30 Burst results for "Aspen Institute"

Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

Outcomes Rocket

04:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

"Welcome back to the outcomes rockets Sal Marquez here, and they have the privilege of hosting for the Second Time Miss Deb Gordon, she's spent her career trying to level the playing field for health care consumers haven't listened to the first podcasts with DAB. You've gotta go listen to it. It's all about the consumer and healthcare. She's all about you. She's all about your employees and how you can get the most for your healthcare dollar. She's the author of the healthcare consumers manifesto how to get the most for your money based on research she conducted as a senior fellow. At the Harvard Kennedy, School Center for Business and government she's a former health insurance executive and health care CEO. She's an aspen. Institute health innovators fellow and an Eisenhower fellow, her research and commentaries have appeared in USA Today, the Harvard Business Review blog, and on network open. She holds a B A in bioethics from Brown University and an MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and I'm excited to dive into her work again around the consumer's manifesto deb such a privilege to have you back on. Hey, saw. Thanks so for having me back. Yeah, absolutely. So you've been busy. I have been busy. That's true. I spent probably a year doing research for this book and another year writing a not exactly that split but I spend a good two years of my life producing this baby and it is exciting to come back and tell you about it because when we first met, I was just starting to think about it. I was just starting the research and listening to what consumers had to say. So I'm excited to be back to talk more about it the same here and so dab you know obviously. So listeners goal isn't a DEB's podcast. This you get a deeper appreciation about her time as an insurance executive and what has inspired her work and focus in the consumer sphere but a little bit about the book. Dab. You know what's the focus area? What are the takeaways at a high level? Sure. So I wrote the book mainly to expose the human side of healthcare costs like what is really going on for people when we go to the doctor or were phasing an insurance decision and we have to pay. For it and I was really taken with the fact that so many people of all walks of life come to me and say because I used to work health insurance they know I know something about it and they just say what should I do and you know the most extraordinary people who've accomplished so much in their lives walk into my office at the Kennedy School at Harvard and alike, what health insurance should I buy and I. It just dawned on me that if people like that need help and it's Legitimate that they do. It's very confusing and can be overwhelming like what chance is you know everyone else have of making sense of these decisions. So that's the motivation that I I brought into the book and then in doing my research for it, I heard story after story of consumer. So real people who are trying to get value for their healthcare dollars whether they use those kind of terms or not I say like shopping for healthcare is a thing we could do people don't use those words and they don't even. Know what I'm talking about. But you know I interviewed people about their experiences spending money on healthcare and what I learned is that although it feels really foreign to put that into shopping terms or you know we know how to buy things but we don't know how to shop around in healthcare and. It doesn't mean we're not able to. That's I think the biggest takeaway is that we do actually have more power than we might even realize and that the first step is to just ask the question, what if what, if I could get what I needed? What do I need? Why do I need this? Is there an alternative and just almost like re imagine ourselves as a customer when it comes to healthcare this is Dr is nervous and unhappy by the way, but it's not a slight against doctors. It's just you know what I think consumers need for whatever reason we need permission almost to think of ourselves as entitled to get value for our healthcare dollars.

Sal Marquez Harvard Kennedy Harvard Business School Harvard Business Review Deb Gordon Executive DEB Senior Fellow Brown University School Center For Business Eisenhower Usa Today Harvard Kennedy School
The pandemic may cause 40 million Americans to lose their homes

Pacifica Evening News

01:59 min | 2 months ago

The pandemic may cause 40 million Americans to lose their homes

"About 1/3 of all Americans rent their homes, and a new report for the Aspen Institute shows the pandemic related unemployment crisis could mean eviction. For more than 40% of those households without additional relief measures. Roz Brown reports. Nevada is behind only Alabama, where renters are the most vulnerable to eviction. Other top states for vulnerable renters include Oklahoma, Louisiana and New York City Co author Sam Gillman says the loss of housing often ushers in serious legal consequences and suffering for families. It leads to Children not being able to go to school, homelessness, depression and diseases of despair. An eviction offends everything in a family's life. Nevada has created a rant relief program. But the state's $30 million in assistance relies entirely on federal funds and stimulus talks have stalled in Congress. President Donald Trump circumventing Congress on Saturday by signing executive orders, he says, will deliver aid to Americans, including an eviction moratorium, But it's not clear if their constitutional or substantive, the report shows. A 37% of Nevada renters are at risk of eviction by the end of the year. Visions don't change, Gillman says. Some renters will be able to borrow money or work something out with their landlord. But eventually those options will be exhausted. And at that point, that's when this pick your natural disaster metaphor. Eviction. Avalanche tsunami tornado will continue to start carrying through and accelerating through our communities, according to Gilman. It's not just runners who will be affected, but also landlord's. Those mom and pop landlords are also severely at risk in this rental housing crisis, because if the Rangers can't pay rent The landlord's can't pay their mortgages and we could see the acceleration of a rental housing crisis into a foreclosure crisis. Gilman notes that black and Latino Americans who already experience a greater risk of Cove in 19 make up about 80% of those facing eviction for

Nevada Sam Gillman Congress Gilman Donald Trump Aspen Institute Rangers Roz Brown New York City Oklahoma President Trump Alabama Executive Louisiana
Aspen Institute says it will return $8 million small-business loan

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 5 months ago

Aspen Institute says it will return $8 million small-business loan

"Two a prominent DC based think tank the Aspen Institute is returning eight million dollars it got from the feds as part of the corona virus relief package just yesterday Aspin argue the small business aid was needed to keep its four hundred thirty person staff employed the aspen institute has a one hundred fifteen million dollar endowment and several billionaires are on its board of trustees the decision comes a day after the Washington post reported the institute got the loan it joins the LA Lakers and shake shack and among the businesses that have gotten federal money and then chosen to give

Aspen Institute Aspin Washington Post La Lakers
Bloomberg fills the Obama vacuum

Mark Simone

02:46 min | 8 months ago

Bloomberg fills the Obama vacuum

"Has another problem about you're obviously Joe Biden has a big problem in that he used to be able to talk now he's got dementia Alzheimers whatever the hell is going to know where he is he's bumping into walls so at the most embarrassing thing for by news where is Obama Obama hasn't endorsed them Biden keeps mentioning Obama what he and Barack did what he and Obama did with our administration meantime Obama obviously is not endorsing him and obviously doesn't even like him has no interest in Obama's been secretly helping the fall Patrick seep secretly helping Elizabeth Warren is endorsed somebody in the Canadian racism Dorsey people all the time but he won't endorse Biden so to it's a bit of an embarrassment for Biden so Bloomberg cashes in on this by running these commercials where Obama appears to be endorsing Bloomberg you've seen these commercials were not what it was and this happens a lot when you're at a big event in your speaking the president speaking usually the president will get up and say nice things about all the dignitaries in as a senator Schumer's here I'll say some great things about Schumer it's good to have mayor Bloomberg here that'll say some great things about mayor Bloomberg so that happened on ten occasions so Bloomberg cut together all that footage where you hear Obama say mayor Bloomberg has been one of the great leaders in the country and he and I together been fighting of the so it took a bunch of us come together so it looks like Obama is endorsing Bloomberg now audio has just emerged yesterday from two thousand sixteen of Bloomberg saying he can't really stand bomba and a bomb is not a great president and that he wishes he had voted for a romp or supported right well yeah he says right we would have been better off around so this is just emerged out to another one of these things were Bloomberg is speaking at one of these elitist ridiculous conferences that's why all these audio always emerges a Bloomberg saying these stupid things if you want to be a great politician you go speak at the state fair you go speak at that kind of stuff you go speak in Nebraska that's where you learn how to speak to people that's what Bill Clinton is so good he learned to speak by talking to workers at a seven eleven when you know when you learn how to explain policy to them you'd really know how to do it Donald Trump spent his life on construction sites talking to blue collar guys he knows how to talk to people Bloomberg when he speaks it's at Davos it's at the Aspen Institute in this case with the anti Obama remarks it was at the Goldman Sachs speaker series when you speak in the Goldman Sachs of the Aspen Institute you're totally removed from all American voters so more and more audio Elizabeth Warren was right but when she said you know that we don't know what's lurking out there about Bloomberg's waiting to come out

Joe Biden
"aspen institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:34 min | 9 months ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Grant from the Aspen Institute forum for community solutions to reduce the number of students particular young men of color who get disconnected from high school or community college the twenty thousand dollar grant part of the aspen institute's data for impact project within the opportunity use foreign money will allow the two institutions to better track and analyze student attendance and transfer data for thousands of high school and community college students some sparring Congress where leaders are taking aim at the president and whether he interfered in the sentencing of Roger stone house speaker Nancy Pelosi blasted the president and Attorney General William Barr for interfering in the Roger stone sentencing this is an abuse of power the president is again trying to manipulate federal law enforcement to serve his political interests but minority leader Kevin McCarthy says the president is not interfering and it's Democrats trying to impeach the president all over again you can line from the idea you can just claim impeachment instead of listening to the facts and stop this bill ray Cobb C. B. S. news Washington Attorney General bill Barr taking up public swipe at the president saying that the president's tweets about the justice department prosecutors in cases quote make it impossible for me to do my job by making the comments during an interview with ABC news just days after the DOJ overruled its own prosecutors after initially recommending in a court filing the Roger still be sentenced to seventy nine years in prison defense attorneys tried to persuade jurors today that prosecutors failed to prove their case against Harvey Weinstein or from ABC's Erin to Turkey imploring jurors to have the courage to acquit Harvey Weinstein defense attacked the prosecutor's case you may have a gut feeling once dean is guilty the defense said in closing statements but what counts is the legal standard of proof beyond a reasonable doubt winds dean faces predatory sex assault rape and other charges based accounts from inspiring actress Jessica man and production assistant maybe how lady if you don't believe them the defense soldiers they could ignore the testimony of other accusers that prosecutors called the show a pattern jurors may not like Harvey Weinstein but the defense said this is not a popularity contest Aron Kader ski ABC news New York prosecutors give their closing arguments tomorrow jury deliberations are expected to begin next week Rhode island's Roman Catholic bishop responding to the controversy over a priest who said he did not communion the legislators who support abortion Reverend Richard booty distributed fires last month which said the state lawmakers who voted to preserve abortion rights in the state law would be denied communion WJAR TV reported the G. also said that pedophile yet doesn't kill anyone an abortion does Providence bishop Thomas told is is no one's has an absolute right to receive communion in both sexual abuse of minors and abortion are immoral actions some Ford cars and SUVs have a potential problem it could cause a crash and now there's a recall the automaker is recalling two hundred forty thousand models to fix a suspension problem seems part the keeps tires on the ground can fracture no reports of any injuries so far the recall covers the Ford flex Taurus police car Taurus S. H. O. and Lincoln M. K. T. from the years twenty thirteen through eighteen owners will be notified starting March second at its corresponded feel Hewlett five oh eight try to get a check on Wall Street intro day is at Bloomberg and I guess we can say there's always tomorrow Andrew yeah we'll try again tomorrow but Wall Street averages took a hit today let's try this government used a revised method to diagnose corona virus which sent the number of confirmed cases soaring higher the Dow lost a hundred twenty eight nasdaq down fourteen SO P. five hundred down six the reviews are in on yelp latest quarter and let's just say it didn't get five stars shares falling as much as nine percent after market trades after.

Aspen Institute
"aspen institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:31 min | 9 months ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Is comic I saw all so do you have a problem with that statement and then if you had heard if you were sitting in the audience in aspen institute would you have said Hey Mike I need to speak to you about this the way that came off and or are you okay with that then just not now I I guess what I would say he is it was again trying to be analytical about crime who was causing in what he saw as at that point as a way to try to prevent it clearly is this about both the substance in the form of his comments I'm glad he's done that and I am glad they do use beyond the talk about the future rather than trying to parse W. word about he dug itself forcing he did stop and frisk they believed to crime down dramatically after Rudy Giuliani you should or run from it and say I'm sorry for reducing crime he should say I am sorry for stopping murders in minority neighborhoods either that I'm sorry for that so I'm sorry I got great results I'm telling you he's got a twist himself into a pretzel to run for this nomination because either you braces what he did do a few years ago or apologizes for success I I guess I'd see it a little differently Brian I think he's offered an apology for both is language in court over use of a policy that he has made clear was not entirely effective and cause pain and what we've seen with Donald Trump I mean this is a man whose referred to remember he's been the one that little as you were alluding to said they were very fine people on either side in Charlotte so maybe he hasn't apologized and maybe your point today is that you don't apologize rings in the so you're you're making my point you made my point the present this year Goran of fallout of his supporters never came out and clarified Charlottesville that he was trying to say there are people they do a good people that want Confederate statues to stay up he was in Tuzla praising skinheads or **** and he didn't go out of his way to do it that's a mistake but that's his decision and when he said as whole countries he was in commenting on the people in those countries coming on the government's equality those countries many of which this people would agree but he had no interest in apologizing with Mike Bloomberg wants to say is sorry for being successful I promise not to do that again well I I can tell you there's a Mike Bloomberg has had more success than any man I know literally and I've never heard him apologize for his success and I've never seen him back down from a fight so I think we're gonna have a competitive election we will hopefully have a chance to talk about it in great detail right both what happened in the past and what's gonna happen in the future I know you're you're probably the most diverse expert around good on time but then as well I'm talking about Vladimir Putin and now the big thing is China we we can go of we can go for two hours Doug let alone would you know about politics the Clintons Democrats and Republicans Doug Schoen thanks so much I am always a part thank you adviser to Michael Bloomberg when we come back your call is one eight six six four oh eight seven six six nine my head spinning.

aspen institute
I will not exchange one brutal oppressor for another

The Breakdown with Shaun King

09:57 min | 9 months ago

I will not exchange one brutal oppressor for another

"I don't say this from a place of privilege is quite the opposite. It comes from a real place of pain but Mike Bloomberg is the line that I simply will not cross. I can't here's what you may not know and if you are a supporter of Mike Bloomberg. I'm assuming you don't know this Mike. Bloomberg directly caused real pain real trauma in harm to people that I know personally people that I love and call my friend. That's not rhetoric. I'm telling you that. His decisions his policies his personal directives ruined the actual lives of countless men. Women boys girls and families all over New York City in many of them will never recover. Here's the thing. Because social media did not exist on the scale that it exists today during most of his time as mayor of New York from two thousand and two until two thousand thirteen with his final year in office being the literal year before the Black Lives Matter Movement began. Bloomberg narrowly escaped the nationwide public accountability and scrutiny. But he no doubt would have received in any subsequent year after he left office and as a result. New Yorkers particularly black and Brown New Yorkers have something akin to a collective P. T. S. D. over the harmony cost and. I don't want what I'm about to tell you to be a twenty reasons not to vote for Bloomberg type of peace. Those things out there. I just need you to understand the size scope scale in vile nature of the twelve years where Bloomberg personally oversaw in turbo charged a citywide stop and Frisk policy. Let me break down Britain epic. Bring it bears. What Mike Bloomberg did in his twelve years in office as mayor of New York City was the closest thing the United States has got to Jim Crow Apartheid South Africa in our lifetime. Now Bloomberg will tell you that. Hey everything I did. Existed before him that would be like saying prisons existed before the explosion of mass incarceration from nineteen seventy five until today yeah. Prisons existed but on a scale that was on par with the rest of the developed. Worl see from eighteen. Seventy to nineteen seventy the United States consistently incarcerated fewer than two hundred fifty thousand people per year. Today we incarcerate over two point five million people on any given day and over ten million people per year it's exploded so yes prisons existed before nineteen seventy yes a policy of stop and Frisk existed before Bloomberg took office. But he exploded. That's what he did. When he became mayor he grew it and expanded exponentially. Just give me a minute to explain it to you. In the twelve years Bloomberg was in office he ordered the NYPD. I need you to understand these figures. He ordered the NYPD to stop and Frisk people almost exclusively black and brown people a staggering five million eighty one thousand six hundred eighty nine times. Are you listening to me? And those are just stops. That police officers actually documented. Some people believe the actual numbers could be twice as high completely innocent. People were strip searched. Punched kicked slammed beaten groped. Tasers choked in shot in these stops drugs were planted. People were framed in tens of thousands of people. Every single year or arrested sent to rikers for crimes. They did not commit then eventually released without ever even going to court. Some people spent days in jail where they lost their jobs. Single parents lost custody of their kids. Others they did and spend days in rikers but they spend weeks months and even years for crimes they didn't commit. And while they were there in rikers like a young man a teenage boy named Khalif browder. They were beaten and tortured by both guards and inmates alike forced into solitary confinement for years on end then simply released without even an explanation. When Khalif Browder was released he was broken and took his own life. Experts say tens of thousands of other innocent men women and children were either cokes by prosecutors and police enter taking plea deals so that they could simply be released for time served or just chose to take the deals simply so that they could escape the madness of the jail only to be released from rikers back into Bloomberg's New York where they were routinely stopped and frisked again and again and again some individuals were stopped and frisked by the NYPD. Over a hundred different times. Can you imagine now when I say over a hundred times? I'm not using that number one hundred as a euphemism for a lot. I mean they were literally in stopped literally searched and stopped by the NYPD over one hundred times as parents and activists and organizers and preachers in mental health experts in justice reform advocates in constitutional lawyers all begged and pleaded with Bloomberg to stop. He were a few people met with him personally demanding that he stop begging that he stopped. They marched and protested in New York dozens of times. They interrupted his events in some of the smartest most persistent legal groups in the nation sued the Bloomberg Administration over and over and over again to stop these unlawful practices in a federal judge that Dean Bloomberg's stop and Frisk policies that deemed that they were indeed a modern day apartheid for black and Brown New Yorkers. She found that countless constitutional violations existed as she ordered an immediate halt to what he had done for nearly twelve years and even then he fought back against it and refuse to immediately implement the charges and changes rather that she demanded now when Bloomberg left office and his stop and Frisk was no longer a policy. Crime actually plummeted year after year after year. His racist policies that he said he had in place to make New York. Safer didn't make New York safer at all. New York got safer after stop and Frisk ended. All he had done was caused real terror to millions and millions of people and after this man Left Office. Bloomberg bragged about the policy and defended it with all his might. That's why in Twenty fifteen. He asked the staff at the SNOOTY Aspen Institute to turn off the cameras when he spoke there in bragged about how police withrow black and brown boys against the walls. All in the name of making New York City safer. He knew what he was saying was ugly. Have you heard that audio? Those kids that he's talking about and their mothers and fathers and siblings were not just humiliated by such an awful practice it shattered many of them and Bloomberg literally defended all of this after the policy had stopped after it was ruled unconstitutional. He defended it deep into twenty nineteen right up until he decided to run for president. And here's the thing. I have dedicated my life to fighting back against Donald Trump and his policies. I have campaign to oust horrible politicians and have helped elect bold promising new ones all over the country. I've endangered my family in pursuit of tracking down and bringing White Supremacist Neo Nazis. To justice so yes. Donald Trump is our mortal enemy and I work directly with the people in communities that his evil has impacted the most he must be defeated and he can be. I will not support one oppressor to another one. I want to

Mike Bloomberg Bloomberg New York City Bloomberg Administration Nypd Khalif Browder United States Donald Trump President Trump Britain Snooty Aspen Institute Withrow Black T. S. D. Jim Crow South Africa
In 2015 audio, Bloomberg advocates targeting minorities

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 9 months ago

In 2015 audio, Bloomberg advocates targeting minorities

"Former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg launched his democratic presidential bid with an apology for his support for New York stop and frisk policy now he's apologizing for comments he made it a twenty fifteen appearance at the Aspen Institute in which she defended the practice saying the way to bring down murder rates is to quote but a lot of cops in minority neighborhoods because that's where all the crime is in the audio Bloomberg says that you can't quote just take the description Xerox it and pass it out to all the cops in a statement Bloomberg says he inherited the policy and that his remarks don't reflect his commitment to criminal justice reform and racial equity he says he cut back on the policy but quote I should have done it faster and sooner president trump sent out and then deleted a tweet highlighting the audio declaring Bloomberg's a total racist trump has himself been a vocal supporter of stop and frisk policies Jennifer king Washington

Mike Bloomberg Aspen Institute Xerox Donald Trump New York Murder President Trump Jennifer King Washington
What U.S. Religious Liberty Means — Especially When It Comes To Islam

All Things Considered

05:02 min | 9 months ago

What U.S. Religious Liberty Means — Especially When It Comes To Islam

"The trump administration is made religious liberty a central theme of this presidency for example the US department of health and Human Services now has a conscience and religious freedom division the president has champion judges who have ruled in favor of people seeking religious exemptions to laws and just last month the White House strengthen protections for kids who want to pray at school as mood and is part of my dean is part of the inclusive America project at the Aspen Institute she is also the author of a book on religious liberty called when Islam is not a religion she told me that president trump's focus marks a change from previous administrations there has been just a more pronounced public affirmation of the positive role of religion in American society the need to protect it often we hear from various government officials whether be Mike Pompeii or president trump or US Attorney General bill Barr or even just sessions when he announced religious liberty task force of the department justice is constant refrain about religion is under threat by secularization threatening forces but on on the left to the protection of religion and the protection of our religious freedom that has become a constant refrain what communities have benefited from the administration's attention to the issue or their religious communities that have essentially been left out yeah so we can then candidate Ted Cruz said that it was he called it the religious liberty of election and he said that it was ultimately about like the person who would be able to defend religious liberty the vast and president trump and Ben Carson I'm ricksantorum all got on the bandwagon said absolutely this is about religious liberty and we're going to protect religious liberty for elected president but at the same time as they were making the statement there also competing with each other to determine who could be the most discriminatory against Muslims whether it be present from suggestions about creating a Muslim registry or about banning Muslims from U. S. which as we know when he has before with that as well or be Ted Cruz's suggestion that we surveil Muslim neighborhoods in the aftermath he brought that up in the aftermath of a terrorist incident or ricksantorum saying that Islam absolutely was different from Christianity fee so that is not ours protected under the first amendment as Christianity is and so there was like this obvious hypocrisy so what you saw was a creation of a hierarchy of faith even within this world of law to me yes I even beyond just the creation of a hierarchy I actually saw denial of a song even being a religion that had access through religious freedom another suggestion that present from brought up during the campaign was to close down mosques when you create such as Turk disparity between types of things that you're willing to protect for quote unquote religion and then say that the most basic of religious freedom rights are not afforded to a particular group of people you know how exactly are you explaining that what's the logic there and it didn't take much to figure out what that is because unfortunately increasingly common talking point among many people in the White House and in that sort of larger network is that Islam is not a religion it is a dangerous political ideology and therefore Muslims don't have religious freedom rights can you think of a policy directive from the trump administration that on paper looks good for religious liberties but in reality has really only been and that positive for evangelical Christians more or less just one group well I think that even in the space of Christianity increasingly you hear this I'll cry from our progressive Christians that they feel that the way that Christianity is being defined and champion tends to only happen from this particular angle and of course a constant concern in the context of specifically the sexuality related culture wars is that the rights of LGBT individuals including all your between the visuals of faith or people who hold different positions on abortion contraception from real religious standpoint are being undermined and to that end I think that is has to come from an understanding that religious liberty is not in some way just to safeguard for traditional religious beliefs it is a secret just for beliefs of a wide diversity anywhere they fall on the political spectrum and again the diverse religious spectrum and so what I hope for and I do see some movement on this for more progressive religious liberty groups to bring to the fore more progressive religious claims and say look religious liberty is for this too my concern is that if the rhetoric in the op in the enforcement of some of these policies continues to be only it's thought through in the frame of traditional religious beliefs then there will be other types of religious claims I won't be as protected I don't really have a concrete examples are not being protected but I do see this increasing sort of urgency from our progressive groups to be like what we have these claims to and because religious liberty protects the range and doesn't privilege one particular interpretation or another that are religious claims are also protected husband Jean thank you so much for speaking with us thank you as a dean is part of the inclusive America project at the aspen institute and the author of the book when Islam is not a

Bolton pessimistic on North Korea

Washington Today

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Bolton pessimistic on North Korea

"Well the president's former national security adviser John Bolton giving a pessimistic outlook on the prospects for getting North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons marking his first public appearance since he was ousted from his position earlier this year there are things we should look to and have serious discussions about. one is the possibility limited though it may be a regime change in North Korea. second. we should look at and discuss with China and we should have done it long ago aiming toward the reunification of the peninsula under freely elected government like that in South Korea. and third if you believe and you may not. that it is unacceptable for North Korea to have nuclear weapons at some point. military force has to be an option now this is obviously the most controversial subject and many people say it's just unimaginable. unimaginable that you would use military force. so let me quote to you. the words of. general Joe John done for the chairman the joint chiefs of staff on his last day I might say is chairman he's done an outstanding job he said this. to the Aspen Institute salmon are in the summer of twenty eighteen. on this question of what's unimaginable. general Dunford said but as I've told my counterparts both friend and foe it is not unimaginable to have military options to respond to north Korea's nuclear capability. what is unimaginable to me. is allowing the capability to allow nuclear weapons to land in Denver Colorado. my job will be to develop military options to make sure that doesn't happen thank general Dunford was completely correct that warning from John Bolton who for awhile served as the president's national security adviser being for being forced out his first public comments before the center for strategic and International Studies CSIS here in Washington

President Trump John Bolton North Korea China South Korea. Joe John Chairman Dunford Colorado. International Studies Csis Washington North Korea. Aspen Institute Denver
Microsoft says discovers hacking targeting democratic institutions in Europe

AP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Microsoft says discovers hacking targeting democratic institutions in Europe

"Network. Microsoft has identified hacking attacks aimed at European democratic institutions AP correspondent Charles de LA desma says it's ahead of elections in may the company says a group called strontium targeting Email accounts, more than one hundred people in six European countries. Including from groups, the German Council on foreign relations, the Aspen institute's in Europe, and the German Marshall fund American authorities at tied strontium, otherwise known as fancy bear or AP Twenty-eight. Russia's main intelligence agency known as the Microsoft says the attacks occurred from September to December notify the organizations after discovering

Charles De La Desma Microsoft German Marshall Fund German Council Aspen Institute Europe Russia
Russian Hackers Targeted European Research Groups, Microsoft Says

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Russian Hackers Targeted European Research Groups, Microsoft Says

"O'day. Microsoft says it has uncovered cyber attacks by hackers linked to Russia targeting. European think-tanks comedy says employees of organizations, including the German Council on foreign relations, the Aspen institute and the German Marshall fund or hit with hacks originating from a group called strontium, which Microsoft says widely associated with the Russian government had elections. In may European leaders are worried about attacks targeting voting, technology and manipulating

Microsoft German Marshall Fund German Council Aspen Institute Russian Government Russia O'day.
"aspen institute" Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

"And I'm Scott Galloway coming to from our nation's capital today care, are you what were you doing there? I had breakfast. With about a dozen congressmen congresswomen and a few senators, and then I met with another Senator to talk about big tack. Let's hear about what happened. What why were they all together for breakfast? I am just was in Washington. Now, I'm in New York City, but what was the breakfast about? So there's a breakfast that's hosted by the Aspen institute. And it's every where we Thursday morning for the last I guess thirty years speaker on a topic of interest, and it's you speak for fifteen minutes. And then they throw questions out you really nice environment. And this was all about big. And what was your message? What was your message to these congress people will, you know, my message. My message is that these organizations have become invasive species, they are they are sit lords who started up nine and then turn to the dark side of the force. And unless we arm we arm you are representatives with inside data and the backbone wherewithal to break up what have become invasive species that we're going to continue to kill innovation our country. Our tax base is gonna run the middle class is going to continue to experience lot wages that that the government is here to serve the the governed not the governor's these companies have become the governor's floor. That's really interesting. I just had Shoshana Zubov on talking about this. He has a book called surveillance capitalism where she has exactly the same messages. The the hijacking of everything by these companies, and and for more dire even more dire predictions from her in terms of what's going to happen. Do they hear you do they do they because you know, I've been banging this drum for a while too. So do they hear hear your messaging cursor, get your take my my take? And I'm new to Washington I've been here ten times in my life and five times in the last month. They hear you the greed they nod their head, and they are totally befuddled as to what to do about it. Because I, you know, the scary thing is I think they're outgunned wonder outcome by complexity. These are difficult problems understand only seven percent of our electorate has a background technology engineering. So they're just sort of their intimidated by the subject material into there's Amazon as eighty eight full time lobbyists in DC, and you've written about this the one area of each of the big tech organization spending that's increase faster than anything. Increase faster than our D. Hiring is lobbying. So when the the legislation that banned sex trafficking and puts platforms like back page out of business and gets a ninety seven to one vote in favour, you think well, that's bipartisan action work. There's now an organization challenging that. And trying to take it to the supreme court worried that any any in habituation of what could do could be bad for them. And that organization is a front for Google. So even when it comes to sex trafficking. Google is willing to spend a lot of money to fight it. It's the points. It's really astonishing..

Shoshana Zubov Google Scott Galloway Senator Aspen institute Washington New York City congress D. Hiring Amazon DC fifteen minutes seven percent thirty years
"aspen institute" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Americans revere, the creation of wealth on ungeared, Dr dos wants us to examine this and how it shapes our life together, he knows from the inside the web of Wall Street and Silicon Valley think tanks foundations and convenience from Ted to the Aspen institute and book and speaking circuits and media that confer power I'd interviewed on on before and wanted to draw out the generative aspect of confrontational and thought provoking message. He's now bringing about the implicit moral equations behind a notion like win win and the moral compromises in cultural consensus, we've reached without reflecting on it about what? And who can save us. And I think we're now at a place where we are ripe much as we were a hundred years ago when we were in the first gilded age, and you had these great inequalities and great new technologies on a lot of dislocated people and a lot of anger and a lot of philanthropy and. What that gave way to wasn't age of reform. I think we are ripe for a new age of reform in American life with these basic questions of what's the relationship between work and health care. Well, how do we do social mobility in an age of the gig economy, and you know, iphones? What is our relationship to place as companies, and as workers, there's some big questions that in some ways are almost spiritual questions about the economy and about our our society, I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being..

Ted Krista Tippett Aspen institute Dr dos hundred years
"aspen institute" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

Sports Radio 610

14:14 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

"I forgot and it's my bad when you're supposed to do or how to segment last segment, but hey, we can work some in later on this segment. So if you want to it's kind of like, ask us, anything, you know, you can ask us who what why when where how will not anything? Well, almost anything. Things kind of more or less in our area of I'd prefer sports related or like some sort of athletic question. Yeah. That's kind of my. We'll talk like shoes and stuff like that. I'm cool with that as well. But shoes as well. All right. Let's keep it. There is keeping our wheelhouse. Yeah. Exactly. Seven one three five seven two four six ten. We'll do that coming up later on the segment we'll remind and we already have a few texts. And so we'll get to those as well. If you want to call we can do that. I did want to mention this a couple of things before we get to that. I mentioned there's a study that I found and in fact DA it's the Aspen institute sports in society program, they released a study earlier today in regards to football. And it said flag football should be the national standard for competition until high school age now specifically the institute has recommended for thanks USA football. Pop Warner all other youth football organizations shift to a standardized flag football competition before the age of fourteen those same organizations begin. Teaching fundamental blocking tackling hitting techniques by age twelve high school and colleges. Minimized non game. Tackling player collisions by adopting dark mouth star Dartmouth style instruction in practice standards. And all that means is limiting contact hidden dummies hidden dummies the football industry, including high schools and colleges expand their flag football offerings. Now, here's a couple of things. I think you might find interesting, California, Illinois, New York and Maryland all have proposed age restrictions. No bills have been passed. And it doesn't look like any will anytime soon. The institute began digging down on this subject with a series of discussions beginning in January. And I think I've actually brought this up on the show before. But I don't think you know, in this study. It cites research that shows the number of players in high school football throughout the country. Has shrink for the fourth consecutive year in two thousand seventeen to what one one point seven million from what what what was it four years ago? I'm going to get to that participation among children ages six through twelve have fallen more than seventeen percent over the last five years, the U mass Law Center for public opinion research in two thousand sixteen found that seventy eight percent of adults do not think it is appropriate for children to participate in tackle football before the age of fourteen there are torn teens typically what high freshmen in highschool freshmen in highschool. Yep. Restaurant eighth grade grade. Yeah. There are ten thousand fewer students playing football in the state of California alone. Yeah. Since two thousand and but we don't have a JV team you go from freshman football varsity. That's terrible. I was a I was a sophomore playing varsity. And I was scared scared because those are big guys that's a big difference in to expect just the average football player to go out there. That's why these high school teams are just getting beat to my high school team was playing the I think they all sixty sixty three to four some random score like that. Or something about present day your. Yeah. And it's depressing. These teams just beat like the all the talent is being drawn to like, you know, four or five schools in California. Four or five million drastic? Okay. To schools a conference and the other ten are terrible. Terrible. Here's here's the question. And I'm glad you bring something like that. Because you know, I understand the impetus behind, you know, these studies and the want to and the need to see change for a lot of parents in some coaches because let's be honest. Let's not be ignorant here. You know, there are coaches and programs at the college level major d one college football that have decreased the amount of contact that they have in their practices. You know, then there are some like, you know, who was it the Larry Larry fedora, you know, a couple of weeks back. Just sir football's under attack, you know, this is crap. You know, I don't agree with this, blah, blah, blah that whole thing. But went when you start as DA do you start this? It's never go. When you start this rather, it's not going to be perfect. Because here's even a better question. The a better question than when. Who let me give you a story, and example. Okay. So let's say you owned a gas station and everyone. Over the age of thirty that comes your gas station. Or that's driving a car it needs gas. But all these sixteen year olds. They don't drive gas cars, and then it's like sixteen seventeen years. What would you do as a business? You have to figure out how to get that customer. Right. Like 'cause you eventually say, oh, these sixteen year olds are going to be thirty year olds in fourteen years, and I'm gonna have no customers. Right. That's the same thing. That's going on in the NFL. It drives me nuts that the Houston Texans. The Los Angeles Rams at the New York. Jan giants aren't doing something about this. These teams need to make sure that youth athletes are playing there's not going to be any talent the NFL. There's it's gonna be it's gonna be me five schools. The Alabama's the other school because it's gonna hurt college first. And then I'll hurt the NFL. There's going to be talking about power five the why be power three. And then you're just gonna watch these same kids kinda go all the way through the development process that they need kids to play. And not is not the problem that is when the answers wench is two years ago and the real question is who it's on the NFL. Fell in the NFL teams to make sure that youth kids are playing football that the that. That's the answer. There's so many of the questions that I have like one year. Playing flag football will we're talking about. Where does the development come from offensive lineman deep? That's five footballs. Not the answer. So. Yeah. I mean, there's just not not a place for that. We said what have you strength the field? Like, what if you take the major collisions out of it? And you force like, you know, you start off playing like, I don't know seven on seven football, and they're not allowed to be more than ten yards apart. And they're hitting each other. Like this not as hard yet. Well, isn't that arena football? I mean. Yeah. So they wanna. Arena. But you can't have long motions and stuff. Like, why do they need to be on one hundred yard you ever? See a little kid running for the end zone. Takes them like forty five minutes. Way too long. Well, yeah. Off on a seven foot basketball hoop? I can't disagree with you there. You know, here's my ignorance, I've never once been to a peewee league football game. There's no way they play on a regulation football field. Correct. Oh, yeah. They do. Really? Oh, yeah. They do. Oh my God. That's gonna be outraged is almost peewee seven mean. No. It's not. Okay. I'm sorry. I played on one hundred yard field normal size over you. Starting in third grade. We played high school football field third. Fourth fifth is peewee. Gosh. Yeah. Fifth third graders. Yeah. I just never, you know, we have we have little football players. Taking a knee when you get to the twenty and then and then finished here's a thing. And then I want to move on. Because you told your story about your high school situation, your present your your present day, you know, kind of getting pounded because you don't have the talent. If you started this initiative DA where you did not allow contact football where it was only flag football up until the age of fourteen when you're a freshman in high school when you start this you start that this year. Then you're going to have guys that are going into freshman year that are going to be possibly playing with and against seasoned guys who were bigger faster stronger that our seniors and juniors and sophomores, and there's just going to be an imbalance. There is going to be a curve at some point. And it's going to last at least three years. You know what I'm saying? There. I didn't play football to high school. I didn't either I didn't feel like there was a curve that I could never get over. I played freshman, and then I played JV and in my junior and senior year, well sophomore junior and senior year. I played varsity. You know, what I mean, look my high school now the one that we feed into north shore here they have a freshman team. They have a freshman eighteen team a b team a c team don't. Yes, they do a freshman c team DA who do they play. You know? Team and BFE. I don't know. Yeah. They have c team. That's unbeliev team. Eight. Everyone comes out professional football. That's a lotta guys. How many guys it's all the dudes from the two feeder schools? You know, what they each each freshman team has what forty guys? So it's difficult because I don't know how many like in eighth grade program we have like seventy eighty kids. And I said eighth grade eighth grade we have seventy or eighty kids seventh grade program we have around eighty kids in the program. You have eighty kids on your program. Holy smokes. DARE numbers are down. We used to have one hundred hundred team. I think has thirty three players thirty three guys. Yeah. We get a lot. We get a lot. And the most of those kids that finished eighth grade program. Go to the high school may have some kids at drop out because they're buddies don't launcher Indo pathetically matter. You got fifty five year, you're fine. You can you can move on. And that's a class that means you have one hundred ten June Caesar's, and you can go grab from soft. Yeah. It's pretty crazy. I mean, Texas doesn't have to worry for a while. Then, hey, let me get to a couple of how to because we did have some guys at in. I one from John and Cyprus let people know that this is for them. And so a lot of text in whatever you wanna how to we always want to have how To's. Yeah. I tweeted it out. We got some last segment, and I'm trying to get somebody. You're right. Eating how To's you can tweet at us at David. Emerson eighty nine at Schaumburg Johnny at Joe George or text in seven one three five seven two four six ten John in Cyprus texting. How can I explain to my daughter that I don't really want her playing boy sports she really wants to play football. But not only am I worried about safety, but the environment too. All right. Do you have any girls on your team? No. And I'm trying to think like three three or four years ago. We had a girl that did play eighth grade football. I want to say, and that was no problem. I think she was actually the kicker set coach seventh grade eighth grade. But I think like what she did. She changed in the girls locker room and everybody else out there. So she had her own space that our own thing. And it was cool. I don't remember any problems. Really? Oh, no. I do remember. She was she was good. She was a corner. She was a corner. She wasn't a kicker and she ended up getting in an altercation. I think combined game and that was the end of her eighth grade football career. But yes, so how do you explain to we had? We had. Okay. How do you explain it? I think I have a daughter. And so I can't say I've thought about this. But I definitely thought, you know, she's probably going to like sports we have a couple of balls that roll around the house and like, bouncy one. So as I'm like panning our football night, y'all gonna do this icebox we're gonna make it to the big league. But I would say to my daughter. Playing sports is. Is honest, and as Roger you can really get into all and a lot of a lot of ways in that. Like people are out there, especially in football hitting each other. It's very primal. And so you should expect a lot of that behavior. Not just on the field. But that type of primal like, yes, this is how I feel about the situation the immediacy the trust and honesty. I always find the athletes is a lot different than the normal normal human. So that's something you have to be a aware of. And so here's how football players feel if you are a woman in you're good get out there and play because there's nothing more accepting than being able to ball and football knows no race creed color or sex. If you want to go out there and balled and go ball, and that's good. Now, if you're not very good usually you will get treated like so so that's that's something you have to wear. Right. I if you're going out there and not very good. You'll get treated like so, and it's probably doesn't look good for you. Or the situation. I real quick. I would encourage it. You know, if that's what she really wants to do. But you have to be on the same page as the coaches and that program this this is not as to how to tell her that. She doesn't want her to do it though. Yeah. But I mean, all right. Yeah. You're right. How about this? We're gonna go to the break. We're gonna come back, and we'll debate this a little more. And then we'll get right into ingredients favorite segment. I heard Joe Georgia sous chef backed out. He's been Sergio. We separate switch weeks. I'm gonna make you regret backing out today, by the way back down. It's going to be good ingredients. I have some. Well, I'm not going to give away any of the ingredients right now. But we'll be back sports radio six and the average sports show. I'm David.

football NFL Aspen institute Pop Warner Larry Larry fedora USA David California basketball U mass Law Center Houston Texans Alabama Los Angeles Rams sous chef Joe Georgia Maryland New York Texas Roger John
"aspen institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To me he was just always so kind such a good friend and Brash is a polite way of putting Steve Jobs had a reputation for being a an almost unprecedentedly creative inventor or at least a man. Who harnessed and synthesized other people's, inventions and be. A world class jerk yes he was brilliant but he was. Also petulant and arrogant and just mean to people in a. Way that nearly, defies explanation once he started working on this book with me He just. Wanted to talk on and on which was great Walter Isaacson is an author journalist and former CEO of the Aspen institute jobs handpicked Isaacson to write biography being published just a couple of, weeks after jobs I mean we would Probably for fifty times and sometimes it'd be for hours on end just riding. The neighborhood taking walks and I, think he'd been very very. Private over the years and when he, decided to open up he just wanted. To open up, everything he, also said you know I'm famous for being. Brutally honest with people I want you to be brutally, honest in this book Steve Jobs knew he would die relatively soon when he asked Isaacson. To write his biography so as much as the writer would have a chance to, shape the subjects legacy the subject was being proactive in. Shaping his, own legacy You know the two sets of reactions people have never. Been in business or never been, entrepreneurs and generally older people. Their first reaction especially the first half, of the book is boy he was. Kind of a, jerk and, he was hard to deal with I didn't. Know he had such a prickly personality younger entrepreneurs people, have been in business people who know the things work their reaction is totally different which. Is wow this guy was a genius not that he was a jerk but that, he drove people to do things they thought were impossible I asked Isaacson, how strategic jobs. Was in his jerk that, is could he control himself to, the point where he could turn off the jerk Quinny needed to Jug.

Steve Jobs Walter Isaacson Brash Aspen institute Quinny writer CEO
"aspen institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To people they end up leaving, especially when they can. When you're tough on people but you allow them to be. Tough back on you which is what, Steve did and you're, inspiring and, compelling. Then, they don't leave anybody can be a jerk and then people will just leave but if you look, at Eddie cue Phil Schiller Scott forstall Tim cook Johnny I've these are really a. Plus plus players who have stayed at apple for the past fifteen twenty. Years and they would have left if, Steve were truly? Being humiliating to him or jock so I think you. Have to, realize that anybody can be a jerk would you have to be as inspiring compelling and inspirational I'm just curious, what did you change in your life either as head of the Aspen institute or. As a writer maybe as a husband and father as a result of. Spending so much time with jobs and, writing about him You know. It's probably counterintuitive but noticing how many people were sort of surprised by how tough of a personality could be when I heard all these tales about how do you get mad at the desk clerk at a hotel or whatever I tried to make sure since I. Will never be, as talented to invent the ipod or the ipad that at least on nice to every desk clerk, at every hotel because you realize people do talk about that in that sometimes makes a big impact on people It does make you wonder where your own legacy will.

Steve Aspen institute Phil Schiller Scott apple Eddie writer
"aspen institute" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on Skullduggery

"I'm ABC contributor and a very heaven, happy Aspen institute attendee. So look, obviously there has been enormous controversy over the president's handling of the Helsinki summit and. Especially those comments right off the bat, which questioned the US intelligence findings because Vladimir Putin had denied them that stunned a lot of people. What was your take when you heard the president's comments in Helsinki? Well, let's take apart the Helsinki criticism if we can. The first one seems to be that he had a private meeting with another foreign head of state. And the supposition there is that other foreign head of state is so evil that how possibly could one man have a private meeting with them even if he is the president. I think the tone to that criticism is that some people have decided they distrust and dislike President Trump so much that they don't trust him to carry out a national security matters on their behalf. The issue there that there was no other US officials present for the meeting. Well, I think there's a number of issues. I believe, as I just said, the biggest motivator behind that criticism is distrust in the man, and I can't change that. I don't share that this trust in him, but. Those that this trust him find it very unsettling to think that he's got their future security matters in in their hands in a private meeting where they can't hear oversee everything that he does and says, you're right though. There's another few layers of criticism that I've seen come through. One of them is this fear that the conversation might have been taped, and I think. Then your imagination fills and all the things you might have said and so forth. I think the other fear seems to be an American Fisher wasn't with them. I'm not sure if I understand though the concern, I think, well, both foreign leaders were in the same footing in that situation. Right. I mean, the director of national intelligence, Dan Coats was unaware of what the president and Putin had talked about. Now that does seem to be a problem if you're the chief intelligence officer of the United States, and you don't know what the president is communicating to an agreeing with the president of Russia. Well, fair enough as a question, but that's not a function of whether they were we're not alone. That's a function of what the president has communicated back to a staff and how quickly he is done. So again, it's about trust in the president's judgment. If he felt things were told to him that he needed to share immediately with his senior intelligence advisor. That's his judgment call. I suspect that the president intends to give Dan Coats. And secretary Madison. Everyone else of importance on the security component side of his cabinet, a full rundown of that, which he discussed with Ladimir Putin. As soon as he has that opportunity. I think what we've just seen as an insight into the timing and the style of leadership of this president, he hasn't commanded all of his cabinet is side. The moment the meeting ended to brief them. I suspect for instance that Mike Pompeo does know what was discussed. He was there with him and sitting next to them as they flew back home, there was an opportunity to debrief. So I think Dan just got put in the middle of a little bit of a firestorm for for being away from the president for the days interceding. So if you had been in your previous job is homeland security adviser, and you knew that the president was planning to meet with with Putin alone. You would have been fine with that..

president Vladimir Putin President Trump Dan Coats Helsinki United States ABC Aspen institute Mike Pompeo Russia secretary Madison director officer advisor
Intelligence Chief says he Meant no Disrespect to Trump

Coast to Coast with George Noory

02:07 min | 2 years ago

Intelligence Chief says he Meant no Disrespect to Trump

"Ninety five percent fresh on, rotten tomatoes it's. One of the best action movies ever may Shota Rolling Stone calls off the charts spectacular doing the best northern hooking. Of thrilling clever story filled with, twists and turns target in the hunt we should be dead with an ending. That will blow you away we wrapped and Tom Cruise. Mission impossible fallout Friday with a, PG thirteen may be, inappropriate for children. Under thirteen the young men crashed into a pole outside this trader Joes, with a gun in hand starts running, in exchanges gunfire with police that's when somebody inside the trader Joe's a young woman was, hit, police followed him in tried to resuscitate her but she expired at the store, a, word. Of caution for President Trump from Iran's. President Hassan Rwanda warned Trump about pursuing hostile policies against Iran state media reports. For Awani said Mr. Trump don't play with the, lion's tail this, would only lead to regret as he addressed a gathering. Of Iranian diplomats the director of national intelligence says he He meant no disrespect toward President, Trump, with his awkward response to news of a second Trump summit with Russia's president, seeking, to. Control the fallout from an interview Dan. Coats gave an Aspen institute form coach says some of the press coverage mischaracterized. His response to breaking news ladder Putin Okay It says he's admittedly awkward response was not meant to criticize the president and he and the entire intelligence community are committed to supporting the president in ongoing efforts to prevent Russian election meddling Jan Johnson. Washington they knew Brexit chief in Great Britain adopted a get tough attitude with the European. Union he suggested Britain may not. Pay it's. Fifty one billion dollar divorce. Payment if no trade deal with the EU is. Reached he, said you can't have one side fulfilling its part of the bargain and the other not I'm Barbara. Kusak Zepa. And feel.

Mr. Trump President Trump President Hassan Rwanda Awani Shota Rolling Stone Great Britain Iran Coats Tom Cruise Kusak Zepa Aspen Institute EU JOE Jan Johnson DAN Washington Russia Putin Director
Intelligence chief says he meant no disrespect to Trump

Sean Hannity

02:14 min | 2 years ago

Intelligence chief says he meant no disrespect to Trump

"Gunman surrenders no. Disrespect I'm Barbara Kusak, a gunman surrendered. Peacefully following a three hour long hostage taking at Los Angeles grocery store correspondent Miguel Marquez says it all started after police gave chase as the. Man was suspected of shooting his grandmother and another woman. At a separate location the young, men crashed into a, pole outside this. Trader Joes with a gun in hand starts running in exchanges gunfire with, police that's when somebody inside the trader, Joe's a young woman was hit police followed him in tried to resuscitate her but she, expired, at, the store a word of caution for President Trump, from Iran's president hot Sandra Wani warned Trump about pursuing hostile policies against Iran. State media reports were Awani said this Trump don't play with the lion's tail. This would only lead to regret, as he addressed a gathering of. Iranian diplomats the director of national intelligence says he meant No disrespect, toward, President, Trump with his awkward response to news of a second Trump's summit with Russia's president seeking to control the fallout from an interview. Dan Coats gave an Aspen institute forum coats has some of the press coverage. Mischaracterized his response to breaking news ladder Putin Yeah yeah Okay Says his admittedly awkward response was not meant to criticize the, president and he and the entire intelligence community are committed to supporting the president in ongoing efforts to prevent Russian election meddling Jan Johnson. Washington they knew Brexit chief in Great Britain adopted a get tough attitude with the European. Union he suggested Britain may not. Pay it's. Fifty one billion dollar divorce. Payment if no trade deal with the EU has, reached he, said you can't have one side fulfilling its part of the bargain and the other not I'm Barbara. Kusak I believe that God created you and he also created an abundance, of organic fruits and vegetables to keep you healthy hi I'm Dennis black naturopathic doctor and founder of Texas. SuperFood over thirty years ago I, was diagnosed with stage four cancer and given just months,.

President Trump Donald Trump Barbara Kusak Dan Coats Miguel Marquez Iran Great Britain EU Aspen Institute Los Angeles Sandra Wani Jan Johnson Putin Chase Awani Founder Washington Russia JOE
White House says Trump “disagrees” with Putin’s offer to interview Americans

Steve Dahl

03:42 min | 2 years ago

White House says Trump “disagrees” with Putin’s offer to interview Americans

"In a devastating fire at a prospect heights condo complex Catherine Catalin, has details Lisa now, believe it was a twelve year old child possibly playing with a lighter that touched off the massive fire now hundreds will look for a new place to live the fire. On MacIntosh court, destroyed ninety six units crews have been boarding up what is left of the place firefighters on the scene today checking for, hotspots many residents want answers ABC seven reports they confronted the prospect. Heights police chief l. Stephens as to why, the fire burned for so long upset at the preliminary 'cause as to whether or not the. Child started the fire on purpose but the chief says he has. No comment on that so far. Stephens adds it appears to be accident Catherine Catalane WLS. AM eight nine news, the White House says the President Trump disagrees with Russian President Vladimir Putin's offer to, allow the US to question, twelve Russians accused of interfering. In the two thousand sixteen election in exchange for permitting Russia to interview Americans the Accuses of unspecified crimes correspondent Dana bash has part of, the, statement from the White House. Press secretary on the proposal Sarah Sanders is saying it is a proposal that was made insincerity by President Putin. But, President Trump disagrees with that hopefully President Putin will have the twelve identified Russians come. To the United States to prove their innocence. Or guilt the White House has said had said Wednesday it was under consideration. Even though the State Department, called Russia's. Allegations against the Americans absurd and the president and those around him are trying to make clear that they agree with intelligence. Officials that Russia meddled in the two thousand sixteen election after some responses, to reporter questions that brought conflicting statements Bob Costantini reports. That agreement on Russia's efforts stops when it comes, to the idea of who, benefited US. Intelligence agencies say much of what Moscow did with its election. Interference attempts to hurt Hillary Clinton and conversely elect Donald. Trump who was the Republican nominee but at the Aspen institute economic forum homeland security secretary cures to. Nielsen Still sensitive to. The. President's sensitivity to the idea he benefited but we've seen on the foreign influence, side is they were attempting to. Intervening cause chaos on both sides Russia's Vladimir. Putin said at the Monday news conference in Helsinki he was pleased. That Donald Trump on the US presidency since, as a candidate Mr. Trump called for better relations with Russia Bob Costantini Washington the White House says President, Trump has extended an invitation to Vladimir Putin to meet in Washington this fall discussions are underway and during an appearance at the economic club of Chicago this afternoon Bill Cameron says mayor Emanuel. Made himself the most vulnerable we've ever seen him got emotional and revealed what he considers the most miserable part of, his job as mayor Rahm Surjit rips the soul out of him to talk to families by gun violence here's what he says he tries, to tell him as a, father I, don't want, you to be alone I love you Watching you And as many as tomorrow's this. Is takes. We're here I think. It sucks I'll take. Any fight you wanna give me. On. Politics anyone you take this I don't wanna do. It anymore it just. Sometimes just the hardest piece of. Crap. Of this job And I don't. Invite anybody I don't go with the media I just think it's And. Then you meet somebody Who you know Figured out how to get up the next day and get back in that. Gives me energy you wanna do it if they, can do it we. Can do it, the mayor said Chicago is not a tale, of two cities but a tale. Of two investments, and he says we should all sees the current good economy to help the guy on the corner who would take an opportunity if he could get one at city hall..

President Putin Donald Trump President Trump Russia United States White House Stephens Chicago Rahm Surjit Mayor Emanuel Catherine Catalin ABC Bob Costantini Washington Dana Bash Hillary Clinton Catherine Catalane Press Secretary State Department Nielsen
"aspen institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Want to remind you again not they got too much time between, these reminders Christopher Ray director of the FBI was at the Aspen, institute for skiing and they had an idea summit. Out there and he told everybody? I think I think Walter six and still runs This place there's a lodge halfway up one of the mountains they all go up there they. Have lunch and that's the Aspen institute and they sit around and do their ideas. And. Then come back later and go skiing and Christopher Wray said the, Russians never tamper with our election infrastructure what they do is attempt, to destabilise by gen- generally focusing on the losers And trying to create News items tweeter feeds what have you that make the losers think that they were cheated The Russians? Said Christopher Ray are all. About destabilization oh and do you know what else he said he said the real cyberthreat the. Actual real threat to the United States is from the CHAI calms The People's Republic for the people of China Trump has said the same thing and the drive bys just pilloried him Trump said the same thing about the traffic because Thomas Friedman of the New York Times loves the CHAI calms Thomas Friedman. Drools over the way the tchaykovsky do, things he has written, about how in, China they're. Ten or eleven. Really elite people smart, people they devise everything, they designed the buildings, they designed the railway they. Designed the infrastructure, they designed the, traffic, flows they do. Everything ten or eleven really really smart people we need to do like that in the United States is Thomas Freedman Of the New York Times the left Used to love the Soviet Union now they love China, Trump talked about China being every bit, the big enemy that the Russians are the media just made fun of him left and right for now here comes the FBI director pointing out, that are even greater threat right now particularly in the area of cyber threats is. The tricalm's Where is this news been the past two years he's the director of the, FBI admitting the Russians don't tamper with our actual elections For rock Obama said the same thing and common sense tells you that right With hundreds of, millions of votes there's no way that anybody could rig a national presidential election but they can tamper with The information systems they. Can engage in the information systems and, try to destabilize and as Ray pointed out they love to focus on. The losers if the losers think. They were cheated then you have an ongoing complaint about the electoral system and its integrity and that's exactly what's happening here the democrat party is personally doing more to. Attack the integrity in honor of our elections than anything bladder, Putin could have dreamed of While.

Christopher Ray China Trump director FBI Christopher Wray New York Times Thomas Friedman China Aspen institute United States Thomas Freedman Aspen democrat party Walter Putin Soviet Union Obama two years
"aspen institute" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on The Good Fight

"And they got the alcohol industry to fund a study proving that one drink a day is better for your health so i you undermine the government to not have enough money which creates the conditions that then has the government begging the private sector through foundations to fund government research that proves the point that industry wants to hear another example is the pension for charter schools whether it's the aspen institute or ted or any number of these worlds everybody's got a charter school angle everybody wants to create a charter school education it's all that education we gotta work on teacher performances in that everybody seems passionate about education i'll take an idea i've never heard any of those circles something that you as a european will find a very ordinary idea the idea that all public schools in america should be funded equally not according to the value of your house i've actually never met anybody anybody who was able to justify to me why the value of your parents house in a country that we all think is america crecy should be the basis for public school funding things by the way that that is always underplayed in america is just how anomalous that is in other countries it's not always the federal state right i mean it might be city or it might be you know in in germany bundesland right requirement of state of me in us funds for school invasive slightly different schools would have cited sources of funding but the end result of it is still that in a big city it doesn't matter whether you live in the fancy neighborhood of appointed behind us.

aspen institute america germany us
"aspen institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Globalists' humanist gatherings like the aspen institute or the united nations and i think you'll want to hang in for the last half of coast tonight this morning and tune in for my conversation with theodore roosevelt malik was at one time the oddson favorite to be president trump's choice for us ambassador to the european union will learn why that in happen we'll also get his take on the titanic struggle between global elizabeth in the nation state the future of the eu the deep state the future of capitalism and much more in hours one and to not sure if you remember the neil simon play lost in yonkers but a dozen years ago i was lost in yonkers i was looking for tonight's guest a state certified psychiatrist my tv crew and i finally found him sat down and had a lengthy conversation about one of his psychiatric patients who he calls julia that conversation remains one of the most chilling and profound conversations i've ever had it was at once terrifying and faith affirming dr richard gallagher is an ivy leagueeducated boardcertified psychiatrist who teaches at columbia university in new york medical college he was part of the team that tried to help this particular patient fighting satan's minions wasn't part of gallagher's career plan while he was studying medicine at yale he knew about biblical accounts of demonic possession but though they were an ancient cultures attempts to grapple with mental disorders like epilepsy he proudly calls himself a man of science yet today gallagher has become something else the goto guy for a sprawling network of extra assists in the united states he says demonic possession israel he seen the evidence victim suddenly speaking perfect lap an sacred objects flying off shelves people displaying hidden knowledge or secrets about people that they could not have possibly known it was one woman he says who was like ninety pound soaking wet she through a lutheran decrying deacon who is about two hundred pounds across the room that's not psychiatry that's beyond psychiatry gallagher calls himself a consultant on demonic possessions and for the past twenty five years he's helped clergy distinguish between mental illness in what he calls the real thing he estimates he.

aspen institute united nations theodore roosevelt malik trump us european union elizabeth neil simon yonkers julia dr richard gallagher columbia university new york medical college yale consultant president two hundred pounds twenty five years ninety pound
"aspen institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Globalists' humanist gatherings like the aspen institute or the united nations and then i think you'll want to hang in for the last half of coast tonight this morning and tune in for my conversation with theodore roosevelt malik who was at one time the oddson favorite to be president trump's choice for us ambassador to the european union we'll learn why that in happen we'll also get his take on the titanic struggle between globalism in the nation state the future of the eu the deep state the future of capitalism and much more in hours one and to not sure if you remember the neil simon play lost in yonkers but a dozen years ago i was lost in yonkers i was looking for tonight's guest a state certified psychiatrist my tv crew and i finally found him sat down and had a lengthy conversation about one of his psychiatric patients who he calls julia that conversation remains one of the most chilling and profound conversations i've ever had it was at once terrifying and faith affirming dr richard gallagher is an ivy league educated boardcertified psychiatrist who teaches at columbia university in new york medical college he was part of the team that tried to help this particular patient fighting satan's ninian's wasn't part of gallagher's career plan while he was studying medicine at yale he knew about biblical accounts of demonic possession but though they were an ancient cultures attempts to grapple with mental disorders like epilepsy he proudly calls himself a man of science yet today gallagher has become something else the goto guy for a sprawling network of exorcists in the united states he says demonic possession is real he seen the evidence victim suddenly speaking perfect latin sacred objects flying off shelves people displaying hidden knowledge or secrets about people that they could not have possibly known there was one woman he says who was like ninety pound soaking wet she through a lutheran decrying deacon who is about two hundred pounds across the room that's not psychiatry that's beyond psychiatry gallagher calls himself a consultant on demonic possessions and for the past twenty five years he's helped clergy distinguish between mental illness and what he calls the.

aspen institute united nations theodore roosevelt malik trump us european union neil simon yonkers julia dr richard gallagher columbia university new york medical college yale consultant president ninian two hundred pounds twenty five years ninety pound
"aspen institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"In so people started in my view start making excuses calling this the new normal new normal one and a half percent gdp growth is america hitting on all its economic cylinders that's a narrative in washington to me it's one of the most dangerous narratives they're is if we think that one and a half a twopercent is it for the country we're going to have enormous challenges and we're not gonna be position for global leadership center dan sullivan as an event hosted by the aspen institute my view is different i don't think that that's the future i don't believe in the new normal as a matter of fact one of the privileges of being in the us senate if you go reach out the smart people like many of the people in this room who have time on their hands you say had looked the talks you about an issue when next time you're in washington i reached out to dozens of people with one question is this the future the you believe in the new normal of one and a half percent in if not how do we get back the robot's levels of gdp growth that have made this country great and our foreign policy strong nobody believes in the new normal which is why the narrative is so dangerous so here's the good news on that front we are finally i think starting to focus on this we are starting to focus on getting back to robust levels of growth democrats republicans the white house i think their policies that you can undertake tax reform remember of the ideas that our current tax reform bill you don't hear about in the press president obama had these ideas chuck schumer had these ideas corporate tax rate of thirty five said nobody thinks that's a good idea terms of competitiveness of america infrastructure regulatory permiting reform in the one that i'm very folks on energy energy energy energy the us is on the verge right now be in the world's energy superpower again largest producer of oil bigger in saudi arabia and russia largest producer of natural gas bigger than russia largest producer of renewable spirit anybody to me that is an enormous opportunity grow the economy in when people talk about instruments of foreign policy instruments american power energy is one that i think we're just scratching.

washington dan sullivan us obama producer saudi arabia russia natural gas america aspen institute senate foreign policy president chuck schumer corporate tax twopercent
"aspen institute" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

Chicago's Business Authority

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

"Ladies and gentlemen ted malik one of the more remembers of the day group former head of the aspen institute uh you name it is in studio and i would say he's got amazing sources in our government and other governments who lives in london he was telling artist of mi six told him at dinner last night i didn't know what he get into that but he's willing to get into it right now at here's the big breaking news dino powell deputy national security adviser one of the key baddies that brought an all these bad globalist leftist and also nieto khan's to depart trump white house that's the washington post and gonna give the washington post action little bit of credit jeff visas wash oppose maybe they realized that they are about to lose so they're going to back off because they've been the worst so far email pointed trump campaigned to wish he leaks documents that were already public so now cnn has a top story today that it's over for trump uh that they had witty leach that wikileaks sent them an email we'll know a citizen sent them an email to public stuff off four chan an imphal wars you name it with public wikileaks that we're a month and a half old i mean this is like saying donald trump read the washington post i mean or the new york times the but again the his act like all of this is some big giant evil and they've caught them in something bad that have you ever at a whitney league eurorussian eurorussian agent even though where he lives is not russian and even though cnn with baghdad julian assange on or get the next with lake show this is just absolutely beyond nothing berger of 10 male let's get your take on this and then get in to mich and the and the ppk dossier and mr steele and mr crock and the judge recusing themselves over flynn i mean this thing is collapsing like a landslide right now it's club stronger in in in in front of us think the ah you know the the fact thanks are cleared this is media malpractices what we have to call we should have a class action suit all americans should join it and say we're not watching these fake news outlets any longer i mean when i go on cnn and christina men poor any one of those other.

leach wikileaks donald trump new york times cnn julian assange ted malik aspen institute london dino powell nieto khan washington mr steele mr crock flynn
"aspen institute" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

"The socalled elite publications all the folks that are hijacked americans are they were invincible a year and a half ago there were saying if hillary lose is going to gaza chainreaction gotta pull those articles up where they hit the panic button in the rothschild own uh economist financial times of london i mean it was hundreds album shed if she goes down it's a chainreaction and boy you weren't lyon because line mainstream stuff the public in those more establishment publications are like we're going to have the cia kill the president and then feel mud things you can just go on cnn and say it well guess what the secret service is investigating that i can tell you that they are investigating minded they are investigating clapper brennan on that went on the aspen institute three months ago said he'll be gone by december extrajudicially they say they won't be impeachment i know that legislative but it's a judicial thump show the legislative branch that would impeachment is an indictment the house a trial in the senate and so the secret service this wanted me to know from washington that this was two days ago debt they are investigating these people and just said you have any more info and so i i'm getting a bunch of information we're at all they weren't even aware of some of the times democrats in fbi operatives he wants to see also fbi mud who had appears is greatgreatgreatgreatgreatgrandfather was convicted of aiding john lewis both killing lincoln that's why they say your name will be mud i'm not kidding you can't make this up there are investigating them all that i guess they just want want them to know that too they thought and tell people we are investigating so uh analysts here on trout the government's gonna kill this guy well history marred he had your big con game up they're trying to act powerful act tough to other rogue groups from the government to thank man if they're talking about kill him on tv he must be week you don't think people were unaware of that and now it's come out that eric cramps and all these other groups have had private security the entire time may not do this.

rothschild president cnn aspen institute the house senate washington fbi john lewis lincoln eric cramps hillary gaza lyon cia greatgreatgreatgreatgreatgrand three months two days
"aspen institute" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on 1A

"The aspen institute was started in aspen colorado at the end of world war two and that the time right after world war two by gentleman named walter pecci who came from chicago and noted that aspen in the mountains was like a retreat and that he could bring people and we could gather people to actually get away from the life of the city and talk about the issues of the time and at that time trying to rebuild the world leadership around timeless values and really think about what society a great society should be kitty booed i wonder if maybe interest in the festival has changed over the years i think a lot more people became aware of conferences like this because of ted talks being posted on youtube and some ted talks have gone viral another ted x conferences in in other cities ted is an exclusive invite only events the aspen is is public anyone who can afford to come can come have you noticed that events like ted and programs like ted radio are on npr have shifted the interest in other festivals like the asked when the ethnic there's been a i don't know that it's explosive but a a large growth in conferences over the years that we've been doing this a lot more competition and it's good i think again i think people are hungry for for discussion and to die deep look at south by southwest it's enormous ya and a fantastic in that respect made so many people go and i i think.

aspen institute colorado world war walter pecci chicago youtube ted radio npr ted
"aspen institute" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"aspen institute" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"And the uh the military gets funded and the things that have to get done get done and now we can't do that because people uh get punished if they compromise they get taken out in primaries if they uh show that there are willing to talk to people on the other side so it's not a matter of the center it's a matter of the ability to come together at the end of the process and say okay where can we find a common ground to move forward and that is what partisanship prevents polarization is great you don't fight it out but at the end partisanship keeps you from being able to reach a compromise really what's happening is kind of discouraging is that there are a lot of people in congress now where it's see it seems from the outside that their party loyalty matters more than their loyalty to their obligations as members of congress to serve the country and that that's a very disturbing last question do you see any way out of this you know i have a lot of people will say to me a you know number one you know i it's very dismay and i think i i don't see any hope i don't see any hope for the future and and usually what they will say is we've got these people up there they're not willing to work together i run a political fellowship program for the aspen institute uh and the people who have come through my program republicans and democrats alike.

congress aspen institute