives on Sleep, Dreams and Lucid Dreaming

Untangle

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Rubin Naiman - Perspectives on Sleep, Dreams and Lucid Dreaming

"Today's guest is dr rubin naming a psychologist clinical assistant professor of medicine and sleep and dream specialists at the andrew wheel center for integrative medicine at the university of arizona. He's become a leader in the development of integrative approaches to sleep and dream health as a sleep expert. He looks at sleeping and dreaming as spiritual practices and shares. How can better understand who we are through our dreams through our unconscious and some of his ideas might seem radical. we tend to. He says that dreaming is a subset of waking life. What he's suggesting that waking life just might be a subset of dreaming. He explains lucid dreaming. And how we can be sleeping and conscious at the same time. If mindfulness is about becoming aware of subtle daytime waking experiences then lucidity he says is a bit like mindfulness of the night. There's a lot of mystery in the world of sleep and dreams and reuben has tapped into a bit of this year. Now here's ruben ruben. It is so great to have you on untangled today. I'm really excited to dive into these topics. Thank you to be here. I am curious why you chose originally to study sleep and dreams. Can you tell us a little bit about that. When i hear question like that goes on the back of my mind is another question. Why are y'all doing this. Because there's a presumption that remake we live within our world that what we're doing now waking consciousness ordinary consciousness that carries a nay that this is the gold standard way kings is where it's at the sleeping dreaming or considered secondary serbian state of consciousness there only zero underpinning of waking wife studying trees and forgetting that they have

Dr Rubin Andrew Wheel Center For Integr University Of Arizona Ruben Ruben Reuben
"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Your your crop to someone else in they eventually give you give you the the money later once they receive it from downstream and so the indian government here has introduced a platform which doesn't number of things at once it measures quality directly. So it has. It tries to quantify quality in terms of say moisture content of the crop and so forth. I then runs an auction where people can bid and they don't actually have to be present to bid they could do it over the phone from a different location and then it's kind of the the product is delivered right there so the whole bunch of things happening at once and then there's you know that's not the only part of this. They're also trying to ease rules on who's allowed to be a trader at different sites cross state lines. I'm still pretty early. So they're only. I think three or four years into this. There are some early state specific pilots that have seen to perhaps lowered prices. Sorry raise prices so farmers receiving higher prices than they did before. But i think it's still kind of enough that a very interested in trying to study state. What happened at least from an intuitive sense. It makes a lot of sense so i wanted you know if i'm allowed to. These countries have the same problem in countries I wanted it has some sort of united nations dialogue nights station. Kuchen help you know sort of just start something like there's You would probably get faster. Implementation I don't know if there's any organization. I mean it doesn't require that much often investment right even foundations good could put think about this rate. I think those are an excellent point. i'm strapped. Just by when i talk to government officials say india or other countries How aware of in interested. They are in other countries experiences and unfortunately i think we don't always get as much of that in the us. It's a big country. Of course. But and so i think they're certainly The willingness and desire to learn from others experiences. A i think you're right. It even beyond like borrowing practices some sort of international coordination of benefits. Yeah yeah so. I want to finish up with your most recent michael human capital depreciation Human capital you take depreciated skills are unused But estimating human capital depreciation is challenging as worker skills are difficult to measure and desperate workers are more likely to spec tightening non employment.

three michael four years indian government india nations dialogue nights station united
"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:15 min | 2 months ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics researchers on a variety of topics. If you'd like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to in four at scientific sense dot com back. Michael talking about schools are public and private schools and policy choices in in in public provision of education I love to go into a totally different topic of one of your papers from twenty seventeen consumer price search and platform design internet commerce. You say the platform designed the process that counts bench lawyers on the internet. Navigate toward products dame employee's plays a critical role in recusing search frictions and determining market outcomes. And you study here at played off associated with two.

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:05 min | 2 months ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is prince of michael dynasty. Coolest assistant professor of economics at the university of chicago. His research interests include public economics with an emphasis on education and industrial organization Michael thank you for having it doing so I want to talk with barnacle. Older papers twenty fourteen. It's entitled quantifying. The supplies pawns or private schools. To public policies. You save for public school policies that cause a loss demand shift between public and private schooling may cause some woods to enter or the market. This private school surprised response flood tourists students choices and likely before the policies affect the policy fakes under fixed words as a changing market structure. Maybe very different so that that sounds city. Intuitive michael so you have a sort of a market Test here are using new york new york city data. That's right so I think think of education policy often in isolation is focused on one sector or another and so we have a bunch of education not policy making all across the country in the world and but new york city's a particular particularly active i would say What's the biggest school district in the us. And they're they're often changing their policies and so on. I focused on one of the bigger changes that they've made. This was during michael bloomberg's mayoral administration. I and it was a school funding reform. That basically changed..

Michael new york michael bloomberg today twenty fourteen michael new york city one sector one university of chicago michael dynasty
Assumptions about hurricane season face winds of change

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:59 min | 3 months ago

Assumptions about hurricane season face winds of change

"11. The planet is warming and it's having a notable impact on whether rising water temperatures are fueling a stronger and more active tropical storm season, and that is prompting scientists can to consider starting the Atlantic hurricane season two weeks earlier. Well, let's learn more now with Alison Wing. She's an assistant professor for Florida State University's Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science. She joins us on Skype. Thanks for being with us. We appreciate it. Good afternoon. Thanks for having me first to set this up. Describe the changes that we have been witnessing in terms of these earlier name tropical storms. We're starting to see the stuff earlier and earlier, aren't we? Yes. So in the last six hurricane seasons, all six of those years we have had storms named storms form in May before the official start of the hurricane season on June 1st and so It is something that seems to be happening more and more more frequently recently what our weather researchers considering besides an earlier hurricane season to accommodate these changes. One thing that the National Hurricane Center has already started. For this year. They're going to be issuing their tropical weather outlooks actually starting on May 15 now, which are issued every six hours during the season, just to provide overall overview of what's happening with weather in the tropics. And that would be something to help. You know, people be more aware of what's going on in the tropics, and you know if there's risks of tropical storms or hurricanes forming, But pushing the start to the actual official start to the season earlier is something that you know, could improve public awareness of the risk even more on because when we have these these storms Before hurricane season officially starts. The public isn't always necessarily as aware of the risk they may not have, you know, gotten their supplies and prepared their their homes yet for it, And so it's really a consideration and in order to recognize that we do have storms that happened before June 1st and you know what can we do to make the public As prepared as possible. And is there a way to try to impart to the public? How the storm should be rated like how strong we should expect? Storm's coming our way. It seems like sometimes there's confusion about that. Well, I think one thing to keep in mind is that the wind speed that we used to category categorize storms is category 12 and so on and so forth. That's only one aspect of the type of damage we can can receive from tropical storms and hurricanes. And so I think more and more. Forecasters are emphasizing the full range of impacts from winds be damaged, but also coastal flooding from storm surge inland flooding from rainfall and as well as the potential for tornadoes actually to be embedded inside hurricanes. And so the National Weather Service has some some products that emphasized those and I think that you know we going to see communication of this full range of impacts more and more, and you shouldn't focus solely on the

Atlantic Hurricane Alison Wing Department Of Earth, Ocean And Hurricane Florida State University National Hurricane Center Skype Confusion National Weather Service
'Weight isn't always within your control': Why some states are prioritizing obesity patients for the COVID-19 vaccine

WGN Programming

03:18 min | 3 months ago

'Weight isn't always within your control': Why some states are prioritizing obesity patients for the COVID-19 vaccine

"State leaders make their own decisions on wind groups or eligible, but many people are not happy about obesity being considered a risk factor that should get early dibs at the vaccine joins us now to talk about this Dr Fatima Cody Stanford, She's an assistant professor of medicine in Massachusetts General Hospital. She's also in obesity, medicine, physician and adults, Adolescence and Children and MGH Wait center. Thanks for joining us tonight, Doctor. Thank you for having me. I guess the first question becomes one of the risk factors for those who are overweight when we're talking about Cove it so it's important for us to recognize that obesity is an actual disease, and I think one of the things that people don't realize is that it's the disease is not just how you look. It's actual, a disease process characterized by a high degree of inflammation. And so when we have that high degree of chronic inflammation associated with obesity, the disease it doesn't play well with the acute inflammation of covert 19. As such patients that have the disease of obesity do have a risk of dying. That's much higher, sometimes 3 to 4 times the likelihood of those that are leaner and wait. So it's important for us to recognize that this is important. We need persons with obesity to be vaccinated. We want them to live. We want them not to need ICU care and be on the ventilator. And that's why I think that this really is a prudent and a really important step for those that have the disease of obesity. Doctor. I want to read a quote from the chairwoman of the Obesity Action Co Elite coalition, who was featured in the USA Today article, she said, Wait isn't always within your control. With that in mind, and what we know about the risk of obesity and Kobe complications is the right move to get obese Americans in this next phase of the vaccine. One thing I'm gonna change I don't want to call people will be so this is a label. Obesity is a disease. And so that language can be highly stigmatizing for my patients that actually have this disease of obesity, but hands down. It's the right move to get patients with obesity vaccinated when we're looking at the vaccines, the fires of modern of particularly we saw that patients with obesity had a similar level of immunity with regards to the vaccines as persons that were leaner and wait status. So if we know that they're dying quicker. We know they're getting sicker and having much more Colton disease processes associated with covert. We need to make sure that they're getting vaccinated. Have you had a chance to talk to any of your patients? What was their response when the news broke that the possibility of them being moved to the next group? They're up to get the vaccine. What was that thought process. What was their feelings about that? There were some that felt you know a little bit guilty that their weight status would cause them a higher likelihood of getting the vaccine sooner than others. But many of my patients were actually very pleased, actually finally be able to get this vaccine so that we can return to some sense of normalcy here in the United States and around the world as we try to navigate these issues with social distancing physical, do, insisting and getting back to work, So I think that it's important to see that there's different camps in terms of what people think. But overall for my patients that have a B C that Aaron care they were very relieved to see that they were moving up in the ranks of the consideration for the vaccine. Alright,

Obesity Dr Fatima Cody Stanford Obesity Action Co Elite Coalit Massachusetts General Hospital Chronic Inflammation Usa Today Colton United States Aaron
How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

WSJ The Future of Everything

13:28 min | 3 months ago

How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression

"Depression. It can be a difficult mental illness to pin down. It can feel different for everyone and even those who struggle with it can have trouble identifying bought. It is a mostly came to understood that. I had depression through talking with my friends for the longest time. I kind of system that everyone felt this way. Like weird just like general malays for this twenty nine year old. Depression surfaced about six years ago and began as a feeling of being disconnected with the world. I didn't want to eat because they didn't feel like i deserve to eat. I don't know. I didn't hang out with friends because i didn't feel like i deserve to see my friends. I didn't feel like i should be punishing them by talking to them seeing them. This person uses they them pronouns. They're a maryland resident and work as a software tester. They sought help for their depression. Trying numerous types of treatments may visited a bunch of different mental health professionals and tried different types of arby's In different types of medication but it always kinda felt like things were getting worse and worse and a current really find someone who has really helped me understand what was going on like. I still didn't even believe that. I had depression. All the while the depression advanced it felt like being alive and lake wanting to die rolling constantly fighting over like the resources in my mind then. Their health insurance lapsed in two thousand eighteen making the situation worse a surprise solution appeared while they were scrolling on social media and a posting from johns hopkins university researchers and then one day i was kind of like clicking through facebook and i actually found this ad four like this little simon. Study silla simon. That's the psychedelic drug found in magic mushrooms. And i thought it was fake remarks. I didn't expect there to be you know like a a legitimate study showing up on like facebook ad but they had no insurance basically they were out of options so they called wanted to have hope again from the wall street journal. This is the future of everything. I'm janet babbling today on the podcast. How the hallucinogenic compounds silla zyban once associated with nine hundred sixty s drug culture is making a comeback and giving people suffering from depression and other mental illnesses. Hope for this twenty nine year old study participant. Depression was not something that happened in their family. My family's from the caribbean and lived in america probably for about lake in years. We came here in ninety nine. It's kind of interesting because where from like a place that doesn't really view mental health. The that like america's mental health. It took me a while to realize that. I was having mental health problems that i was kind of experiencing depression. Depression affects a staggering number of people hundreds of millions worldwide according to a study published in the peer reviewed journal the lancet in two thousand eighteen. The pandemic didn't make things any easier. Last june about a third of people who responded to web based surveys said they suffered from symptoms of depression or anxiety disorder. Those results were published by the centers for disease control and prevention the protocol for treating these conditions hasn't changed much in the past few years. What we've been using is typically one of two things either a medication that people take every day or we have psychotherapy dr. Alan davis is clinical psychologist and an assistant professor at the ohio state university. He's also an adjunct assistant. Professor at johns hopkins university. A lot of people will improve with either medication or therapy or both to basically have both have a better chance but it doesn't work for everyone. Some studies report between ten and thirty. Five percent of patients suffer from treatment resistant. Depression and davis is that similar to what he's found in his own practice working with veterans suffering from substance abuse trauma and other mental health issues. So he began looking for alternative treatments present and welcome to psychedelic science. Two thousand and thirteen in twenty thirteen davis attended a science conference and came across a study exploring the use of silla. Sivan a chemical compound found in specific varieties of mushrooms to treat cancer patients with mental health conditions. The compounds documented facts include feelings of heightened awareness ecstasy visions and changes in the perception of reality for researchers say one of the most useful qualities is its ability to dissolve the ego to allow a user to observe oneself from the outside in the study of cancer patients. The drug was able to alleviate some of the anxiety and depression that can be associated with having a life threatening illness. I was just inspired by that word. I thought gosh this really could have a strong impact in the areas that i'm working with veterans and with others davis became part of a team of researchers at johns hopkins university that put together a randomized clinical trial. Twenty four participants. They were administered. Silla sivan with talk therapy to treat their depression. Enrollment for the trial took place in two thousand seventeen and twenty nineteen and the results were analyzed in two thousand twenty. Most of them had had chronic depression meaning decades of experiencing depression though not some had had it for shorter amount of time but this study was a weightless control trials so some people came in and started treatment right away. Others had to wait eight weeks before starting treatment so we had a comparison group. The study subjects received an extensive intake examined questionnaire to confirm. They were suffering from symptoms of depression. Participants were screened for schizophrenia. And drug use as these conditions can interfere with suicide and treatment. The big worry many people have about psychedelics is what's often referred to as a bad trip. Mary negative hallucinations. That can be scary and this is kind of trip that can go bad. Martissant received hefty doses of these drugs. The doses are based on weight and they vary slightly but patients receive around twenty milligrams in the first session a bit more in the second session to minimize the risk of a negative experience. Davis says researchers focused on controlling. What's called and setting. They work ahead of time to ensure the volunteers current mood and surroundings while taking the drugs. Remain as calm and comfortable as possible and so we spend about eight to ten hours with people before they ever get the drug talking about what the effects are talking about. What may or may not happen when they have this experience and that's why we have to train professionals there with them not only to prepare them for that but to help them through the experience when it happens because a lot of people have anxiety coming into the session. The person we spoke to the twenty nine year old participated in davis study group in august of two thousand eighteen. They had no prior experience with psychedelic drugs and didn't know watch expect basically went in kind of blindly. I don't have any other options. So that's kind of my thought process at the time was just basically kind of sticking anything to the wall and hoping it would work after fasting the previous night the treatment can cause nausea. They were placed in a small tranquil room fitted with a comfy couch. The whole room was a really really cool in very comforting because like they had like these statues like imagery in their end like. I think one of the muslim dowa tibetan model. I wanna say this and like there was like this nice lamp. It's off this really. Soft light psychedelic assisted. Therapy participants are encouraged to bring in objects from home to make them feel more comfortable. Some bring in ten bears pictures of family. The twenty nine year old brought a lightness of an ancient sumerian goddess. Soon nana once they were settled in the room. They were given two pills in a wooden cop the therapists top that the sivan would take fifteen to thirty minutes to start working. In the interim they were told to put on ice shades and headphones. That would play a selection of music they choose from classical tibetan chanting african drumming and modern music too. Once the drug fact the participants says the first session became a kaleidoscope of mental images and sensations. I remember being in lake. Felt like mount olympus the fall of the gods like oval the clouds and suffering them. And then one of my god's up to me and she gave me a key fell through the clouds. And i felt all the way down through the earth and i ended up in hell which is really strange because they don't remember being scared even though i was in hell and i remember asking like hey you know why am i hair And it was like haiti's leading me through hell kind of just like showing me around for life this very cold and desolate last. He was like of course. This is where you would come like. This is where you've made your home. The self revelations continued throughout this long session and turned intensely personal. I remember like hearing like the beats. Come on and i felt myself in like this place like all of my ancestors were and i was really close to my grandfather when i was a kid. And he died. Probably around when i was like four and i saw him kind of materialize And he walked towards the youth like these. She'll bananas which is what he's doing her then he handed one to me and i always kind of was afraid that if he was alive he would be disappointed in me and i remember asking him you know. When am i supposed to do like if my family like my parents and lake my siblings can accept me and he said that he'll always be there for me and my ancestors will always be there for me and i like that scene just like it. Metsu in mental to me after about seven hours than drugs started to wear off when it was over. You know you're still kind of like feeling it but just not as intensely so just basically like this really happy kind of floaty failing and we couldn't drive so like i had to have a sister pick me up. They ended the experience hungry and exhausted as for the depression not much appeared to have changed then. They tried the silla sivan trip once more this time with the stronger dose and after that these say they experienced to palpable shift. It felt like i was back into the world again like i was in reality. A lot of people said that not only was there. Depression differently felt like they had come out of dark hole that they've been in for years but a lot of people regardless of whether they're depression was gone or or reduced said that there was something really meaningful different about how they view their life initial results for the study reviewing outcomes from up to a month after the sessions were completed found that silla sivan plus therapy was more than four times more effective than other treatments. Such as medication alone at one week. Fifty eight percent of the sample were in complete remission from depression that actually lasted up to four weeks. After fifty four percent of people were in complete remission and were now studying those same people up to twelve months after to see how long that remission lasted the rest of the participants in the study. Were not in remission they were still experiencing clinically significant depressive symptoms researchers have yet to publish the results of longer term outcomes for all the participants their condition up to a year after treatment and this was a small study. Just twenty four people. Some scientists remain skeptical of this kind of treatment not just of silla simon. But of the validity of the data an outcomes for all studies involving psychoactive substances

Depression Johns Hopkins University Silla Simon Silla Zyban Peer Reviewed Journal Centers For Disease Control An Davis Substance Abuse Trauma Silla Sivan Arby Facebook Martissant Alan Davis America Sivan The Wall Street Journal Anxiety Disorder
"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:09 min | 4 months ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday's Who assistant professor of neuroscience at columbia university. his whistled focuses on learning memory and computation. Malcolm a great to be here. Yes thanks for doing this. I want to stop gun of people. Entitled dopamine neurons in court performance ever in singing birds and he said many behaviors are unknowns through by batching performance. Two ton of gore's yet make sense of performance. Evaluation remain poorly understood yet. This is always be Sort of a mystery right. You know we have the steep learning networks in the in the out of intelligence world and performance evaluation is is always a difficult thing in silicon.

Mike Malcolm yesterday Two ton columbia university gore
"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 4 months ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods.

How we can climate-proof the power grid

Climate Cast

03:51 min | 4 months ago

How we can climate-proof the power grid

"We climate proof our energy infrastructure going forward. This week's blackouts are just the latest example of how vulnerable are grits are two more extreme climate change driven weather events. She nazi is an assistant. Professor at purdue university school of industrial engineering hierachy welcome to climate. Cast thank you so much for having me. Start at this with compassion. Millions of our fellow americans without power heat water food even gas in subfreezing temperatures with that in mind. We much colder winters here. In minnesota than texas and our power grid is very reliable here in the winter. Why did the energy infrastructure in texas fail so tragically this week so it's not so much about the absolute values of the temperature. Right it's more about your region has been historically you still is just the fact that the temperatures really caught them by surprise. But i wouldn't say that. This story is unique to tax us. Well so on that point. Extreme cold isn't the only weather events challenging our grids. What other ways does climate change impact power so if you look on the power outage data collected by the department of energy but you can easily see First of all severe weather and climate events have been the major culprits for the large-scale sustain. Outages if you look at the data from early two thousands you see that there's actually been a three fold increase in the frequency and intensity of major power outages and exactly to your point. You know these extreme events can range from cold snaps to heat waves two hurricanes the wildfires. I mean there's no shortage of unfortunately You know natural disasters that hit our greg. So what are the best practices in hardening electric grids to climate change and extreme weather events. So there is really a number of different solutions. one micro-credits grids. They've been shown to have a positive impact on the overall resilience of the region during disasters Peres undergrounding some of the key. Assets and leveraging the techniques that we've already developed for other for seeing you know the impact on not only demand or physical infrastructure but also supply capacity prior to the onset of events roshii for people who aren't familiar. What are the benefits of micro grids so for example right now. What we're seeing in texas They're not able to balance the note right. So with micro grid not only it can alleviate note from the overall grid and allow the busing to happen a little bit more easily but also can sort of provides energy to stop off the customers trying to get to the source of what happened in texas and why it doesn't happen in other places right. Some people trying to falsely blame frozen wind turbines for power loss in texas but natural gas coal nuclear infrastructure accounted for eighty seven percent of the loss of generating capacity there. This week renewables just about thirteen percent is overall the shift to renewable also improving resilience. Absolutely there is plenty of evidence adds diversity and moving more towards renewables and distributed resources. Just improve the overall resilience not to mention the sustainability outcomes. Right while i'm grateful to everyone who plans and delivers energy to our homes than this week. So a big. Thank you to everybody who does that. She nateghi assistant professor at purdue university school of engineering. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast. Today thank you so much for having me. I really enjoyed speaking with you today.

Purdue University School Of In Texas Department Of Energy Minnesota Peres Greg Purdue University School Of En
The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:49 min | 4 months ago

The Power of Black Female Voters With Marcia Chatelain

"I recently wrote in forbes about how kamala harris may be able to heal the wounds between black women and white women but i defer to our terrific yesterday on these issues. I'd like you to meet dr. Marcia chatelaine a provost distinguished associate professor of history and african american studies at georgetown university here in washington dc. She's a scholar of american life and culture previously. She was an assistant professor of honors in african american studies at the university of oklahoma in norman. She earned her. Phd at brown university and her undergraduate studies at the university of missouri columbia in journalism and religious studies fellow aspiring journalists. They go. Marsha was a terrific expert featured in the recent pbs series. The vote on how women fought for and won the right to vote over an eighty year struggle or more welcomed green connections radio. Marcia thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Oh you're welcome. You're welcome so our start in the heart of this issue. As i said in my introduction i've understood the black and white women had a kind of love hate relationship if you will during the suffrage battles as i understand it. Black women wanted white women to include abolition in their struggle. But the white women leaders believe the combining the two would keep the legislation from. What is your take on it. Tell us the truth. Because you're the historian so the issue at hand between abolition and suffrage are deeply tied. And that's because a number of figures in the suffrage movement were first activists in the fight against slavery and i think the poignancy of the battle for women's suffrage was the fact that many of the white women who were at the lead of the suffrage movement were anti-slavery and they had supported. Abolitionist may have believed that there was a moral reason to end the system of slavery but when it came to suffrage they were divided over the issue of universal suffrage Some do not believe that black women white men should equally have the vote. Some did not believe that black men and black women should have the vote. So i think that the suffrage movement really exposes the limitations of racial solidarity even among people who were on the right side of history one issue were not able to transfer that sense of grace to the issue of suffrage. And that's where you see the fault lines. In the suffrage movement really emerged from it was the fact that they did not want include african american women visibly or prominently or ideologically in their fight for the right to vote because they believed that it would degrade the quality of the vote of degrade the preciousness of the right and a number of these women again. Even though they were morally opposed to slavery they would not immune from white supremacist ideas. Okay so there's so much to unpack in there. You said something really interesting you said and i paraphrase of course but the the the divisions over the vote represented larger divisions in the racial schisms. If you will Racial solidarity behind the vote. Yes so one of the things that i think. A lot of people don't understand from how they're taught history is that we often think of the issue of slavery as one in which people were either pro or anti and it's often presented as a matter of north versus south union versus confederacy. But if you look at the movement to end slavery and look at abolitionists. They all had very different ideas of what happens next. They knew that slavery is a scourge on the nation. But they didn't agree on. What would it mean for african americans to be elevated to the level of status rather the level of a citizen and what that status should mean and so there were people who were abolitionists but they were segregationists. There were abolitionists who believed that african americans should be repatriated to colonies in africa. They were people who believed in complete and total social equality in some people believed in some level of social quality but not marriage and so those debates among the abolitionist movement i think are very much mirrored in the debate among white selfridge's who should get the vote i who should be allowed to vote. And what measures should be taken in order to ensure their desired goals

Marcia Chatelaine University Of Missouri Columbi Kamala Harris University Of Oklahoma Georgetown University Brown University Marsha Marcia PBS Norman DC Washington South Union White Selfridge Africa
"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:43 min | 5 months ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is professor john. Person who's assistant professor of neurobiology. A duke today is research focuses on application machine. Learning methods do the analysis of data malcolm. Hi thanks doing the so I want to start with one of your recent papers. online estimation but noisy testing. You say one of the primary goals of systems euroscience is to relate the structure of your surrogates to their function yet. Packets of connectivity are difficult establish than according from large populations indicating organisms. Can please approaches. Have attempted to estimate fox connectivity between neurons using statistical modeling of original data. But you say about this approaches. Like heavily on parametric assumptions and a purely relational so so the noodle connectivity obviously if the galvastan that well has office applications.

today john. one
"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:15 min | 6 months ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"They did is they prevented from sleeping. Down saw that this indeed decreases their life span severely. Their life spending half. Let's say to suppress ninety percent of sleep if you percent prevent all sleep cops a downing quarter and preceding these preceding this increase in mortality They founded there's a really dramatic increase in reactive oxygen species and we talk. We can talk about what these are. These molecules reactive oxygen species the gut specifically flies and so this accumulation for seated that In flies the regardless of the method with which we suppress sleep som examples of examples abroad so trump peroxide h two two is an example of routes relatively Officer superoxide is another one. So what what russ are are the ross stands for reactive oxygen species so these are derivatives of molecular oxygen sox. Oxygen is very reactive. Element sorta severi chemically reactive element. It loves electrons and that's why we use it in a lot of reactions Most notably you use it in the in the might of the electron transport chain with were essentially a sink for electrons you electrically power production of atp survey energy cellular energy Currency in the might of contra you electrically powered then what you do with those electrons at the end. Oxygen takes them up because it's it really loves electrons but in the process of doing that gets converted into any been more reactive molecule reactive oxygen species which that needs to be quickly neutralized the salvat. Rust are made in other processes. They're not just made in. The michael conjure their mates for example in god in particular. They're used for normal physiological processes. So they're made for example to control the levels of bacteria in the gut and also to control turnover of cells in the gut would actually do need to be turned over. Every few days walks gives says. I know that it has been implicated in many different things. Including our siamese disease oxidative stress in the brain this oxidative stress in the gut and And you are drawing a specific connection between Lack of sleep and the production of laws and then consequently oxidative stress and And the implications that severe oxidative stress prolonged oxidative stress leads to leads to death at least in the fry experiment. Yes so in the gut. This accumulation ross guts..

russ ross michael
"assistant professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 6 months ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. Carl and Kristina. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having us my name is Charles from far shields, Queens and I have been estranged from my father for my father since I was 19 years old. He's a stranger and was so difficult that I actually went into the service to get away from it. And then about five years ago through other family and friends, I learned that The difficulty that my father had been in. It was a veteran. He suffered from cheap PTSD before it had a name and that I began to recognize that I very much contributed, wind up writing him a letter apologizing for my part and understanding his part. But my dad died in 1969. And I wrote the letter about five years ago. I'm feeling much better. Thank you. That's our show for today. If you have any thoughts for us, you could give us a call at 8778 might take or you could reach us on Twitter at the takeaway. I'm tansy. No, Vega. This is the takeaway. And thanks so much for listening. O p R X coming up this evening at seven on the next fresh air. Terry Gross remembers John Locke Array who's spy novels include the Spy who Came in from the Cold and Tinker, Tailor, Soldier Spy. He died on Saturday at age 89. We'll listen the seeming to interviews Terry recorded with Emma 1989 and 2017, in which he discussed his spy novels. His earlier work is a British spy for M I five and M I six and his father, who was a pathological liar. Donors tonight. Seven PM Fresh air here on KQED Public Radio Julie Devilish joins us again for Look a traffic.

Terry Gross assistant professor PTSD Charles Julie Devilish Twitter Carl KQED Kristina Department of Communication Queens University of Washington John Locke Emma
"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:46 min | 8 months ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today stopped a goat of Jane. Who is an assistant professor of marketing of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He Switzerland examines of individuals, make judgments, estimates, and decisions if the absence of complete inflammation. guttural. Thank. You thanks a lot girl. It's my pleasure. Sure. So I want to start with one of our recent peepers of fluency and perceptions of decision making. invite you say lucidity consistently finds that fluent stimuli in marketing communications a better better light at more trusted. Than more difficult process simulate. So what do you mean by fluence tonight? So basically fluency a stands for the ease of processing any information that you become exposed to. Suppose I just told you display of the definition of fluency that has information for you. If I had said that said disinformation in extremely scientific domes, it would be less fluent flew. In a marketing context, suppose your eating a particular advertisement. Printed meant for parental. In a magazine. That advertisement if the inflammation is very difficult for you to process, it will be less fluent. In. Many many ways in which fluency of. On. The opposite disfluencies can be manipulated by market is Important is linguistic fluency. It is about the language. So, if a message uses a lot of complex language, it becomes linguistically disfluent of the method uses simple language that people can understand. It becomes linguistically fluent. These second is conceptual. Fluency, fluency Avenida suggests it depends on the kind of concept has been trying to explain tried to explain. The concept is a very difficult do understand a concept. It is a disfluent concept. Most important of all, I should say most important for marketers point of view, it's a sexual fluency. Market deals can leave the formed. All. The background color and foreground contrast and many of the aspects. But Zip jewel aspects of of the message. Make it easy to process by the customers are difficult process by the customers. So that is known as sports central fluency ease of processing information is fluency. Lack of that ease..

assistant professor of marketi Rensselaer Polytechnic Institu Switzerland inflammation.
"assistant professor" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

12:33 min | 1 year ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"By Great Western Petroleum. Begging the question. How much more can the food supply chain with stand This as president trump invoking the defense protection act to classify meat-processing as a critical infrastructure to keep plants. Open Cova del reporting this morning. Another outbreak has shown up at the mountain. States Rosen lamb processing plant in weld county where eight employees test positive for covert nineteen seven employees tested positive at Aurora organic. Dairy PLANT VILLE. One has died. Additionally Greeley's Letrino foods has seen twenty four employees test positive for the virus is covert nineteen breaking the food supply chain as as Tyson foods indicated and taking out a full page ad. Just this past Sunday saying that the food supply chain is indeed breaking. Join this morning. Vi- Zach Rogers. Zach is an assistant professor of operations and supply chain management in Colorado State. University's College of Business Zach. Thanks for taking the time this morning. Certainly do appreciate it. Yeah be here you know. If nothing else I would have known there was some kind of economic situation going on because you just said there's no traffic on. I twenty five there you go. I twenty five. It's been a ghost town For the past. Oh I don't know six weeks or so right. So yeah but boy. I'll tell you what this is really getting frightening and I just did a little bit of okay admittedly just cursory research but I come process piece in just preparing to talk with you this morning. this came out at Fortune magazine. Boneless chicken is the first to go scare says Corona virus hits the. Us Meat Supply. So I decided okay. I'll just do you know little little research so I went down to a local grocery store and well. Let's say yeah. Boneless chicken was in short supplies. I watched two people hoarding meet. Yes yeah so. The reason that boneless chicken actually is in short supply. I think I saw that article too. So the reason that they're backing up boneless chicken is because it takes longer and more effort to process chickens When you debone them so there will still be bone in chicken But in order it so you know we have to remember so if we think about what? A meat supply chain books like. So there's you know the the the raw materials of the ranchers farmers and then there's the processing plants and then the consumers and right now all of the issue is in that middle step down processing plants because consumer demand is still high in supply on the ranch side is still high and so basically what we've done is is there's because we've had twenty maybe twenty one processing plants closed down which is a huge percentage. You know it's like ten percent of our production capacity twenty five percent of our pork production capacity because all that's closed down. We have to figure out a way to be more efficient with the production capacity. We have left. So that's why you're seeing things like okay. We're not gonNA take the bones out of chicken anymore because that takes too much time we're just gonNA push it through and we're seeing similar things with like you know if you feel like having another grocery store reconnaissance mission later this week. I'd recommend going to Walmart or something and looking at the different cuts of beef. They have because they're doing way more things like strip loin and and you know stuff from the leg and things that normal you only see restaurants We're now pushing forward to grocery stores because basically we have to use as as much of each animal as we can and we have to do it as efficiently as possible another stealth mission to Walmart. Eleven twelve thirteen ten. Kfi Thirteen Ten K. O. K. A. dot com mornings gale joined by Jack Rogers Assistant Professor of operations and supply chain management at Colorado State. University's College of business. You Know Zach. It was just what a couple of weeks ago that this supply chain now. I know you follow it quite closely. But for many of us that This well yet another Hydra head of Cova Bank nineteen reared its ugly head with concerns over the food supply chain and a couple of weeks ago. We were in a much different place. Weren't we absolutely and supply. Chain is one of those things that I think. When when I was here a couple of weeks we talked about how resilient it had been where whereas so many other many other industries kinda fallen off supply chance. They'd strong and now. We're starting to see some cracks and and really what we're seeing so you know if we go back to picture of raw materials processors consumers so you know we see things like and it seems you know that that it's like things that don't belong together so like okay. Well people are hungry. We see people lining up food banks because thirty million people have lost their jobs last six weeks and we see okay. We have to euthanize chickens or dumped potatoes. And and so it's hard I think without a real understanding of of how the supply chain works to understand how those two because those seem like two opposite things how things could be going on at the same time and it's because that middle step of processing and also because of the links between the components of the supply chain so so the transportation and so you could think okay well all right the the meat processing plant down. The road from me is shut down. I'll just send my my livestock to the plant. One St over you know the Colorado Plains Donaldson Nebraska Utah. Well the problem is is that grocery is two things. It's very Very low margin items. Generally you don't make a lot of money you know per head of livestock or per you know Grocery produce or anything like that and it's very lean and so we don't have big stores built up of of we don't have a lot of inventory. 'cause grocery items tend to not stay fresh for that long so you can't hold a lot in store so we didn't have a lot of reserves other than maybe frozen going into this and the the cost so let's see we add on another five hundred miles that our livestock has to go before it gets processed. So now we're paying. Maybe double what we work for freight our margins might be totally gone and so it it really the way. The food supply chain is set up. It's almost like a clock where everything is in. Perfect synchronization It's it's just in time management which means you get the inventory or the livestock just in time right when you need it and not a second before and not a second after and so to have all of this you know. Twenty five percent in pork ten percent and beef of our processing capacity. Just be off line. It's like taking years out of a clock and suddenly this perfect machine that we had built doesn't work anymore because there's pieces missing. So what if any I mean? We find ourselves once again in so many ways in uncharted territory. What's the resolution to this? I mean I understand. President Trump With the Defense Authorization Act Declaring that these Plants these meat processing. Plants are an essential part of our infrastructure. But then you've got to balance the fact that we are seeing outbreaks in these plants. You know we. We just saw it well across the country. Recently pre-nup Foods J. B. S. swept. Which is you know since reopened in Greeley. But it begs the question that these these these meat processing plants are built for efficiency. Not for social distancing and what's the resolution to this when you balance the safety of the employees and their families Given the fact that These processing plants are a hotbed of covert nineteen. I don't think I'm lapsing into her permanently there but balance that and what about Osha Regulations A. Maybe I'm getting outside of your area of expertise here so I apologize. No no I I Before I came back to school I was. I spent a lot of time working. Warehouses actually can't go network so so you know it's I think absolutely The president is correct. That need is an essential industry. The issue is it doesn't work. We can open up the factories but if there is not enough healthy folks to work inside them then. It doesn't really matter if the factories are open or not you know. In in grocery stores you can see the employees getting some distance from each other right. You're not working on top of each other. The trucking piece of it or the farming piece of it people aren't working on top of each other. You can be fairly isolated. This is the one part of the food supply chain where everybody's been pretty tight Pretty tight proximity sure. Because they're they're like they're elbow to elbow you not shoulder to shoulder no absolutely and so you know I. I think you WanNa keep many of these open as you can but you know to me. It seems like the choice has to be okay and keep things open but we're going to run it at a lower level of capacity so maybe you know with fifty percent of the workforce we would normally have and that will decrease capacity. But it's better. I believe to have to run it. Forty fifty percent capacity and keep everybody healthy than it is to try to run one hundred percent capacity but then you might drop down even below the fifty percent anyway if if people end up getting sick and so to me it seems like some sort of. There's there's there's probably some sort of middle ground in exactly what you're saying it's balanced where okay we're we're gonNA protect workers as much as possible while still maintaining some sort of food supply chain and and we do have by the way you know. Everyone's saying oh we're going to run out of meat. Mostly that's a reference to fresh meat. There is big big stores of frozen meat if you go to the the USDA webpage they'll they'll show you okay we have you know nine hundred million pounds of frozen chicken and five hundred million pounds of frozen beef and things like that and so we can supplement now that that's not enough to replace. I mean if all fresh me turned off than the frozen meat would be gone quick but we can supplement some of what we're doing with our frozen stores But but you gotta do it. You gotta I mean you. You have to have meat production. Come back but you have to do it. In a way where it's holistic where you because without the workers to meet production goes away anyway so it has to be assistant that protects the workers. Well it looks like it's drum sticks. It's what's for dinner these days by these days villa. Yeah definitely not making light of this whatsoever. But you know I can't help but think as public health officials and you've got more states loosening restrictions. I can't help but think as we get more of a handle on covert nineteen. Hopefully this pressure on the food supply chain. This too shall pass or my being pollyannaish. Well no you. Would you think it will eventually I think But it's if you think about what station the brunt of everything it is the food supply chain. I mean think about how much everyone's cooking at home these days and so you have this specific piece of it because really I mean. There was beef production for restaurants and then beef production for consumers and the stuff for restaurants is totally gone so all the pressure has been on consumers in groceries. And things like that and so it's really taking the brunt of of of covert nineteen. And so now. Maybe there's some stuff we can move over from restaurant production to two regular home production but it's still there's just so much pressure on it and and like you. I agree I'm hoping there's a way that we can relieve some of that same. Yeah I can't think of that old Henry Kissinger quote who controls the food supply controls. The people it's kind of frightening times right now. Zac Rogers Assistant Professor of operations and supply chain management at Colorado State. University's College of business. Thanks as always for your time your insights your perspective.

College of Business Zach Rogers Greeley assistant professor of operati president Colorado State weld county Walmart Tyson foods Fortune magazine Great Western Petroleum Jack Rogers Assistant Professo Henry Kissinger Cova Bank
"assistant professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is an assistant professor in landscape architecture at Virginia Tech well I think the future tree planting is strong and sound because trees have essentially involved to deal with these ups and downs in the climate this may be one of the most dramatic in a few hundred thousand years the swing that were beginning to experience now but the trees that we plant today have been through drastic dramatic climate change and they're really a product of it they have come out of it and so it's really a our job I think as urban planners and citizens in cities to identify the trees that have done well through various climate changes and plant those even sometimes if they don't fulfill all of our ideas about what a city tree should look like it's really a matter of selecting the trees that have been through those kinds of ships that is the work of designers and said it might be that there is a comma for out there that would be useful that doesn't fit the model would in fact be a great street tree planting trees is a long term investment that is in the end the best thing for our communities you have the prospect of seventy or eighty feet of growth and all the years of shade that it will provide for the city I'm Jim Metzner and this is the pulse of the planet take a break from the headlines immerse yourself in some joyful Ted talks and ideas the two special merrily brushes for doesn't work very well did we mention that they use those robots because it really is not practical join me my new summer roadie and Ted's Helen Walters for her hand picked selection of talks to make you feel that's next time on the Ted radio hour from NPR the Ted at three o'clock this afternoon and Monday morning at two AM this week on says you spoiled food I don't know that salted fish goes bad you never have locks of my hands over his house the only log again as fast as it's fun and everyone's a winner says you would be worried should be game out of Boston here on KQED public radio at four o'clock every Sunday afternoon time now is.

assistant professor Virginia Tech Jim Metzner Ted Helen Walters NPR Boston KQED
"assistant professor" Discussed on WOW! I want to take that class!

WOW! I want to take that class!

15:20 min | 1 year ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on WOW! I want to take that class!

"Under for Gas Robert Talbot made the trek over you to be with US along from Harmon it's beautiful over on this Ah Chin Learning beat on ice. I'm not saying that what they're doing because in project management when you're doing scheduling them activities. use it as a proxy for engagement and in some ways an actual measure of engage so faculty they're listening to this today that are saying gene you know I'm really trying to make classes more engaging my online classes might see the class is I'm really trying to make them a experience but you know I'm having trouble doing it or you know I just feel stuck or maybe my class was once a while but now I'm kind of feeling like I'm looking at my students faces in their Moore's do you have any advice the faculty to really think outside the box do physical activities. I think that helps change the environment find different ways teaching things kind of experience for me going outside the boxes I've done stand up comedy yeah you're GonNa have to talk a little bit more about that a couple of minutes good that's that's the fun thing and then you can pick up skills in different areas and apply them to your classroom very rewarding the students love it even if you even if you maybe don't do so well in certain areas certain activity seems like the students are forgiving of that it's so true tradition fray trying that's right every night before absent minded sometimes I struggle with names in an example of of trying something to learn every student's name and something about them and I tell the students I'm terrible with names even with my own family. I get their names wrong so they do that with them I'll do it with you I apologize but I hope you'll understand that I'm trying to make a connection here right and it seems like they're forgiving one of our most yes yeah that's such a great point is it's better than just saying you know what with names from not GonNa Learn Missouri's not gonNa you know but instead just coming out and being open with them you know is a struggle for me but I'm afraid oh yeah and again back to go outside your comfort zone I'm going to try something new I'm that contract and you can let your swim saying hey we're going to discipline new today this isn't really my area Europe how I liked to do but I think it's going to be fun and let's learn together and get their feedback Gordon ask them you know I wanNa know what you think about this was it worth or donor since it's nice that they will come with view in your journey right and I'm very grateful Dale Carnegie and one of his books the person's name is the sweetest thing of them that's why I think it's important to noon just at least their first name address them in class yeah I love that well in speaking of students we were we were just talking about a bit how do you think that students factor into the wow experience because you know learning is a two way to a you know I think art of communication absolutely critical they don't go with you on the jury end up wherever you're by yourself right so it's important to monitor the classroom ask them questions and I going too fast my going to slow he like this like that and I use the comment section in my teacher avowals to incorporate any changes on my need in the classroom but something I tell my students is you don't have to wait until future's phillies faculty how does your heads in fact you tell me soon you know by the time you fill out the Khalil and I read it year long that's right so such a great point you know if you feel that I'm going to fast in need to tell me a and so but we've got we've got one more question for you which is our surprise question which is tell us more about the stand up comedy so have gone soon you now you know open mic night ted how tell us about that experience it's it's it's incredibly rewarding and it's kind of scary to walk in unbelievably skits.

Dale Carnegie Khalil Robert Talbot Harmon Moore phillies Missouri Europe Gordon ted
"assistant professor" Discussed on WOW! I want to take that class!

WOW! I want to take that class!

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on WOW! I want to take that class!

"Welcome here we are enrolling today really start to office you're not on the road on the road I stay gosh with all those TV's I love the technology over there you can do more but it's always podins right always I love this Zhao Sista ticker over there across the beings look cool oh my gosh you really do stock trading floor the Wall Street wouldn't that be nice that's great like a Mac like a mock classroom full of as you have trade I guess really talked about doing something Nelson idea that I've had nuts doesn't it's not so applicable the class that I teach remain calm analytics but it's definitely applicable to finance were shirt so Robert you are in a sister fester in information systems correct if the Plaster School Biz for numerous in you teach business that's my main course taught several different types of courses over the years but that's my main when I teach on ground online and I'll just get the gist of the class is getting your mind wrapped around large amounts of data for the first time for the first Sunday human history we have data coming from all kinds of angles self owns cashier stations laptops webcams surest everywhere in the power that you can harness by examining patterns and making relationships is for companies quite profitable target I think when they started it I think within the first year or two when they started really pushing forward with their ideas with analytic state I think they added a billion dollars to the revenues date I notice correlations it's basic statistics they notice correlations in purchases determined if you can identify early on the young woman I read that book the and that is the always will forever stick in my mind who's got that's just the beginning so they can they can trace throughout your lifetime the different purchasing decisions you make you capitalize on our not only elevator anybody that uses those reward cards which is just about everybody now it seems like they're great patterns that they're coming across in using that example Oh yeah COSCO in just in my personal I know Costco was against the winning me my Parson and I know that I'm GonNa agree and it seemed like they were capitalizing on that as well because I remember being at home one day and my wife said to me you know I think we should get a new Bedford our son or or something like that you know maybe we should maybe we should just get beds for the whole family you know it's time they're growing up we get rid of the little race car bed and we walked into Costco in the home huge little was nothing but beds thinking where I have what's going on so we this for the whole family and I don't know what seemed like a number of weeks went by in my wife said you know probably use mm strawberry around the house yeah it happened so we walk into all of them except for a little corner the rape bradberry George Orwell they're telling you I I you know I was thinking the same thing tell that story was like when I'm on my phone searching for something shop in but then I'll come up with a different computer are going to when I was looking for and it's it's Freaky I mike behind it's a revolution is your with facial recognition they're linking all ad together they could go onto facebook and find out if you're on vacation and all you know if you're coming in a story you're getting ready to go on vacation just a massive teach your class is one Mike Okay I want an woke him you're why wouldn't I read this early so do are the students that take your class are they business majors are they are there does it vary it mainly as business majors but I do have some students coming in from other areas for example computers science from my on ground class right now I have one data science student from the math department so just different backgrounds but probably we know the over one hundred or business to but my gosh everything's so it's.

billion dollars one day
"assistant professor" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Fast name moore book uh by a uh very smart uh so she had professor assistant professor um and uh it's interesting to get a perspective as to how we got here and there was a time where you know and look i think uh mode rosenfeld says is i certainly don't have a particular issue with higher polarization i don't um broader process questions are not uh i don't go keep me up at night but it seems to me inevitable that you're going to have polarization when you have differences of opinion uh politically uh the extent of the polarization and the grounds for it though sometimes are a little bit suspect but i think you'll find it's very interesting uh we're gonna take a quick break matt will have one of his famous i'm in paris picks for the fun half who knows what it will be something parisian maybe we don't know but uh folks members and i wanna do thank our members it is you that make the show possible you can become a member today at joined the majority report dot com please do if you have the financial means and if you don't as always sent an email at majority reported a gmailcom we will take care of you we will not lock anybody out for financial reasons are quick break when we come back sam roosevelt two.

rosenfeld matt sam roosevelt moore professor assistant professor paris
"assistant professor" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Assistant professor of electrical and computer engineer your duke and his new approach moves away from the the original idea that he and the group had in 2011 with these tiny complex pumps to uh in a in a direction involving electromagnetic fields that can move salt water charged particles and that's really the crux of it so using wires and coils he figures he can create in electromagnetic fields around a vehicle that can move that can move to solve the ions like potassium magnesium and sodium so in other so many of them and salt water that he thinks he can he can move the water immediately around a submersible say precisely enough to pull this off and admitted that sounds fantastic but there was actually a kind of a prototype ship built by japan i in 1991 call the model one which is based on a very similar idea above using these forces as a means of propulsion i think ultimately they found that it wasn't any more efficient than than conventional propellers but that would you know that was then this is now wow so modern fluid dynamics simulation show at this field should be able to control the speed and direction of the water in such a way that so try to imagine is that the the water that's within the cloak of right around the submersible would be on would be unmoving compared to the water outside it so we will be kinda like stagnant and tips compared to the water that's that's outside of of the cloak this would remove not offers significant fraction of the drag in wake generated by a moving submersible and there that's that's pretty much the crux of it right there but another is another piece or that was very very important perhaps even the most important realization that there is a resume of had that he makes it his paper was at the greater speeds would i would not require complicated controls so basically to go faster and faster and faster oil you really need to do was hit the accelerator that was it he says here that if you don't have to adjusted distribution of forces you don't need any electronic switches or any other means of dynamic control you can set the structure with a specific.

Assistant professor engineer japan
"assistant professor" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"assistant professor" Discussed on The Science Show

"Anyway i think that's completely in the saying what's going on there from when such a mild men the professors insane you should worry pamela your isn't assistant professor at the university of california los angeles and so to appear chief of this week comal like madonna she just use his one name and she notes that we still use clunky pins instead of body identification frau devices because cuts on the hand for instance can distort fingerprints and blood short is the ira's identification 's is there a way round this nowadays personal identity authentication is an integral part of everyone's life from entering an office building two different online services such as online banking email social network etcetera be are constantly ostro very fi who've er this is because cyber attacks are increasing in frequency with perpetrators continuously finding their efforts to compromise system and information while light according to a recent survey by the australian cybercrime online reporting network disciple attacks including sixty two percent of external and fifty six percent of internal frauds happened because of weak authentication can is therefore if we can strengthen the authentication mechanism we can prove win the unauthorized access and decrees the number of success will cyber attacks gun mentioned only been so passwords have been used for ten degation however the limitations add that they can be manipulated insecurity can be reached additionally the greater number of services we use the greater number of been so passwords we have to remember.

assistant professor ira online services social network pamela university of california los angeles fifty six percent sixty two percent