35 Burst results for "Assad"

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | Last week

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
WikiLeaks' Assange back in court to fight U.S. extradition request

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | Last week

WikiLeaks' Assange back in court to fight U.S. extradition request

"A British judge has rejected a request by Julian Assange and his lawyer to delay his extradition hearing until next until next year to give his lawyer's Mohr time to respond to US allegations that he conspired with hackers to obtain classified information. She's fighting prosecutors attempts to send him to the US to stand trial on spying charges in an initial volley. Assad's attorney, Marc Summers, argued it had bean an impossible task. For his team to deal with the new allegations quickly and that the judge should excise the new claims. But the judge said no saying she'd offered the defense the chance in August to postpone the hearing. They had declined to do so. She said the defense and asked for the case to be adjourned until January, but she refused That too.

United States Julian Assange Marc Summers Assad Attorney
Hurricane Laura Intensifies To All-Out Reckoning For Our Eternal Sins

The Topical

01:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Hurricane Laura Intensifies To All-Out Reckoning For Our Eternal Sins

"According to the national. Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration the twenty twenty hurricane season is shaping up to be one of the most active in recent history this week alone we've seen the unprecedented occurrence of not one but two major storm systems, tropical storm Marco, and now Hurricane Laura making landfall striking the coast of Louisiana and Texas opr weather reporter Kenneth Nearly as braving the conditions and joins us. Now from the Gulf coast with more Kenneth, can you tell us how each of these storms came about? Yeah Forms. Turned the ocean surface and the. Assad Mazes, spinal judgments on my menu sense then hurricane. Following close behind. Winds up to one hundred miles per hour served as his divine punishment a really because many scientists I'm meteorologist are attributing the storm's intensity as well as this extremely active Atlantic hurricane season to global warming us away besides. not this time Leslie

Kenneth Nearly Hurricane Laura Gulf Coast Atmospheric Administration Assad Reporter Marco Louisiana Leslie Texas
5 Reasons We Wait For Permission To Do What We Really Want

Accelerate Your Business Growth

04:51 min | Last month

5 Reasons We Wait For Permission To Do What We Really Want

"My guest today as Sally holder. Sally is the acclaimed bestselling author of hitting rock metal. The roadmap from empty success to true fulfillment which. Published this year earlier this year? She's a podcast host end founder of the Brim. She's Assad after coach Speaker trainer and guide to her clients breaking out of their silent screaming success and into true fulfillment. Thanks so much for joining me today Sally. I am thrilled to be here. Diane. Thanks for having me. Absolutely I. I. Love the subject and I wanNA dive right in and have you explain what is rock. Metal. Chore Rock Metal is a term that I use to describe that middle place in your life or career wear. You can often times get stock and stay there forever. It is where you're not yet reaching your greatest potential, but you're also not at rock-bottom, right your succeeding but often times in the middle we experienced that really tough place where your success lacks fulfillment. So for me the true definition of reaching your greatest potential ad having, you know the ultimate definition of success in my experience in in my coaching life has always included both success and fulfillment. and. I find that a lot of people get left behind because they get left in this noodle place and I figured if we could come up with the definition for that and some terminology we talk about it more and if we talk about it more than people will solve that problem in move out of that place and find their potential and a whole `nother level of happiness that they really deserve. that. That is so great and I'm curious. So. Like how does it happen is if we? Like get a job and we don't really think about fulfillment. Yet or right or are we so like? Heads down trying to accomplish something that we don't think about what's going on there. Well. I can tell a little bit about my story and I think it exemplifies it quite well You know I followed what I call societies model of success. That external definition at success? It does it come along with any internal markers right? No is saying here all the check boxes that you need to. Check. In order to reach success, they are dis which are all external and they are. These are all internal rate. We've completely left behind all of the internal check boxes, and so I just did all the external ones I went to a prestigious undergraduate school. I went directly to law school I went to the second largest labor employment law firm in the country I received awards, accolades, and all these things, and I found myself in a tenure law practice absolutely fundamentally miserable now, externally I was having articles written about my successes and you know like I said receiving awards. I hated it and it was this jerk secret that I kept long longtime because I thought who cares about a woman who's earning six figures and hates our life. Nobody cares about that person like they want to come and save you when you're at rock-bottom and everybody wants to grab you from that place and say make change. Let me help you. But when you are it rock metal in that middle place no one's coming to grab you and say, let me help you out of this and so. I stayed there for a really long time and You know I think that it is because creating change from a place of success is very, very difficult and often discouraged and so You know I want to open up like you know Pandora's box and give people a big permission slip to create change from that place of success whenever they desire. And start that conversation around that just because you decide at twenty two, what you WanNa do and B doesn't mean you're gonNA still, Levi at forty two and oftentimes you're not. So. Again, life experience comes with evolution growth and so naturally, our careers should follow that growth too. So that's what I. It's been hard

Sally Holder Founder Diane Levi Pandora
Ken Nguyen: Republic  Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

Epicenter

05:14 min | Last month

Ken Nguyen: Republic Bridging the Gap Between Investing and Startups

"We can grander founder and CEO of the public and really excited to speak with you. Today can about republic and so moved to super innovative things. You guys are doing with crowdfunding in republic note in particular. So thanks much for joining us. Brian thank you so much for having me. Wonderful being year. For some people probably haven't heard about Republic Right but republic east of connected with Angel Lists and lists of course had the big impact on crowdfunding I mean there's also growing list right that has come out that we've had on the podcast before as well. Speak a little bit about your background time angels and sort of how that evolves into starting republic. I started out my career securities attorney in New York, and then over time went into asset management in back into academia. So back in twenty, three, thirteen, I got a chance to get introduced to novel and injuries team and became their general counsel Wendy roll out his new investment product costs indication right did everyone knows about but injuries syndication is only available to millionaires or accredited investors then under president, Obama is a change. In US law and very relevant for blockchain laid on as well that did change in the law allow non accredited meaning. Anyone doesn't matter what income and net worth to invest in private securities, and that became fully legal in two thousand sixteen and that's when I left. Angeles to Launch Republic with a-list ended up invested in us. So there a significant backer among many of the VC's suggested to heritage between to companies. Role and yeah, I think many people have heard of the jobs act in in that regulation. So tells a little bit of what was that changed at happened in two thousand sixteen and you know what was the opportunity that opened up back then? If I may take a walk down memory lane or history lane and go little bit far back through the Great Depression in the United States back in the nineteen thirties easily eighty years ago after that will regulate is in DC decided, hey to avoid investigating defrauded no-one can invest in private securities in private company unless they really Ridge if they rich, we assume that this fisted and can you know tolerate the loss of capital that went on for eighty years in even though in the US people spend like eighty billion dollars a year and lottery ticket. And the same amount addict casino, and yet you have to be a millionaire to invest in start it obviously stop making sense a while back, but it took the Obama administration and a change in the law of for that to really now opened a gateway so that anyone if they go through a platform like republic can invest in early stage, Google early stay facebook or a restaurant even and will little bit behind compared to European counterparts particularly the UK and other countries in the EU that had allow up for democratized private investing years before the US. So what inspired you to start Republican? was there anything that you saw during your time angel which convinced you that there was a problem worth solving here? The problem with stuffing I think goes a little bit back before my time at is so my family immigrated to the US from Vietnam in we stuttered out in Palo Alto in the bay area. Just because you're right in the thick of innovation in at Tam Amazon and Google new startups and everyone wanted to invest but like we weren't accredited so we weren't able to invest and even neighbors who were credited meaning millionaires, doctors, lawyers this still couldn't invest either. So Cadillac the teenage me was like men I wish I get to put a little bit of money into Amazon Google early on but couldn't and I think catalyzed stay with me and I went on and became a lawyer Working Wall Street and still couldn't invest privately us so that desire. To make venture capital private investing more accessible I. think There's a little bit of a personal background behind that an angel is each is Amado that when I knew about I was like, wow, these guys are making it possible for my oldest siblings who are physicians and engineers to invest. That's really cool and so that's why I joined injuries back in two thousand thirteen does only a glimmer of the possibility. What we do at Republic is Cadillac to hope that a single mom Vietnam Ecuador when they can invest like five dollars in Assad of in Silicon Valley. blockchain and ICO

United States Google Founder And Ceo Angel Lists Cadillac Brian Amazon Barack Obama New York Obama Administration Palo Alto DC Attorney Amado Tam Amazon General Counsel Wendy Roll Vietnam EU
Lebanon tribunal names 4 suspects in Hariri killing

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:55 min | Last month

Lebanon tribunal names 4 suspects in Hariri killing

"Is more than. Fifteen years since Lebanon's Prime Minister Rafic, Hariri was killed in a massive car bomb along with twenty one others. Later today an international caught near The Hague will hand down verdicts in the trial of four people accused of planning and carrying out the attack the four accused of of the Iran backed militia and political party. Hasballah. Hezbollah itself is not formally accused. Well, let's hear from the journalist and multiple twenty four regular contributor in Beirut Leyla Milana Allen Lali you're standing outside the very hotel in front of which Rafic Hariri was killed. What sense is in Beirut today that the justice will be done. There is very little sense. the families, all of the twenty one people other than because eighty who were killed as well as the nearly three hundred injured have waited as you say, over fifteen years justice taking a very long time this commission to come through with this, and the problems are a few of course many people here feel that the responsibility lies with the Syrian regime and through has through then has one. and. The five men on trial here all labeled as Hezbollah supporters because they found it very difficult to actually find evidence to show that they his bumbling members because, of course. Is So secretive I'm one of the biggest problems is that must have budgeted dean who was the main sort of ringleader debt these indictments who was accused of having set. The whole thing was known very well as the military imam to Hezbollah was killed in two thousand sixteen an attack on Damascus APP while his was helping Bashar Assad's regime with the wool there. So he was the one person who is very easy to link to Hezbollah and the only evidence they have all circumstantial evidence from these mobile phone networks. So as we expected, the indictment will come through the verdict will. Saying that before remaining men all guilty lane attempts about those who are accused of the murder of the prime minister. said a five men who stand accused have all been labeled Hezbollah supporters and that's because it's incredibly difficult to prove that they were in fact, Hezbollah members everyone in Lebanon believes that that. The majority of people believe that Kennedy was assassinated at because he was starting to pull away from supporting the Syrian regime who'd had troops stationed in Lebanon nearly thirty years all the way through the civil war and afterwards, and of course, we now know that Hezbollah very heavily H. Two zero. But this was all just sort of starting not link between Syria and Iran and Hezbollah but the main man was accused of being the ringleader. Organized the whole nation is most of that that the WHO was very well known as the head of the military wing of Hezbollah but he was killed in two, thousand sixteen and attacks Damascus Apple, which means he's no longer in the indictments and he was the only person. It was very easy to direct the link because there was evidence that he walls a top commander in. Bola. So I, the that means that it's very unlikely has itself will be named in the verdict today it will simply be. These men and then these men haven't been found the Lebanese government has been able to find. Her Bella is a big portion Lebanese government and the chief of Hezbollah nationalize long maintained that he absolutely does not see any of independence in this inquiry he says that it's funded by Israel and he says that there is no way that they will ever hand over these suspects old they will ever be found and historic has very good at hiding its top guys who've been involved in operations in. Lebanon in Syria and even Iran many think that these four worship over to Iran. So even if that comes through in the verdict is guilty as we expect, there's not really going to be any justice indeed has on Rolla said that Hezbollah isn't worried or isn't remotely concerned with today's verdicts but what will the repercussions be? The repercussions are unlikely to be much at this point, and that's for a few reasons I, Ne- as I said standing outside the. Hotel, which at the time in two, thousand and five win this thousand kilograms of TNT when pages devastating crater in the middle of the road and destroying all the buildings around loons lodge in the public consciousness here you there had been assassinations in the years off the list of this by the largest active. So many people because whoever was responsible really wasn't taking any chances and it was enormous copy. And other than the two thousand, six war with Israel, which was very different because it's a war in terms of an explosion going off in a very recognizable. Popular Ponte. out of nowhere that was the one that was remembered. Of course, until two weeks ago, two, thousand, seven, hundred and fifty tons of ammonium nitrate. In the port, just a few hundred meters down the road from this hotel. Injuring seven thousand people or more chilling up to two hundred, and still don't have a full body copy. What is still missing Susan now is far more would have. Done that assassination the other thing is that at the time, it was very shocking that people. Had Eighty was really associated with post for Lebanon. He was the symbol of course will Lebanon deeply loved by international leaders around the world as well as many Lebanese and so the idea that the Syrian regime would dad's kill him has would dare to kill him with. So shocking even though of course, assassinations were quite common but he was he was such. An important figure now firstly, since then of course, we've seen brushing Alaska wage a almost decade long bloody war against his own citizens in Syria we've seen very clearly now those strong legs between Hezbollah Syria and Iran Hezbollah work soldiers full bachelor says regime in the civil war in Syria. So nobody would be remote. You surprised now that that they all responsible. And the other issue of course is the fact that. Sad had eighty I think Kennedy some kind of stepped in his stead very much because he was the son and that's why he was given so much faith especially young age and has become such an important figure in politics here. But in the last year, we've seen a rudy seismic shift in Lebanese. Politics. People say that happens every fifteen years the lost round with two, thousand, five, thousand, and six before the civil war ended in one, thousand, nine, hundred before about. It started in nineteen, seventy five, and now of two, thousand, one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty weeks but newest protest movement Saudi the is very much seen as one of those political elites people out. So the younger generation at least don't have that same attachment to the family and time to seeing them as such an important force a good and for future movements, which is what that party is called Ford Movement in Lebanon So really this bird apartment, of course for the families. Of those killed and injured is not really going to have that much of an impact with so much else going on right now.

Hezbollah Lebanon Iran Syria Rafic Hariri Damascus Israel Beirut Lebanese Government Kennedy Prime Minister Bashar Assad Leyla Milana Allen Lali Dean Commander Murder Alaska
UN-backed court to issue verdicts in Lebanon's Hariri case

All Of It

00:45 sec | Last month

UN-backed court to issue verdicts in Lebanon's Hariri case

"A U. N backed court in The Hague will deliver its verdict later today on four men accused of the assassination of Lebanon's former prime Minister Rafik Hariri in a car bomb 15 years ago. Jeremy Bone reports Rafiq al Hariri and 21 others were killed when a massive bomb blerp is motorcade in Beirut. His followers blamed Syria. A few months earlier, President Bashar al Assad had threatened her Riri for questioning Syria's right to dominate Lebanon. Before Hezbollah men still accused were relatively low level operatives. They won't be in court as the leader Hassan Nasrallah, refused to give them up. He denies accusations that Hezbollah killed Hariri, perhaps on the orders of its backers in Syria and Iran.

Rafiq Al Hariri Syria Rafik Hariri President Bashar Al Assad Hezbollah Lebanon Hassan Nasrallah Prime Minister Jeremy Bone Beirut Iran Riri
David Archer previews the Atlanta Falcons

Joe Giglio

08:47 min | Last month

David Archer previews the Atlanta Falcons

"The Atlanta Falcons will do so with a former Falcons quarterback. Now he is their longtime color analysts on the radio network for Atlanta. And that is David Archer. David Hope all is. Well. Thanks for doing this. When we look at the Falcons, they made a big offseason acquisition getting Todd Gurley We don't know where the health is of Todd Gurley. What do you expect at a Todd Gurley coming over from l. A to Atlanta for this upcoming season? Well, be honest with you. I think we're expecting a lot of early and mainly in the Red zone. If you look at Todd Gurley's numbers, even with with so called quote unquote down near Around 900 yards rushing, still had 12 touchdowns. All 12 of those touchdowns came in the red Zone, and I think that Atlanta if they could find a way to run the football down close Help three up the talented weapons that Ryan has on the perimeter. Now, listen, you have a little bit more of a potent attack a little bit more looking a little bit more like what? You looked like a 16 when Avante Freeman and Tevin Coleman. We're carrying the ball down there close and created that problem in the run game. Atlanta has not had that over the last couple of seasons. I think that's where they expect Todd Gurley to make his main hey is down there in the red Zone. With the way that you probably have to manage his reps as a running back the rest of the running back room. Is there something that jumps out to you? Yeah, I think it's a good group. Really Do I think that when you look at Brian, Ill in the way, Brian Gillis Kamani together that Hawkins drafted a couple of years ago, Brian Handsome solid moments a year ago. Quadri Allyson. Kid at Pittsburgh rookie from a year ago. Uh, kind of woke himself. A little bit of a roll is a short yardage guy. £225 Goal line Guy, four touchdowns. Hopefully, you know, Smith can come back. He was injured in the game a year ago. I believe against the Rams in which he was trying to pick up a Blitzer, which he shouldn't be here should be doing, but he is an outstanding receiver out of the backfield. And a good change of pace back at the back, So they get to three young guys that I think you could lean on. And like you said, Take some of that. Load off. Assad, Girl. Let's get to the next down. And when we do so, we take a look at Matt Ryan and Julio Jones. The two big names in that organization. Do you still believe that this team could be a play off team once again with Matt Ryan and Julio Jones? I do, but it's you know, obviously, it's about you know your supporting cast and you do some things on the other side of the ball, and I'm sure there's a question you've got to worry about the defense's side the football, But there there's a little area in the offensive line. The left guard has been a little bit leaky, right guard's been a little bit leaky because of some injuries and things that they could shore up that into your part of the offensive line. Ryan's Like most classic quarterbacks climb in the pocket. They got to be able to give him that opportunity. Do so if you get into your pressure and accurate from problems, one game will help in that regard, but Yeah. Julio Jones, 16 seconds, 1300 yard seasons. Matt Ryan, nine consecutive 4000 yard seasons. I don't see the one those guys backing off. When you talk about that offensive line to follow up on that I'm a big fan of Matt Hennessy. Being a temple grad, really smart football player puts in a lot of work. Is he going to make an immediate impact in your number one? Yeah, There's always a question that he's certainly in the mix to be the starting guard. There's no question about that. I think that there's ah lot excitement around when he brings the table and and obviously the heir apparent, Alex Mack, probably its center. So Alex back in a little bit longer to still have a good football any But I need to put some guys around him that Khun taken, it could be in there and we had German Brown and James Carpenter guys that could not stay on the field. There was some solid moments from those two big veteran players, but they did not stay on the field and consistency. In the interior specialist that left guard spotted Kennedy ultimately will probably win that job and be the starter that guard let's get to the next down. All right, David Archer. When they flip the switch here and go to the other side of the ball defensively, it was an up and down year for the defense, but it seemed like they did finish in a better spot than what they did earlier on in the season. You could probably say that for the entire team with the Atlanta Falcons this division. Is loaded with offensive talent. You know what the Saints are. Now you have Tom Brady and the division with Tampa Bay, and I'll be curious to see what Teddy Bridgewater does with the Panthers. What's your read on the Falcons defense entering 2020 Well, it's an uncertain situation obviously went on God. Dante Fowler, Dad's pressure off the edge contact. McKinley realized what they thought they had when they drafted him a couple of years and the number one spot picked up Charles Haley, who, ironically, was in the same draft. And raided a route the same attack McKinley are Charles Harris. I'm sorry. Charles. Charles Charles Haley. Right way. I'd like to have the guy that was rushing the pastor there for both the Cowboys in the 40 Niners. That would be great, but Harris. He does have some raw talent there. Can't he realize that I'm the Falcon Tutelage will have to wait and see Grady dear. It's an emerging star in the tackle position and Marlon Davidson, Vienna and an interesting ad, a guy that has the versatility to play inside. Maybe in past situations and also play the perimeter as a 34 defensive didn't run down situations. The answer at all Burn second round draft pick of the fact that they think they've upgraded their defensive line. It'll have to be upgraded because you get extremely young secondary. Probably gonna have a rookie a corner starting your nickels, a second year guy in your other corners of third year, guys, So there's a lot of young players on the perimeter need to get some pass rush speed up the thought process for the quarterback. Let's get to the final down. Alright. I'm surprised that Dan Quinn is Bacca's the head football coach for the Lancer Falcons. What does he have to do this year to keep his job and Is that seats the warm because, like I said, I was surprised that they brought him back for this year. It is warm. I think that it's fortunate they brought him back because of the current situation with the pandemic and the uncertainties, so some continuity certainly has played into Atlanta Falcons off season. I think they've had a solid offseason, much as you can, with the limitations. They're attached to this year, So I think that it was good in retrospect that, uh, Mr Black decided to keep Dan Quint on, but I think he's got there. They've got a bit pushed for a playoff spot. I think they've got to be. They can't come out of the box one in seven. It's got to be a team. It's in the hunt of the entire way. As you said, it's going to be outstanding division with outstanding quarterback play, but they have to be in the hunt to be a part of the postseason play. If they do that. And I think the fans will be a little bit of stab on the wound for the fans. But if you get out to a slow start, it would not surprise me. If if Mr Blank made some kind of decision mid season on coach Boy and I think, coach when is the right guy for the job Now it's put up or shut up. He scored a touchdown will go for two here Oscar. One more question This team was 11 5 We all know the deal they were in the Super Bowl blew the 28 23 lead. The next year, they did go 10 and six, the last two years. It's seven and nine. If you had to identify the biggest reason why this team has regressed, and I know they've had some injuries to but overall if it's not the health of the team, what's the biggest thing that you look at? Why this team wasn't able to recreate that magic from 2016 and 2017? I think their inconsistency ball on both sides of the football in conversion, down situations and in the red zone. I think Atlanta's done a great job of moving the ball from 20 to 20 But when they get in the red zone, they bogged down and settle for too many threes. And I think in turn the defense's side of the football. What about 22 23 scoring defense coming up 25 points a game. They've got to find a way to get more stops in the red zone. That's probably the answer that you could probably get from all teams struggled and not made the playoff teams, but I certainly think That that's identifiable with the Falcons over the last couple years, the inability down deep in the red Zone both on offensive defense, Julio Jones, he's Ah Hall of Fame player. We all know that one of the better wide receivers in the league He's only had one year of double digit touchdowns, going back to 2012 when he had 10 TUC maybe 10 touchdowns in his fortunes this year. Well, I think he's certainly capable of it. But you got an outstanding receiver on the other side of Calvin Ridley, who's realized his abilities down in the red Zone Pretty close. I think Aidan hearse is going to be a seamless transition from Austin Hooper tight end spot So there are a lot of weapons from that Ryan to get the football too. Don't forget Todd Gurley and how good he is at the back catching the football as well. So I I would say no, I think he's going to be 89 touchdowns. I don't think he goes double digits, but I think there's a lot of guys around him. They're going to score touchdowns. Look for guys somewhere between 13 14 guys catch touchdown passes issue. Say that we appreciate it. Thanks so much. You be well, my

Todd Gurley Football Matt Ryan Atlanta Falcons Atlanta Falcons Julio Jones David Archer Charles Haley Charles Harris David Hope Radio Network Alex Mack Matt Hennessy Quadri Allyson Mckinley Assad Pittsburgh Rams Lancer Falcons
Russia Bounty Reports, U.S. Troop Movements Put Trump-Putin Relationship in Spotlight

KNX Evening News

06:02 min | Last month

Russia Bounty Reports, U.S. Troop Movements Put Trump-Putin Relationship in Spotlight

"That he has never once broach the issue of Russia, placing bounties on the heads of American troops in Afghanistan with his counterpart Vladimir Putin. Then just hours later, he announces the complete withdrawal of U. S forces from Germany. And Hodges is a retired lieutenant general in the U. S Army and former commanding general for United States Army Europe based in Germany. Currently he is an analyst and scholar at the centre for European Policy Analysis. General. Thank you for joining us. Thanks for the privilege. So let's start with the last thing first. Which was the announcement from the White House about us troops out of Germany. Did that shock you? Well, it was a surprise when I heard it two months ago when it came out in a Wall Street Journal report that about 10,000 we're going to come out on days. Of course, it was also a shock to all of the U. S headquarters in Europe at the time, as well as our allies. On today. Of course, the number that we heard was closer to 12 hours. So they're apparently going to moves to other regions. What is the basis for having troops in these numbers in Germany in the first place? Once the original idea, and then how are the other countries there now reacting to this Well, keep in mind that the total number of Americans that are based in Germany's 34,000 That's about 12,000 Air Force in 22,000 army so That's probably about 1/3 of what could be seated in the Coliseum there in Los Angeles or some other major university stadium. It's not a lot of people, the primary function that they perform. Ah, commanding control, logistics, intelligence communications. Things that help the United States carry out our national security strategy in our defensive strategy in Europe, Africa in the Middle East, so anything, they're not. They're providing protection for Germany at all. They're there to give us Forward, basing that makes it easier for us to carry out our strategy. But am I correct general that the Russians were never exactly to put it mildly pleased that these air troops were in Germany and would be not at all disappointed that they're leaving. Well, no, This is just to the Kremlin because they've done nothing to change their behavior in a positive way. They still occupy Crimea illegally. They still are killing Ukrainian soldiers and done passed done Mass every week. Still occupied 20% of Georgia. They still support the Assad regime, which has generated millions of refugees and killed hundreds of thousands of their own people and their supporting general Haftar in Libya, which is going to generate another 1,000,000 refugees. Into Europe, so they've done nothing to change their behavior. And yet we reduce our capability and Germany by about 1/3 so to me that that again now We've had US troops in Germany since the end of World War two on some people have said. Well, why are they still there? The Cold War's over and I would say well because of US leadership and because of NATO. We've had no war in Europe for 71 years. I mean, that's actually since 1945. Don't do math in public 75 years. That's an incredible accomplishment. When you think of the history of Europe so Well, with the exception of the break up in Yugoslavia, all the nations of Europe that have found each other for centuries. Now, basically all of the same team in NATO What a huge benefit to the United States that are most important trading partner partner. The European Union is stable and secure, so this is for our benefit. Move on to the other part of this discussion. The time we have left the president not confronting Vladimir Putin about the bounties in the most recent phone call, they have, and then reportedly also other phone calls that they've had Knowing that everyone would be watching for this that people wanted something to be said. Yeah, I don't understand. Um, while the president is not more forceful and clear, because actually the acts of the department offense up until this terrible announcement today of the action Of this administration have actually increased in Europe. We have more troops in Germany today than we did under President Obama and everything that President Obama promised. Has been carried out by this administration. So there's a disconnect between what Is happening on the ground in Europe and in what the president says to be candid. I can't explain that when it comes to the reports of bounces, own troops head in Afghanistan. I was there for 15 months back in 2009 and 2010. As a brigadier general, I always assumed that the Russians wanted to see us fail to see us bleed because of our support for the mujahideen with the Soviet Union was in Afghanistan. But, um Wouldn't when the domain of Thailand from Pakistan into Afghanistan was cut off. The Russian's still allowed us to move supplies What we call the northern Supply line moving supply around. We were still able to move through Russia to get stuff in and out so they could have really hurt us if they want to. I suspect that this business about the bounty is probably at some local level some overeager person. I never thought the Taliban needed any motivation to kill Americans. The president could make this go away if he was much more clear about how he opposes the criminals. Technologists. Retired Lieutenant general US Army Former Commanding general for United States Army Europe Thanks the K Index in depth podcast you're going Get that for free

Europe Germany United States United States Army President Trump Vladimir Putin Afghanistan Russia Nato President Obama U. S Army Wall Street Journal U. S Analyst European Policy Analysis Taliban Hodges European Union
Negotiations with Taliban slated to start in 'week's time,' Afghan government says

All of It

00:56 sec | Last month

Negotiations with Taliban slated to start in 'week's time,' Afghan government says

"A rare cease fire in Afghanistan for an upcoming Muslim holiday spokesman saying on Twitter A three day halt of fighting is meant to allow Afghans is celebrating peace. Here's NPR's DEA Hadeed. Taliban spokesman said the cease fire would last for the Muslim celebration of idle at her. It's the third cease fire that the Taliban of cold over the past two years before then they were exceedingly ray. The whole two fire seems intended to show Afghans that the insurgents a serious about upcoming negotiations with the Afghan government, those negotiations mental in the conflict and give the Taliban a role in governing the country. In response, the Afghan president Assad of Honey said he'd soon release hundreds of Taliban prisoners. Their release is meant to proceed. The pace talks on the U. S. Is backing those talks, but they've made many liberal minded Afghans apprehensive. Because the Taliban say they'll impose strict Islamic law if they come back into power. NPR's see Hadid This's NPR

Taliban NPR Afghanistan Afghan Government DEA Twitter Assad President Trump Hadid Honey
ETH - Yep I Am In

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:19 min | 2 months ago

ETH - Yep I Am In

"I also have been very vocal about moving some money into a theory in with that resistance level in the high low building. That's what I did I, actually pretty much, nailed to the to the timing perfectly yesterday, by quite some time as of close at other positions, rather than going back into Bitcoin, a moving some back to his theory, I think it's much more bullish looking shot. And for me. The reminder of the Ted that I had. Assad for trading pays are putting too serious, so yeah, it's been a bloody good day. Without actually having to take any particular tribes and warm Italian is on not telling you this as Brag now. You'RE GONNA. See I've already seen loss of brags. Away said this Tom Blah. Blah Blah That's wonderful good for them. Excellent on I think that's fantastic that the helping people make money, or they're making money and showing people's stuff. But under the Braga. Hated by one. I'm here to do from here to motivate you to take the plunge to get started. Because whether you're looking to manage any investment portfolio oil, you're looking to trade on low timeframes and everything in between what I do. We'll help you with that, and that's what I'm saying about. Link at some sighing about eighth sign about cod dominate the. Pain them. To know how what you're looking for well, it could certainly change your loss of. Where are we right now? About five minutes until the market closes for today do. Well thousand five hundred thirty dollars at one point, five percent on the BTS Yayha and guess what today has done. You heard me talking about the bright of that weekly candlelight back on the sixth of July broken the heart and we look at much more bullish now. BITCOIN is a move in and a very came very to see work always to next because well. Thing? Theorin I the big dog got to sixty four, forty six. To sixty four. Forty six cents wanted are fake. That will because as a theory. And a thirty to fifty beautiful, it's up seven point five five percent. And there was a wonderful little. Krylya Sally which she'd be a byte point five times. You'll risk if he took good Scifi. Yep there. It is I saw Pai. In exile pays moved up two point. One percents twenty point four cents. Yes, it has. It's actually broken through that twenty cent. Barry, that's really struggling with for a little while. She's up through a looking good. It'll move their necks. bitcoin cash that four hour cradle started up for out to our cradle was at ten P.. I. T.. n. p. m. a. pointed that out of my McAfee video. I didn't try anything I did like the look of Bitcoin cash guys a practice few to tall or not feeling well, you stay at and I just I just feeling. Thoughts Utah yesterday so I stayed up. Di Big would abate on that puppy up four percent to forty dollars at the moment. Ida Okada twelve point four percent. Up Point six five not too much, but it's obviously going to be big moose bigoted, pretty quick, musical, best one, eighty, four thirty. I'd up two point nine percent right now. Lot coins three percent up one foil candle. Wish Guy. Right up in the. Forty! Five Dollars and eleven cents Barn answer bit of an honest move there also two point two six percent up sitting right around that resistance region from yesterday, eighteen dollars and twelve cents per tools, sixty six out one point six percent renting the top ten. We've got leakage at seven dollars forty two point three nine percent of the standard as a theorem. There is absolutely no doubt about it. We broken the resistance. We've broken out on the pitch shot. We've broken up against bitcoin working up and through every single barrier level. You imagine we have go blue sky ahead. What will I be looking for I'll be looking for. Nazi boosters crypto cradles and big breakouts, while because that's all I have looked full. The three strategies that are built my career as a tried and I'll go all checkless for you. Should you wish to? Get stuck into them.

Tom Blah Assad TED Di Big Krylya Sally Ida Okada Utah Barry I. T.. N. P. M. A.
"assad" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:27 min | 3 months ago

"assad" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"In Syria this week, a sweeping new set of American sanctions takes hold. State Department spokesperson Morgan Ortega's says the goal is to cut off the revenue that president. Bashar Assad uses to wage war against his people. We begin a sustained campaign of sanctions against the Assad regime under the Caesar Act named after the brave photographer who six years ago brought the world documented proof of the Assad regime's brutality against fellow Syrians. The defector code-named Caesar smuggled out tens of thousands of images of men, tortured and starved to death in regime prisons. The sanctions come at a hard time for Mr. Assad and for the country's exhausted people. More than nine years of fighting Mr Assad has all but one the civil war. The few rebel holdouts are greatly weakened. But the regime now faces new challenges. That can't be resolved with force. This ought to be great time for the team of the shower last. He's been fighting a civil war for nine years, and he's really pushed his enemies back to the periphery of the country. Nicholas is economists Middle East correspondent. He's regained. The major cities is reduced the level of fighting to what last month was the lowest number of civilian casualties today, but just as he seems beginning the upper hand militarily. He's floundering badly economically. The country is in a really desperate state, and he doesn't have the money to rebuild really not even to feed his own population. The value of the currency has collapsed prices of increased. Three times since this thought of this year fifty since the war began I've spoken to farmers who are closing down because demand has collapsed for meet, people are struggling to afford for level and the food of the poor. Let alone the cost of a chicken. You've got an outbreak of demonstrations. In some of the lowest heartlands of the regime, people challenging the same slogans, the opposition used to chunk when they began the civil war in two thousand and eleven. So what's gone wrong here? Why haven't the military gains been matched with with some competency? There tends to blame the outside world it says at. America fell to bring down the. The regime militarily, and is now trying to do the same economically it points to a new American Law of the Caesar Act that comes into effect this week, which bans trade financial transactions with the key sectors that prop up the Syrian regime including reconstruction. I think it's wrong to attribute all the problems that Syria has to American sanctions. This is a country which don't forget has been broken by nine years of wards smashed it still divided and in effect Mr Spectrum is half of his twenty years in power. Fighting a civil war devastated much reserve it. Infrastructure is destroyed his manufacturing hub in Aleppo. It's left almost half the population. Displaced or chase them abroad, so here's really the author of his own economic woes, and the regime doesn't have the resources to rebuild its main patrons. Russia and Iran are more interested in taking money getting what they can out of Syria than putting money in on top of that those those Lebanon, which was serious economic window to the outside world. It was the place where this is used can. Is the banking center and now Levin itself is in economic chaos. So what has Mr done as as all of these sources of of support have have fallen away as he's tried to blame others. He sacked his prime minister. He's introduced a series of. Economic measures to try and hold them to what revenues he still has in the country. He slashed impulse. Buy Fifty percents. He's stopped his banks from issuing loans. ATM's of pretty much down across regime areas, and indeed he's sort of been fleecing the most powerful businessmen in Syria including his cousin Ramaema's Loof, but always seemed to be kind of piecemeal measures. Measures they seem desperate. It has said that there's not really much vision coming from the top. Charlotte said he's been surprisingly absent from the political scene. He hoped that some Gulf states might bail him out, but that seems to be floundering as well because the Caesar Act is going to deter many who might have engaged with the regime from banking on Mr. Perhaps his two best hopes. Ironically the Arizona outside regime-controlled, because they will not be subject to the Caesar Act so the come the two hours in the north. And it might be the detritus to increase trade within the uses these areas which previously. Loggerheads with him as as middlemen to access the outside well, and then of course there's Hezbollah its share on group which is kept Lebanon's most powerful force, and has been heavily involved in the fighting in Syria in Lebanon control the only airport, and they control many of the crossings into Syria, so it might be that you're going to see increased reliance on Hezbollah to bring in impulse from the outside world, but all this is going to lead to an increase in reliance. Reliance on smuggling rings, going to lead to an increase in racketeering. This isn't really the basis for trying to manage a country's economy, and so can he find his way out of this? Is there a chance that all this could bring mister down at last trust has been remarkably successful, defying predictions his demise, but this time it has to be said there is a difference the economic crisis in series on settling the regime in a way that the war rarely did. Even at the worst moments of the fighting Mr Asset managed to retain the loyalty of half the population particularly relied on minorities whether they were Christians or his own Alawite base. They're a splinter sect the that comes from mainstream Islam, and then you have the truth minority as well. All seemed to be wavering. They wonder what's happened to the peace dividend. They wonder whether Mr Assad is going to be able to feed them looks like the whole patronage network is crumbling before their eyes, and so all beginning to wonder whether he is not the solution to their problems, but the problem itself. Nicholas thank you very much for joining Jason..

Syria Bashar Assad Mr. Assad Assad Lebanon Nicholas Mr Asset State Department Hezbollah Morgan Ortega Aleppo president Arizona America racketeering prime minister Levin Russia
Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

The $100 MBA Show

06:10 min | 3 months ago

Do You Need A Degree To Be a Successful Entrepreneur?

"I could begin today's episode by naming all the famous entrepreneurs. We all know that don't have a college degree. Whether. It's Mark Zuckerberg or Walt Disney or Michael. Dell or Steve Jobs or Steve Wozniak or Bill Gates or Ray KROC or I can keep going right. But. That doesn't prove that have a college. Degree is a waste of money, or the conjugate doesn't help you become an entrepreneur. I let's recognize the fact that everybody on that list I just named and more ones I didn't list are exceptional entrepreneurs, exceptional people whether they're very bright and talented, whether they have a lot of tenacity like Ray Kroc, or just are willing to work harder than everybody else I'm not interested in edge, cases or extraordinary people that are extraordinarily things. I am interested in addressing this question with the fact that what about everybody else everybody who may not be a genius or The special gifts of some of the people we've talked about. Can they make it as an entrepreneur without a college degree? Well, let's talk about what caused. Agree gives you so that we can boil it down to. Do you need those things to be successful there more college degree? We'll give you an education. They will teach you somethings who go to class and you'll learn now whether that. is of date or not is a different matter, but you will learn. You will gain those skills number two. It's going to put you in an environment where you're going to meet. Other people go to college whether it's online or offline, you are going to be networking with other people other likeminded people other people. WanNa be successful just like you, and often you know in the same field whether it's computer, science, or business, or whatever it is so one you're gonNA give formation number two. You're going to get exposed to people, and you'll be able to build a network and the third thing that call will give you is a piece of paper. They'll give you a certificate. They'll give you a diploma. Something that tells other people employers particularly that hate. This person knows stuff or knows this area of expertise whatever your degrees in, so it's almost like a permission, slip or sort of like a coupon like hey, this paper proves of this person. Know something in this area with a stern on a different matter, but that's how society views a degree, so those are the three things college will give you now. Can you achieve these three things outside of college with Al GonNa College Information Skills. Skills Yup, you can learn the outside college whether that is indifferent programs online learning courses online books, universities will have a monopoly on the information, right? You can get this information elsewhere network while there's a little bit different because you know you're not in a space like an actual campus, but hey, you still can go to conferences. You still can meet people online. You could be a a person that really values relationships in kind of. Of Fall some advice. We talked about in this in this podcast. How To make sure you build your network constantly? So this is doable. Assad College, and the third thing is the piece of paper now a totally different think society has agreed that this piece of paper will allow you to get you know opportunities whether it's jobs or an interview or whatever it is. This is the difference the piece of paper. So do you need a? A piece of paper. That's the question here, so college is beneficial. If you do need a piece of paper that permission slip, but if you plan to be an entrepreneur, if your soul is GonNa, be a business bill I want to be an entrepreneur. All my life I don't want to really pursue a career that requires me to have a degree. If that's you tried and true, then really GonNa College may not make the most financial. Financial Sense not going to say it's going to hurt you, but it's a lot of time often in your prime years and a lot of money being spent on something, you may not really need because you can achieve the things you want to achieve as an entrepreneur without it now if you are not sure if you like fifty fifty. Hey, I think I to be an entrepreneur, but maybe I want to work for a little while. While maybe I want to start a business and then after that I wanna go ahead and you know work somewhere at a corporation, a degree will help you get that job. This justice, the reality of the situation there are exceptions to the rules of course in different careers one of them is programming development engineering technology. Many engineers don't have college degrees, but they're so highly skilled, and so saw after that they can get a job. Job Easily and our certification programs outside of the university structure that you can take in that field that can qualify you to get jobs. A lot of people say hey, getting your degree is sort of like a backup plan. You can always get a job if things don't work out, but that really doesn't help you answer that question of. Do you need a college degree to Be Successful Entrepreneur? I don't think you need it I. I do believe you'll. The half caused. Degrees can be successful I. do believe that people that don't can be successful as well as a matter of how you WanNa spend your resources. Your time and your money I can't tell you for certain that thing that I learned in university. I don't use at all in my day to day life as an entrepreneur. I'm sure there are some things that I've picked up that I've used. But if I'm going to be completely honest. I don't think there's enough of that. I would say would require me to have gone to college to be. Successful, so you also have to define what success means. What does success mean to you as an entrepreneur? Is Success being able to pursue a hobby that you love and make a profit is success being able to replace current income in your current job with your business success, a a million dollar business is that a ten million dollar business? Is it a billion dollar business which a lot of? Of People think that's the only meaning of success. No, you need to define what success is for you as an entrepreneur and for most people I think it should be able to make a healthy living that allows you to be financially free doing something that you really feel passionate about that. You

Ray Kroc Assad College Steve Jobs Mark Zuckerberg Dell Bill Gates Steve Wozniak Walt Disney AL Michael
Acts of Resistance Story Call

You Had Me At Black

02:48 min | 4 months ago

Acts of Resistance Story Call

"Hey welcome to you had me at. Black. I'm Martina Abraham's in light of the uprisings in cities across the country and our collective desire for community action. We've decided to pivot. The next topic are at the House series. Many of us are unsure of how to turn our pain and our raid into protests. But every day we survive racism. Sexism Assad Ginny Homophobia Islamophobia trans-phobia a really never ends so this week. We're going to remind ourselves who we are in how it's done. Share a story about an active resistance at time where you stood up or fought back against injustice or mistreatment. Big Or small what happened. What did you do what happens next? Submit your story at you. Had ME AT BLACK DOT com slash at the house submissions or do you by Wednesday June third. And while I have you I just want to remind you that your feelings. Whatever they are right now are valid and justified. You do not need to explain the way you do not need to defend them with stats or logic or examples. Take that energy in. Pour it into our community. Here are a few ways you can do. I find a grassroots or mutual aid organization in your local area there organizing and they're making sure that the community's needs are met every day and they can use our support whether it's financially or with our time if you feel called to protest that is great but you do not need to be in the street to be a part of the movement and do movement work making 'cause providing childcare feeding protesters fundraising doing research securing meeting locations. The list of things to be done. It's really never ending. And it takes many hands to make these networks run second. Being black does not absolve from the need to study to do the work to recognize on pack unlearn and dismantle the white supremacy in imperialism in ourselves. No one who goes up in a society like ours is free from it. Oh and it's important to study the movement before us because that will help inform our objectives and our next steps now so we really want to be about it. We have to start with us

Martina Abraham
Just like in a monologue when he would blow a joke and it would get a laugh

Nick Digilio

03:29 min | 4 months ago

Just like in a monologue when he would blow a joke and it would get a laugh

"One one of of course course okay okay now try to get spring time okay springtime when it's springtime when spring well oh man so there you go Pancho yeah it's really funny you know anytime Johnny had animals on and the segment turned out to be a wash out it was always hilarious because of Johnny just like in a monologue when he would blow a joke and it would get a laugh it was almost funnier than if it was a good joke and it got a laugh so god that's funny wonder what ponchos doing today now he said he could believe he could live to be seventy or eighty in the in the clip he said enough lived to be seventy right now I'm just like that guy probably dead center that was thirty is thirty nine years ago well I hope we can still be around probably you know just play in the clubs yeah on the kilometer gaze touring yeah Pancho the signal well now he's doing virtual tours yeah he's he's in his state of recording the rituals in its cage according virtual sorrow for the internet oh boy all right poncho all right every every morning at two thirty with a morning at two thirty you get to hear some lovely comedy from the classic Johnny Carson again Johnny Carson Assad's showed every night on antenna TV must see television right there okay we're back to Samoa slang terms that don't get used as much anymore how about can you dig it Cyrus user from the warriors a car near older grant don't worry nobody's asking you to grab a shovel and dig a hole digging something means that you understand what's being said I get the I get the last piece of pizza can you dig it the lady I always thought this one was ridiculous it may sound like a pet name for your grandma but old ladies actually term of endearment for your girlfriend or wife example now I can't hit the clubs tonight my old lady is waiting for me at home how is it a term of endearment that sound like a term of endearment nana particularly yeah I know the old ladies waiting for me at home why just color ball and chain the old ball and chain all right freak flag people still use this one don't say what like let your freak flag yeah hi yeah I guess so that's a that's a phrase when Jimi Hendrix declared the song in the song if six was nine yeah he was gonna wave going to wave my freak flag high read a whole new way of announcing that you're the weirdest one in the room example it's great to get wild tonight I'm gonna let my freak flag fly all right how bout dah how about

Johnny Pancho Johnny Carson Jimi Hendrix Johnny Carson Assad
A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

Asian Enough

05:42 min | 5 months ago

A Conversation with Civil Rights Attorney Rabia Chaudry

"The story that works. You know I've had thousands of people over the years reach out. It's not just me not saying we read this book or we listen to this. We Watch this. And we didn't even realize some of the assumptions we held or the prejudices. We had about Muslims until we heard your story and was like Oh my God. You're just you're just like any of us and and you know it made it much more self aware I think storytelling is one of the most powerful aspects. Storytelling is what changes people's hearts and minds really. Nothing else works. What were some of the stories that I made you feel that like even growing up. You're always like a writer at heart. What were the stories that I took hold in you? Where did you get them? You know the stories growing up as an American Muslim when before nine eleven honestly a lot of people had no or maybe before the Iran hostage crisis. I'm trying to think of what international event made me realize that I'm a Muslim probably the first the first Gulf War. I remember the Gulf War. I was in middle school and the war began in the middle of the day and teacher came over to me and said hey tell your uncle Saddam Hussein to back off or something and I said who is it. Almost saying I'm not era. I don't even know what's happening and I was a kid. But you know a lot of the stories really just came from like my parents handing down stories like stories out of our religious traditions cultural tradition as an adult. I realize what's problematic with a lot of the stories? They're wonderful stories of very heroic stories but they also set up this false like idealism. That didn't allow us to feel like if you're a Muslim you can also have false. You can make mistakes. You can screw up because all the stories were told. Were about people who are just incredibly honorable. Did the most amazing things. And that's what you aspire to And that's what you're supposed to be What's an example? Gosh I mean one example is like my name so I'm named after medieval century like Muslim female saint one of the only Muslim female saints I best known I think she lived in the twelfth century. I don't even know Rubio other. We and you know the story I was told about her growing up. Was that you know she was incredibly right. Just and pious and she spent her days worshiping God in the evening she would go out and teach people and she had so much faith in God that she she just kind of stayed cloistered in this little space that she told people. Don't bring me any food. Because will deliver me. Sustenance and food would appear out of nowhere so for a little kid to be like okay I got like visas does incredible role model and And she says she was an amazing saint from what we know. But of course over the years you don't know what's been added to the tradition and it was just kind of this this really high expectation of piety and religious righteousness. That is really almost impossible to meet. Because you tell us a little bit about where you grew up your born in Pakistan and ended up in Maryland right. Yeah so I thought this was only like six or seven I was. I was under one when my parents came over here. Fundraising United States and my dad worked for the US Department of Agriculture. He was a veterinarian. And a lot of people don't know there's like this huge Boccassini veterinary like a whole gang of them in the US Department of Agriculture. They all came over in the seventies what we grew up in very small agricultural towns because of that. Because my dad had to work where you know where there was agricultural business oh Kansas Delaware Lancaster County Pennsylvania just very remote places where we were often the only people of color not just the only Muslim but really there were there. Were places where there were no other black people know. They're black families so very small town America. Then when I got about high school is when we kind of moved to a slightly bigger town with with diversity in it so but most of my formative years in adult life. I've grown up around the beltway. Northern Virginia or Maryland. And that's where I am. Now you've written on your blog that your parents know how to be quote critical of where we've been and where we are without throwing the baby out with the bathwater. Yeah I guess I just wanted to know how your parents raised you and how that shaped you my parents you know. They left boxes on one thousand nine hundred seventy nine hundred seventy s block. Assad never left them so as time moved on their idea of what's culturally appropriate for us was forever one thousand nine hundred seventy something bucks on. Meaning you know my dad would be like. Why don't you have your hair? Your hair should be in two braids and it should be well oiled and dress a certain way and you should at home. We always wore a boxing enclosing home. You know we only eight bucks any food at home but the funny thing is we would visit Baucus on like in the eighty s and ninety s people over there would be like all the women have their care cut and permed and look really cute and they'd be like what is wrong with you people. Why do you look like like? You're from a blast from the past. But you know my my parents are. My Dad is a very spiritual person. He's not like a a religious person. Like ritualistic my mom is much more religious. My mom raised us with some really strong values. And look the one thing that we heard and over and over again is the whole purpose of your life is how you're going to serve other people like what are you. GonNa do with all the education. The time the health the wealth the youth everything you have is basically like a test like we're being tested for. What are you GonNa do with it? That's the whole point of being here and so you know I. I always appreciate that because I think that's the one thing that's driven me to always feel like there's more there's more to do. There's a lot more to do.

Us Department Of Agriculture United States Maryland Saddam Hussein Iran Writer Pakistan Kansas Delaware Lancaster Coun Rubio Assad Baucus Boccassini Virginia
"assad" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

11:57 min | 5 months ago

"assad" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"More about dropping. Cover a lot of questions about that but I want to hear about this. Suv Stop Stories. Speaking following the law persona non grata ambush training. You've got stopped in your as you. The on the way to the CIA compound. Let's hear that because that's not something that most of us deal with every day on our commute. Oh my gosh so you know here. I was praying to never have to use this ambush training in real life and I did in fact have to use it but it was presented to me in a way that I could have never anticipated so here I am in this kidnapping and carjacking one of the capitals of the world. I had found out that one of my colleagues who had my position about a year or two before me. She had actually been kidnapped in the capital city and at that time other people being kidnapped out of the capital city. They're usually targets of opportunity meaning people saw them saw that they were valuable as a Westerner and that they could be sold to al Qaeda for money so I was very aware of this and we would tell each other at work. Just don't ever get taken. If you get taken you'll never come back. All of the kid nappies that we were. We're I've had been killed. We did an episode with Gavin Becker. Who wrote the gift of fear and one of the things that he taught me in the nineties that he writes about in some of his books is never go to the secondary location. Which has you know is the place where they're going to take you because your best chance to stand and fight is right there and willing to that Gavin de Becker episode in the show notes. But that's essentially the concept that you're talking about is do not get taken if you get killed at the point at which they're trying to take you so be it. It's probably better than the way you're gonNA get killed later after they take you. That's absolutely correct and I always referenced. This book the Gift of fear. It is absolutely one of the best books that I've ever read. And he is spot on in terms of telling you how to handle these situations and so it was like. Don't ever get taken absolutely not so. I'm driving alone from my compound of the southern edge of the city. My husband was traveling so as by myself and this is a country where all the women are completely covered as western diplomats. We did not have to cover but obviously I would address very respectfully long sleeves but when you're driving to work. How much can somebody see-through Windshield? Really? It's just your head and your neck area but I stopped at a stop late in the middle of the city and a car pulled up behind me and then a man was crossing the street in front of me and when he got in front of my suv he looked up and he saw me through the windshield. And again I had mentioned earlier about these places being extremely sexually repressed cultures. And these places where you can't even see another woman's face outside of your family it turns out that that was just too much of a turn on for this guy and so he planted his feet in front of my car and he started carrying out a particular activity. Wow Harvey Weinstein Style. Right in the middle of the road yes. That's a good way to put it. That's exactly what was happening and I had been the Middle East for years. I've traveled all over the place and Jordan. I have never seen anything like it. You can't walk around with NO HEADSCARF. But if you want to whip it out in an intersection go ahead buddy. Exactly and I'm thinking to myself. This cannot be happening. This is so horrible. This is so stupid he really doing this. It's on my mind is racing and I'm totally annoyed. I'm embarrassed I'm turning red and then suddenly I'm realizing that is. He's doing his business. That other men on the street or taking note and are getting very curious strangely enough. They weren't curious about what he was doing but what was a listening this in him so they wanted to see what was inside the vehicle that was ultimately like what is in there. They started gathering from the street from the shops. And I'm seeing out of the corner of my eyes into my rear view mirror. I literally have all of these men coming towards the car and then suddenly it was like the ambush training kicked in and was like. Oh my God. I'm sitting on the axe. I've got a car behind me because otherwise I would have just backed up and gone around this guy. This guy planted right in front of my car and I can't go anywhere. I'm stuck in like crap. I'm on the axe and I started sweating and I started shaking and I'm like yelling at this guy in Arabic and I'm like Oh for God's sake get it over with and we're talking now Jordan like dozens and dozens of men are now coming towards my vehicle and I thought if they surround my car then it is entirely likely I could be a target of opportunity and get kidnapped or carjacked and taken. Obviously as we've said that cannot happen and so almost without thinking very gut early I took my foot off of the break and I pressed the Gash and I hit the guy with my car. Wow he got ran over while miserable. That's rare that's gotta be single digit number of occurrences in the world at any given time. And I didn't run them over like hit him and threw him and he was completely shocked is I was that I had just done this. Yeah I wasn't even fully thinking through it. I was just like I have to get out of here. He inner surprisingly gets back up again. Plans to ski and continues. And I'm like are a stubborn guy. I mean that drive is pretty strong. Obviously if you're pulling it out and intersection I'm just imagining though like how did Mohammed Diet? Well he was masturbating in an intersection and the woman that he was doing that too ran over with her SUV. Oh okay that's not weird at all. Yeah and so I had a second time and thank God. The second time I was like you know next time I will completely run you over. Because it's either you or me at this point and it's not GonNa be me and so he finally after the second time. Got Up off the pavement and moved out of the way and I can tell you for sure that I did not stop for any more red lights or stop signs all week to the work on bound. I was shaking you know the adrenaline surging through my body. And I realized like I could have just gotten taken and so it was probably one of the scariest things I've done through while serving abroad. Jeez yeah I thought you were going to say I didn't stop for a red light or a stop sign for the next three years because I feel like that's where I'd be at that point just like okay. No longer worried about the traffic signals here. I'm worried about packers on my hood. Boy I had never imagined that I would ever be a situation like that. That's for sure. That's pretty ridiculous. And the fact that you had to hit him twice before he put it away was also really strange. I mean that that whole thing is just completely outside my reality and I would imagine they're like Hey Michelle. You're a little bit late today. What happened on the way here? Yeah over there like what? What do that Baghdad traffic? It's always been well. Actually what happened? Give to file a report when things like that happen. Imagine you can't just show up and go. You'll never believe this right. I did. I had to file a report with the embassy security officer so that they were aware that this kind of thing was happening and they could also alert other drivers to the fact that this happened and they can keep an eye out for their own self protection holy cow. That's unbelievable all right. Well now you've been back in the states. Did you have to keep up appearances for awhile? I mean you have to stay as your cover for a few months years while you're back but you have to maintain your cover forever unless you get special dispensation to drop cover. Oh Wow so as far as anybody knows in. This isn't your case because you did break or you are able to drop cover is far as anybody knows over there. You'RE NOT MICHELLE. Rigby aside your whatever name you used in Egypt or Baghdad or Afghanistan or wherever yeah so obviously we wouldn't use your real name or name with your sources and I looked a little bit different when I was over there as well. So that's helpful. It's like being a different person. You looked a little bit different meaning. I mean you didn't get taller. You get shorter. What do you mean? I wore my hair differently dressed differently so it would make it a little bit harder to know exactly who I was and at that point in time to of course we didn't have social media. We were doing everything we could to maintain a very low profile. I mean we would do regularly search ourselves on Google to make sure we didn't come up which makes people laugh because it was the world was going in one direction and we were going in another. Yeah usually when you see a google alert for your name you get excited whereas in your case you're thinking Oh my God. I hope there's not a photo attached to this right exactly. So did you have to move once you dropped cover to get a fresh start. I can kind of imagine it would be weird to go. Hey at the neighborhood association meeting or the Picnic Basket the way. My name is not Jordan Harbinger. It's actually and you tell everybody that you've lied to them for the last couple of years living in this apartment complex or your neighborhood and your kid's school and you've got to change everything and they're just kind of like that's weird right. So did you just move and unplug and plug everything back in again? We were so unplugged for so long and our lives were so limited in terms of our circles abroad. It wasn't like we were so well known by all kinds of people when we were doing our job again. Kind of flying under the radar. Most of the time. Is there anything? You'd be worried about now that you're sort of out of the CIA closet. Is there anything you have to pay attention to? At all. Sure always personal security will be an issue and something that I have to be very careful with well. You didn't have social media like you said the world's moving in one direction you're moving in another. You've missed so much as you can see. What's your favorite part of being able to rejoin kind of the public world at large here? Well I don't know it's become a favorite thing yet. It's still very scary. Every time I post things I do is so much trepidation. It's very unnatural for me. So of course as you know in order to publish a book you have to have a platform. And you have to do all the self branding and so these things for me. Take a great deal of energy to do them. And it's not natural on the plus side obviously sharing your story and being able to see that it's resonating with other people and it's having an impact that's the plus side for me. So that's the part. That kind of keeps me plugged in and engaged in arenas that make me feel very uncomfortable. Social Social Media. I can imagine that that's the case for sure. What do you think you were better off? Not Having while you're undercover. Do you think you were healthier or had less foam. O or maybe just more free time when you were undercover as opposed to now with all the technology and things that you're using right in fact these days that you have to really make a conscious decision to unplug so for me it's like Oh just get off that social media and read your book. You know you used to do that all the time got to do more of that. I think just like everybody else. Michelle thank you so much for coming on the show here. There's a lot. I know you're sort of new to presenting a lot of these two people that aren't in the CIA. So thank you so much for joining us here on the show and being so open about a lot of crazy stories including some stuff. That might be a little bit. Yeah embarrassing I suppose yes thanks Jordan for having me giving me an opportunity to share a little bit about my background and the hopes that it can inspire other people to do things that scare them a little bit because I have found that my place of purpose in the locations and the activities. That scared me the most big thanks to Michelle for joining us on this show today. Her book is called breaking. Cover my secret life in the CIA and what it taught me about. What's worth fighting for links to all her stuff will be in the website.

Jordan Harbinger CIA Michelle Baghdad Google Gavin Becker Gavin de Becker kidnapping Middle East Harvey Weinstein packers officer Picnic Basket Rigby Afghanistan Egypt
Watchdog: Syrian air force responsible for chemical attacks

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 5 months ago

Watchdog: Syrian air force responsible for chemical attacks

"An international chemical weapons watchdog has issued a report blaming Syria for a series of attacks in March of two thousand seventeen as NPR's Michelle Kellerman tells us the US calls the report damning and accuses Russia of trying to shield the Syrian government from Accountability Secretary of State. Mike Pompeo says the US shares the same conclusions as the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons his statement says the US also believes that the Syrian regime retains quote sufficient chemicals and expertise to use Sarin and chlorine munitions and to develop new chemical weapons. Syria agreed to get rid of its chemical weapon stockpiles in two thousand thirteen under pressure from the US and Russia one State Department official says Russia has since blocked every effort to hold Bouchara. Assad's regime accountable. Even as Syria continued to carry out attacks. Like the ones documented by the

United States Syria Russia Syrian Government Mike Pompeo Michelle Kellerman NPR Sarin Assad State Department Bouchara Official
20 Minutes With Aly Orady The Founder Of Tonal

20 Minute Fitness

05:15 min | 6 months ago

20 Minutes With Aly Orady The Founder Of Tonal

"Everyone it's Martin from twenty minutes fitness. Today we're having actually a remote interview with Adia. Righty from TONAL AT A. We have been talking before last year in May but for the listeners have not had the chance. Listened to that podcast. We're GONNA make sure that episode awesome to our show notes. Why don't you just say a few words about who you are? And what total is Yeah Martin. Thanks for having me back on the show. I'm the founder and CEO of Ohio and tunnel is a connected streaming system for the home so it's a digital strength training machine that's versatile enough to support Every single movement that you would do on any machine and our weight room and comes with Multi Week Programming and Onscreen coaching guides. Our guys are members through their workouts. Every every step of the way it's Super Compact. It's compact enough to monster walls. It's compact enough to sit in a one bedroom apartment or or a home and And it super smart and intelligent. Ai In it that personalizes the workouts to user and and guides people through the work that so what would like typically experienced. Like if. I'm a user an ice pack. You know may gun through on morning and do my I work out. How would that apply so So the first thing is when you walk up to a tunnel you actually just looks like a TV mounted on wall but but vertically I end the arms tucked away so when you're not using it it's it's stowed looks really clean and sleek is when you walk up to it the first thing you do on still the arm so these arms often and they become adjustable seen all sorts of different exercises. I know there's a twenty four inch screen When you first create your account you know you do everything you do with a personal trainer. You'd Salsa Basic Steiger Age or your goals and then we take you through a quick strength test ought to find out how strong you are And that becomes the baseline that we use from that point that point forward and then you know what you'll do is you'll you'll select the program that you want to do and you know you have the option of doing a single day workout With one of our coaches so you you might take a coach and pick a twenty minute workout or for workout. Or you'll enroll in a multi week program. This is what most people actually do we were. We were grams oriented around specific goal. So we have programs for people who want to lose weight people who want to build muscle people who want to get better at specific sport. Like an example. We will retraining program for somebody's training for a five K. Five Ron. You don't actually become a better runner by running more you do it. You can read strength training and then once you step into the workout. We'll take you for warmup routine and then as we take you for every single strength. Training exercise tonal will automatically choose. How Much Weight? You should lift scored exercise. Assess how you're doing and then Decide whether it's time for you to lift more weight or less weight so so in essence. The is adopting every workout to you. In terms of the way the pacing to work. That's actually will speed up and slow down depending on on how you're doing. I even give you real time feedback right emotion elements of your arm. So it's it's pretty cool and Since we last talked. And that's I'm tonal had just launched a few months before that and what has happened since then what has changed. I think a lot of a lot of things have changed. I think when when we first started a lot of people would look at this thing and not sure what it was and now now we're in a position where where people look at this and they will have a tonal. Just tell us that. It's the most incredible piece of equipment if they've ever used and I think the the analogy I can use. It's like it's like one test Reduction of electric cars. I think when I was a kid when you looked electric cars they were always. They're always like the all environmentally friendly alternative to gasoline cars. But you're serious about cars. You had to go gasoline. And now Tesla has proven that an electric car cannot perform a gasoline card every single dimension. And that's exactly. What tonal is tonal? Doesn't rely on big metal place in gravity. We actually generate or she using electricity And electromagnetics and just repel cars or trains or in Donald Generate enough force. The pick you up off the ground or give you a really really serious workout and I think before we. We launched people who would see. The product would be impressed by now that it's people's homes and more and more people hearing. We're starting to get this this reputation of being a superior way to strength train. The resistance is more pure the spotter which automatically adjusts the way. If you're struggling you push yourself harder. Va I which selects the wage for you. Opt To push yourself harder. The guidance is is really is really great. Because you're getting a crush routine every day And so I think that that reputation is starting to to proceed us community has really grown become very vibrant. And I think that's all great very exciting. And you mentioned that initially customers didn't quite know what to make for Assad and do you think that was more phone Education thing that you had to explain the product more and you had to put up that reputation like you mentioned like something that you had to change around the product experience fall for your users. It was all about. It was all about education and about letting people experienced thing that was new and different than what they'd seen before you know when you walk into a gym and you look at our traditional cable crossover weight machine or you look at Iraq dumbbells. I think we all know what those things do. I think with tonal people. Look at it and you know it's really small. It's leak and and it's easy to underestimate because pretty until that same person. Twenty minutes later is sitting on a puddle on the ground puddle of sweat on the ground you know out of breath the thing we hear most often from people as it exceeded my expectations. This is way harder than I ever expected him. The resistance is more pure. It's smooth and in in the beginning. You know it it. You know people look at this thing. They don't is under skeptical? And then after you know after. The community began digging gave momentum. I think we started to see See The tide turn.

Founder And Ceo Martin Adia Tesla VA Ohio Iraq Assad Donald Trump
Fighting Hunger During a Pandemic

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

09:01 min | 6 months ago

Fighting Hunger During a Pandemic

"Dr Hernandez. Thank you for broadcasting from your home and join us on no jargon today. Oh thank you for having me and especially under this unique circumstance. Yeah absolutely no. We're really glad that you're part of the network but we can speak with today This is something that people need to think about you. Research Food Insecurity so you know. Lay the groundwork for me. What do we mean when we describe people as food insecure That's a term that I think researchers use a lot. Maybe not so much the general public and how you know this is something that existed before this moment. How bad was the problem in the? Us before Corona virus came along. Yes so food. Insecurity is the Academic term that we use or hunger or the lack of access to food In the lack of access to food because of resources it's not because an individual is going on a diet it refusing to eat the. This is a real concern where one seven households had children on a regular basis experience. Food security is does not mean that children are not being. Fed hairs usually shelter their younger children from lack of access to food by themselves eating less or skipping a meal but we are beginning to notice that older children off. The shelves are practicing food coping strategies. Such as they're eating less to ensure that their yard is siblings. Have enough to eat. You know typically we have always defined families that are at the poverty level at most at risk for experiencing food security but we now know that families about two hundred percent of the threshold or poverty are at rest in. This is because these families have difficulties making ends meet and there's no safety available for them so these are families that have Deal WITH ECONOMIC HARDSHIP. Which is basically the difficulty of meeting basic needs and basic needs such as shelter utilities food clothing medical expenses. These families are living paycheck to paycheck. Either because they have limited Ah Limited paycheck or changes in paychecks now our combination of two so put c Stanley at greater risk for experiencing what we call food. Insecurity is so you've listed some of the ways that they can mitigate these issues and try to put food on the table as much as possible adults and older children foregoing it of course maybe the most immediate one that definitely impacts people's health but talk about some other consequences food insecurity. We know it's not good to be hungry. But what's the impact on families in particular? What's the impact on children? You know what does it mean for their physical and mental health? Children are read. So we think about How informants school. They are at risk or attention problems. There are a number of children that miss site knows with attention deficit disorder When the fact is that is their lack of concentration is because they haven't had enough to eat in the no the attention problems can lead to academic failures Dropping out a school in a cycle of poverty continues long term. We have seen insecurity be associated with obesity and Diet sensitive. Chronic diseases such as diabetes And we've even seen the association between Security mental health. Some of the early work focused on parents and we saw anxiety. Depression related to food insecurity. But we're now seeing the same association among adolescents and so interesting impacts than on education that maybe people wouldn't think of that. The you know the idea of misdiagnoses with attention deficit issues actually being simply because of hunger is an interesting one when we think about all the research that goes into diagnosing and treating those types of issues in children So I'm hearing that while. School can be a place where some of the kind of entitlements of food insecurity come out there also a place where food insecurity can be strongly combated. Is that correct? How'd you how'd you schools? Actually help children get food yes. Schools are in many ways. The Flying Defense For Reducing Food Insecurity A number of the children school-age children receive meals from the school breakfast program in from National School Lunch Program. There are almost thirty million children who benefit from the national school lunch program the majority of the children that Assad's programs are low income in the positive. Y in some people may be wondering why we still have these programs around and the reason we have around is because it they had a positive impact our on our school age children. First and foremost they have reduced food insecurity rates among these children over voicing positive impact on their academics children. All these programs have better attention. Their behavior is better. Academic performance is better than children. Who are the same income but not receiving these these meals so we still have. We advocate for these programs because it helps children not only received the nutrition that they need but it helps them with their academic performance and then hopefully graduate in break the cycle old hardy so that brings us to our current situation as we speak at we're in the middle of a pandemic In our micro situation that we're in the middle of a tiny room under the stairs in my small apartment in an urban setting where there is a non food insecure child who you may be able to hear in the background. We apologize for that but I think you know. My situation draws a contrast the perils of having to work from home and be creative about how you work when you have a young child at home is one thing and that's been a very public conversation that we need to have this one that we're having right now as well. What does it actually mean? When you take away structure that is you know not just caring for children during the day so the parents can work but as you just said feeding them you know. What is the impact of the outbreak having on food insecurity in the US? Obviously this just happened. So I know you don't have like immediate research. Can you can tell us a little bit more from what you know about what this is going to mean for. Food insecure families. Yes so Clearly with tools hosing that means that a school issue. Jim will not have access to food that they regularly get than schools are open but we do know a little bit from Research over the summer. So we know that insecurity rates usually increase over the summer When students don't have access to these regular meals currently school districts with the help of nonprofit organizations in advocacy groups are setting up locations where families can go in pick up meals Similar through a drive through children's presence or for the meal to be provided. I know locally Houston Food. Bank is preparing disaster boxes of what these are. Our boxes filled with food. That can then be picked up sue locally at agencies the Houston area in the most recent as in like last night. Is that the families. I run a virus response. Act was passed on. It's been passed the Senate and the House expected that the bill will go into law soon when president trump sign it and the good news about this act is that it does provide assistance in the area child. Nutrition were children but it also is going to provide a pandemic ABT act. Which is An emergency anti-hunger programme for families during this pandemic so is going to be similar from what I can tell is. GonNa be Sandler. Set up to the Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program or snap or what we call the food stamp program but it can be urgency a for families journey during this endemic. So I do applaud. You know all the Senators House. Presentative saw the congressman. That really thought about this through in and you know families I in in need of eating eating families during this during this difficult

Houston Food National School Lunch Program Dr Hernandez Lack Of Concentration Supplementary Nutrition Assist Obesity Diabetes Houston United States C Stanley Sandler Presentative Depression Senate Congressman Assad JIM
"assad" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"assad" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Live side. Assad. Everything shades. Sidra? Lost. Source. Hey. Saw. Rich. Saw. Never tried. It. I'm sorry. Channel..

Sidra Assad
"assad" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"assad" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Mantra sheba. South Assad shop, but. Bye. Soda. Gallery. Herself..

Assad
"assad" Discussed on Intersections

Intersections

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"assad" Discussed on Intersections

"Like the imf and the world bank you both in two different papers that you both ever in most recommendations were on this go local go slow approach can you talk a little bit about some of your specific recommendations for the places where it's appropriate to start certain reconstruction efforts talk about what those projects with look like talk a little more about that go local that you've just started talking about tamara i'll start an i know steve will have a lot to san this as well i think that in the paper that i wrote with brian reeves up premise there was that we were talking about areas that were not under the direct control of the assad regime and so the primary concern there was look assad or no assad this is a society that has been at war with itself and there are a whole sets of divisions amongst and between communities that have been reflected in the fighting reflected in population displacement and so as outsiders come in and provide reconstruction assistance there are ways in which they might provide that assistance that could exacerbate those social conflicts rather than help to melia them and so brian and i were really trying in that paper to provide some guidelines that would mitigate that risk and to focus in on helping donors understand the existing power relationships that are reflected on the ground that they might either reinforce or soften with their reconstruction assistance and also to look at specific ways in which international donors can invest in community reconciliation so one example i think that flows very much out of the experience in iraq is where you have an ethnic or sectarian division within a community and you've had a lot of population displacement from one ethnicity or sect it's important to recognize that you know you might do reconstruct.

imf steve brian reeves assad iraq
"assad" Discussed on Congratulations with Chris D'Elia

Congratulations with Chris D'Elia

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"assad" Discussed on Congratulations with Chris D'Elia

"Like with baby looks like he's gonna fuck your girl i mean you're a fucking baby who you neo god damn man just you know what shout out to people who keep it fucking real and just do what they do without any flash we're just just living their lives nobody's trying to exploit anybody exploit anything shut out to the hard work man and woman shout out to the hardworking men and women that are just doing their thing not thoughts on fucking instagram they're not dudes trying to flex on you shout out to those people for real because i know a lot of you guys are listening shout out to you guys you keep our country moving man god baby assad look this executive producer assad cal go fuck yourself counting money who started that rapper talking on the phone with the fucking money who who started that on believable i don't know should we do an elder i should yeah this is that yeah okay good all right you know what i'm going to announce the elder this is good i've been wanting to do this guy for for the past week because of what he did here we go congrats buddy congratulations you are the new elder his name is matthew heath aka sa matthew which i love is name matthew for the reason why he is an elder is because he made this this killer youtube video which we shared on twitter atoz of congratulations and it's really funny because it shows i didn't even know what's he going he'll he'll take like a he'll go a and then i'll say like and then cut to me saying whatever the fucking eighth thing i said was.

assad executive producer matthew heath youtube twitter
"assad" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"assad" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The service of asset alone on the long drive from damascus to aleppo the graffiti spelt it out al assad lillard assad for eternity an assad were ahead said and no one else and surrey hora an assad were bus syria freedom asset and that's it the merchandising is also in full swing by shaw mugs bush and putin photos on sale in hotel lobbies cabela's simp for iranian visitors a society is being broken bit by bit for now assad is rewriting history with putin's help to cover up the original cause of the damage everything is laid at the door of the terrorists on the drive back from aleppo we stopped at adra maderas one of the many reception centres housing refugees displaced from the huta after the russian lead saran army offensive just over a month ago this one holds about five thousand and they are being held like animals it was the first taste of reality on the trip roy humanity without filters deeply affecting for everyone as we stepped inside pretty children were pushed forward and men behind them started to talk about their escape from the terrorists but surprisingly the arabic speakers among us we're able to slip off into the crowds a woman invited me to her home leading me through a maze of small curtains spaces each one for a family to her own small space with nothing but a thin mattress plastic sheet on the floor and the gaping hole in the concrete roof about fifteen moreland soon squeezed into the tiny space desperate to tell me their stories they offered me water from ten cup since they had nothing else no facilities to cook or make tea it emerged hygiene facilities are horrific.

damascus al assad lillard assad putin aleppo adra maderas syria bush moreland ten cup
"assad" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"assad" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"He was in the german military and they were guest by it was the french and and he was wounded by that that's that's it was the disability at earned him the aaron cross and got him out of the army yet so the idea is i don't know maybe just in a lot of society as a whole the fact that this particular you know field of weaponry troubled him on so viscerally that and then turning around and seeing you know presumably one of the greatest monsters of human history is so freaked out by on the other hand he wasn't he wasn't at all rachel freaked out about using gas against his own people against i'd say yeah not certainly not in concentration camps or anything but in the field about i don't know if that if just seeing like okay if something troubles this monster this way it must be more like immeasurably more terrifying than alternatives i don't know i'm just making a lot like extrapolating a lot but i'm wondering i don't know in your opinion what i don't know what sense it could be too that any kind of how our our current perception might might take on the serious situation is is pretty straightforward you have there and and this is an my sadness about this whole thing is that americans don't understand how complex this is that first of all assad is a criminal i mean he's a he has you know even if even if he didn't commit any of those fifty plus gas attacks against his own people that he's been accused of non numerous ones welldocumented even if he didn't do any of them he's still has killed hundreds of thousands of his own people through conventional weapons and through his torture regimes george w bush employed bishara law saad to torture people during after nine eleven you know if we wanted people if we wanted information extracted from them we sent them to turkey if we simply wanted them tortured to death we sent them to syria and the cia was all over this so assad we've known for a long time assad is is a brutal killer who has no business running a country i am not supporting the kinky line which tries to excuse him from that let let me just finish this point i'd love to get your take on it particularly calling from ukraine but but on the other hand we have to acknowledge the fact that just.

rachel assad saad syria cia ukraine aaron george w bush
"assad" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

Last Podcast on the Left

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"assad" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

"People died else was just want to current events what assad assad older brother was supposed to be in syria but he died in the sod was just an optometrist and he's like now i have to lead it doesn't make him good no absolute killing his own people absolutely ignorance turns at some point at some point just being like i'm bad at your job like when when it sell stakes do the punishments are also high stakes if you can't figure out how to run your shit this is opposed to be some this the you have to be very capable to run something complex like it's an autocracy that's matched with a citizen government that also has a whole branch of the church that's also involve and you're fighting a revolution within your own country and wars against multiple people that are outgunning you like debt would take a genius into just just to keep it together into emotionally sympathetic i have stressed dreams we run a podcast so i can't i will butuan just this show really had to get on medication so i can handle it so yes i understand very difficult positions that they were in yeah very difficult i it's it's a lot more complicated than just they deserved it oh of course yeah i mean of course people who did it were horrible lennon installing mean they were also just and then you get into the whole line of just following orders date or know what to do there's a whole level of blame is very difficult and context of international i guess.

syria lennon assad assad
"assad" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"assad" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Eleven yeah i mean when i grew up the taliban i knew about them you know in the nineties growing up we we taken care of several refugees trying to escape taliban but they're largely on the other side of the border and that obviously changed after nine eleven so definitely things got a lot more dangerous security had to be up upgraded everywhere in where where it didn't you know they felt it when i was in of course that started culminating into attacks on westerners you know there was a there was a church that some of my friends went to that grown up within in gilgit in a it was in assad and the church was in so my friends mcgill friends with their and guys just came into start throwing grenades down the aisles of the church ship yeah and like just stuff like that there's a couple a couple more attacks and then my school it was my second week of so i don to a boarding school i mean so i went to kind of to a home school starting off and it was kind of home school my parents didn't teach there there was like seven kids up in gilgit in seven to nine depending on the year all different ages in the parents take turns you know or like that we'd have volunteers in teach but once you start hitting six seventh eighth grade it's like okay we need to send them to some like an actual institution you know real school basically so a lot of people went to british boarding school in murray it was called as our away from a from some of which was assan was thirteen hour drive from my house in gilgit but a one hour flight because you're going through the mountains like going through the himalayas like hairpin turn after been turned but anyway so i went to british boarding school and some guys came in to the school and shot up the school and killed six people that was my second week of eighth grade.

taliban gilgit assad murray himalayas british boarding school thirteen hour one hour
"assad" Discussed on Part of the Problem

Part of the Problem

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"assad" Discussed on Part of the Problem

"It's the old kind of like messaien human action deduction that you can make right like you it's like if someone was trying to convince you that life is way better and people are way happier in in mexico the may are in the united states of america that'd be a kind of tough sell right because people are flooding out of mexico into america and not vice versa so you can kind of deduce by the action that people are taking that they they prefer this choice over that one and it doesn't mean that either choices perfect it's a doesn't mean that there aren't bad things on both sides but it's far from the case that assad is is responsible for this entire civil war in fact it's quite likely to believe that if we had never gotten involved none of this would have happened to begin with and so you know it it's a whole mess over there but there's really no question that if if we hadn't overthrown saddam hussein if we hadn't tilted the balance of power toward the shiites in the first place and then decided that we had tilt the balance back and then decided that we had to arm up anybody who is fighting against assad you know there's there's really no way to see isis rising to begin with we're the ones who drew a al qaeda in iraq into iraq where we're the ones who who you know us the us in our allies are the ones who armed them when they became isis and so you know this is there's really no way to imagine the scenario getting this bad and so these these hundreds of thousands of people who are dead in syria you know what the media doesn't wanna tell you when they're condemning assad is that actually us foreign policy is pretty directly responsible as pretty directly responsible and and again it's just it's it's really hard for me to stomach when a see all these journalists who are like so outraged by the hundreds of thousands of people dead in in syria who had who basically were supporters of the war in iraq and also have nothing to say in yemen.

mexico united states america assad saddam hussein syria iraq yemen
"assad" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"assad" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Lama long good good all he is so on us assad the hello man salle him law hello john their way john oh long.

john assad
"assad" Discussed on PURE ROCK RADIO Originals

PURE ROCK RADIO Originals

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"assad" Discussed on PURE ROCK RADIO Originals

"Assad and good map puff fit all all new the.

Assad
"assad" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"assad" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"And he's sitting in front of some steps and behind him you can see that there's assad house back there like a literal for can sought house i remember asking my grandma one us at one time when we were over their houses and w you know who is that in the picture she says that your grandpa as i when i was a kid i didn't really realize what i think about it now and i look at that and i say my freaking rep a multimillionaire my grandfather started his life in assad freaking house let that sink in for a little bit think about where you are in the opportunities that you have had in your life we don't we don't get rich we don't winner attain wealth or happiness because somebody gives it to us we we get it because we earn it because we realise and accept the fact that if we want to be successful in this world we have to take some positive action and unfortunately when i see things like affordable housing i instantly know how to translate that when they talk on the government talks about a four year ford will housing what are they really talking about well it's either shoddy it's either chunk which the government is fond of putting up ord subsidized which means is not really affordable it's just the you are paying the bill for someone else to live in that house because of the you know the financial commitment that the government makes to subsidising the housing to make it quote unquote affordable.

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"assad" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"assad" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"The china pick lowers pain greener the nutrition shoes does the virtue ladies jio although of the native look of eleven it's been a little baid sucking money needed him again john mccoll about killing kilani pay which assad two the me didn't attend a tenth of the lead through which are the eleven novels the no way the colorful mccain level a commercial loud the competition is woman little blumenthal of the new the one thing i need a sound a warning does he played over they took him money needed it's official the jamaa call but kill any pay too oh tom izzo on that in the black mention that the faulted the year let the band in guatemala the and a brand new gear now she had the grocery shop again gene the rape the girl gill as winning his budget unabashedly close god we'd operate beloved his god also wednesday natives in appease when iraqi deeming of 11 name good skinny basins edgy leinna widowed me one element vein these are the money needed here nady it's a shame shame assad and again oh james mitchell magog argue many girl two yes two.

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"assad" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"assad" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Mm no one darrelle revis ars assad yeah bush was was written throwing on mexican vicks here's everything over three topthree wanted it upi mexican end up a hand and say asia is the full hour 106 number of off instead he uses his grow once they go macadamia jim nicholson listening well we can make them go wondering if assistant the flow no group has got the baby waiting illegal no responded it'll be the same some in the brain the uk but we villa sustain if that of the places villainous makes you two buying up the first the bracelet chris onto the case it naked the thing about this and his death so the la in his look southern israel she i need that china great is here sixers christmas saturday december six another the the rapper may soon sure don't whatever showers guy does his loss of joys as much as your new what does.

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"assad" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"assad" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"The north's no so hairs two two his fallen insane sad the assad should she's bravest japan shares in reigning no so and bernie danny manning soon i do say i wish you but japan shares that yes the bucks shares really yeah from knows so.

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