34 Burst results for "Aspen Institute Institute"

"aspen  institute" Discussed on It's All Journalism

It's All Journalism

04:16 min | 2 months ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on It's All Journalism

"Welcome to its all journalism. Don colico is a producer, writer, and a director whose documentary work has aired on Colorado PBS, and Amazon Prime Video. His current project trusted sources is tackling a subject that's near and dear to the producers of this podcast. The importance of trustworthy news to our society, Don. Welcome to cell journalism. Oh, thanks for having me. So first of all, tell me a little bit about your background. How did you get into video production? How did you become a documentarian? Oh gosh, it's something I've been doing for a long time, not so much in video. I started in the days of audiotape and radio. But I had a career in high-tech marketing, business to business marketing. And I made a career change a few years ago to make films. I went to film school to learn how to do it. The professional way. The issue of misinformation and news came to my attention while I was in film school. So while I was there, I made a documentary called winner take all, which I think you had heard of. As you mentioned, it was broadcast on local PBS streaming on Amazon. And actually now it's expanded to Apple TV plus and two B but there was more misinformation that came up in the run up to the 2016 election. And it just got worse from there. That statement that one of the candidates made that the press was the enemy of the people. That really got my attention. And then in 2019, a report from the night foundation also published by the Aspen institute and with the survey data from Gallup titled crisis and democracy, renewing trust in America. That report came out and they ranked 15 institutions for trust. Newspapers were 11th lowest out of the 15. In terms of trust, TV news was 13th. Can you guess what institution ranked 15th dead last? Probably politician. Congress actually, Congress. So trust is a critical element of in functioning democracies, right? That was actually a statement out of that report. If you have too little, you have political dysfunction. If you have too much trust, you wind up with autocracy. But that was the spark that really put me on this path. Our democracy was at risk. Yeah, and again, this is stuff that we've talked about many times on the podcast.

Don colico Amazon PBS Colorado Don Aspen institute Apple Congress TV news America
The Biden Administration's Political Problem With Oil Production

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:18 min | 5 months ago

The Biden Administration's Political Problem With Oil Production

"Now, Wendy Sherman coming on Fox News Sunday is good. I'm glad that she did. But as you pointed out, she did the 94 deal with North Korea. She did the 2015 JCPOA, former head of anneliese list. She speaks in that kind of Aspen institute, Davos speak, that never makes any sense to me. At the end of that conversation, do you think you're any closer to the modus, the motive that is animating team Biden here? That's a great question. I mean, I tried to ask different things different ways so that the audience could see how there's kind of a confliction here. And I think it's clear, but at some point you have to stop asking the question because the answer coming back is roughly the same. I do think that they politically, on a foreign policy issue, just have a really tough hand to defend. You know, not doing domestic production going after Venezuela, signing this Iran deal in part because of the oil, but also obviously the nuclear part of it. I thought the other scary answer was is the better than 2015 or as good as 2015.

Wendy Sherman Jcpoa Anneliese Aspen Institute Fox News North Korea Biden Venezuela Iran
The 4 Pillars of Gaslighting as Used by the Leftist Misinformation Machine

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 9 months ago

The 4 Pillars of Gaslighting as Used by the Leftist Misinformation Machine

"And misinformation can exist without gaslighting okay Gaslighting What is gaslighting You hear the term a lot but not a lot of hosts explain what it is Gaslighting is a very specific thing Do I still have that movie Someone sent me the movie gaslight is blamed off of a listener It's based off sorry not blame though Sorry it's been a long weekend And I was looking through my creative listener stuff they sent in almost lost my IFB too Then I wouldn't be able to hear Jim That would be a tragedy But gaslighting is this By the way sound familiar We're talking about the media It's number one lying Media does that all the time Second lying often Media does that all the time too Third you have to have all these things Lying confidently confidently And then fourth isolating people from the truth so they never see it Gaslighting is getting people to believe in alternate reality Things that aren't real are real And the only way you can get them to do that based on the movie gaslight is lie lie often lie confidently and isolate them from the truth Now do you see why the leftist misinformation machine And the whole cat lady liberal funded Soros Aspen institute nonsense where they try to silence conservative voices Do you understand why they're so critical to the misinformation gaslighting machine Because we are the truth And if we're allowed to exist gaslighting you need all of those four components you will never get to people to believe that an alternate reality where Kyle rittenhouse is a domestic terrorist white supremacist with a short barreled rifle across state lines and murdered black men That story is factually inaccurate Only idiots believe it Well how do you create idiots Lie them Lie to them often Why confidently And isolate them

Soros Aspen Institute JIM Kyle Rittenhouse
How The Biden Administration Can Tackle America's Longest War

Marketplace

03:38 min | 1 year ago

How The Biden Administration Can Tackle America's Longest War

"Administration is reviewing its options in many areas of foreign policy, including Afghanistan. It is America's longest war and in a deal with the Taliban. Last year, the Trump Administration agreed to withdraw U. S troops by May, but The new administration says the Taliban is not keeping its end of the bargain, hinting that U. S troops will likely stay longer. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports a former U. S government and U. N expert on Afghanistan, Rina Amiri knows that Americans are tired of fighting endless wars. Now we're trying to win the peace. But she says the Trump administration left a complicated hand. Amiri, now with New York University, says the U. S emboldened the Taliban. By negotiating the withdrawal schedule and keeping to it even as violent spite and Afghan peace talks faltered. And now what we have the situation where the Taliban feels very much they have won this war that they're winning this war that the peace agreement is simply a cover for withdrawal for the U. S. The U. S still has 2500 troops in Afghanistan under the deal with the Taliban, they're supposed to be gone a few months from now. But Biden's national security advisor Jake Sullivan, says the administration is taking a hard look at whether the Taliban are meeting their commitments to break ties with terrorists, reduce violence and negotiate in a serious way with the Afghan government. And in that context, we make decisions and now our force posture and our diplomatic strategy going forward. That's welcome news to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. He told the Aspen Institute last week that he expects a U. S team in Kabul soon, and he's gotten good signals from Secretary of State Tony Blinken. A promised me robust diplomacy in the region. Full coordination with us in a focus on ending 40 years of violence, the bidet administration may be promising too much, though Laurel Miller of the International Crisis Group says it's signaling that it wants to keep some US troops in Afghanistan for counterterrorism purposes and wants a peace deal that protects the democratic and human rights gains of the past two decades. Those are all perfectly fine and understandable things to be saying Again in the very first days of the administration, but ultimately you can't have all of the above. Miller says The Biden administration will have to prioritize. There cannot be both a negotiated peace and keeping some troops even a small number in Afghanistan for counterterrorism or any other purposes Because the Taliban won't agree to that there can't be a negotiated peace and No change in the nature of the system of governance and and writes in Afghanistan. U. S officials have long said they would protect women's rights in Afghanistan. Rina Amiri says not following through on that could send the wrong signal to Islamist groups elsewhere, so she thinks the U. S needs to get the diplomacy, right. And she'd like to see a third party, perhaps from the U. N manage the peace process. It will also be more helpful for the U. S. Because right now, everything right on the U. S. You need a manager of this peace process Right now. We do not have a manager. A State Department spokesperson says the U. S will support the Afghan peace process with a quote senior and robust American diplomatic effort. Trump Administration's envoy, Zalmay Khalilzad, remains on the job. Even a secretary Blinken builds out the team. Michele Kelemen. NPR NEWS Washington

U. Taliban Afghanistan Rina Amiri Trump Administration Michele Kelemen Jake Sullivan Afghan Government Ashraf Ghani Tony Blinken Amiri Bidet Administration Laurel Miller New York University NPR Aspen Institute Biden Administration Biden America
Unpacking Biden's Executive Orders Advancing Racial Equity And Tribal Sovereignty

Morning Edition

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Unpacking Biden's Executive Orders Advancing Racial Equity And Tribal Sovereignty

"Faith and morality require. Among the executive orders He's signed since arriving in the Oval Office for are aimed at advancing racial equity and tribal sovereignty. Earlier this week, we spoke with the Brookings Institution's Andre Perry about one of those initiatives. Tackling discriminatory federal housing policies. I do think this is a start. You have to start somewhere you start with HUD and hopefully mo mentum from the public. Can encourage these other areas to make change. We called on three experts to address the other pillars of the Biden plan, reaffirming tribal sovereignty, ending the federal government's use of private prisons and condemning discrimination, bias and hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Ethel Branches. A former attorney general for the Navajo Nation. Paul Butler, is a former prosecutor and author and professor at Georgetown Law and from Citizen University and the Aspen Institute. Eric Liu. I started off by asking. Will these executive orders make a difference? Ethel Branch spoke first. Absolutely. It sends a strong message. Using the language of equity is very hopeful. It's a needed reaffirm INTs to Indian country that this administration's engagement with Indian nations will be very different from the last administration and also signals that some of the things that were under way under the Obama administration will be put back into place. But I think this is just a start. If President Biden really wants to reaffirm tribal sovereignty we need to start talking about Lifting the federal chains essentially that restrict tries from controlling their territory and governing with respect to their people. And Eric Liu, you have written about the experience of Chinese American families. I wonder what you make of this order fighting xenophobia against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. I think President Trump created a frame of permission. That it was okay to be casually racist toward Asian Americans and people of Asian descent. And, as with so much of President Trump's racism he could say, at least on the surface, plausibly. Oh, I didn't mean that that's not meant to be that you're being too sensitive. But I think anybody of actual Asian descent could feel the vibe of disrespect and menace and the form of disrespect comes in this way in particular. Which is You look Asian. I don't really care whether you're Asian, American or Asian from Asia. I'm going to see you as a threat. I'm going to see you as a problem. I'm going to see his escape goat President Biden Simply by changing the tone simply by refusing to speak in that way, makes a big difference. I want to turn to

Eric Liu Andre Perry Mo Mentum Ethel Branches Georgetown Law And From Citize Ethel Branch President Trump Brookings Institution Oval Office President Biden Obama Administration Paul Butler Aspen Institute HUD Biden Federal Government Asia
What Trump Might Do With His Remaining Weeks In Office

The World

05:35 min | 1 year ago

What Trump Might Do With His Remaining Weeks In Office

"Decisions for their last weeks in office, writes my guest journalist Garrett Graff, he says, so imagine what might happen in a post election period when Donald Trump, a president who has spent four years demonstrating his lack of interest in norms and practices of a democracy. Retains all the powers and authority of the presidency and officially has nothing left to lose. In an article on Political magazine graph lays out some of the norm busting actions Trump may take in the days remaining in this presidency graph wrote that article just before the election. Since then, President Trump has broken other norms by refusing to concede the election. Making baseless allegations of widespread voter fraud and pursuing legal challenges. Trump is also standing in the way of a smooth transition by blocking President elect Biden's access to the funding allocated for the transition process and blocking access to classified information, such as the presidential Daily briefing. It was supposed to be granted to a president elect. Paragraph also wrote a recent article in Politico magazine about what Trump might do. After leaving the White House. Graff is a former editor of Politico magazine and is a contributor to wired. He's written books about Robert Mueller's 10 Years FBI director A history of the secret bunkers built to protect government leaders in case of nuclear attack and an aural history of 9 11. He's also the director of the cyber initiative at the Aspen Institute. Our interview was recorded yesterday. Paragraph Welcome back to fresh air. Thanks so much for having me, Terry. Let's start with a couple of the what you consider most norm breaking things President Trump has done so far to interfere with the transfer of power. The biggest one has to just be the simple fact that he has not yet accepted the projected winner of the election being Joe Biden. This is A very different situation than we faced in 2000 with the Florida recount. The state victories across the country are definitive, their decisive And Joe Biden looks like he's actually on his way to a comfortable victory in the electoral College and the fact that now more than a week after the election Donald Trump has not yet accepted that he's not yet given permission for Republican leaders to accept that and not yet given permission for the U. S government to accept that is deeply worrisome. There's a second level of his norm, breaking that we are already beginning to see which is one of the things that I had speculated about before the election. Which is widespread firings of senior government officials housecleaning if you will, among top national security and intelligence leaders. In a way that is worrisome from the National Security's perspective amid a transition. We've never seen a president in a lame duck period like this. Fire. For instance, the defense secretary and this is injecting Ah lot of uncertainty and instability into some very key American institutions at a moment where you are already facing uncertainty and instability and made a presidential transition. Attorney General William Barr has given federal prosecutor's approval to pursue allegations of quote voter tabulation irregularities in certain cases before results are certified. But, he added. In terms of investigating voter fraud, species speculative, fanciful of far fetched claim should not be a basis for initiating federal enquiries. So what does that mean? Because you could argue that all of Trump's claims about voter fraud, our species speculator, fanciful or far fetched? Yeah. And on the one hand, it seems a little too early to know whether this bar memo is just sort of bluster and performative Tioga give Donald Trump a little bit of cover as he Carries out these, askew said. Sort of species, the court filings and court arguments around the country around voter fraud, all of which have been turned aside unanimously by courts across the country state after state. And there is indeed no evidence of any widespread fraud and certainly no evidence of any fraud anywhere close to the level of the victories that we are seeing. Joe Biden pile up in states like Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Georgia. At the same time, though, there is reason to be worried that Bill bars memo might beam or than just hot air just a few hours after Hey, issued that memo. We saw the head of the election crimes unit at the Justice Department resigned in protest on But that's a That's a worry some statement by someone who is presumably in a good position to know what Bill Bar might be trying to do with that memo. But we haven't yet seen any evidence of that bar memo appearing in court across the country in investigations carried out by the federal government. Marquess for the

President Trump Donald Trump Garrett Graff Politico Joe Biden Robert Mueller Aspen Institute Graff Biden Attorney General William Barr Electoral College FBI White House Terry U. Florida
Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

Outcomes Rocket

04:15 min | 2 years ago

Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

"Welcome back to the outcomes rockets Sal Marquez here, and they have the privilege of hosting for the Second Time Miss Deb Gordon, she's spent her career trying to level the playing field for health care consumers haven't listened to the first podcasts with DAB. You've gotta go listen to it. It's all about the consumer and healthcare. She's all about you. She's all about your employees and how you can get the most for your healthcare dollar. She's the author of the healthcare consumers manifesto how to get the most for your money based on research she conducted as a senior fellow. At the Harvard Kennedy, School Center for Business and government she's a former health insurance executive and health care CEO. She's an aspen. Institute health innovators fellow and an Eisenhower fellow, her research and commentaries have appeared in USA Today, the Harvard Business Review blog, and on network open. She holds a B A in bioethics from Brown University and an MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and I'm excited to dive into her work again around the consumer's manifesto deb such a privilege to have you back on. Hey, saw. Thanks so for having me back. Yeah, absolutely. So you've been busy. I have been busy. That's true. I spent probably a year doing research for this book and another year writing a not exactly that split but I spend a good two years of my life producing this baby and it is exciting to come back and tell you about it because when we first met, I was just starting to think about it. I was just starting the research and listening to what consumers had to say. So I'm excited to be back to talk more about it the same here and so dab you know obviously. So listeners goal isn't a DEB's podcast. This you get a deeper appreciation about her time as an insurance executive and what has inspired her work and focus in the consumer sphere but a little bit about the book. Dab. You know what's the focus area? What are the takeaways at a high level? Sure. So I wrote the book mainly to expose the human side of healthcare costs like what is really going on for people when we go to the doctor or were phasing an insurance decision and we have to pay. For it and I was really taken with the fact that so many people of all walks of life come to me and say because I used to work health insurance they know I know something about it and they just say what should I do and you know the most extraordinary people who've accomplished so much in their lives walk into my office at the Kennedy School at Harvard and alike, what health insurance should I buy and I. It just dawned on me that if people like that need help and it's Legitimate that they do. It's very confusing and can be overwhelming like what chance is you know everyone else have of making sense of these decisions. So that's the motivation that I I brought into the book and then in doing my research for it, I heard story after story of consumer. So real people who are trying to get value for their healthcare dollars whether they use those kind of terms or not I say like shopping for healthcare is a thing we could do people don't use those words and they don't even. Know what I'm talking about. But you know I interviewed people about their experiences spending money on healthcare and what I learned is that although it feels really foreign to put that into shopping terms or you know we know how to buy things but we don't know how to shop around in healthcare and. It doesn't mean we're not able to. That's I think the biggest takeaway is that we do actually have more power than we might even realize and that the first step is to just ask the question, what if what, if I could get what I needed? What do I need? Why do I need this? Is there an alternative and just almost like re imagine ourselves as a customer when it comes to healthcare this is Dr is nervous and unhappy by the way, but it's not a slight against doctors. It's just you know what I think consumers need for whatever reason we need permission almost to think of ourselves as entitled to get value for our healthcare dollars.

Sal Marquez Harvard Kennedy Harvard Business School Harvard Business Review Deb Gordon Executive DEB Senior Fellow Brown University School Center For Business Eisenhower Usa Today Harvard Kennedy School
"aspen  institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Northwest highway at Western and an alliance. Harlem is black between 55 47th due to a rollover tanker with a fuel spill. Sarabande about beauty and traffic Central, a new study says. 1.1 Million Illinois residents are at risk for eviction. The Aspen Institute says one in for Illinois INS are behind on the rent right now. Governor J. B. Pritzker and Industry experts are working on a plan to prevent a wave of homelessness once the moratorium on evictions is lifted. The governor has also informed his Cabinet to be prepared to cut 5% of department budgets. If the U. S. Congress is unable to pass another round of stimulus money for state and local governments, 50 members of Congress are unveiling a new Corona virus stimulus plan. Today. The $1.5 trillion package includes a new round of stimulus checks, more unemployment aid on more unemployment insurance that is an aid to states and localities. Congress has until the end of the month to approve a package before they break for the election. Meanwhile, today Illinois is reporting another 1466 new corona virus cases in 20 additional deaths statewide positivity is at 3.6%. A new CDC study shows Children exposed to Cova 19 in daycare centers can spread the virus to other family members and teachers. The study followed 12 Children who contracted the virus in childcare facilities. Those Children spread the virus to 12 of the 46 parents and siblings. They came into contact with Infected Children had mild to no symptoms. One child was eight.

Illinois Congress Governor J. B. Pritzker Harlem Aspen Institute Cabinet Cova CDC
The pandemic may cause 40 million Americans to lose their homes

Pacifica Evening News

01:59 min | 2 years ago

The pandemic may cause 40 million Americans to lose their homes

"About 1/3 of all Americans rent their homes, and a new report for the Aspen Institute shows the pandemic related unemployment crisis could mean eviction. For more than 40% of those households without additional relief measures. Roz Brown reports. Nevada is behind only Alabama, where renters are the most vulnerable to eviction. Other top states for vulnerable renters include Oklahoma, Louisiana and New York City Co author Sam Gillman says the loss of housing often ushers in serious legal consequences and suffering for families. It leads to Children not being able to go to school, homelessness, depression and diseases of despair. An eviction offends everything in a family's life. Nevada has created a rant relief program. But the state's $30 million in assistance relies entirely on federal funds and stimulus talks have stalled in Congress. President Donald Trump circumventing Congress on Saturday by signing executive orders, he says, will deliver aid to Americans, including an eviction moratorium, But it's not clear if their constitutional or substantive, the report shows. A 37% of Nevada renters are at risk of eviction by the end of the year. Visions don't change, Gillman says. Some renters will be able to borrow money or work something out with their landlord. But eventually those options will be exhausted. And at that point, that's when this pick your natural disaster metaphor. Eviction. Avalanche tsunami tornado will continue to start carrying through and accelerating through our communities, according to Gilman. It's not just runners who will be affected, but also landlord's. Those mom and pop landlords are also severely at risk in this rental housing crisis, because if the Rangers can't pay rent The landlord's can't pay their mortgages and we could see the acceleration of a rental housing crisis into a foreclosure crisis. Gilman notes that black and Latino Americans who already experience a greater risk of Cove in 19 make up about 80% of those facing eviction for

Nevada Sam Gillman Congress Gilman Donald Trump Aspen Institute Rangers Roz Brown New York City Oklahoma President Trump Alabama Executive Louisiana
"aspen  institute" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on WTOP

"Three weeks worth of supplies we had less than that the U. S. government will now Stockwell three whole months much of it made in the USA Steven Portnoy a CBS news Washington five forty two a prominent DC based think tank the Aspen Institute is returning eight million dollars it got from the feds as part of the corona virus relief package just yesterday Aspin argue the small business aid was needed to keep its four hundred thirty person staff employed the aspen institute has a one hundred fifteen million dollar endowment and several billionaires are on its board of trustees the decision comes a day after the Washington post reported the institute got the loan it joins the LA Lakers and shake shack and among the businesses that have gotten federal money and then chosen to give it back five forty three the CDC is finally posting its guidance on re opening it focuses on a set of six decision tools each one uses traffic signs and other graphics to tell organizations what to consider before pulling the trigger to open up the CDC has more extensive and specific guidance that has not been posted yet the original draft was initially shelved by the trump administration the pandemic has eviscerated state coffers and Maryland's comptroller is warning big budget challenges lie ahead there is a sliver of good news in Maryland's budget forecast because instead of a two point eight billion dollar shortfall for twenty twenty Maryland could face a loss of nine hundred twenty five million dollars but that's if federal aid comes through comptroller Peter Franchot says it's also based on the assumption that there's a vaccine for the corona virus by twenty twenty one that's in the my understanding of the history of vaccines very very optimistic France has been accused of fear mongering by Senate president bill Ferguson and he dismisses that I also don't want to sugar coat things treasurer Nancy Kopp said even with the budget shortfalls she believes that layoffs of state workers can be avoided French Joe disagrees everything's going to have to be revisited Kate Ryan WTOP news the trump administration is easing rules that limit working hours for the nation's truck drivers.

bill Ferguson Kate Ryan WTOP treasurer president Senate twenty twenty Washington CBS Joe Nancy Kopp Steven Portnoy France Peter Franchot comptroller Maryland CDC LA Lakers Washington post Aspin Aspen Institute
Aspen Institute says it will return $8 million small-business loan

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Aspen Institute says it will return $8 million small-business loan

"Two a prominent DC based think tank the Aspen Institute is returning eight million dollars it got from the feds as part of the corona virus relief package just yesterday Aspin argue the small business aid was needed to keep its four hundred thirty person staff employed the aspen institute has a one hundred fifteen million dollar endowment and several billionaires are on its board of trustees the decision comes a day after the Washington post reported the institute got the loan it joins the LA Lakers and shake shack and among the businesses that have gotten federal money and then chosen to give

Aspen Institute Aspin Washington Post La Lakers
Bloomberg fills the Obama vacuum

Mark Simone

02:46 min | 2 years ago

Bloomberg fills the Obama vacuum

"Has another problem about you're obviously Joe Biden has a big problem in that he used to be able to talk now he's got dementia Alzheimers whatever the hell is going to know where he is he's bumping into walls so at the most embarrassing thing for by news where is Obama Obama hasn't endorsed them Biden keeps mentioning Obama what he and Barack did what he and Obama did with our administration meantime Obama obviously is not endorsing him and obviously doesn't even like him has no interest in Obama's been secretly helping the fall Patrick seep secretly helping Elizabeth Warren is endorsed somebody in the Canadian racism Dorsey people all the time but he won't endorse Biden so to it's a bit of an embarrassment for Biden so Bloomberg cashes in on this by running these commercials where Obama appears to be endorsing Bloomberg you've seen these commercials were not what it was and this happens a lot when you're at a big event in your speaking the president speaking usually the president will get up and say nice things about all the dignitaries in as a senator Schumer's here I'll say some great things about Schumer it's good to have mayor Bloomberg here that'll say some great things about mayor Bloomberg so that happened on ten occasions so Bloomberg cut together all that footage where you hear Obama say mayor Bloomberg has been one of the great leaders in the country and he and I together been fighting of the so it took a bunch of us come together so it looks like Obama is endorsing Bloomberg now audio has just emerged yesterday from two thousand sixteen of Bloomberg saying he can't really stand bomba and a bomb is not a great president and that he wishes he had voted for a romp or supported right well yeah he says right we would have been better off around so this is just emerged out to another one of these things were Bloomberg is speaking at one of these elitist ridiculous conferences that's why all these audio always emerges a Bloomberg saying these stupid things if you want to be a great politician you go speak at the state fair you go speak at that kind of stuff you go speak in Nebraska that's where you learn how to speak to people that's what Bill Clinton is so good he learned to speak by talking to workers at a seven eleven when you know when you learn how to explain policy to them you'd really know how to do it Donald Trump spent his life on construction sites talking to blue collar guys he knows how to talk to people Bloomberg when he speaks it's at Davos it's at the Aspen Institute in this case with the anti Obama remarks it was at the Goldman Sachs speaker series when you speak in the Goldman Sachs of the Aspen Institute you're totally removed from all American voters so more and more audio Elizabeth Warren was right but when she said you know that we don't know what's lurking out there about Bloomberg's waiting to come out

Joe Biden
"aspen  institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"First off remember Michael Bloomberg said in two thousand seventeen when asked why he wasn't getting into this race cut to but it's just not gonna happen on a national level for somebody like me starting more info on last I was willing to change all my views and go one what CNN called an apology tour Joe Biden when I apologize for being male over fifty why data or whatever his name is his apologize for being born so that was the old by Bloomberg months later for whatever reason they say is because buying was so bad he thought the lane is open I got to do it and now is passes coming into light for example we told about red line last week we told you about his still view one stop and frisk at the Aspen Institute which they said they would never do update today was set will sue you infer releases video was somehow they got the audio now listen to this from Mike Bloomberg in two thousand sixteen on forming cut one I could teach anybody even people in this room so no offense intended to be a farmer you it's a process so you dig a hole you put the seed and you put dirt on top and water comes the corn then we had three hundred you could learn that then and you have three hundred years in the industrial society you put the piece of metal in the late to turn the crank and the direction of the arrow and you can have a job and we created a lot of jobs the information economy is fundamentally different because it's built around replacing people with technology and the skill sets that you have to learn our how to think and analyze and that is a whole degree level different you have to have a different skills that you have done a lot more gray matter okay so Hey you dummies I hate you dummy.

Michael Bloomberg CNN Joe Biden Aspen Institute Bloomberg
"aspen  institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Youth collaborative was awarded the grant from the Aspen Institute the collaborative was put together by the Boston private industry council and the Boston you for opportunity agenda council executive director Neil Solomon this is practical nuts and bolts if we want to enable the Boston public schools and Bunker Hill community college then we want to be able to arm of those who keep track of information and share information internally this is about being able to take data and move it into intervention as quickly as possible the groups say they're doing this in hopes of reducing the number of students who drop out of high school or community college they say the initiative will have a particular focus on young men of color an eighteen year old from Worcester was arrested in connection with the February tenth the shooting on north Hampton street two people were taken to a hospital with serious injuries knowledge of Lansky is facing charges including armed assault with intent to murder and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon a defunct Massachusetts priest is appealing his child sex abuse conviction in Maine Ronald Packwood's attorney contends the trial judge should have required the prosecutor to disclose details of the victims criminal record Republican New Hampshire governor Chris soon though using his state of the state address to argue that the granite state is a bit different I'm a lot better than other states Sununu recounting economic educational and environmental successes in his speech while offering a handful of initiatives spanning life stages from pre birth to old age he says he's backing legislation to ensure pregnant women are treated fairly good work and has asked the state health commissioner to improve long term care for seniors Democrats criticized his support for a paid family leave plan they believe does not go far enough coming up we'll check sports how long your commute will be tomorrow's weather day was impossible there's a place for world easy Boston's news radio this is a Bloomberg money minute for the first time this week a down day for stocks mixed reports on the corona virus kept investors on the defensive the Dow Jones industrial average dropped one hundred twenty eight the S. and P. five hundred fell six the nasdaq composite lost fourteen Expedia says it expects to maintain bookings this year despite slowing travel demand due to the corona virus it sees double digit profit growth this year beating estimates fourth quarter revenue climbed seven point three percent from a year earlier Mattel wasn't playing around as it tightened its belt during the fourth quarter the toy maker says cost cutting offset weak holiday sales producing a better than expected profit demand for its American girl dolls and Fisher price toys was lower the federal judges blocked Microsoft from working on a ten billion dollar Pentagon contract Amazon one the delay after allege in a lawsuit the president trump interfered in the awarding of the contract Microsoft says the contract award was fair Larry Kaski Bloomberg radio WBZ gets results for thousands of New England businesses if you want to grow your business listen to this since.

Aspen Institute
"aspen  institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Grant from the Aspen Institute forum for community solutions to reduce the number of students particular young men of color who get disconnected from high school or community college the twenty thousand dollar grant part of the aspen institute's data for impact project within the opportunity use foreign money will allow the two institutions to better track and analyze student attendance and transfer data for thousands of high school and community college students some sparring Congress where leaders are taking aim at the president and whether he interfered in the sentencing of Roger stone house speaker Nancy Pelosi blasted the president and Attorney General William Barr for interfering in the Roger stone sentencing this is an abuse of power the president is again trying to manipulate federal law enforcement to serve his political interests but minority leader Kevin McCarthy says the president is not interfering and it's Democrats trying to impeach the president all over again you can line from the idea you can just claim impeachment instead of listening to the facts and stop this bill ray Cobb C. B. S. news Washington Attorney General bill Barr taking up public swipe at the president saying that the president's tweets about the justice department prosecutors in cases quote make it impossible for me to do my job by making the comments during an interview with ABC news just days after the DOJ overruled its own prosecutors after initially recommending in a court filing the Roger still be sentenced to seventy nine years in prison defense attorneys tried to persuade jurors today that prosecutors failed to prove their case against Harvey Weinstein or from ABC's Erin to Turkey imploring jurors to have the courage to acquit Harvey Weinstein defense attacked the prosecutor's case you may have a gut feeling once dean is guilty the defense said in closing statements but what counts is the legal standard of proof beyond a reasonable doubt winds dean faces predatory sex assault rape and other charges based accounts from inspiring actress Jessica man and production assistant maybe how lady if you don't believe them the defense soldiers they could ignore the testimony of other accusers that prosecutors called the show a pattern jurors may not like Harvey Weinstein but the defense said this is not a popularity contest Aron Kader ski ABC news New York prosecutors give their closing arguments tomorrow jury deliberations are expected to begin next week Rhode island's Roman Catholic bishop responding to the controversy over a priest who said he did not communion the legislators who support abortion Reverend Richard booty distributed fires last month which said the state lawmakers who voted to preserve abortion rights in the state law would be denied communion WJAR TV reported the G. also said that pedophile yet doesn't kill anyone an abortion does Providence bishop Thomas told is is no one's has an absolute right to receive communion in both sexual abuse of minors and abortion are immoral actions some Ford cars and SUVs have a potential problem it could cause a crash and now there's a recall the automaker is recalling two hundred forty thousand models to fix a suspension problem seems part the keeps tires on the ground can fracture no reports of any injuries so far the recall covers the Ford flex Taurus police car Taurus S. H. O. and Lincoln M. K. T. from the years twenty thirteen through eighteen owners will be notified starting March second at its corresponded feel Hewlett five oh eight try to get a check on Wall Street intro day is at Bloomberg and I guess we can say there's always tomorrow Andrew yeah we'll try again tomorrow but Wall Street averages took a hit today let's try this government used a revised method to diagnose corona virus which sent the number of confirmed cases soaring higher the Dow lost a hundred twenty eight nasdaq down fourteen SO P. five hundred down six the reviews are in on yelp latest quarter and let's just say it didn't get five stars shares falling as much as nine percent after market trades after.

Aspen Institute
"aspen  institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Is comic I saw all so do you have a problem with that statement and then if you had heard if you were sitting in the audience in aspen institute would you have said Hey Mike I need to speak to you about this the way that came off and or are you okay with that then just not now I I guess what I would say he is it was again trying to be analytical about crime who was causing in what he saw as at that point as a way to try to prevent it clearly is this about both the substance in the form of his comments I'm glad he's done that and I am glad they do use beyond the talk about the future rather than trying to parse W. word about he dug itself forcing he did stop and frisk they believed to crime down dramatically after Rudy Giuliani you should or run from it and say I'm sorry for reducing crime he should say I am sorry for stopping murders in minority neighborhoods either that I'm sorry for that so I'm sorry I got great results I'm telling you he's got a twist himself into a pretzel to run for this nomination because either you braces what he did do a few years ago or apologizes for success I I guess I'd see it a little differently Brian I think he's offered an apology for both is language in court over use of a policy that he has made clear was not entirely effective and cause pain and what we've seen with Donald Trump I mean this is a man whose referred to remember he's been the one that little as you were alluding to said they were very fine people on either side in Charlotte so maybe he hasn't apologized and maybe your point today is that you don't apologize rings in the so you're you're making my point you made my point the present this year Goran of fallout of his supporters never came out and clarified Charlottesville that he was trying to say there are people they do a good people that want Confederate statues to stay up he was in Tuzla praising skinheads or **** and he didn't go out of his way to do it that's a mistake but that's his decision and when he said as whole countries he was in commenting on the people in those countries coming on the government's equality those countries many of which this people would agree but he had no interest in apologizing with Mike Bloomberg wants to say is sorry for being successful I promise not to do that again well I I can tell you there's a Mike Bloomberg has had more success than any man I know literally and I've never heard him apologize for his success and I've never seen him back down from a fight so I think we're gonna have a competitive election we will hopefully have a chance to talk about it in great detail right both what happened in the past and what's gonna happen in the future I know you're you're probably the most diverse expert around good on time but then as well I'm talking about Vladimir Putin and now the big thing is China we we can go of we can go for two hours Doug let alone would you know about politics the Clintons Democrats and Republicans Doug Schoen thanks so much I am always a part thank you adviser to Michael Bloomberg when we come back your call is one eight six six four oh eight seven six six nine my head spinning.

aspen institute
I will not exchange one brutal oppressor for another

The Breakdown with Shaun King

09:57 min | 2 years ago

I will not exchange one brutal oppressor for another

"I don't say this from a place of privilege is quite the opposite. It comes from a real place of pain but Mike Bloomberg is the line that I simply will not cross. I can't here's what you may not know and if you are a supporter of Mike Bloomberg. I'm assuming you don't know this Mike. Bloomberg directly caused real pain real trauma in harm to people that I know personally people that I love and call my friend. That's not rhetoric. I'm telling you that. His decisions his policies his personal directives ruined the actual lives of countless men. Women boys girls and families all over New York City in many of them will never recover. Here's the thing. Because social media did not exist on the scale that it exists today during most of his time as mayor of New York from two thousand and two until two thousand thirteen with his final year in office being the literal year before the Black Lives Matter Movement began. Bloomberg narrowly escaped the nationwide public accountability and scrutiny. But he no doubt would have received in any subsequent year after he left office and as a result. New Yorkers particularly black and Brown New Yorkers have something akin to a collective P. T. S. D. over the harmony cost and. I don't want what I'm about to tell you to be a twenty reasons not to vote for Bloomberg type of peace. Those things out there. I just need you to understand the size scope scale in vile nature of the twelve years where Bloomberg personally oversaw in turbo charged a citywide stop and Frisk policy. Let me break down Britain epic. Bring it bears. What Mike Bloomberg did in his twelve years in office as mayor of New York City was the closest thing the United States has got to Jim Crow Apartheid South Africa in our lifetime. Now Bloomberg will tell you that. Hey everything I did. Existed before him that would be like saying prisons existed before the explosion of mass incarceration from nineteen seventy five until today yeah. Prisons existed but on a scale that was on par with the rest of the developed. Worl see from eighteen. Seventy to nineteen seventy the United States consistently incarcerated fewer than two hundred fifty thousand people per year. Today we incarcerate over two point five million people on any given day and over ten million people per year it's exploded so yes prisons existed before nineteen seventy yes a policy of stop and Frisk existed before Bloomberg took office. But he exploded. That's what he did. When he became mayor he grew it and expanded exponentially. Just give me a minute to explain it to you. In the twelve years Bloomberg was in office he ordered the NYPD. I need you to understand these figures. He ordered the NYPD to stop and Frisk people almost exclusively black and brown people a staggering five million eighty one thousand six hundred eighty nine times. Are you listening to me? And those are just stops. That police officers actually documented. Some people believe the actual numbers could be twice as high completely innocent. People were strip searched. Punched kicked slammed beaten groped. Tasers choked in shot in these stops drugs were planted. People were framed in tens of thousands of people. Every single year or arrested sent to rikers for crimes. They did not commit then eventually released without ever even going to court. Some people spent days in jail where they lost their jobs. Single parents lost custody of their kids. Others they did and spend days in rikers but they spend weeks months and even years for crimes they didn't commit. And while they were there in rikers like a young man a teenage boy named Khalif browder. They were beaten and tortured by both guards and inmates alike forced into solitary confinement for years on end then simply released without even an explanation. When Khalif Browder was released he was broken and took his own life. Experts say tens of thousands of other innocent men women and children were either cokes by prosecutors and police enter taking plea deals so that they could simply be released for time served or just chose to take the deals simply so that they could escape the madness of the jail only to be released from rikers back into Bloomberg's New York where they were routinely stopped and frisked again and again and again some individuals were stopped and frisked by the NYPD. Over a hundred different times. Can you imagine now when I say over a hundred times? I'm not using that number one hundred as a euphemism for a lot. I mean they were literally in stopped literally searched and stopped by the NYPD over one hundred times as parents and activists and organizers and preachers in mental health experts in justice reform advocates in constitutional lawyers all begged and pleaded with Bloomberg to stop. He were a few people met with him personally demanding that he stop begging that he stopped. They marched and protested in New York dozens of times. They interrupted his events in some of the smartest most persistent legal groups in the nation sued the Bloomberg Administration over and over and over again to stop these unlawful practices in a federal judge that Dean Bloomberg's stop and Frisk policies that deemed that they were indeed a modern day apartheid for black and Brown New Yorkers. She found that countless constitutional violations existed as she ordered an immediate halt to what he had done for nearly twelve years and even then he fought back against it and refuse to immediately implement the charges and changes rather that she demanded now when Bloomberg left office and his stop and Frisk was no longer a policy. Crime actually plummeted year after year after year. His racist policies that he said he had in place to make New York. Safer didn't make New York safer at all. New York got safer after stop and Frisk ended. All he had done was caused real terror to millions and millions of people and after this man Left Office. Bloomberg bragged about the policy and defended it with all his might. That's why in Twenty fifteen. He asked the staff at the SNOOTY Aspen Institute to turn off the cameras when he spoke there in bragged about how police withrow black and brown boys against the walls. All in the name of making New York City safer. He knew what he was saying was ugly. Have you heard that audio? Those kids that he's talking about and their mothers and fathers and siblings were not just humiliated by such an awful practice it shattered many of them and Bloomberg literally defended all of this after the policy had stopped after it was ruled unconstitutional. He defended it deep into twenty nineteen right up until he decided to run for president. And here's the thing. I have dedicated my life to fighting back against Donald Trump and his policies. I have campaign to oust horrible politicians and have helped elect bold promising new ones all over the country. I've endangered my family in pursuit of tracking down and bringing White Supremacist Neo Nazis. To justice so yes. Donald Trump is our mortal enemy and I work directly with the people in communities that his evil has impacted the most he must be defeated and he can be. I will not support one oppressor to another one. I want to

Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg New York City Bloomberg Administration Nypd Khalif Browder United States Donald Trump President Trump Britain Snooty Aspen Institute Withrow Black T. S. D. Jim Crow South Africa
"aspen  institute" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:05 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KGO 810

"There was some resurfaced audio for Mike Bloomberg out there talking to the aspen group in twenty fifteen and he had some words about stop and frisk that shall we say contradict his later position about how right that was or was not and how he feels about it today well it sure is interesting what he said to the Aspen Institute about that and that was on earth and re broadcast by one of the people I admire most in this radio podcast business Benjamin Dickson is a media entrepreneur he's got a master's degree in poli sci from Florida Atlantic University and he is the man behind the book god is not a Republican you've probably heard from him in any number of context he's out there now with this very big deal about released audio Benjamin Dickson welcome to the Patterson show with Angie coro Eiji thank you so much for happy meals are amazingly kind words I appreciate it not at all I'm I'm very impressed that you found this audio and got it back out there in fact let's hear that first clip and then we'll talk about the content the audio is not what it could be because it wasn't recorded professionally we're gonna find out what that says in just a moment let's give that a listen this is Bloomberg talking at the Aspen Institute in twenty fifteen all my god you are arresting here's the marijuana they're all on her yes that's true wider world house and when are you yeah that's true I mean that's all about it and on the way down the road it is clear from the castle wall beginners stargazer automata I don't like a cross okay don't based on all well that's an awful lot to dig into right there her if someone tell me what some of that audio was that we just heard you know is there there's a lot there at Indy is really reflective of his thinking his world view was boring work right he's apologized for before but it was kind of an empty apology when you hear how he describes where the crime is and why we send all the cops to one neighborhood in yeah it happens so happens that we arrest young person for marijuana but we arrested because they're in the neighborhood we send all the cops in which an all the cops there because that's where all the crime is that type of worldview that type of thinking is extremely dangerous it is too dangerous for him to just give us the motels apology definitely especially when you say S. when you find out that he apparently said I think we disproportionately stopped whites too much and minorities too little what planet is this man on right it's a deeply rooted that's the thing now make no apologies I oppose Michael Bloomberg is the candidate for president because I believe these are all the dark was purchasing our democracy he's spending his own personal money to protect his personal money so I don't make an apology for that but at the core of this it is so problematic that if you take out all the politics and you look at the fact that this is a person who wants to be the president of the United States and he holds the deeply held beliefs with regards to young minorities that puts us at risk from a person in the White House you know it suddenly occurs to me that there are people in our audience who might be a little bit too young to remember stop and frisk can you give us a quick rundown of what that was and where the problems were with that yeah the best the best way to describe to someone who sent me a video they explain to me how in New York if you're fourteen and fifteen it was a look it was a rite of passage to have the police officers drive by and stare you down and for no other reason that pull up on the curb jump out grab you know we up against a wall of rescue and happened so often that everyone every young minority mail experienced it and it was almost like a thing like a badge or some type of camaraderie my brother that arms in the face of a fascist the police state but in the description he gave me next was very terrified he said that they used to pull them out of restaurants I was on the debate is what they are just you know being customers and they were thrown out and build up against the wall just like Michael Bloomberg describe like you said you told him up against the wall and this is how they describe it to me and so it was a system that they no longer had to have any justification any reasonable suspicion for pulling someone over are stopping the most risk you know they just identified you and had this free reign to stop you interesting to see if you had any any illegal substances or weapons on you know it is like an acceleration and and the multiplication of driving while black or shopping while black what I mean it's it's even worse it's that carried to its extreme yes yeah I know very very much so and it's deeply rooted in racial profiling I mean he gives the thing about this clip that made me soul compelled to share it with you know why I cashed in every favor I had you know live a lot of people in the industry but I never asked for anything on Twitter and I'm like you got at least look at this I don't know if everyone is going to have the same visceral reaction to that I did because you know sometimes we do this work and you can testify that this you do it over and over and over again you become desensitized to it yes blight but hearing this particular line from him when he when he identifies very specifically that they're young black and brown minority may and it's like what chance do any of these kids have whatsoever but to be introduced to a criminal justice system that has no no justice involved in it in the first place you know I can't help I never got this caller out of my brain and this is years ago I had this caller that I I could not convinced that there are racist elements to the law as it's practiced and law enforcement as as practice his contention was where do you even go with this his contention was that what we just heard from Bloomberg that all of the police go to the minority neighborhoods because that's where all the crime is and I said to him well you know is that can that possibly possibly be explained by more people of color being arrested and that's why the statistics are you insisting that it is because they genuinely commit all the crimes and he's no that's absolutely possible what do you say to someone like that so you have to really push them into the corner this logical corner because they have to answer the question do they believe that there's a call the relationship is there a call the link between the crimes that happen in the black community are minority communities and the fact that they are minorities so are you willing to say that that the reason there's crime is because the minorities well if you say that then we can we definitively can categorize you as a racist but if you don't agree to that then you have to ask the next question why is their crime there and as you pointed out one aspect which is if you stayed in police there you're gonna have a over a disproportionate representation of crime from community that are over overly police obvious the party is and this is the part this depressing about a mayor who's a billionaire who had no regard to the economic conditions of the people there there's a direct correlation between poverty and in front of me it's been demonstrated over and over again instead of ever addressing that underlying problem what does he do he decides to bring down the hammer of the law school force of law it's in in the storm troopers for lack of a better word to crush it you know what is the cause mayor Bloomberg he didn't care about the policy didn't care about the poverty all he cared about was going to keep it up against the wall talking to podcast radio host and author Benjamin Dickson we will take your questions at eighty eighty eight ten four one five eight zero eight zero eight one zero as we talk about this re released audio from Mike Bloomberg at the my brain just fell out of my head I hate when that happens it is a two twenty fifteen eight zero eight zero eight one zero I have to ask you about something you said earlier Benjamin and that was when you refer to him as an oligarch which I think by dictionary definition I don't understand why there's an argument about that but I think it was Nina Turner who first said it publicly I got all kinds of blow back on that what is that even even an issue you know what I I I personally explore that quite a bit with the person who was giving me the turn of the blowback Dr Jason Johnson good guy really have a lot of respect for him but really disagree with them here he was arguing that if we use the definition of oligarch that Bernie Sanders whose only work two million dollars is that all the guard as Michael Bloomberg who's worth thirty thousand times more at sixty billion and you know as I explored it with them more that community online on Twitter I began to realize that it really has been a become kind of a cultural kind of a a wage to are really a scare trope dad mainstream media has used it a sign to Russian oligarchs right there's been so much that over the last three years and I'm not knocking the Russian investigation but I think that there's something that has been set over the last three years that when you speak of oligarch it conjures up a Russian areas over lower kind imagery and a lot of people just aren't ready to apply that to Americans because we have sanitized are billionaires here when reality exploded labor is just as nefarious is whatever you want that means they got their billions in Russian you know when we talk about what kind of terms applicables words have power words have meaning and I really Klein has now said that this is what plutocracy looks like when you have someone like Bloomberg who can out spend everyone out of his own pocket to me that's a direct threat to democracy thank you right there I mean I don't know melodramatic rated sometimes we we get a little sensational toward ourselves but I just had a ball to really think about this the fact that he can come in quite frankly is to protect his wealth if you look at a little bit more splash form her wealth tax calculator he he's listed there directly Michael Bloomberg click here if you're if you're on our site click here and she sold that he's going to pay about three point five six billion dollars in taxes if he's elected right and of course he's going to pay probably more if Bernie Sanders is elected so to have him be able to invest a billion dollars to save two point five six billion just for himself personally it's a terrifying notion when the cost of that right the real cost of it isn't a billion dollars instead if that millions of voters who are having their voices snatched away by an oligarch loosely let's go to Steve who's checking in from Berkeley Steve you're on the air with Benjamin Dickson wow that was quick thank you so much Sir okay first of all for a minute title quite bad over the over the age of sixty I have no idea what it's like to be a black teenager it can't be fun it can't be great Mr Bloomberg is that old Jewish rich billionaire from New York City I'm sure he's got a lot or to hide hi then just best not I just I just to you're mentioning his his Jewishness a his Jewish you have to watch it with he is Jewish correct yes he is Jewish but you just put that in line with a lot of more negative con connotation well I'm sorry my PC what so on guard right there I don't think you will see I think it's actually absolutely important to point out when Jewish people are painted as something to do with there being an oligarch and something to do with that having all that money I just think it's important to call that out okay thank you so what I my question is this is is that what I say okay this little birch structure bad guy that we can't use this guide to get rid of all potential Adolf Hitler and he is only one man just like truck was only one banner truck but he was gonna step it just changed everything well guess what it's a democracy yeah I think that.

Mike Bloomberg Aspen Institute Benjamin Dickson
"aspen  institute" Discussed on AP News

AP News

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on AP News

"Former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg launched his democratic presidential bid with an apology for his support for New York stop and frisk policy now he's apologizing for comments he made it a 2015 appearance at the Aspen Institute in which she defended the practice saying the way to bring down murder rates is to quote but a lot of cops in minority neighborhoods because that's where all the crime is in the audio Bloomberg says that you can't quote just take the description Xerox it and pass it out to all the cops in a statement Bloomberg says he inherited the policy and that his remarks don't reflect his commitment to criminal justice reform and racial equity he says he cut back on the policy but quote I should have done it faster and sooner president trump sent out and then deleted a tweet highlighting the audio declaring Bloomberg's a total racist trump has himself been a vocal supporter of stop and frisk policies Jennifer king Washington

Mike Bloomberg Aspen Institute Xerox trump New York murder president Jennifer king Washington
In 2015 audio, Bloomberg advocates targeting minorities

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

In 2015 audio, Bloomberg advocates targeting minorities

"Former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg launched his democratic presidential bid with an apology for his support for New York stop and frisk policy now he's apologizing for comments he made it a twenty fifteen appearance at the Aspen Institute in which she defended the practice saying the way to bring down murder rates is to quote but a lot of cops in minority neighborhoods because that's where all the crime is in the audio Bloomberg says that you can't quote just take the description Xerox it and pass it out to all the cops in a statement Bloomberg says he inherited the policy and that his remarks don't reflect his commitment to criminal justice reform and racial equity he says he cut back on the policy but quote I should have done it faster and sooner president trump sent out and then deleted a tweet highlighting the audio declaring Bloomberg's a total racist trump has himself been a vocal supporter of stop and frisk policies Jennifer king Washington

Mike Bloomberg Aspen Institute Xerox Donald Trump New York Murder President Trump Jennifer King Washington
"aspen  institute" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on WJR 760

"The store the road this morning was this interesting clip from two thousand fifteen with Michael Bloomberg speaking before the Aspen Institute and defending his stop and frisk policy a policy which by then had already been declared unconstitutional by a federal judge but he defended it as both the fact is and and then went on and with a very broad brush which is now receiving intense criticism talked about who it was aimed at do you think that this is going to be a stain that cannot be removed will this stall would have been a Bloomberg surge in the past ten days Scott is in to come sit with some thoughts on that we always welcome Scott to this show hello Scott I would go and I'm good I got probably do two things I want to deal with you're the first one I'm going to try to put away quickly but earlier was that some of our will if yes our this compare with the access Hollywood tape and and I'd say that I don't think anything compared with the access Hollywood tape because none of these done these things about coming out about about Democrat politician that happened worry were recorded of a of a private citizen not a civil service order without their knowledge and then held until a week before the election and yeah and not go over some pricing is different yeah yeah that's the plug was made and I think it's a it's it's available but as far as the the stop and frisk program Bloomberg yup so therefore you know him I I think you can take you can draw some conclusions from from him speaking about that that is to do the things he said and then the time and and the location and you know you can you can make some inferences of by about all that information well I don't really have the you know twenty of other things that he wants to actually do the letter way more troublesome than than that if you were say and I would actually have a problem with it three out of three because my my basic promises is that you have to look at the whole purpose of law enforcement and if the purpose of law enforcement is to protect the innocent from from people who were broken the law you know it's like everyone of the shooting that you see where where a white captures a black kid in there every last one start off with the black kid not doing what the cop told me to do every last one starts with that yeah and I am the if you if you got people like to judge out running around ten wall our country very so from top to bottom from the get go your continue to have problems like this because you know it your compiler isolated case of racism in this country here and there but is not a wholesale we're all fairly rations country like some people seem to see either of the damage and making it that well Scott you are going to see it one way right and there are those who pay their people of color that may see it very differently and I think that's the key thing here because we've got twenty two to twenty four percent of the electorate voting in the democratic primary being people of color that could come back to haunt Michael Bloomberg so I agree with you what really matters here is whether it was an effective policy and whether it worked for those neighborhoods that it was intended to help and about that there is no consensus but you can't studies on both sides claiming very very different outcomes let's get the time in Ohio before we got to get to a break here hello Tom yes I know you act good afternoon yes let me bring that up I'm just reading that book the Warren traps like heather mac Donald yes and she's a privately easing writer very amazing she seems to back everything up that she says but I think that the politicians today are too quick to apologize and not quick enough to clarify and or explain what they're trying to say and I think that does them more harm by just coming right out apologizing and saying Hey maybe I said it wrong but this is what I meant and statistics what you have to be very careful with what statistical policing is the sexual it does work it does it you know it it's been interesting because there's been a bit of a debate Evan reading today there's a difference between the stop and frisk and also broken window policing and the evidence a broken window policing don't necessarily want to be associated with stop and frisk they think it's two different things and you're right I think one of the things is overlooked here is that the politicians that support these policies get no credit for the neighborhoods of color that they're trying to defend and clean up but they get all the blame for the people of color that they put in jail and and it's it does two things need to be reconciled and and I don't know why they constantly a running away from the fact that they're trying to help these neighborhoods Tom thanks for your call John I want to give you sixty seconds but that's all I got time for so have added okay John hello are you there go ahead again okay die guy only diary my IRA I heard that Bloomberg annex first day in office was going to write an executive order banning the big gold no he already did that New York many yeah he tried it there yeah I know I'm a super sized kind of guy I'd be the first one you can throw he'll have to throw me in jail on that one I'll be the first federal offender with will we'll have our own little tea party and we'll do it with super sized cups okay.

Michael Bloomberg Aspen Institute
What U.S. Religious Liberty Means — Especially When It Comes To Islam

All Things Considered

05:02 min | 2 years ago

What U.S. Religious Liberty Means — Especially When It Comes To Islam

"The trump administration is made religious liberty a central theme of this presidency for example the US department of health and Human Services now has a conscience and religious freedom division the president has champion judges who have ruled in favor of people seeking religious exemptions to laws and just last month the White House strengthen protections for kids who want to pray at school as mood and is part of my dean is part of the inclusive America project at the Aspen Institute she is also the author of a book on religious liberty called when Islam is not a religion she told me that president trump's focus marks a change from previous administrations there has been just a more pronounced public affirmation of the positive role of religion in American society the need to protect it often we hear from various government officials whether be Mike Pompeii or president trump or US Attorney General bill Barr or even just sessions when he announced religious liberty task force of the department justice is constant refrain about religion is under threat by secularization threatening forces but on on the left to the protection of religion and the protection of our religious freedom that has become a constant refrain what communities have benefited from the administration's attention to the issue or their religious communities that have essentially been left out yeah so we can then candidate Ted Cruz said that it was he called it the religious liberty of election and he said that it was ultimately about like the person who would be able to defend religious liberty the vast and president trump and Ben Carson I'm ricksantorum all got on the bandwagon said absolutely this is about religious liberty and we're going to protect religious liberty for elected president but at the same time as they were making the statement there also competing with each other to determine who could be the most discriminatory against Muslims whether it be present from suggestions about creating a Muslim registry or about banning Muslims from U. S. which as we know when he has before with that as well or be Ted Cruz's suggestion that we surveil Muslim neighborhoods in the aftermath he brought that up in the aftermath of a terrorist incident or ricksantorum saying that Islam absolutely was different from Christianity fee so that is not ours protected under the first amendment as Christianity is and so there was like this obvious hypocrisy so what you saw was a creation of a hierarchy of faith even within this world of law to me yes I even beyond just the creation of a hierarchy I actually saw denial of a song even being a religion that had access through religious freedom another suggestion that present from brought up during the campaign was to close down mosques when you create such as Turk disparity between types of things that you're willing to protect for quote unquote religion and then say that the most basic of religious freedom rights are not afforded to a particular group of people you know how exactly are you explaining that what's the logic there and it didn't take much to figure out what that is because unfortunately increasingly common talking point among many people in the White House and in that sort of larger network is that Islam is not a religion it is a dangerous political ideology and therefore Muslims don't have religious freedom rights can you think of a policy directive from the trump administration that on paper looks good for religious liberties but in reality has really only been and that positive for evangelical Christians more or less just one group well I think that even in the space of Christianity increasingly you hear this I'll cry from our progressive Christians that they feel that the way that Christianity is being defined and champion tends to only happen from this particular angle and of course a constant concern in the context of specifically the sexuality related culture wars is that the rights of LGBT individuals including all your between the visuals of faith or people who hold different positions on abortion contraception from real religious standpoint are being undermined and to that end I think that is has to come from an understanding that religious liberty is not in some way just to safeguard for traditional religious beliefs it is a secret just for beliefs of a wide diversity anywhere they fall on the political spectrum and again the diverse religious spectrum and so what I hope for and I do see some movement on this for more progressive religious liberty groups to bring to the fore more progressive religious claims and say look religious liberty is for this too my concern is that if the rhetoric in the op in the enforcement of some of these policies continues to be only it's thought through in the frame of traditional religious beliefs then there will be other types of religious claims I won't be as protected I don't really have a concrete examples are not being protected but I do see this increasing sort of urgency from our progressive groups to be like what we have these claims to and because religious liberty protects the range and doesn't privilege one particular interpretation or another that are religious claims are also protected husband Jean thank you so much for speaking with us thank you as a dean is part of the inclusive America project at the aspen institute and the author of the book when Islam is not a

"aspen  institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:59 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Aspen Institute I'm Jane Wales your host at the age of twenty two amaryllis fox became one of the C. I. A.'s youngest female officers after training she was deployed as an undercover agent working throughout the Middle East to stop acts of extreme terrorism now an advocate for humane engagement and strategic non violence at home and overseas fox's story offers a unique insight into the secretive world of the CIA she joins us to share her story of life under cover and talk about her efforts to promote peace around the world moderating the program is Meena Kim she's the news anchor for KQED this broadcast is made possible each week by the generous support of chevron TPG and the draper Richards Kaplan foundation let me tell you your book was a total page Turner and when I finished it my first thought was I will never complain about my job again I mean well first what does it mean to be in clandestine service of the CIA and to be under non official cover how is that different from other roles of the CIA the role of C. I. A. that sets it apart from the military from really other parts of the intelligence community is to build a human relationships relationships with human sources who are for whatever reason positions to be able to help us predict or prevent acts of war or acts of terrorism and increasingly that's a really rare and powerful thing in an age of of reliance on technical surveillance and technical warfare I I always say it's it's sort of like how if you have friends who you follow on social media and then friends that you see once a week for a drink right the friends you follow on social media you know the facts of their life right if they've had a baby or or they they post a photo where they're getting engaged you know those data points but if you see them for a drink every week you know how they feel about all those things you know whether they're afraid to get married or you know they're they're planning to have babies before they announce them and that ability to understand somebody's fears their dreams their hopes their plans and aspirations allows you to to predict geopolitics in a way that that technical data points just can't it's the why instead of the what and so human intelligence gatherers CIA officers are tasked with going out and doing this at its best very soulful work of meeting and identifying sources that have the potential to to want to leave this legacy of protecting lives and slowly slowly building enough trust and amber or where is the is the sources to be able to move them to a place where you can do that work together but there are analysts and there are CA officers who have official cover like for example there diplomat there's somebody who is known and important enough that in a pinch you can get them out of a hairy situation but if you're in non official cover are you basically I mean you don't have you don't have those those benefits yeah I you know want one touched on that I often offer for people as Argo if you guys have seen the movie Argo right so this is the that the true story of of a CIA operation to go into Iran and rescue some Americans and in order to do so they created a fictional film production company right and went on in order to in order to you know pretend services location scout but actually they were doing this operational work and the advantage of non official cover like that is that you can put yourself in places where you are not likely to be as a diplomat or or a U. S. government official it explains why you are in the far flung regions you need to be and to stop many of these attacks or do these kinds of operations the challenge is that you don't have diplomatic immunity right and you don't have the emotional comfort of a of a shared work environment where eat all of the the operational considerations can fall away and you can sit with fellow officers every day and you know get advice share stories be in one another's company so it it makes it quite lonely work where there's no one who really fully shares your truth in the training for the work that you did I think also gives a sense of just how dangerous it is I mean you're learning how to use a Glock you're learning out of with Stan torture I mean you're you're learning things that as I said make anyone reads her current top and what they're going to complain about it but I do remember going and being in my friend's wedding and my wrists were completely wrong from learning some escape and evasion techniques and in the in the formal down and saying I'm not even going to ask what that is but she had no idea what I was doing at the time is like what did you spend your kid to do it is there a habit like a surveillance have it or some kind of having that you picked up from such intense training that you find even today is hard to shake one of the things were offensive is is kind of surprising I think given the depictions of the movies is that a lot of what we're taught is to be really boring a lot of the time the rate because yeah not to stand out to be non alerting a eat it all of the kind of roof gymnastics and Glock juggling you see in the movies you know like that one she see in through city streets and you know your cover's blown and you're either out of the country or you're in jail and that is not a very efficient and practical way to go about this work so really a lot of what you're doing is for the ninety percent of the time where you're not operational is is being as tall as possible and so I think the operational habits that stick with me are or though is aged drives my husband crazy that I stop at every orange light right every yellow light that because you're very rule abiding all your when you know when you're in a situation where you might have somebody in a car behind you and you do the kind of normal thing that anyone would do which is to skate through the yellow light you you risk that person thinking that you're trying to lose them and that is a learning and and raises a whole concert is in no way people so so a lot of the behavior is not what you would think from from the screen but it's all they are designed to keep you safe so that in a moment where you are ready to to invite the source to to help do this work that both of you have been protected throughout the process of development as you talk about trying to be boring your identity your fake identity was as an art dealer and you're living in Shanghai and you literally had the Chinese government surveilling you but you had a housekeeper who worked for the government who lived with you right during that time and so you had to be as normal as possible while you're going out and trying to infiltrate no illicit arms deals and and networks and in the Middle East as well I mean you were traveling to to the Middle East as you're doing this and I remember this moment that you talk about where a CIA officer presents you with a photo of you crying and it had been taken by a the Chinese surveil ours but because the CIA was surveilling the Chinese they have that image and they said what was going on here with you and was this very private moment for you you were crying alone and the fact that it was just like these levels of surveillance and just the intensity of how intimately they watched every move in your life how did you how did you acted normal how are you able to create a life for years knowing that you have that level of surveillance it is very immersive and at times very lonely because in a way when when there's a dot degree of presence everywhere it's almost no where I mean you're you're really alone in in your truth for the most part I I I understand from friends of mine who are actors that it's sort of similar to method acting right where you really have to kind of immerse yourself in in the role or the version of yourself that you are at that time I think that I had because I started so young this idea that you know at the end of all this when I laughed when I drove out the gates for the last time that all of those different versions of myself and I had to keep straight what kind of fall away and I would like magically be this integrated authentic version of myself that was completely present with every person and what I actually found is that in many ways do it having different versions of ourselves isn't just for intelligence officers this thing that had felt really unique to me and maybe had heightened stakes for me and in the field was actually the same thing that I saw my friends and my sisters and other people doing where you know there's there's the one version of themselves on their Instagram account and another version for their parents and another version for their boss and this temptation to kind of lock the armor down and CM stronger or cooler than we are right which we all feel that and certainly in geo politics there is that tendency I think in a way it prepared me for it for the same challenges as we all face in everyday life you also mentioned it was a really interesting way I think to characterize the role of the CIA officer which is this very human roll this this role of getting to know someone so intimately can you talk about how you did that and just tell the story of the man that you befriended and then ultimately turned out to become an asset for you who was an illicit arms arms dealer how you how you like the specific human bone abilities that you were able to key in on with this person that created the connection needed for him ultimately to to trust me up so the character who is referred to as Jakob in the book is a really interesting example and several of the operational characters have a few composite elements from in order to to preserve their identity by Jakub was a really important one for me to include because it he really does illustrate the the power of understanding the human motivations that Dr violence or drive criminal activity in this case he he was a very imposing British figure of a of a man and yet he had this very lyrical singing voice that I actually heard a singing voice before I saw his face and sighs as I approached him on on the street he he was singing any he turned around and had this kind of brutalist Stalinist kind of phase so and tattoos but his voice sounded really sorrowful and kind of had this folk song quality to it that felt almost nostalgic even though it wasn't from my own childhood and I had the sense right away that there was some other deaths or layer to him that that but his face really belied over the course of developing him and getting to know him I asked him about it a ring that he wore and that had a lamb on it and a he said that it wore it because it reminded him of his grandfather and to be to be strong and I said you know your your grandfather was strong and he said no you know I wanted him to be a line but said that he was a lamb and he was was taken that tortured eventually killed by the authoritarian government in the eastern European country they came from back in in the communist era and he said it with this kind of dismissive almost discussed as though he had been raised to be stronger than that but underneath it I sort.

"aspen  institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:58 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Aspen Institute I'm Jane Wales your host at the age of twenty two amaryllis fox became one of the C. I. A.'s youngest female officers after training she was deployed as an undercover agent working throughout the Middle East to stop acts of extreme terrorism now an advocate for humane engagement and strategic non violence at home and overseas fox's story offers a unique insight into the secretive world of the CIA she joins us to share her story of life under cover and talk about her efforts to promote peace around the world moderating the program is Meena Kim she's the news anchor for KQED this broadcast is made possible each week by the generous support of chevron TPG and the draper Richards Kaplan foundation let me tell you your book was a total page Turner and when I finished at my first thought was I will never complain about my job again I mean well first what does it mean to be in clandestine service at the CIA and to be under non official cover how is that different from other roles of the CIA the role of C. I. A. that sets it apart from the military from really other parts of the intelligence community is to build a human relationships relationships with human sources who are for whatever reason positions to be able to help us predict or prevent acts of war or acts of terrorism and increasingly that's a really rare and powerful thing in an age of of reliance on technical surveillance and technical warfare I I always say it's it's sort of like how if you have friends who you follow on social media and then friends that you see once a week for a drink right the friends you follow on social media you know the facts of their life right if they've had a baby or or they they post a photo where they're getting engaged you know those data points but if you see them for a drink every week you know how they feel about all those things you know whether they're afraid to get married or you know they're they're planning to have babies before they announce them and that ability to understand somebody's fears their dreams their hopes their plans and aspirations allows you to to predict geopolitics in a way that that technical data points just can't it's the why instead of the what and so human intelligence gatherers CIA officers are tasked with going out and doing this at its best very soulful work of meeting and identifying sources that have the potential to to want to leave this legacy of protecting lives and slowly slowly building enough trust and amber or where is the is the sources to be able to move them to a place where you can do that work together with their our analysts and there are CA officers who have official cover like for example there diplomat there's somebody who is known and important enough that in a pinch you can get them out of a hairy situation but if you're in non official cover are you basically I mean you don't have you don't have those those benefits yeah you know want one touched on that I often offer for people as Argo if U. S. have seen the movie Argo right so this is the that the true story of of a CIA operation to go into Iran and rescue some Americans and in order to do so they created a fictional film production company right and when's in order to in order to you know pretend to visit location scout but actually they were doing this operational work and the advantage of non official cover like that is that you can put yourself in places where you are not likely to be as a diplomat or or a U. S. government official it explains why you are in the far flung regions you need to be and to stop many of these attacks or do these kinds of operations the challenge is that you don't have diplomatic immunity right and you don't have the emotional comfort of a of a shared work environment where you all of the the operational considerations can fall away and you can sit with fellow officers every day and you know get advice share stories be in one another's company so it it makes it quite lonely work where there's no one who really fully shares your truth in the training for the work that you did I think also gives a sense of just how dangerous it is I mean you're learning how to use a Glock you're learning out of with stand torture I mean you're you're learning things that as I said make anyone reads her current top and what they're going to complain about it but I do remember going and being in my friend's wedding and my wrists were completely wrong from learning some escape and evasion techniques and in the in the formal down and saying I'm not even going to ask what that is but she had no idea what I was doing at the time is like what did you spend your kid to do it is there a habit like a surveillance have it or some kind of have a you picked up from such intense training that you find even today is hard to shake one of the things were that fence it is it is kind of surprising I think given the depictions in the movies is that a lot of what we're taught is to be really boring a lot of the time the rate because not just you know to be non alerting a eat it all of the kind of roof gymnastics and Glock juggling you see in the movies you know like that wind cheesy and through city streets and you know your cover's blown and you're either out of the country or you're in jail and that is not a very efficient and practical way to go about this work so really a lot of what you're doing is for the ninety percent of the time where you're not operational is is being as tall as possible and so I think the operational habits that stick with me are or though is aged drives my husband crazy that I stop at every orange light right every yellow light that because you're very rule abiding all your when you know when you're in a situation where you might have somebody in a car behind you and you do the kind of normal thing that anyone would do which is to skate through the yellow light you you risk that person thinking that you're trying to lose them and that is a learning and and raises a whole can also just in the way people so so a lot of the behavior is not what you would think from from the screen but it's all they are designed to keep you safe so that in a moment where you are ready to to invite the source to to help do this work that both of you have been protected throughout the process of development as you talk about trying to be boring your identity your fake identity was as an art dealer and you were living in Shanghai and you literally had the Chinese government surveilling you but you had a housekeeper who worked for the government who lived with you right during that time and so you had to be as normal as possible while you're going out and trying to infiltrate no illicit arms deals and and networks and in the Middle East as well I mean you were traveling to to the Middle East as you're doing this and I remember this moment that you talk about where a CIA officer presents you with a photo of you crying and it had been taken by the Chinese surveil ours but because the CIA was surveilling the Chinese they have that image and they said what was going on here with you and was this very private moment for you you were crying alone and the fact that it was just like these levels of surveillance and just the intensity of how intimately they watched every move in your life how did you how did you acted normal how are you able to create a life for years knowing that you have that level of surveillance it is very immersive and at times very lonely because in a way when when there's a dot degree of presence everywhere it's almost no where I mean you're you're really alone in in your trees for the most part I I I understand from friends of mine who are actors that it's sort of similar to method acting right where you really have to kind of immerse yourself in in the role or the version of yourself that you are at that time I think that I had because I started so young this idea that you know at the end of all this when I laughed when I drove out the gates for the last time that all of those different versions of myself that I had to keep straight what kind of fall away and I would like magically be this integrated authentic version of myself that was completely present with every person and what I actually found is that in many ways do it having different versions of ourselves isn't just for intelligence officers this thing that had felt really unique to me and maybe had heightened stakes for me and in the field was actually the same thing that I saw my friends and my sisters and other people doing where you know there's there's the one version of themselves on their Instagram account and another version for their parents and another version for their boss and this temptation to kind of lock the armor down and CM stronger or cooler than we are right which we all feel that and certainly in geo politics there is that tendency I think in a way it prepared me for it for the same challenges we all face in everyday life you also mentioned in it was a really interesting way I think to characterize the role of the CIA officer which is this very human roll this this role of getting to know someone so intimately can you talk about how you did that and just tell the story of the man that you befriended and then ultimately turned out to become an asset for you who was an illicit arms arms dealer how you how you like the specific human bone abilities that you were able to key in on with this person that created the connection needed for him ultimately to to trust me up so the character who is referred to as Jakob in the book is a really interesting example and several of the operational characters have a few composite elements from in order to to preserve their identity by Jakub was a really important one for me to include because it he really does illustrate the the power of understanding the human motivations that Dr violence or drive criminal activity in this case he he was a very imposing British figure of a of a man and yet he had this very lyrical singing voice and I actually heard a singing voice before I saw his face and sighs as I approached him on on the street he he was singing any he turned around and had this kind of brutalist Stalinist kind of phase so and tattoos but his voice sounded really sorrowful and kind of had this folk song quality to it that felt almost nostalgic even though it wasn't from my own childhood and I had the sense right away that there was some other deaths or layer to him that that his face really belied over the course of developing him and getting to know him I asked him about it a ring that he wore and that had a lamb on it and a he said that it wore it because it reminded him of his grandfather and to to be to be strong and I said you know your your grandfather was strong and he said no you know I wanted him to be a line breaks but he was a lamb and he was was taken that torture dimensionally killed by the authoritarian government in the eastern European country they came from back in in the communist era and he said it with this kind of dismissive almost discussed as though he had been raised to be stronger than that but underneath it I sort.

Bolton pessimistic on North Korea

Washington Today

02:15 min | 3 years ago

Bolton pessimistic on North Korea

"Well the president's former national security adviser John Bolton giving a pessimistic outlook on the prospects for getting North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons marking his first public appearance since he was ousted from his position earlier this year there are things we should look to and have serious discussions about. one is the possibility limited though it may be a regime change in North Korea. second. we should look at and discuss with China and we should have done it long ago aiming toward the reunification of the peninsula under freely elected government like that in South Korea. and third if you believe and you may not. that it is unacceptable for North Korea to have nuclear weapons at some point. military force has to be an option now this is obviously the most controversial subject and many people say it's just unimaginable. unimaginable that you would use military force. so let me quote to you. the words of. general Joe John done for the chairman the joint chiefs of staff on his last day I might say is chairman he's done an outstanding job he said this. to the Aspen Institute salmon are in the summer of twenty eighteen. on this question of what's unimaginable. general Dunford said but as I've told my counterparts both friend and foe it is not unimaginable to have military options to respond to north Korea's nuclear capability. what is unimaginable to me. is allowing the capability to allow nuclear weapons to land in Denver Colorado. my job will be to develop military options to make sure that doesn't happen thank general Dunford was completely correct that warning from John Bolton who for awhile served as the president's national security adviser being for being forced out his first public comments before the center for strategic and International Studies CSIS here in Washington

President Trump John Bolton North Korea China South Korea. Joe John Chairman Dunford Colorado. International Studies Csis Washington North Korea. Aspen Institute Denver
"aspen  institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KCRW

"To avoid hiring people full time he says they can just pay people one gig at a time if you can rent the parts of the business use temps rather than full time employees rent a factory then you can look a lot more like a virtual start up that you don't really need to create an enterprise with employees which raises an issue of economic mobility small businesses do most of the country's hiring so for many workers did the first rung on the economic ladder in a bigger share of start ups is now formed by historically disadvantaged groups says Joyce Klein at the Aspen Institute increasingly are pie of entrepreneur. it is more likely to be constituted it up people of color and women and they have greater barriers and growing their business that maybe a trend that we're seeing here in the census data new businesses are critical to economic growth says James angel a Georgetown they're not just with the hiring is there were the innovations is as well. I'm Scott song for market place. whether a recession is coming or not is one of those known unknowns right I mean one is definitely coming we just don't know when. then when people hear the R. word a lot of things probably go through their minds how much savings they have what the stock market might do on whether they are going to keep their jobs we asked you the other day to tell us what recession it makes you think of here are the jobs responses my name is C. and I'm calling from Michigan I work at a small college and I really love my job..

Joyce Klein Aspen Institute James angel Georgetown Scott Michigan
"aspen  institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:27 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In association with KQED public radio and the Aspen Institute I'm Jane Wales your host well the Islamic state no longer holds territory is still has the capacity to recruit and to engage in terrorist actions on this week's episode will consider the future of ISIS along with the fate of thousands of captured fighters and their families joining us for this conversation is Ali su farm he's a former FBI special agent and he's the author of the autonomy of terror from the death of bin laden to the rise of the Islamic state he's joined by robin Wright she's a writer for The New Yorker and fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center moderating the program is my co host ray Suarez this program is made possible each week by the generous support of chevron TPG and the draper Richards Kaplan foundation and now to race Juarez ice is lost its last territory in Syria on March twenty third and when that happened more than five thousand fighters were captured or surrendered tens of thousands more were already in some form of captivity or restraint thousands of civilians came along robin Wright what's the latest on ISIS in captivity where are they do we know how many there are this year democratic forces that lead the fight against ISIS captured more than nine thousand fighters about two thousand of them are foreign fighters are the majority are Syrians and Iraqis but among those two thousand who are believed to be among the most militant you have dozens of nationalities including the United States but also from Russia China France Morocco Egypt I toured the prison which is now one of these pop up prisons that is now are holding many of the prisoners they filled one prison in four days with one thousand five hundred and these are all facilities that had to be organized really at the last minute because they know one estimated how many there would be but on top of those fighters there are another seventy three thousand largely women and children who were the families of ISIS fighters and they are now being confined in a camp in north east Syria in a city called all whole and the conditions there are pretty miserable again no one anticipated what was the American intelligence community the Syrian democratic forces of war the international aid groups what kind of numbers there would be and what their needs would be these are people who are now totally dependent for housing for food for blankets and for medical care everything including you know measles vaccines do they share with the fighters themselves an international profile these women well it's interesting the women had for female battalions with Ian isis and some of the other women who lived under the Islamic state police contend that these women were often among the most brutal in their enforcement of a social and cultural and legal restrictions on people who lived on under ISIS command and and this one quite interesting at at all hold there are women particularly in the annex for the foreign fighters who are trying to recreate the caliphate in effect they are are trying to impose strict Islamic rule and and even stoning some of the women who engage with whether it's foreign reporters or mail aid workers it's ISIS it's just isis in jail now Ali su fun a does this make for a complicated of months ahead perhaps even years ahead as I'm down to say that the a lot of these countries are not going to want their nationals back war will do so only if they immediately imprisoned them when they arrive or will never take them back yeah absolutely I mean what to robin talked about the is a problem waiting to happen this is a cyclical nature of terrorism you know and I'll hold for example you have almost seventy four thousand granted to many of them about forty two from Syria I believe in forty three percent from Iraq but there's also the foreigners who are from third country and I think what we're seeing now that you know the caliphate might be physically defeated but spiritually mentally it's still there and ISIS will probably take advantage of the situation in these camps in order to make these people living waters are we have to think about the local people from Iraq and Syria they are important to the social fabric off Iraq and Syria and remember isis happened in the first place because of the policies of the Maliki government in Iraq against the Sunnis which sh ISIS benefited from directly in establishing their so called state and so called caliphate in we seeing these dynamics continue to exist as for the foreigners you know we have about five thousand from Europe who went to join Iraq and Syria ISIS in Iraq and Syria granted there's lots of them state many came back about that the average twenty to twenty five percent came back to the to their nations but the people who are the foreign or find the foreign fighters who robin spoke about and especially some of the women and children are still there and this is going to be a big problem what do you do with them the European need to basically take care of their citizens I think every country need to take care of their citizen I know it is politically complicated itself operationally complicated there is a significant political and financial costs for this to happen however the cost is going to be way more down the road if they let these people stay there or the Kurds or the Iraqis or what ever released on now they are all in one place we can control the situation we can interview these people we can figure out who did what they can do a lot of four prosecutions for people who are involved in criminal activities that can do we have any patience for others if you let these people go on I think they're gonna be spread around the world and it's going to be extremely difficult to surveillance to surveil them and counter the threat that they might pose down the road let me put it to you this way we had that before with the Soviet I'm gone jihadis people who want to fight in Afghanistan against the Soviet any of them could not go back home especially from Egypt from Libya from Algeria and they created a sub culture and they went around this guy you some of bin laden and they established Okada some European countries think maybe we can pull their citizenship away yeah that's a very short sighted decision because people have family and friends back home and that can radicalize for their people in these communities Saudi Arabia took the citizenship was sought before some of bin laden alone that did not stop the East Africa embassy bombing did not stop the USS Cole and did not stop nine eleven the change the world I think every country need to be responsible towards their citizen the they need to percent investigation teams and intelligence teams do interviews of these individuals and figure out who they can you know flip because they want to cooperate to go back home who can they testify against others who are so radical that they need they need to be prosecuted and so forth but it's I did we pay now or we gonna pay later and it's what we've seen with Afghanistan back in the late eighties early nineties by on steroids with isis but Ali briefly just in ones and twos these people have created a challenge for different countries in Britain the story of a woman trying to get back into the country and reunite with her family has become a national issue debated from one end of the country to the other debated in parliament can you imagine that at scale countries trying to take home not just one person but three dozen each with their own need to be debriefed to be examined to be analyzed to see whether they could really enter society again is is it really plausible look you know what you're saying is very very important point and this is probably one of the difficult difficulties many European countries have especially because they don't have the laws of conspiracy to deal with the situation however this is because of the lack of strategy there is no strategy from the Europeans in dealing with the situation you have in England for example four hundred who came back already more than four hundred who came back already and there is no strategy to deal with these individuals and guess what most of these people are free most of these people are roaming around so they need to develop a strategy on how to deal with the situation and unfortunately that does not exist look if Kazakhstan can develop strategy to take their citizens back Russia can develop a strategy to take their citizen box Morocco and so many other countries I think the European countries can figure out a way to do it however I think it's very difficult politically and as I mentioned earlier either they're going to have to deal with this now when they have almost total control of the situation or the gonna have to deal with it later I mean they can't keep them with the courage the courage is not a country I think there's a lot of complications in dealing with the Kurds in continuing to hold these fighters I'm the it rocky government the you know they are prosecuting dumb and that's good but every time there's a European that receive this death sentence because what they did in Iraq and Syria their opinion countries they go up an arm all how do you do the death sentence so look if you want to leave them there they have to be subjected to the laws of the countries where they all are so I think the Europeans need to develop a strategy because if they don't many of these people I will be released a lot of them will go and join ISIS in different areas around the world where ISIS is still operating Southeast Asia Africa there are so many different places where ISIS capitalizes on local conflict in order to embed themselves in the region and they can flight there or they might sneak into Europe or try to recruit family and friends in Europe based on the status of living waters that has been created we've seen that before let's learn from the past robin Wright you've visited with some of the fighters who are arguably in some sort of rehabilitation process what did they tell you were they ready were any of them ready to denounce the struggle as the price to get their ticket punched for a re entry into another country to get themselves out of prison look the rivulet Haitian program is one tiny little fraction of the way super democratic forces in the international community is dealing with the numbers it applies only to the Syrians and only to those who are not fighters with an ISIS but those who were you know the functionaries the labor who whether they were janitors or cooks or whatever but those who may have had guns but they weren't involved in fighting and killing that had committed no felonies very small number of them have been given back to the tribes to go through a real will rebuild Tatian program and though I I did interview both the leader of the guy who the Sheik who runs of all one of the pilot programs and some of the recent graduates but let me make a let me address some of the points are only made first of all of the autocratic countries that don't have kind of rule of law or have questionable justice systems are most willing to take back their fighters because they can detain them indefinitely and they don't necessarily have to have the kind of evidence you would in a western court to prove their guilt one of the problems is that there is very little independent documentation on what each individual fighter has done you can't rely on other ISIS fighters to be the sole source of information they would be questioned in court and so the Europeans have taken a number of different actions the Brits have strip citizenship of some of the isis fighter so that they don't have to take them back are the Germans have said they need evidence in order to be able to try them before they will take fighters back and of course that's in it almost impossibly high standards for all those for all of the Germans or dual citizens who may have joined ISIS other Canadian have a dollar just that they don't know whether their system has capability the sophistication to deal with this kind of question despite the fact the world is known for five years at ISIS has been luring seducing fighters from more than eighty countries it is made very little in the way of preparation for what to do if isis was actually defeated the on the French diplomat told me that even if they try to take back just the women who.

Aspen Institute Jane Wales KQED forty three percent twenty five percent five years four days
"aspen  institute" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

11:42 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Aspen Institute about don't let your kids quit sports when they're only ten or eleven years old now look I eat I find the spot well done and of course the message is a good one but between you and me I really don't get the sense that kids are quitting sports in fact just the other day the California interscholastic federation which is the ruling body of all high school sports and that large state well they reported that for the seventh year in a row participation in high school sports in California has risen to yet another all time high well that kind of report certainly seems to to run counter to what the TV commercials saying now what true course high school football numbers continue to slump nationwide but all the other sports including soccer and basketball cross track and field they'll continue to add numbers so I don't understand that on one hand how use sports has expanded the last few years into a seventeen billion dollar industry and yet now the reports that there are number of kids between the ages of six and twelve who playing sports or or beginning to to drop out now again we know about the concerns about football due to concussions and of course you're not video games are exploding in popularity but I'm I'm getting mixed messages here and I want to ask you what your senses and I wanted to sort of like informal poll this morning to see what if we your neck of the your perspective in your neck of the woods are you funny that fewer and fewer kids are playing sports now course today's sports parents and grandparents well they all grew up when the lower of sports was truly about having fun running around and playing with one's friends now course fun has been replaced in the equation with dreams of scholarships and professional contracts but overall I'm just not so sure that fewer kids are playing sports these days and I was as I just reported that's not the case in California I'm curious as a sports parent today your sports fan or as a coach or educator are you seeing numbers drop in your area let's talk about this give me a call one eight seven seven three three seven sixty six sixty six and the phone lines are open now you know we we know that little league baseball numbers are dropping everywhere because kids are are flocking to the traveling club teams like like a Ripken baseball or a you and of course we talk about football and its issues as well but what about the other sports that I kids play soccer and basketball softball cross track and field field hockey ice hockey what are you saying because I was upset I'm getting mixed messages about this I want to get a real track here as to what our kids are doing with their spare time he sighs perhaps playing video games and we know of course that limited this is important to recognize as well we know that seventy four percent of all kids quit playing sports by the time they're thirteen by that age the nearest cover something else a life or that they are particularly talented in a sport and that's step by the way that the the fact that kids quit by ten to thirteen that seventy four percent number that comes from a landmark study that was done some twenty years ago at the institute for you sports at Michigan state and I believe the percentage still remains the same today seventy four percent so that's sort of like the the the the the guideline the landmark though people used to talk about when kids decide that they're not going to play sports by time they're entering into adolescence but I'm not sure kids according when they're ten or eleven let's talk about the census our conversation this morning with our friend ed ward over Elizabeth it good morning you're on the fan good morning Rick I you don't do that good I I I don't think the overall spectrum of kids drop out of sports has dropped I just think they might be going into other sports like for example in the spring outlook courses become a big sport right sell maybe kids are going to different sports where and if if for some reason read people are dropping out I think a lot of it might be the because of the economic factor of the cost of buying these different travel there sports and all that stuff because the they dig the good again the prices are going up all the time and I I think I said this on past shows reason why did it goes up all the time the tournaments that that that they participate in it goes up so that that's that's weird the course actors in that it is any drops I think it's because of the economic economic factor of parents maybe can afford to pay for travel you know and I and I think those two point you make a good ones yes we had discussed about the fact that the sports is sort of gradually becoming a case of hams are have nots because of the the rising cost that's certainly reason why perhaps we with that that the numbers are dropping off that could certainly be a part of it the other thing you mentioned two is about the the ball specialization in the past you know kids would play two or three sports during the course of the year nowadays kids are sort of say well I'm a plain one sport and so the numbers if they want a once for like I'd say play lacrosse all year round well that's going to drop off the numbers in other sports they used to play so merry that's party issue was well but I'm I'm I said you your love is so your whole life with baseball are you using kids the numbers of baseball dropping off the youth leagues and I kind of thing well I I I haven't the only thing I might see is that the count level may have dropped off okay well that's that's that's my feeling on it I think everyone wants to be travel coach so then again is more more teams and then I then better than teens become warder down in in that aspect okay this intro that that that that that's my feeling on that but none are there there's there's still many people play baseball no matter what and it's just a matter of now people go into other sports that that they feel what kids want to play in any I think they're going to play the course because it's it's it has more action compared to baseball if you understand what I'm saying of course insisted at the at the youth level ed thank yous always he thought for you should have a good day call was a bit in the little league world series that's right I'm glad you reminded me yes absolutely the sale for those guys get in Cooperstown under excuse me all with his words we'll see what happens Rick on that okay thanks and talk to you soon and yeah yeah those those things making some noise and wings poured good for them let's see how far they can keep going in the Little League World Series let's move on let's go to Scott and New Brunswick Hey Scott good morning you're on the fan good how are you okay I want to talk about I think that number that seventy four percent at thirteen yes I think it coincides with a lot of different things and it makes sense for I don't think that's a great judge of you know to support because that thirteen year old males and females are going to reset it become interested in each other I thirteen that's when you also have a lot of teams have try outs now so when you got your high school team people are getting caught show that alright but you know we're playing I mean if you're a little repairs picking teams right there's a lot of kids out there changes up taking his daughter here's why when you go to the actual that can narrow down your what's your twenty five kids yeah it's a hundred twenty five kids are getting caught and then they don't like to have a shop where sports so I think that is so good to give here like this is one of those kids hello you know what I'm not good at the place where you can go with with different support you know I just think that it has a lot to do with that was gone I think you're absolutely right that's why I think that that landmark study at a Michigan state still holds up after so many years I recall looking at that that study as as a twenty twenty five years ago and for all the reasons you just outlined and more what by age thirteen or fourteen you're either an eighth grader going to ninth grade that's begins be sort of you decide a winner of the flock as to how many kids are really good enough or are either have to want to play sports in high school and there are cuts at that age kids begin to say well you know I don't think I may enjoy playing the sport but I'm not going to really be very good at it so many have become the team manager or maybe I'll go on now and work in the the it'll be in the school band or I'll do something was you know for video games because the other thing okay was now it is a lot why each sports because kids are playing in groups are playing with a team of Judah they have to strategize their land sure I understood her to learn leadership so I think it's wrong into that you know that side of things too and that's not considered a sport even though you're still kind of you're still getting some of the same skill sets that he would but the the point are you you making I agree this is that the around the age thirteen fourteen is a kids get into adolescence to begin to get they sort of the Valparaiso so I say is their own voice their own persona they begin to get a sense of where they fit into the world and they're not going to be a superstar athlete in high school make the varsity than they sort of drift and other things which is fine that's all part of life that's for the the the maturation process but to your point you know it kids find their way around that age I don't see Scott that the kids and thank you for your call I don't know if kids age ten or eleven are retiring from sports that's a crew I mean those two or three years between thirteen or being ten those two three years are critical developmental area and I don't I again I I know the thrust of the of the peace the commercial it's running for ESPN aspen is about to know don't put parental pressure on kids I am not getting the sense that kids are dropping out when they're ten or eleven because of parental pressure we've we've we've we've been down that path many many times and we like to think that in this day and age that moms and dads are a little more sophisticated a sports parents knowing full well not to put that kind of pressure on their kids because the kids will eventually decide to walk away from sports and on a play these are different issues that may be subtle in terms of their implications but they are important in the terms away what we we you work with our kids and encouraging on sports and again if the state of California is telling me that that for the seventh year in a row they've had the highest numbers ever kids playing high school sports that suggests to me that the kids aren't quitting quits their ten or eleven at least in California and that's that's what I'm trying to sense from today from your calls and again I I am I'm just taking a brief from former pole to get your sense of you know what you think we know the said football numbers are down because of concussion concerns hello the other sports yeah let me let me take a time out when I come back after a day's up they did Ms update I go right back to your calls at one eight seven seven three three seven sixty six sixty six well the thing to finish my back to school list that's what my mom takes me a Walgreens because it's easy to find what we need and it doesn't cost a super whole bunch this week twelve Oct effects are two for seven dollars and Gatorade twenty ounce four packs are too for four ninety nine I love this stuff in my lunchbox thanks for all.

Aspen Institute California interscholastic fed California seventy four percent seventeen billion dollar twenty twenty five years two three years seven dollars thirteen year eleven years twenty ounce twenty years three years one hand
"aspen  institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Best known for founding. The Aspen institute buyers will get a sixty eight hundred square foot contemporary Aspen home with a massive entertaining space and seven bedrooms, including two secret rooms hidden behind a bookshelf is a Bloomberg pursuits dot com for more. I'm Andrew O'day. Bloomberg radio. Twenty five years ago NJIT graduate, dick Sweeney, co-founded Curie Green Mountain a company whose incredible innovations changed the way the world bruise a Cup of coffee today, he lectures, widely on business leadership, and is a strong advocate for NJIT's work to combine business education with the power of stem NJIT is definitely fostering innovative thinking for budding entrepreneurs simply because that's the world. We live in NJIT is producing students that had been trained educated. And given the business to be a contributor to accompany the distinct mission is to develop great stem scholars attributes I've always look for and team members are heart smart, Scotsman luck. Everyone people with passion intelligence, courage, and every discount luck these students coming out of NJIT has has experienced all of that NJIT, New Jersey institute of technology. Learn more at storiesofinnovation dot NJIT dot EDU. With wealth management offers investment and wealth advisory services to high net worth individuals and institutions by removing many conflicts of interest associated with your typical investment advisory firm with a wealth management can offer you a different wealth management experience one that puts your interests first. For more information on a client, I wealth management experience. Visit with them wealthed dot com, that's with a wealth dot com. Connecting decision-makers to a network of news and.

NJIT Bloomberg Aspen institute Aspen dick Sweeney Andrew O'day Curie Green Mountain Twenty five years
Microsoft says discovers hacking targeting democratic institutions in Europe

AP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 3 years ago

Microsoft says discovers hacking targeting democratic institutions in Europe

"Network. Microsoft has identified hacking attacks aimed at European democratic institutions AP correspondent Charles de LA desma says it's ahead of elections in may the company says a group called strontium targeting Email accounts, more than one hundred people in six European countries. Including from groups, the German Council on foreign relations, the Aspen institute's in Europe, and the German Marshall fund American authorities at tied strontium, otherwise known as fancy bear or AP Twenty-eight. Russia's main intelligence agency known as the Microsoft says the attacks occurred from September to December notify the organizations after discovering

Charles De La Desma Microsoft German Marshall Fund German Council Aspen Institute Europe Russia
"aspen  institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And once but there were some positive ones too. Yeah. I appreciate you making that clarification. And that is how it comes across the book more about this innate almost very difficult to put into words. Yeah. Yeah. I mean me as a very strong willed stubborn, very incredibly smart child. And she has been that way. Since she was born. I mean, I had to stay two steps in front of her mentally almost all the time or she would just school me. And that's hard when you're stressed and you're tired and you're exhausted. And just cannot read another story at eight thirty at night. So. So yeah, she's she's a I don't wanna say handful. But she was a challenge. Right. Pushed you in all the ways that kids can do. And has she read the book, she has not she read a chapter of it. I had a conversation with her before I left for New York. I had originally told her that once the book was out that she could read it. And now I'm going to be gone for the next month. So she has to wait a little bit longer. But I kind of want to be there with her. To answer any questions. There's a lot of stuff in the book. Especially about my relationship with her dad that could possibly change her relationship with her dad or changed her relationship with herself or make her feel a little less valued. And so I I want to be there. Not only to reassure her. But just to answer any questions, you might have. But I can imagine. It's also going to be really weird for her to read a story about her that she didn't. Right. So I tried to be really mindful of that in writing the book, I didn't want to turn it into her story because that's not something that I can tell. But I mean. There's a lot of things in there that she might be embarrassed for someone to read when she's seventeen eighteen years old dating. I don't know. So and. I I hope she likes it. I'm sure and she's at that age too of everything's self conscious. Anyway, like entering into a period of time where you. Yeah. Who you are. Yeah. She's starting middle school next year. And I feel for her. Yeah. Exactly. Makes sense. Stephanie land of made hard work low-pay. Mothers will to survive. Interviewed by Rachel Schneider of the Aspen institute on afterwards on C span radio. The. But it's, but I'm glad we had a chance to talk about that piece because this book comes across much as a story of motherhood. And. And your relationship with her is really beautifully told in it. So. We really have talked about all of the things that were on my mind as I was reading through this book. The ideas, about empathy and. How you maintain it? But I use about how you maintain..

Aspen institute Rachel Schneider Stephanie land New York seventeen eighteen years
Intelligence Chief says he Meant no Disrespect to Trump

Coast to Coast with George Noory

02:07 min | 4 years ago

Intelligence Chief says he Meant no Disrespect to Trump

"Ninety five percent fresh on, rotten tomatoes it's. One of the best action movies ever may Shota Rolling Stone calls off the charts spectacular doing the best northern hooking. Of thrilling clever story filled with, twists and turns target in the hunt we should be dead with an ending. That will blow you away we wrapped and Tom Cruise. Mission impossible fallout Friday with a, PG thirteen may be, inappropriate for children. Under thirteen the young men crashed into a pole outside this trader Joes, with a gun in hand starts running, in exchanges gunfire with police that's when somebody inside the trader Joe's a young woman was, hit, police followed him in tried to resuscitate her but she expired at the store, a, word. Of caution for President Trump from Iran's. President Hassan Rwanda warned Trump about pursuing hostile policies against Iran state media reports. For Awani said Mr. Trump don't play with the, lion's tail this, would only lead to regret as he addressed a gathering. Of Iranian diplomats the director of national intelligence says he He meant no disrespect toward President, Trump, with his awkward response to news of a second Trump summit with Russia's president, seeking, to. Control the fallout from an interview Dan. Coats gave an Aspen institute form coach says some of the press coverage mischaracterized. His response to breaking news ladder Putin Okay It says he's admittedly awkward response was not meant to criticize the president and he and the entire intelligence community are committed to supporting the president in ongoing efforts to prevent Russian election meddling Jan Johnson. Washington they knew Brexit chief in Great Britain adopted a get tough attitude with the European. Union he suggested Britain may not. Pay it's. Fifty one billion dollar divorce. Payment if no trade deal with the EU is. Reached he, said you can't have one side fulfilling its part of the bargain and the other not I'm Barbara. Kusak Zepa. And feel.

Mr. Trump President Trump President Hassan Rwanda Awani Shota Rolling Stone Great Britain Iran Coats Tom Cruise Kusak Zepa Aspen Institute EU JOE Jan Johnson DAN Washington Russia Putin Director
Intelligence chief says he meant no disrespect to Trump

Sean Hannity

02:14 min | 4 years ago

Intelligence chief says he meant no disrespect to Trump

"Gunman surrenders no. Disrespect I'm Barbara Kusak, a gunman surrendered. Peacefully following a three hour long hostage taking at Los Angeles grocery store correspondent Miguel Marquez says it all started after police gave chase as the. Man was suspected of shooting his grandmother and another woman. At a separate location the young, men crashed into a, pole outside this. Trader Joes with a gun in hand starts running in exchanges gunfire with, police that's when somebody inside the trader, Joe's a young woman was hit police followed him in tried to resuscitate her but she, expired, at, the store a word of caution for President Trump, from Iran's president hot Sandra Wani warned Trump about pursuing hostile policies against Iran. State media reports were Awani said this Trump don't play with the lion's tail. This would only lead to regret, as he addressed a gathering of. Iranian diplomats the director of national intelligence says he meant No disrespect, toward, President, Trump with his awkward response to news of a second Trump's summit with Russia's president seeking to control the fallout from an interview. Dan Coats gave an Aspen institute forum coats has some of the press coverage. Mischaracterized his response to breaking news ladder Putin Yeah yeah Okay Says his admittedly awkward response was not meant to criticize the, president and he and the entire intelligence community are committed to supporting the president in ongoing efforts to prevent Russian election meddling Jan Johnson. Washington they knew Brexit chief in Great Britain adopted a get tough attitude with the European. Union he suggested Britain may not. Pay it's. Fifty one billion dollar divorce. Payment if no trade deal with the EU has, reached he, said you can't have one side fulfilling its part of the bargain and the other not I'm Barbara. Kusak I believe that God created you and he also created an abundance, of organic fruits and vegetables to keep you healthy hi I'm Dennis black naturopathic doctor and founder of Texas. SuperFood over thirty years ago I, was diagnosed with stage four cancer and given just months,.

President Trump Donald Trump Barbara Kusak Dan Coats Miguel Marquez Iran Great Britain EU Aspen Institute Los Angeles Sandra Wani Jan Johnson Putin Chase Awani Founder Washington Russia JOE
White House says Trump “disagrees” with Putin’s offer to interview Americans

Steve Dahl

03:42 min | 4 years ago

White House says Trump “disagrees” with Putin’s offer to interview Americans

"In a devastating fire at a prospect heights condo complex Catherine Catalin, has details Lisa now, believe it was a twelve year old child possibly playing with a lighter that touched off the massive fire now hundreds will look for a new place to live the fire. On MacIntosh court, destroyed ninety six units crews have been boarding up what is left of the place firefighters on the scene today checking for, hotspots many residents want answers ABC seven reports they confronted the prospect. Heights police chief l. Stephens as to why, the fire burned for so long upset at the preliminary 'cause as to whether or not the. Child started the fire on purpose but the chief says he has. No comment on that so far. Stephens adds it appears to be accident Catherine Catalane WLS. AM eight nine news, the White House says the President Trump disagrees with Russian President Vladimir Putin's offer to, allow the US to question, twelve Russians accused of interfering. In the two thousand sixteen election in exchange for permitting Russia to interview Americans the Accuses of unspecified crimes correspondent Dana bash has part of, the, statement from the White House. Press secretary on the proposal Sarah Sanders is saying it is a proposal that was made insincerity by President Putin. But, President Trump disagrees with that hopefully President Putin will have the twelve identified Russians come. To the United States to prove their innocence. Or guilt the White House has said had said Wednesday it was under consideration. Even though the State Department, called Russia's. Allegations against the Americans absurd and the president and those around him are trying to make clear that they agree with intelligence. Officials that Russia meddled in the two thousand sixteen election after some responses, to reporter questions that brought conflicting statements Bob Costantini reports. That agreement on Russia's efforts stops when it comes, to the idea of who, benefited US. Intelligence agencies say much of what Moscow did with its election. Interference attempts to hurt Hillary Clinton and conversely elect Donald. Trump who was the Republican nominee but at the Aspen institute economic forum homeland security secretary cures to. Nielsen Still sensitive to. The. President's sensitivity to the idea he benefited but we've seen on the foreign influence, side is they were attempting to. Intervening cause chaos on both sides Russia's Vladimir. Putin said at the Monday news conference in Helsinki he was pleased. That Donald Trump on the US presidency since, as a candidate Mr. Trump called for better relations with Russia Bob Costantini Washington the White House says President, Trump has extended an invitation to Vladimir Putin to meet in Washington this fall discussions are underway and during an appearance at the economic club of Chicago this afternoon Bill Cameron says mayor Emanuel. Made himself the most vulnerable we've ever seen him got emotional and revealed what he considers the most miserable part of, his job as mayor Rahm Surjit rips the soul out of him to talk to families by gun violence here's what he says he tries, to tell him as a, father I, don't want, you to be alone I love you Watching you And as many as tomorrow's this. Is takes. We're here I think. It sucks I'll take. Any fight you wanna give me. On. Politics anyone you take this I don't wanna do. It anymore it just. Sometimes just the hardest piece of. Crap. Of this job And I don't. Invite anybody I don't go with the media I just think it's And. Then you meet somebody Who you know Figured out how to get up the next day and get back in that. Gives me energy you wanna do it if they, can do it we. Can do it, the mayor said Chicago is not a tale, of two cities but a tale. Of two investments, and he says we should all sees the current good economy to help the guy on the corner who would take an opportunity if he could get one at city hall..

President Putin Donald Trump President Trump Russia United States White House Stephens Chicago Rahm Surjit Mayor Emanuel Catherine Catalin ABC Bob Costantini Washington Dana Bash Hillary Clinton Catherine Catalane Press Secretary State Department Nielsen