18 Burst results for "Asperger's Syndrome"

Dogecoin Tumbles After Elon Musk Calls It a 'Hustle' on SNL

WJR Programming

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Dogecoin Tumbles After Elon Musk Calls It a 'Hustle' on SNL

"Crypto currency. Dodge Coin drops sharply after Elon Musk joked about it. In his debut on NBC's Saturday Night Live. It's an unstoppable financial vehicle is going to take over the world. I get that, But what is it, man? I keep telling you, it's a Cryptocurrency. You can trade for conventional money. Oh, so the hustle Yes. Also 49 year old multi billionaire also unexpectedly revealed an Asperger's syndrome diagnosis. I'm

Elon Musk Saturday Night Live Dodge NBC Asperger's Syndrome
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:03 min | 11 months ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Glad you're with us. Several recent events have placed more public scrutiny on how police respond to emergency calls about people with mental illness. Yesterday we took a look at Daniel Prudes case. A black man killed by police in March while suffering a psychotic episode in Rochester, New York, Protests broke out in Rochester last week after body camera footage was released showing police holding a hood over proves head To prevent him from spitting, who died a week later from asphyxiation. In an update to that story, the entire police command, including the chief have resigned. And in Salt Lake City last Friday, 13 year old Linden Cameron, who lives with Asperger syndrome, with suffering a mental breakdown when his mother called 901 for help. Police responded to the call and shot him multiple times in his home. He's now in serious condition. These cases are continuing to spotlight police interactions with people who have mental illness, According to the treatment advocacy center. A person with severe mental illness is 16 times more likely to be killed in an encounter with police. With me is Alisa Rock, a mental health reporter at American Public Media and the author of the book Insane America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness. Lisa, Welcome to the takeaway. Thank you. We hear terms like psychotic or mental breakdown to describe people. Including Daniel proved and Linda Camera, and these terms tend to sound pretty alarming. What is an episode like that typically look like it can present in a variety of ways. Often, the person will be hearing voices that nobody else can hear. They'll be having hallucinations, so seeing things that weren't actually there, and for the person who is experiencing this, it could be a really frightening moment. On DH, So what will often see is the person shouting or lashing out or running away? But they're running from things that they alone are seeing. It's not. It's not real threats, and that can come across To the police to other people. As this person is acting threatening, this person is presenting a danger to me when in fact that person is just frightened and trying to protect him or herself. In many of these cases, and this is just an ongoing problem. You have men and women with guns who show up and who, as you just explain, don't necessarily know how to deal with these situations. Why is this the norm in so many American cities? It starts with the problem that we have nobody else to respond to a mental health crisis. So if heaven forbid, my house is on fire, I know to call the fire department. If my neighbors having a heart attack, I know to call the ambulance service. But if a person is having a mental health crisis very, very often, it's the police who respond and the police have been called on for. It's been decades now that the police have been called on to respond to mental health crisis, But for the most part, police have very little training in how to deal with this. Police are instead trained. To respond as if this is a public safety emergency and respond accordingly. Are there other options for them? Besides calling the police or what should the options be? Instead of calling the police in a better world? You know it's interesting because this is a place where the people who say we should defund the police and the people who say we absolutely should not be from the police really come together and say police officers should not be the ones responding to a mental health crisis. It should Not be a police officer who's trying to talk somebody down, if if they're if they're threatening to hurt themselves. It should not be a police officer who comes when a mother calls because her 13 year old son is having a mental health crisis and runs off. There are various approaches, The different departments have taken different cities have taken so. In some cases Now we're starting to see police officers being trained. How do you respond? How do you deescalate the situation? How do you talk somebody down from this this moment and convince them Tio, whether it's dropped the weapon or go to the hospital. We're seeing police departments that have teamed up with him into health professionals. So The person you call 911 because your loved one is having a crisis and a social worker and a police officer may be dispatched in a few places were actually seeing just a mental health professional being dispatched, But it's in many, many cases. We were just saying the police respond and they shouldn't be. As you mentioned earlier person with severe mental illness, 16 times more likely to be killed in an encounter with police, You know, there's no breakdown there in terms of race. Presumably, this is even worse for people who are black, who also are dealing with mental mental illness. Correct. Absolutely. We know that black people on black men in particular are much more likely to be shot by the police. And the flip side of that is that a police encounter a white person having a mental health crisis. They're much more likely to see that as a mental health crisis and that this person is in need of help, rather than this person is a threat. And so absolutely it is. It is much more likely that we see you know, roughly one in five fatal police shootings involve a person with mental illness that said. I've seen many, many fatal police shootings of of both white people and black people, and I think that the problem is that people with mental illness are being seen as a threat by the police. And again that police are being called in to respond to a situation that they're that they're not prepared for that They're not trained to dio. I've seen figures from the past, saying that Cook County Correctional Facility, Rikers Island thes these jails. Tend to be some of the biggest mental health facilities in America. Is that correct? It is true that they are among the largest providers of psychiatric care in this country. People with mental illnesses are much more likely to end up in the criminal justice system. They're much more They're much less likely to make bail. And those who do make bail are much more likely to sit for a longer time in jail while they're waiting, Tio To come up with the money, so that means that you have many more people who are sitting in the jails with mental illness On the prison side. They're much more likely to get sentenced so much less likely to get a plea bargain. They're much more likely to get a longer sentence, and they're much less likely to make parole or good time or all of the things that could get him out sooner. All right. We will be right back with more on the police shooting of people with.

officer Daniel Prudes Rochester Asperger syndrome Salt Lake City Linden Cameron American Public Media New York Lisa Rikers Island Alisa Rock Cook County Correctional Facil reporter America Linda Camera
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:46 min | 11 months ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Glad you're with us. Several recent events have placed more public scrutiny on how police respond to emergency calls about people with mental illness. Yesterday we took a look at Daniel Prudes case. A black man killed by police in March while suffering a psychotic episode in Rochester, New York, Protests broke out in Rochester last week after body camera footage was released showing police holding a hood over proves head To prevent him from spitting, who died a week later from asphyxiation. In an update to that story, the entire police command, including the chief have reside. And in Salt Lake City last Friday, 13 year old Linden Cameron, who lives with Asperger syndrome, was suffering a mental breakdown when his mother called 911 for help. Police responded to the call and shot him multiple times in his home. He's now in serious condition. These cases are continuing to spotlight police interactions with people who have mental illness, according to treatment advocacy center. A person with severe mental illness is 16 times more likely to be killed in an encounter with police. With me is Alisa Rock, a mental health reporter at American Public Media and the author of the book Insane America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness. Lisa, Welcome to the takeaway. Thank you. We hear terms like psychotic or mental breakdown to describe people, including Daniel Prude and Linden Camera. And these terms tend to sound pretty alarming. What is an episode like that typically look like it can present in AA a variety of ways. Often the person will be hearing voices that nobody else can hear. They'll be having hallucinations, so seeing things that weren't actually there, and for the person who is experiencing this, it could be a really frightening moment. Um And so what will often see is the person shouting or lashing out or running away? But they're running from things that they alone are seeing. It's not. It's not real threats, and that can come across To the police to other people. As this person is acting threatening, this person is presenting in danger to me when in fact that person is just frightened and trying to protect him or herself. In many of these cases, and this is just an ongoing problem. You have men and women with guns who show up and who, as you just explained, don't necessarily know how to deal with these situations. Why is this the norm in so many American cities? It starts with the problem that we have nobody else to respond to a mental health crisis. So if heaven forbid, my house is on fire, I know to call the fire department. If my neighbors having a heart attack, I know to call the ambulance service. But if a person is having a mental health crisis very, very often, it's the police who respond and the police have been called on for. It's been decades now that the police have been called on to respond to mental health crisis, But for the most part, police have very little training. In how to deal with this. Police are instead trained to respond as if this is ah public safety emergency and and respond accordingly. Are there other options for them? Besides calling the police or what? What should the options be? Instead of calling the police in a better world? You know it's interesting because this is a place where the people who say we should defund the police and the people who say we absolutely should not be fun. The police really come together and say police officers should not be the ones responding to a mental health crisis. It should not be a police officer whose Trying to talk somebody down, if if they're if they're threatening to hurt themselves, it should not be a police officer who comes when ah mother calls because her 13 year old son is having a mental health crisis and runs off. There are various approaches. The different departments have taken different cities have taken so in some cases Now we're starting to see police officers being trained. How do you respond? How do you deescalate the situation? How do you talk somebody down from this? This moment and convince them Tio whether it's dropped the weapon or go to the hospital. We're seeing police department that have teamed up with a mental health professionals. So the person You call 911 because your loved one is having a crisis and a social worker and a police officer may be dispatched in a few places were actually seeing just a mental health professional being dispatched, But it's in many, many cases. We were just saying that the police respond and they shouldn't be. As you mentioned earlier. Ah, person with severe mental illness is 16 times more likely to be killed in an encounter with police. You know, there's no breakdown there in terms of race. Presumably, this is even worse for people who are black, who also are dealing with mental mental illness. Correct. Absolutely. We know that black people on black men in particular are much more likely to be shot by the police. And the flip side of that is that a police encounter a white person. Having a mental health crisis. They're much more likely to see that as a mental health crisis and that this person is in need of help, rather than this person is a threat, and so absolutely it is. It is. Much more likely that we see you know, roughly one in five fatal police shootings involve a person with mental illness that said. I've seen many, many fatal police shootings of Of both white people and black people..

officer Rochester Linden Cameron Daniel Prudes Asperger syndrome Salt Lake City Linden Camera American Public Media Daniel Prude New York Alisa Rock Lisa reporter
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KCRW

"Would explain to me the sometimes customers didn't see things the same way I and I told them about billion sort of lonely and isolated and I always felt like I was on the outside looking in and after a few years of these conversations that comes in one day and he says to me John I've been thinking about this and I thought about it for a long time because in the therapy world we got the saying that therapist shouldn't diagnose their friends are pretty soon they won't have any left but there's this thing everyone's talking about the mental health community this is in the nineteen nineties and he says you are the poster boy for and I thought for a long time about telling you because you're successful guy but you've told me about billion lonely and and all and it's this thing called Asperger syndrome and it's a form of autism and I was watched on I had no idea I had no idea what autism laws and it took this book he gave me and I looked in it and it was like people ask burgers can't look other people in the eye all my life people said that two million people with Asperger's can't read body language and they get too close to people in Scherman they turn away when they're talking and people think were rude and people ask burgers we say inappropriate things because we don't have any filters in our heads and and even if we are right about whether the customers are experts people don't like to hear that and and you know I read the book in his and I thought to myself arm by god teach myself to act different I'm gonna make myself normal well of course today the disability community will say things like that but this was a different time and got IBM so I resolve to teach myself I was told to teach myself and you know the difference was like magic I begin to have friends and to be invited places and I started speaking out because I knew that there were millions of young people growing up had crummy childhoods just like me because people told us we were losers and recharge and morons and all the other ugly things people said to me and when I started speaking out people began inviting me to speak out more people began asking me if I wanted to get involved in research so some folks from Harvard Medical School right here in town came to me and they said we'd be interested in your artistic perspective in a study that we want to do to use a new tool to see if we can help autistic people read emotions and other people they were just sort of looking for me to endorse it when I heard that and I thought boy that's the thing that's been wrong with me all my life course they didn't know that and I said where do I sign up and let me into the lab and they sat me down in front of a computer and they said we're gonna show you these faces on the screen and you just have to push the buttons were the happier they said out of the jealous or angry and faces flashed in front of me and I had absolutely no idea what I was saying and I thought hi flaunted before we even started and they said no not at all what we're gonna do is we're gonna stimulate you with this this machine it was a thing called TMS we're gonna fire pulses electromagnetic energy and your head with this and and afterwards we're going to test you again we're gonna see if the responses change ever sat me in a chair the fired this TMS into my head for half an hour and and my brain was just kind of a neutral the whole time and then it stopped it's like come on we gotta get you and we're going to test your before wears off and so I go overnight sit down and they show me the faces again that's exactly the same I got no idea what I'm saying and I thought what kind of a crazy fool side of Frank I could I could go to a hospital in these mad scientists could do something to me and it would change route was you know Beth Israel hospital of Harvard Medical School and really good mad scientist but even still so again my car drive home and and driving home I always would listen to old music and I put on this recording of tomorrow are some of you might remember Saturday night fever is huge movie back in the seventies and to walrus son more than a woman and number the other songs on that but before they sang in that movie the saying in clubs right here in Boston because they were guys from new Bedford and and played a recording of them and you know it was like I was back in nineteen seventy seven again it was like all the years just fell away and and it was so real it was like I could smell of cigarette smoke right there in my car and and you know all the years I engineered rock and roll people told me I did such a great job of delivering beautiful music and I could never feel and it didn't make any difference to me what we played and that night as that music played I could feel it these were love songs that were storage written for real people an and I could feel it for the first time and I got home and it made me cry and it didn't make me cry because you know do what did make me sad to make me happy it just was like overwhelming and I wrote to the scientists Russia has some powerful Mocho you've got membership and you know it really was like a dream come true I thought I could use I can see it I could feel emotions in people I thought it's gonna be magical it's going to be beauty and sweetness and light Washington it was it was fear anger and jealousy and all about emotions that fill the world and I thought well hell should not have known they say the news is nothing but bad news and that's what life is and and yet the final I had wanted had come true and and as a learned to live with with be indifferent and and this was this happened all to me eight years ago as a learned about that are realized that it was being different it was beyond that freak that didn't have any friends but could talk to guitar amplifiers that was the thing that made me special in the world and I always thought what I want most of all is to be normal but but my wish to be normal it was just like a crazy fantasy it was like I want to be like everyone else and and of course in that way this for a one way the one thing in my life that made me successful and it was really that was the thing I learned from my time with those scientists was that people like me or complete functional humans we are not broken versions of someone else's normal somewhere.

eight years one day
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Would explain to me the sometimes customers didn't see things the same way I do and I told them about billion sore lonely and isolated not always felt like I was on the outside looking in and after a few years of these conversations are comes in one day and he says to me John I've been thinking about this and I thought about it for a long time because in the therapy world we got the saying that therapist shouldn't diagnose their friends are pretty soon they won't have any left but there's this thing everyone's talking about the mental health community this is in the nineteen nineties and he says you are the poster boy for and I thought for a long time about telling you because you're successful guy but you have told me about billion lonely and and all and it's this thing called Asperger syndrome and it's a form of autism and I was like stone I had no idea I have no idea what autism laws and a trip this book he gave me and I looked in it and it was like people with Asperger's can't look other people in the eye all my wife people said that two million people with Asperger's can't read body language and they get too close to people on scared when they turn away when they're talking and people think were rude and people ask burgers we say inappropriate things because we don't have any filters on our heads and and even if we are right about whether the customers are actually people don't like to hear that and and you know I read the book in his and I thought to myself on my god teach myself to act different I'm gonna make myself normal well of course today the disability community will say things like that but this was a different time and got IBM so I resolve to teach myself I was told to teach myself and you know the difference was like magic I begin to have friends and to be invited places and I started speaking out because I knew that there were millions of young people growing up who had crummy childhoods just like me because people told us we were losers and recharge them morons and all the other ugly things people said to me and when I started speaking out people began inviting me to speak out more people began asking me if I wanted to get involved in research so some folks from Harvard Medical School right here in town came to me and they said we'd be interested in your artistic perspective in a study that we want to do use a new tool to see if we can help autistic people read emotions and other people they were just sort of looking for me to endorse it when I heard that and I thought boy that's the thing that's been wrong with me all my life course they didn't know that and I said where do I sign up and let me enter the lab and they sat me down in front of a computer and they said we're gonna show you these faces on the screen and you just have to push the buttons were happy or sad or jealous or angry and faces flashed in front of me and I have absolutely no idea what I was and I thought hi flaunted before we even started and they said no not at all what we're gonna do is we're gonna stimulate you with this this machine it was a fine call TMS we're gonna fire pulses of electromagnetic energy and your head with this and and afterwards we're going to test you again we're gonna see if the responses change ever sat in a chair in the fire does TMS into my head for half an hour and and my brain was just kind of a neutral the whole time and then it stopped and it's like come on we gotta get you and we're going to test your before wears off and so on overnight sit down and they show me the faces again that's exactly the same I got no idea what I'm saying and I thought what kind of a crazy fool side of Frank I could I could go to a hospital in these mad scientists could do something to me and it would change route was you know Beth Israel hospital of Harvard Medical School and really good mad scientist but even still so I get my car the drive home and and driving home I always would listen to old music and I put on this recording of tomorrow are some of you might remember Saturday night fever is huge movie back in the seventies and to Lawrence son more than a woman and number the other songs on that but before they sang in that movie I sang in clubs right here in Boston because there were guys from new Bedford and played a recording of them and you know it was like I was back in nineteen seventy seven again it was like all the years just fell away and and it was so real it was like I could smell of cigarette smoke right there in my car and and you know all the years I engineered rock and roll people told me I did such a great job of delivering beautiful music and I could never feel and it didn't make any difference to me what we played and that night as that music played I could feel it these were love songs that were storage written for real people and I could feel it for the first time and I got home and it made me cry and it didn't make me cry because you don't do what did make me sad to make me happy it just was like overwhelming and I wrote to the scientists Russia some powerful Mocho you're not have machine and you know it really was like a dream come true I thought I because I can see and I could feel emotions in people it's going to be magical it's going to be beauty and sweetness and light Washington it was it was fear anger and jealousy and all about emotions that fill the world and I thought well hell should not have known they say the news is nothing but bad news and that's what life is and and yet the fact that I had wanted had come true and and as a learned to live which would be in different and and this was this happened all to me eight years ago as a learned about that are realized that it was being different it was beyond that freak that didn't have any friends but could talk to guitar amplifiers that was the thing that made me special in the world and I always thought what I want most of all was to be normal but but my wish to be normal it was just like a crazy fantasy it was like I want to be like everyone else and and of course being that way this for a one way the one thing in my life that made me successful and it was really that was the thing I learned from my time with those scientists was that people like me our complete functional humans we are not broken versions of someone else is normal okay.

eight years one day
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KCRW

"Tell us the story the way you would to a friend over dinner. Hi, my name's Gary Weinstein. I live in Greenwich, Connecticut, my wife and I have three daughters. Our middle daughter. Kate is has Asperger's syndrome. She has difficulty with social interactions at impulsivity and. We have been determined to get her a driver's license. A big challenge for some of the problems that she has we gave her extremely teaching many many extra hours and signed her up for her road test for the road test. I said to her Kate is that you act normal. You really have to work on acting normal. The instructor is going to see you for a very short amount of time. And I don't want them to prejudge you. And she said to me dad, stop yelling at me look at the dog cowering in the side of the room. I can take it. But the dog can't the appointed day came, and we waited for her to be called they called her name. She jumped up from her seat and immediately laid down on the floor. I said quick get up the instructors coming over. What are you doing? She said, oh, my back fruits and the doctor said to lie down when my back hurts. I get up now you've got to have normal. She leaves twenty minutes comes back with a big smile on her face. I asked what happened? She said. Wait need structure will. Tell you instructor said Cape did great she passed. So I grabbed her in the middle of the motor vehicle bureau, and I held her in a waltz like position, and.

Kate instructor Gary Weinstein impulsivity Greenwich Connecticut Asperger's syndrome Cape twenty minutes
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Be yourself. Tell us the story the way you would to a friend over dinner. Hi, my name's Gary Weinstein. I live in Greenwich, Connecticut, my wife and I have three daughters. Our middle daughter. Kate is has Asperger's syndrome. She has difficulty with social interactions and impulsivity and. We have been determined to get her driver's license. A big challenge for some of the problems that she has we gave her extremely what of teaching many many extra hours and signed her up for her road test for the road test. I said to her Kate is imperative that you act normal you really have to work on acting normal. The instructor is going to see you for a very short amount of time. And I don't want them to prejudge you. And she said to me dad, stop yelling at me look at the dog cowering in the side of the room. I can take it. But the dog can't the appointed day came, and we waited for her to be called they called her name. She jumped up from her seat and immediately laid down on the floor. I said quick get the instructors coming over. What are you doing? She said, oh, my back hurts and the doctor said to lie down when my backwards. I said get up now, you gotta have normal. She leaves twenty minutes comes back with a big smile on her face. I asked what happened? She said. Wait need structure will. Tell you the instructor said Kate that great she passed. So I grabbed her in the middle of the motor vehicle bureau, and I held her in a waltz like position, and I danced.

Kate instructor Gary Weinstein impulsivity Asperger's syndrome Greenwich Connecticut twenty minutes
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Advice is not to worry about writing out a perfectly polished piece to read. But rather just tell us the highlights the details that make the story unique to you if it's funny. Tell us the craziest moments if it's more intense. Tell us the biggest challenge and don't forget to tell us how you felt both physically and emotionally. It's the emotion. People relate to we all know what it feels like to have your heart race or your stomach drop. But most importantly, just be yourself. Tell us the story the way you would to a friend over dinner. Hi, my name's Gary Weinstein. I live in Greenwich, Connecticut, my wife and I have three daughters. Our middle daughter. Kate is has Asperger's syndrome. She has difficulty with social interactions and impulsivity, and we have been determined to get her driver's license. A big challenge for some of the problems that she has we gave her extremely what of teaching many many extra hours and signed up for her road test before the road test. I said to her Kate it is imperative that you act normal you really have to work on acting normal. The instructor is going to see you for a very short amount of time. And I don't want them to prejudge you. And she said to me dad, stop yelling at me look at the dog cowering in the side of the room. I can take it. But the dog can't the appointed day came, and we waited for her to be called they called her name. She jumped up from her seat and immediately laid down on the floor. I said quick get up the instructors coming over. What are you doing? She said, oh my. Back hurts and the doctor said to lie down when my backwards. I said get up now, you gotta have normal. She leaves twenty minutes comes back with a big smile on her face. I asked what happened? She said waiting instructor will tell you the instructor said Kate did great she passed. So I grabbed her in the middle of the motor vehicle bureau, and I held her a waltz.

Kate instructor Gary Weinstein impulsivity Greenwich Connecticut Asperger's syndrome twenty minutes
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"When I was about eight years old. I I heard about something called climate change will blow warming. Apparently that was something humans had created by our way of living. I was told to turn off the lights to save energy and to recycle paper to save resources. I remember thinking that it was very strange that humans who are an animal species. Among others could be capable of changing the oath climate. Because if we were if it was really happening. We wouldn't be talking about anything else. As soon as you turn on the TV everything would be about that. Headlines radio newspapers, you would never read or hear about anything else as safely was a World War going on. But no one ever talked about it. If burning fossil fuels were so bad that threaten our very existence. How could we just continue like before? Why were the no restrictions? Why wasn't it made illegal? To me that did not add up. People's to unreal. So when I was eleven I became ill. I fell into depression. I stopped talking an I stopped eating. In two months. I lost about ten kilos of weight. Later on. I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome OCD and selective. Nudism? The basically means I only speak when I think is necessary now with one of those.

OCD eight years two months ten kilos
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"When I was about eight years old. I I heard about something called climate change will blow warming. Apparently that was something humans had created by our way of living. I was told to turn off the lights to save energy and to recycle paper to save resources. I remember thinking that it was very strange that humans who are an animal species. Among others could be capable of changing the oath climate. Because if we were if it was really happening. We wouldn't be talking about anything else. As soon as you turn on the TV everything would be about that. Headlines radio newspapers, you would never read or hear about anything else as safely was a World War going on. But no one ever talked about it. If burning fossil fuels were so bad that threaten our very existence. How could we just continue like before? Why were the no restrictions? Why wasn't it made illegal? To me that did not add up. People's to unreal. So when I was eleven I became ill. I fell into depression. I stopped talking an I stopped eating. In two months. I lost about ten kilos of weight. Later on. I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome OCD and selective. Nudism? The basically means I only speak when I think is necessary now with one of those.

OCD eight years two months ten kilos
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"What did he do with that discovery i believe this is nine thousand nine hundred nineteen one at that now give us asperger's syndrome good evening to you good evening thank you for talking to me lorna wing decided to attach aspects mean to her own research she had been conducting research on children who she felt did not fit into the standard idea of autism developed by leo kanner and she discovered his nineteen forty four thesis which are husband translated for her and recognized in some of his descriptions behaviors she herself had studied her research had been more robust than asperger's research but it's a professional courtesy she decided to name what she was seeing asperger's syndrome he had died the previous year and she saw benefit and to attach his name to her her research there were two faithful aspects to this decision however one was that what she was describing with not what asper in fact had described he developed what he considered a psychopathy he called these children autistic psychopaths and wing decided to cleanse that nazi language from her work and she decided to call it a syndrome so when she presented asper work today speaking world it was cleansed of it nazi context she was she regretted that decision in two thousand fourteen upon a near her death is that correct he absolutely did although she regretted it for a different reason which brings me to the second point which is she really envisaged what we call today an autism spectrum spectrum with her word and aspect had sought the children he were describing where superhuman and fundamentally different from the psychotic children that he considered kanter was describing so he saw two conditions in which she regretted with naming it asper syndrome and implying that there wasn't a spectrum and so at the time of her death she believe we should do away with these subtypes entirely and see chiltern as individuals let us go to the history of hans asper he graduates medical school in march of nineteen thirty one in australia and he almost immediately is hired at a very visionary establishment this is the this is the university of vienna hospital the children's hospital part of it and in that there is a ward or a a series of rooms that are devoted to what is called in translation the curative education department or ward of the university hospital hans house burger is hired with a medical degree by men named franz hamburger who is the who has inherited all of this domain why did hamburger hire aas burger what did he see about him and what did aas burger do with the hiring sure so hamburger team directorship of the university of the nfl children's hospital in nineteen thirty and this marked a departure in the hospital which had been one of the leading pediatric facilities in the world it had been internationally renowned as progressive the cured of education ward was founded during this time in the nineteen teens and twenties as a kind of form of holistic psychology treating what we would call the whole child looking at their family relationships their medical conditions their well being in general it was a very progressive philosophy homberger assumed directorship after a protracted leadership battle and was known as far right wing reactionary he joined the nazi party very early on in was extreme cleanly radical in his right wing views and he began to purge jews and leftists from.

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In a manner that does not violate the code of student conduct under our code of student conduct if there was no intent to harm the other person it doesn't constitute a violation it's free speech that's greg germain law professor at syracuse university we reached at syracuse university for a response to professor germain but we did not hear back in time for this broadcast across the country people have been grappling with how to acknowledge historical moments that are now understood as morally reprehensible recently this is involved emotional debates about statues or names of streets schools and other public buildings and now now that debate has moved into a medical diagnosis asperger's syndrome a form of autism that was named after hans asper a doctor in nazi vienna although he had long been suspected of nazi ties hans asperger's real story was largely unknown until now and that knowledge has sparked a debate over whether the diagnosis should be renamed historian edith scheffer tells a story in her new book as burgers children the origins of autism and nazi vienna and our own michelle martin's spoke with her recently professor scheffer thanks so much for speaking with us thank you so much for having me so first of all please tell us about hans asper or who he was and what his ties were to the nazi party's killing machine will sure hans ass burger was a pediatrician who lived in vienna in the nineteen thirties and forties what's grabbing the headlines in what my book reveals his his involvement in the child euthanasia program which was murdering children considered to be disabled and hans asks burger was not a major figure in this program and that's why his past has not been uncovered until now but he was involved in transferring children to vienna's killing center it spiegelgrund and he can be linked to the deaths of dozens of children there what was his motivation he was up for promotion he worked under an ardent nazi who was the director of the university vienna children's hospital and he was up for assistant associate professor in nineteen forty three and he did prize the what he called the special abilities of children that he diagnosed with autism and he believed that they could be even superior to normal children or typical children i should say at the same time he had a.

professor syracuse university vienna edith scheffer autism michelle martin hans burger director associate professor greg germain professor germain hans asper hans asperger child euthanasia university vienna
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on The Moth

"By the way natasha came to through our pitch line you can do the same thing if you go to our website and the moth dot org and look for tele story it'll give you all the info for how to call us or even recorded two minute pitch of your story right there on the website we have a team of people including me and we listen to every story that comes in and we'd love to hear yours named gary weinstein i live in greenwich connecticut my wife and i have three daughters our middle daughter kate has asperger's syndrome she has difficulty with social interactions and impulsivity and i have been determined to get her driver's license a big challenge for some of the problems that she has we gave her a lot of teaching many many extra hours and signed up for her road test before the road test i said to her kate is imperative that you act normal the instructor has going to see you for a very short amount of time and i don't want them to prejudge you and she said to me dead stop yelling at me look at the dog cowering in the side of the room i can take it but the dog cat the appointed day came and we waited for her to be called they called her name she jumped up from her seat and immediately laid down on the floor i said quick get up the instructors coming over what are you doing she said oh my back hurts and the doctor said to lie down when my backwards i said get up now you gotta act normal she leaves twenty minutes comes back with.

natasha gary weinstein greenwich connecticut kate impulsivity instructor asperger's syndrome twenty minutes two minute
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on Here & Now

"Well he was the first two designate a group of children with distinct symptoms as cystic psychopaths and therefore lay the groundwork for the concept of autism the in the medical field of we have to say that the still still controversial his symptoms really an independent clinical entity or if it should be treated as such leo kenner in baltimore around the same time describe too much more severe form of autism are experts today who claim that they should be kept totally separate concepts but clearly he was one of the first if not the first to tro attention to autism in the property story percents for people with asp burgers could there be an added stigma now that their condition is linked to a nazi collaborator i mean should we be talking about changing the name of the syndrome well as for an additional a paint linked to this i certainly would would hope not i'm sure that for many people this raises very serious questions about about this link about associations but in no way i think people diagnosed if asperger's syndrome should be affected by this directly or in the view of society as for the episode as i mentioned before the question of of its clinical usefulness of the concept is in dispute and as historian i cannot really speak to that but from a historical standpoint i do not think that epa name asperger's syndrome should be purged from history because of his.

leo kenner baltimore asperger's syndrome epa
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Will ordinary people there's probably someone who was a scholar someone who was a poet someone who was a genius someone who was a criminal summit wound up in a madhouse probably an axe murderer probably a brigander a criminal somewhere not too far removed in your ancestry but they're all functional your dna it's an amazing thing to think about is what is it that keeps the average human from going off the rails you look at the news and what does it news focus on the genius no the great composers the new york post all of them are tabloids what you bind becomes polluted it's like a polluted stream it's like a toxic waste dump if you want to simply read these newspapers every day or go online every day to the same new sources what you're doing is dumping toxic waste into your soul and your mind the you understand what i'm saying to you so sometimes you have to step back i saw an article that's a little tricky for you to read without misinterpreting i saw of the new york post this morning and i jumped on it doctor who gave asperger's syndrome it's name was kid killer for hitler i should what and i read the australian doctor from asperger's syndrome is named helped the nazis killed disabled children during world war two according to a study published today hans asper a pediatrician who first identified the syndrome in nineteen forty four made good with.

new york post asperger's syndrome hans asper
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Will ordinary people there's probably someone who was a scholar someone who was a poet someone who was a genius someone who is a criminal summit of wound up in a madhouse probably an axe murderer probably a criminal somewhere not too far removed in your ancestry but they're all functional your dna it's an amazing thing to think about is that what is it that keeps the average human from going off the rails you look at the news and what does the news focus on the genius day and night and that's what you live on our the tabloids the new york post all of them are tabloids what you're buying becomes polluted it's like a polluted stream it's like a toxic waste dump if you wanna simply read these newspapers every day or go online every day so the same news sources what you're doing is dumping toxic waste into your soul and your mind do you understand what i'm saying to you so sometimes you have to step back i saw the article that's a little tricky for you to read without misinterpreting mate i saw in the new york post this morning and i jumped on it doctor who gave asperger's syndrome its name was kid killer for hitler i should what and i read the australian doctor from asperger's syndrome is named helped the nazis killed disabled children during world war two according to a study published today hans asper a pediatrician i identified the syndrome in nineteen forty four.

new york post asperger's syndrome hans asper
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"You cbs can help you body produce or nbc nitric or any oxide of the others naturally you are mistaken by drinking superbeets there only is superbeets no evidence is made of from chemical beets grown weapon to attack exacting duma standards from assad and the nutrients so far no in one the has beets come up are with concentrated it anymore than in a they've way come that up makes them useable with any to the proof body to create that nitric that trump oxide colluded safely with russia and naturally they've come up with if no you proof want to increase your body's that nitric assad oxide himself levels meaning has and military you should believe launched that chemical attack or that there was actually a chemical attack no proof what's so ever it's a gigantic propaganda show from the new world order that wants syria to be struck again and to be taken over and divided up into three or four portions former uk bassett the syria peter ford said possible we're deluded and suckered by chemical weapons allegations democrat senator bob menendez says i wonder if the serious strikes were choreographed and a kabuki show did you hear what i just said people are starting to understand that this whole lie about assad gassing his own people was nothing but a false flag as i first reported this is the savage nation trying to get to the bottom of things and again the phone number's eight five five four hundred seventy two what do you want me to talk about each day to millions of people what are the biggest mass hysteria of our time i saw another article that's a little tricky for you to read without misinterpreting mate but i saw in the new york post this morning and jumped on it doctor who gave asperger's syndrome its name was kid killer for hitler i should what and i read the australian doctor from asperger's syndrome is named helped the nazis killed disabled children during world war two according to a study published today hans asper a pediatrician who first identified the syndrome in nineteen forty four may.

assad russia syria peter ford senator bob menendez new york post cbs nbc asperger's syndrome hans asper
"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"asperger syndrome" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"There is no evidence of chemical weapon attack and duma from assad so far no one has come up with it anymore than they've come up with any proof that that trump colluded with russia they've come up with no proof that assad himself meaning his military launched that chemical attack or that there was actually a chemical attack no proof whatsoever it's a gigantic propaganda show from the new world order that wants syria to be struck again and to be taken over and divided up to three or four portions former uk ambassador to syria peter ford said possible were diluted and suckered by chemical weapons allegations democrat senator bob menendez says i wonder if the serious strikes were choreographed and a kabuki show did you hear what i just said people are starting to understand that this whole lie about assad gassing his own people was nothing but a false flag as i first reported this is the savage nation trying to get to the bottom of things and again the phone number's eight five five four hundred seven two eight two what do you want me to talk about each day to millions of people what are the biggest mass hysteria of our time i saw another article that's a little tricky for you to read without misinterpreting but i sort of the new york post this morning and i jumped on it doctor who gave asperger's syndrome its name was kid killer for hitler i should what and i read the austrian doctor from asperger's syndrome is named helped the nazis killed disabled children during world war two according to a study published today hans asper a pediatrician who first identified the syndrome in nineteen forty four may good with the nazis by reffering referring children to.

russia assad syria peter ford senator bob menendez new york post uk asperger's syndrome hans asper