20 Burst results for "Asian American Studies"

"asian american studies" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:30 min | Last month

"asian american studies" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"To make our community safe now, but we also need to educate our Children and create a new narrative about who belongs here. The thing that made me a historian was an experience I had with my grandmother where I was asking her about when she moved from Maui to Honolulu during the Depression, and she stopped in mid sentence in explaining it and asked me why did I care about her story? And she said no one cares about what happened to me. And it broke my heart because I cared about her. I think that students shouldn't have to wait until college if they make it to college to find Asian American studies. And so I've been advocating for proposed Senate Bill 678 just a bill to include Asian American and Pacific Islander studies in the Connecticut state curriculum. This is building off of recent successes to include African American and Puerto Rican Latino studies in our schools. When we do that we eliminate the space for those stereotypes to grab hold of people. Um, they make sense of the world based on a deeper historical appreciation. But I really want to shift the political stakes from my history, their history to a broader sense of our history. In order to create an equitable and just society. We have to do that together, and I think the schools are a way for us to practice that. Jason. Thank you very much. This is really challenging conversation, and I really appreciate the attention to it. Jason Oliver Chang is director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. At the University of Connecticut. So what is happening when we look but cannot see when we see but cannot remember Professor Erika Lee, I cannot tell you how many times When I start lecturing to a class or give a public talk or speak to the media. How many times I've heard the phrase I've never Heard that before. I never knew that this happened and I've been teaching a long time at the beginning. I thought you're right. You know, I had never heard this until recently, either until I had started studying it, But now I'm angry,.

Maui Honolulu Jason Oliver Chang Jason Erika Lee Connecticut African American Asian and University of Connecticut Asian American Puerto Rican Asian American Studies Institu Pacific Islander Bill 678 Senate Professor Latino Depression
Myanmar's leader detained as military seizes control in apparent coup

All Things Considered

03:06 min | 3 months ago

Myanmar's leader detained as military seizes control in apparent coup

"Chang, the country of Myanmar is under military control again after a coup deposed the government of former democracy icon on San Souci. The military claims. Massive election fraud that sauce Ooh Cheese party went overwhelmingly in November's general election. Michael Sullivan reports. The military says it's state of emergency will only last a year. Mo Tosia of the Institute for Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore. Isn't buying. She has a long memory and recalls a similar promise made by the military. After a student led uprising. Decades ago, I go back to 1988 promise was to convene elections and hand over power to the party that won the elections, and we all know what happened to 1990. What happened then, she says, was that on some soup cheese party won convincingly. Victory. The military then refused to recognize. But today she insists things are different than they were 30 years ago. The global political and economic climate It will just be very unfavorable for military hunter seeking to justify his actions. I think That's assuming the military cares. I think that probably calculated that they've got friends in the world that will be disappointed in them, but will ultimately put their own self interests to the fore. And let them get away with it. David Matheson is a Youngun based analyst reached in Thailand. The endgame, I think is quite disturbing. I think it's them holding onto power. And definitely Mary Kelehan, a Myanmar scholar at the University of Washington, who is in the former capital, Yangon, isn't so sure. I don't even know if they have a plan. But, she says, even without a plan This crisis was inevitable, given the cohabitation that the 2008 Constitution imposed upon political and personal photos or enemies, So I'm not so shocked. To be honest. That arrangement she says, was created in part by the military drafted Constitution. That allowed it to retain control over several key ministries while guaranteeing the military a quarter of the seats in parliament effective veto power. Despite this on song suit, she went to the International Court of Justice in 2019 to refute allegations of genocide by Myanmar's military against the Muslim minority Rohingya. I think foreigners read too much into that, and that's what's being that's what we're hearing over and over. Which is that you know, she went to bat for the military, but she went about for her country. I mean, she saw this I C J case as an attack on her country and inevitable or not, Callahan says. This crisis couldn't have come at a worst time mammals facing its greatest health threat since the Spanish flu of 1918 There's new outbreaks of fighting in places where there had not been violent in a decade, and now it has a national political crisis when she says that will not turn out well for the people

Government Of Former Democracy San Souci Ooh Cheese Party Mo Tosia Institute For Southeast Asian Myanmar Michael Sullivan David Matheson Mary Kelehan Chang Singapore Yangon University Of Washington Thailand International Court Of Justice Callahan FLU
The Food Fix

PODSHIP EARTH

05:13 min | 6 months ago

The Food Fix

"I must admit to being exhausted. The last four years has taken a massive psychological and emotional toll that i'm only now just beginning to appreciate truthfully the struggle to keep hope that this day would arrive of alluded me the good news that we now have the opportunity to reignite democracy civility truth and move towards healing both our country and the earth. We've gone so far backwards that we need to move forward with deliberate tangible and bold steps one of the voices calling for such a revolution in thinking and action is dr mark. Hyman mark is a systems thinker and for dr. Hyman health is about connecting the soil with the farmer with the groza without diet and only when we connect all those dots. Can we begin to achieve planetary regeneration. As we'll hear in today's podcast what is truly staggering is the cost of today's broken food system. In which sixty percent of our calories in the us come in the form of ultra processed food. Dr mark hyman is head of strategy and innovation of the cleveland clinic center for functional medicine. He's the founder and director of the ultra wellness center and the board president of clinical affairs for the institute of functional medicine. Mark hosts one of the leading health. Podcast the doctors pharmacies spelled f. a. a. c. y. Pham esi marcus. The thirteen time. New york best seller author. His most recent book is called food. Fix how to save our health our economy our communities and our planet one bite. At a time i sought by ascii mark. How he got into medicine in the first place. Ming doctor was a total afterthought for me buddhist student in college. I studied buddhism. Asian studies chinese. I studied ecology. The environment systems thinking ancient systems of healing. Very eclectic and i decided after i graduated. But what am. I going do with a degree in buddhism so i took a long hike by myself in the shenandoah valley through my backpack brought a copy of moby dick. Because it was a very thick books. I could carry and read house before kindle and I just walked and thought and just kind of thought about what i wanted to do in the buddhist framework is really about healing. It's a it's a healing system. It's not really a religion it's really a system of healing of the mind and it's about the relief of suffering it's about compassion and love and service and and those were things that really called to me as a young man and i thought well. What could i do. That kind of fits all that. I could be a monk. That didn't sound like a lot of fun. But i decided i could be a doctor and it was a total afterthought i just i didn't have any science courses. I had to go back. And take some pre med courses and ended up loving. And i decided i would just keep doing as long as i liked it. And if i didn't like it anymore. I would stop and so far so good thirty years later. I mean that's great advice for anyone thinking about people. Ask me career advice. I say that like if you enjoy it if it fills you keep doing it and if it doesn't maybe think about stopping it exactly exactly chain. I've changed so many things i've been you know a small town country doctrine idaho and a native american reservation. Emergency room doctor started clinics in china ex patriots. I was the medical director. Kanye ranch i developed my own. Practice started writing books and teaching About functional medicine became the faculty of functional medicine institute and direct and the chairman of it started big center for functional medicine at cleveland clinic. And now i'm sort of moving into a different phase of thinking about how do we deal with the intersecting issues of food and health and agriculture environment which all may seem separate but are actually all one problem and if we want to solve one we have to solve them all to before we end that. What is functional medicine. What does that mean. That joke is the opposite of dysfunctional medicine. Which is what we have now. As essentially a system of thinking it's not a methodology or treatment or attests supplement is is essentially a way of thinking about disease based on systems. It's it's base c ecosystem medicine. You understand that that the environment is an ecosystem and that everything has to be imbalanced in nature. For to thrive and in madison we really created a reductionist model that allows us to focus on diseases and symptoms in drugs to target those symptoms and not really understand what is health. We never took the course in medical school. Creating a healthy human wanna one. You know we we basically learn how to diagnose and diseases functional. Medicine is the science creating health. And when you do that does goes away. The side effect if you create a healthy ecosystem for example on a farm or a natural ecosystem it becomes. Resilient disease doesn't occur.

Dr Mark Hyman Mark Dr Mark Hyman Cleveland Clinic Center For Fu Ultra Wellness Center Institute Of Functional Medici Pham Esi Marcus Ascii Mark Hyman Moby Dick Shenandoah Valley Ming Kanye Ranch Functional Medicine Institute Ecology Mark New York
"asian american studies" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

15:48 min | 1 year ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Hey everyone welcome to another episode. Capela hunters podcast the podcast that is dedicated towards bridging the divide between the police in the communities that they serve. WanNa thank you once again for coming along with me in with us as we look to do just that and that is bridged that divide between the police and the community once again. I'M GONNA ask you to make sure that you support the podcast and you can support the podcast pay of cash up and then Mo also can go over to the Pedro on page cap two hundred podcast. Patriot and supported that way can also support the podcast. Remember to rate these episode. Subscribe to these episodes and please most importantly share these episodes shared on your facebook page shared through email. Sheriff through word of Mouth Shirt. The your I g whatever you had to do missionary pleased that you support the podcast and share these episodes so the word in the information can get out. That is most important way that you can help. Us support the episode now. Of course the monetary. Some methodist support is most appreciated as well. This episode is also going to be up anew to Capitol Hunters podcast on Youtube Make sure that you're following instagram. Cpt A hunter twitter CPT enter and make sure that you follow me on those platforms without further ado. Ladies and Gentlemen WanNa get into the episode. It's going to be kind of a short episodes as you can see from the time line. I want to ask the simple question Just looking at what's going on around the country as continuing to struggle to grapple with this Corona Virus. And when asked simple questions are Asian Americans being targeted because of this V Ide- Kobe nineteen. In what can we do in order to help? stemmed the flow of racist xenophobia. And all these kind of crazy nonsense. That's going on so my special guest today is is Dr Russell. Joan Dr Zhong received his B. A in human biology in 'em May in education from Stanford University after working in China in in the mayor's Office of San Francisco he obtained his PhD in sociology from the University of California Berkeley in two thousand at teaching it Photo College for two years. He came to San Francisco State. University's Asian American Studies Department in two thousand two. He is the author of sustaining faith traditions race ethnicity and religion among Latino and Asian Americans second-generation. Another Book Faith Generations Race and New Asian American Churches Couple of other books His current interest of research is Ron Sociology of raise the sociology of religion in social movement. His Current Research Project examines the Worldview of Chinese Americans were the most non religious ethnic group in the United States. We had a great conversation and I like to have him back on. Because the Topic of religion is extremely important to me. Personally I I enjoy talking about religion and that seems to be a great deal of the many of the papers that he has published in some of the work that he's doing so I definitely want to have him back to so we can discuss that So without further ADO LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. We're going to get right into it in here is the interview with Dr Russell and we're going to be analyzing State of response in the uptick in racist attacks against members of the Asian Community. So thank you so much for coming to captain hunters podcast. I really really appreciate it. I reached out to a number of in. Thank you for agreeing to come on You know I I often have thought about changing the name of my podcast because I think that people are kind of skeptical about speaking to a former law enforcement officer so But I thank you for coming on and it'd be brave enough to come. Come here tab. Sounds like a sailor show. I thought you know I. I I there was a state actually. Us Representative Name was Johanna. We actually went the middle school together and so she became she's now a U S representative And I had her come on but when I was emailing her staff like who's this guys some he some sailor or something as exact they said. So maybe that's another reason but my picture says it's shows what I'm supposed to be a cop so I I don't know so I really kind of rethink what I went where I wanna go. Abc cast anyway so but So I wanted to have a conversation about The uptick in racist activities towards as because of the corona virus and I really appreciated you coming on and agreeing to have this conversation No it's not easy. read a number of articles in wash number of news Affiliates try to talk about this but I really want to have an expert on to talk about this and see what we can do in order to stop it and In ask the questions law enforcement join enough but before we get into that. Would you just kind of introduce yourself to the audience in? Tell us who you are what you do and all that kind of stuff. Thanks captain hundred for inviting me. I'm Dr Russell. John M Chair and professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State and I knew that as soon as I heard about the corona virus Spreading as a pandemic. I knew that Asian Americans would be targeted is US past American history since the nineteenth century Chinese have been targeted and scapegoated because of diseases coming over and so it's a historic stereotype of Chinese Americans and Asian Americans. And so you'd think we'd grow out of this right if it's happened so many times in the past you know wise history repeating itself. What's up with this country? Why can't we get past this racial angle that we're constantly dealing with because it's actually useful this racial angle for politicians to incite nationalism and to create enemies to build up their base? So you know as recently as nine eleven. That's happened right. We had SARS in two thousand nine eleven people began to rationalize Muslims and people who look like Muslims as terrorists and so he had a beard and turban. Then you'd be seen as the terrorists today if you have a mask and you're Asian than you're perceived as being a disease that's that racial ization process and Politicians.

Dr Russell United States San Francisco State Asian American Studies Departm New Asian American Churches Co representative WanNa Asian American Studies Asian Community Mo facebook San Francisco Joan Dr Zhong Capitol Hunters Pedro University of California Berke Ron Sociology Abc Stanford University
"asian american studies" Discussed on Asian Americana

Asian Americana

10:17 min | 1 year ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on Asian Americana

"So like I mentioned. There's been a lot of news about tax on Asian Americans that have been fueled by attitudes around the pandemic. I'll spare you all the disturbing details but there have been serious attacks on individuals homes and businesses all over the country campaigns like wash. The hate racism is a virus and hate is a virus have sprung up in response. I couldn't be silent anymore. We can't be silent. I just told myself enough is enough. You want to stand up because we didn't want be victim. We want to make a difference whether it's spreading the word on social media creating more educational resources to just having dialogue with our community as well as other communities beyond so Hashtag is a virus is a movement response choosing a phobia and discrimination fueled by cove in nineteen because this virus does not discriminate boozer Michelle Brian. And TAMMY CO founders of the haters virus campaign my name is Michelle Que. Han Busa and I'm the founder of we are uprise irs which is a community driven clothing brand. I'm japanese-american maneuvers. Bryant them on the founder of Asian Hustle Network. We have forty six thousand members and entrepreneurs on facebook Vietnamese American High Antennae. Shell and the founder of Better Braves were a nonprofit that tackles workplace harassment discrimination retaliation korean-american. I met Tammy briefly to a local event in Los Angeles and Brian. I actually connected through His facebook group. Michelle sharing news about eight wins and their businesses being targets of xenophobic attitudes attacks. Brian notice she wasn't the only one posting about this. I was seeing a lot of these typos. Come into Asian network. The recent we were getting about one hundred fifty two hundred both end I would say about seventy to eighty percents of the posts. Were about racism. Aside huge uptick with crime and Asian business owner who were struggling and when I saw that for eight to nine days consecutively. I knew that it was in my responsibility to not sit back and watches Vote around that time. Michelle actually posted in the group. I thought that the idea to partner with someone like her. Meanwhile Timmy had recently moved back to Los Angeles from San Francisco and was thinking about our own family. May parents ran dry cleaning business for over a decade so I thought them experiencing some of the racism as small business owners even before the current virus and thankfully my parents ended up retiring last year in relocate to Korea but when the corona virus hit they were very concerned about me here. It was scary to think about all the other business owners that are here not getting. That was just really heartbreaking. You know and then I found myself and my friends also talking about this being scared even to walk in the streets of Koreatown in La wearing masks because we're worried that we might be targeted by somebody on the street and so when I came across a social media post that Michelle. Put out talking about how she wanted to create a movement tackling these Irish off to her on instagram and we ended up connecting bouncing around some ideas and then eventually On the campaign the campaign started as a way to just support Asian American businesses through patronage in small group. Profess got together to form a weekly food crawl. That ended up Not working out due to the lockdown so we quickly decided to pivot Take on more like a digital route. And that's how we got together to form what it is today. There's three main points to Hashtag. Hate is a virus. The first one is the social media campaign to spread awareness people posting on various social media channels with a t shirt that says Virus a piece of paper with hitters virus on people getting really creative with their masks and even photos shopping them. Our second initiative is to raise one million dollars for the Relief Fund. Yes so right now. We're primarily raising through. Go on me. And we wanted to give up that one million towards profits charities in taking the application process where we can disperse between five to ten J small business. Three is to provide educational content for people to share educate themselves and also inform others through our weekly email. Blasts been providing things like maps visualizing peoples reports as well as things guides on to de escalate a situation if you encounter a hate incident dancing really inspiring to see a lot of these other movements come forth wall including wash the hate Holler back say and racism is a virus and we're seeing a lot of members of the community. Come together to make a stand that we're not tolerate. Discriminatory behavior goes to show how much this issue has affected our community and how the community is coming together to make sure that we raise awareness. Jacksonville but still. They made their own in the music. Got Me for a single victim. Build a future reached my goal to make home. You can learn more about their campaign at hate as a virus top world or honor Asian Americana Website. Raising awareness is a great start but I know that effort can't exist in a vacuum there also has to be changes in policy along with the information needed to make those changes so I called up. Someone who is working on that developed a petition that went to the Attorney General of California to ask that they collect Ada on what was going on the response. Was that the attorney. General doesn't really do that kind of work. But they rely on local data and for that reason they couldn't start a reporting center here in Los Angeles App. Connett already developed a reporting form and so on March Nineteenth. We launched stop. Api Hate Carney. Name is Manjoo Coke Ernie. I am executive director of APP Condie Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council identify as a South Asian American woman and use the Pronoun she her and Hers. As far organization was founded in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy six. As a part of what was the burgeoning Asian American Pacific islander movements today we are a coalition of more than forty community based organizations that serve and represent the one point five million Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Los Angeles County up con-. It's collaborating organizations work. On all sorts of issues including housing economic development health environmental justice human trafficking and other issues and with a hate incidents associated with covert nineteen. They've had to add another project to that sleep. Our project started in early February. What happened was in Los Angeles? We learned of an incident where a boy was accused of having the corona virus simply because he was Asian American. I won't show the brutal details but basically this accusation it'd into a physical attack and this was really badly assaulted sending him to the emergency room. Obviously this was a very concerning incident for us. We immediately began to provide help to the family and we also held a press conference where Ed local officials after doing that. Work folks in the bay area started to see similar issues. Crop up there and so Chinese -firmative action and the Asian American Studies Department at San Francisco State University reached out. They went to the state attorney. General for help but as you heard earlier they were not successful so these partners took the responsibility of collecting data into their own hands. They launched their new collaborative stop. Api Hate at the reporting center to the public so we have a four pronged approach to our reporting center. We want to report what we're hearing from our communities and either firsthand accounts you know when you read our report we've been sure to include actual descriptions from community members though you understand really sort of a hate and vitriol. That folks are facing right now number. Two we want to provide resources as well as the instance so we are planning to post on the website resources in terms of what you can do if this happens to you. If you're a bystander. What actions you can take information like that. Additionally we want to try to provide assistance if there are cases where we can help to intervene with governmental bodies public officials with a team of pro bono. Attorneys WE WANNA be able to do that. Number three is advocacy. We want to try to get changes in the law changes in enforcement and implementation of laws around. Hey we're really trying to take a deep dive into what's on the books now. Work with state and local officials to see. Where are there gaps? Where can we fill in those gaps? The last Prong is public education. And that's part of. I think strengthening our communities is getting the word out about what's acceptable. What's not and what were the funding from these reports. We've gotten over eleven hundred incident reports from individuals throughout the country. What we're seeing is in terms of populations themselves this impacts non-chinese as well as Chinese Americans. You know our data in the last two weeks shows that number really do come out. A variety of ethnic populations these include Filipino among Japanese Taiwanese Thai.

Los Angeles Michelle attorney Michelle Brian TAMMY CO founder Condie Asian Pacific Policy an Asian Americana Website partner Asian Hustle Network Michelle Que Los Angeles County Asian American Studies Departm Han Busa irs business owner Korea Braves March Nineteenth
"asian american studies" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"American history book and be like all funny. You know what I'm saying. And then all of a sudden he's going to be like all like you know let's go back to the motherland and like a suicide start smoking weed. He's GonNa get raves. He's he's like four years behind everybody else and this is this is Angie Yanks. Tweet three years from now. Hey have you guys sort of movie called crazy? Rich Asians sexy. My favorite is that he's doing. Yeah that's what I'm saying. He's late to the party. But but but the media is giving him so much attention and the What's the other part is the media? Part is I mean obviously like as reports that we're talking about it but like it's almost like Washington Post and CNN like these like they obviously knew this is going to happen. And so like I don't know there's a click beatty aspect tour like we just keep talking about it and that becomes the primary narrative when when it's like who the fuck is this guy. He's not we should be talking to like a East Asian American Studies Professor at Columbia University. It'd be yeah I mean we should building coalitions and talking to different people and like marginalized voices on all that stuff. But instead we're like talking to Asian guy in the Blazer again I've got damaged Ha. I don't even hate him I think he's kind of like he's he's like a big puppy dog no and he keeps you know keeps tracking all this murder. And you're just like well you know you mean well but God you're dumb you know Yeah Yeah Yeah. And he's listening to this podcast man. Somebody I'm sure somebody's with Andrew. Young on internetwork so please send him this episode and also sent him a copy of Pachinko where the fuck he needs to read. Hey coming over Kelly. Oh Wow this is so.

Angie Yanks Washington Post CNN beatty Kelly murder Andrew Professor Columbia University
Daniel Goleman: The Mind and Meditation

The Wisdom Podcast

09:41 min | 1 year ago

Daniel Goleman: The Mind and Meditation

"I have the pleasure of speaking with Daniel Goldman to claim psychologist and author of several books including the international bestseller emotional intelligence. Why Can Madam Molden? Iq Daniel has written extensively on the connections between human psychology science and contemplative practice and their practical applications in both leadership and in everyday life in this conversation. Daniel talks about his early years at Harvard where he earned his PhD in psychology and how encounters with great teachers such as Ramdas took Kunar remedy and many others would pave the way for his research on meditation and Non Western theories of mind unlike he studies in psychology which largely focused on the content of the mind. By-pass enough focused on the process. Which was tremendously exciting Daniel. He then discusses how mindfulness and meditation topics not will receive. Graduate advises have evolved within the United States and within American culture most profoundly. Daniel discusses his most recent work on climate change. He off is extraordinarily astute insights on how the human mind grapples with the difference between imminent verses symbolic threats and how these translates into the world of capital consumerism and personal responsibility he also shares his thoughts on how Donald Practitioners My contrbute to these calls. Especially I so much enjoyed this conversation and I hope you do too so I thought to start with awesome you so. You're a graduate student at Harvard and went to. India is that is that rushing seventy might travelling companions on the trip. Were someone known as Jeff. Cable? Who's called Krishna? Dos The devotional singer. Another friend was released for DOS. Who just lose writing books with Rhonda's because I had met Ramdas quite by accident cosmic what you would say tender auspicious coincidence or something but My Freshman Freshman Trish during graduate school. I was writing a paper suicide over the Christmas. Oh holiday and I get a knock on the door of my apartment in Cambridge in. It's a woman why never seen before. And she had run into a friend of mine who had been in a communal house in Berkeley. Who's going around the world? And he had sent a letter to me that she was the currier four and she had been in a monastery in Nepal where she met a an American. A guy named Bongolan not rundown. Yes and basically she. I have two things to do here. One is delivered this letter to you. The second is to visit this guy. The BAGUA DOS it. I really shouldn't need and the third was to go to my sister's wedding but she backed out and so that was why she came to America. So I said well I'll take you to meet this person you know. Your Christmas is writing on suicide. We ended up driving up to New Hampshire in there in this farm house. Luxuriance funhouse in a small room. Upstairs was this guy all white along there but no Julia was and he had all these weird pictures on the wall turned out to be Hindu deities and we watching remit and nobody said anything. I never been in a social situation where nobody said anything but I went along with it. And then after a while he spoke and it turned out he was Richard Alpert now. Rhonda's just come back from India and it turned out also that he had been fired from the program at Harvard that I was enrolled in a graduate student. Also I was on the graduates to school colloquium committee which meant I could invite him to come back and speak. Nice which I which was the first time he'd been back to Harvard since he was fired. And so you know he was on fire. He was really full of shocked as they say just back from India and he started. He came give a lecture started. Seven ended it too and to bribe janitor lettuce sticky two. Am to work. And I began to go to a kind of a summer camp that he was running his father's place in the Hampshire where I visited him. This was in the summer and after two rounds I found out that might fill ship to harbored included. A traveling challenge ship nice and I had a wonderful mentor at Harvard David McClellan who actually had hired fired leary and so what did he think about your little excursions to bomb. While he was a devout quaker and he was very interested in meditation so it seems glad that I was getting into this because none of it all is other graduate students. Were like all its study the need to achieve from the you know also you riding on suicide just WanNa go back to that in. What was was there any in that compelled you to write. Oh I had been at a teaching assistant in a course on death and dying talk. Guinan and I had gotten access to about several hundred suicide notes for Bailey Corner. Yeah and you know it's just a you know you study stuff in doubt. I mean I wasn't suicidal. But yet you had interesting death and dying or was that interested. Dr. Not like a personal interest but kind of academic academic India okay and so I should give it back on. My father was professor humanities and my mother was a social worker and I think I got a a kind of implicit value system. It was a very ecumenical. He taught a course called autobiography of civilization which was world literature so it a very lot instead of Sanskrit actually version Among other languages his best friend was the guy who founded the Asian Studies Department at Berkeley? No so I had this kind of view of the world which was larger than just Western yesterday so I was very interested in going to India but I found could In graduate school because Ron dos made me think oh I'd love to meet his guru yet girly Bob Him. You Know No. I'd never met anyone like him of the KARMAPA sixteenth city. Zuma Sitter Sixteenth Mama's yeah and They meant didn't see each other enough. Say met but Lama nor law whose retreat master for College Berries who was close to carmont stayed within croly Baba for two years and I think maybe he told them I never got the story of how he knew anything again. But anyway and Because this was nineteen seventy s very early. A lot of the wonderful lauman's the very shall we say far advanced llamas on the path from Tibet were still alive and Christopher Dawson and I met coup Air Fiche who is very humble. Wonderful being reviewed seem around dawn. You know mumbling all money. I when I saw going around the Stupa and people come and see him day and night and he was always happy to see. Whoever came which I contrasted with my professors at Harvard were world famous psychologist. You could see them like two to three on Tuesday office hours so anyway. Long Story Short coup. Who was wonderful and I didn't know till decades later with he was the teacher of the Dalai Lama on Compassion Chari out the time. You would certainly never say so. He had been offered the kind of the presidential suite with top sweet. And the monastery top floor didn't want he stayed in a very small room had little wooden bed. That was it was very simple. It beautiful way so I met him and kind of made it my business to look around I. I ended up studying the Pasta with Joseph Goldstein. Who was in residence of the Burmese? Mahara I think. Joseph was little horrified that other Westerners were showing up and Manindra had invited his friend going Kaji to give up his second course for Westerners and I went back and gave a talk at the conference on Yoga and Therapy Deli and told people there that there was going to be sub ten day retreat and when the people audience was named Sharon Salzberg cow and so she came to book Guy Learn how to meditate the rest is history was charged with Joseph of course so we go way way back to nineteen seventy really

Harvard India Daniel Goldman Graduate Student Ramdas Rhonda Joseph Goldstein Berkeley Madam Molden United States New Hampshire Richard Alpert Donald Trump
"asian american studies" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on Asian Enough

"There for a while. So it's it's just kind of like a wild wild west of information out there right now. Frank where like where's your mom getting these hoaxes? That she's sending to you. Oh we chat we chat line. There's a network of Asian ladies who pass around this information. You know Have you guys seen hoaxes from Your Family Sammy? His parents are doctors. But my I mean my extended family is India and after the two thousand sixteen election. I remember thinking like I don't have any family that believe fake news and then I went to India and all of my family believes all sorts of things that aren't real So I don't actually. I haven't checked in with them about this in particular. I'd like my GRANDPA. Though is my GRANDPA's an impressive guy. He's on twitter. He's on facebook on everything he's like. Eighty five. I'm sure he believes all sorts of weird stuff about this disease but I think in general it's like the real data is so scary that it's almost easier to believe that you know it's some hoax that and so therefore it can magically disappear or you know there's some various thing behind it instead of just like nature is doing this to us. My parents are in a shelter in place area and so it took many nights of being on the phone with them a lot more than I am usually and being very firm about. No you have to stay inside. That means you don't go anywhere and they would be like a we. Don't go anywhere anyway but we go to Costco. We go to gas station. We go to the store for food. We go to run errands and stuff and I'm like you go out all the time even if it doesn't seem like it in retirement and my parents particularly love Costco of all places and like Costco is one of their favorite places has been ever since like for for decades so to convince my mom to stop going to Costco and have somebody else you know. Pick up supplies or groceries or needs or or you know prescription. Whatever for them took days. Hi Mom if you're listening to this thank you for staying. I'm hearing this stuff from like you know seniors in Chinatown to and in Little Tokyo and an Asian neighborhoods. You know something. People don't really know about Asian neighbors around. La Is that they have these large kind of stationary senior populations that can't really function anywhere else. And so the enclave really exists as this like shelter for them as so a lot of them. You know have really got like really intense walking routines. They take the bus everywhere. They're autonomous and they kind of really define themselves a lot in you know what they can do at their age and take a lot of pride in their health trying to get them to give that up. You know is has been been pretty difficult. I've been arguing with couple of seniors myself this week about staying home because they're the most endangered and and another thing. I keep running into. Is this idea that immigrants think the US has got this crisis handle you know? They sacrificed a lot to come to this country. They they trust this country to to handle something like this and to ring the alarm bells when they need to and and I guess like we have to tell them is right now. You you can't really. The federal response has has really hurt this sort of local responses in and everyone needs to kind of act to protect each other. Well that brings us to another discussion that we really wanted to have which is about Cova. Nineteen and racism. We have the president of the United States calling the quote Chinese virus and we have others pushing back on the use of that terminology and debating. It's very real effects on the perceptions of Asians and Asian Americans right now We're also hearing more and more first person reports of Anti Asian discrimination harassment even violence in places like London New York in right here in Los Angeles. So have you guys experienced anything like that? Or how are you feeling about it right now in those term? Yeah I mean. This has been happening for months. I feel like it's similar to the hoax thing. It's people want to believe something that isn't what's real and in this case. They want to believe that the virus is you know only infecting a certain population of People. Or they can you know. Put blame on it when they feel scared about. That's what people WANNA do. They feel scared about something. They WanNA blame someone else and this happens all the time like they every time. There's a new disease if there's a way to sort of say like oh it's only affecting population people will do it with HIV. They did the same thing like they just said. Oh that's affecting gay people in that case. I would argue in this case to hinders the response. Because if we're saying that it can't affect everyone then we don't really have to respond to it like it's a threat for us. It's a threat you know for this disease. It was a threat in China. I think it's sort of like a tail as old as time. It's just this is just how people respond to things. And the problem with this is that it's been going on for so long and having these very real like economic impacts and obviously social impacts. Yeah I mean it's such a weird time to be American right now. I don't know about y'all but for me. Asian American is never felt more like a skin color than it does right now. I haven't added anything like overtly racist happened to me but I was at the TACO stand. The other day walked up hurt some laughing comments about like Chino and international customers. And then when I reach to touch the SALSA CUPS THE TAKARA. She reached over to try to serve the salsa to me but I insist on touching them myself. It really struck me how scared she was. You know. People are refusing to be seen by my mom at her hospital job because my mom wears a face mask and they don't feel comfortable with their care like I hear more sort of like widespread street level incidents of racism against asian-americans than than like I've ever heard before and I think it's forcing this awareness that like. Hey you know Asian Americans. We're not white. We're the targets of racism were being targeted with it right now. I was talking with this dad. Whose son so they were like trash talking. Each other in basketball and his son is in the fourth grade. The the bully was like you have the corona virus in the Sun. Said you know fuck you. You know a curse word and his son. Who's WHO's WHO's in a Chinese kid. Got Way more punishment than the kid who said the racist thing. You know way more punishment for a curse word. This dad is like. He's never had to talk to his son about race before and I don't know it's just this time where we're kind of confronting race more directly than before and there are some statistics. I wanted to share to over at San Francisco State University. There've been tracking racist incidents in the news. And you know in a period over the last rough month Corona virus discrimination news increased by fifty percent from ninety three articles in week. One to one hundred forty stories in week. Four four hundred seventy one total cases of xenophobia discrimination against Asians that sixteen cases per day and ten new cases per day. And so this is a report by Russell. Junk Sarah Gowing and Carrot Takasaki at the Asian American Studies Department of San Francisco State University and it was prepared on the behalf of Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council and the group Chinese for affirmative action. And I just want to mention that these two groups are also launching an API. Hate crimes tracker this week and they're encouraging Asian Americans to report racist incidents with the Hashtag stop a Api hate. You can also go to their website to report something. Www Dot Asian pacific policy and Planning Council dot org slash. Stop Dash a dash eight but It does it does kind of give a sense of of how how this is. This is really on the rise right now. It's similar to how I'm seeing people taking cover. Nineteen seriously but it doesn't really sink in until till they know somebody or they're like closer in terms of degrees of separation to somebody who directly has it and I think the same case is true for instances of discrimination right now. There's a friend of this. Podcast named Paula Marta. Who has her own fantastic? Podcast called long distance about the Filipino diaspora and she shared on social media an instance that happened to her very recently in the La area. Is things like that. You're seeing more and more being shared on social media and amplified around the Asian and asian-american.

Costco Los Angeles United States India San Francisco State University Asian Pacific Policy and Plann facebook twitter Frank basketball Chino Cova Paula Marta president Asian American Studies Departm Planning Council harassment Chinatown TACO
"asian american studies" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Story of Madam. Butterfly has always reminded me of something that my mom used to say. When I was young young she would say that illusion harder to let go of than reality and I definitely find that in my life you know from relationships to my career? You know what I think I should be doing with it. It's really easy to build these ideas. About what something is or who someone is is and to put all of our faith into that illusion. That's what today's our own bell. D is All about Joe. Joe's son also noticed noticed. Butterfly is a young Japanese girl now. She became a Geisha to support her family. But an American navy lieutenant named Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton who stationed in Nagasaki August. Sake bought her as his bride. Yeah I said bought. These are different times end. Women were still commodities. Anyway chose San Falls head over heels those in love with him and they make beautiful music together and also well a baby boy and then Pinkerton takes off three years pass and she waits for him totally faithful her maid. Suzuki is telling her to let it go. Like the guy's not coming back but butterflies butterflies clinging to the illusion of this life that they could have together. And that's where today's hopeful and heartbreaking. Aria comes in an umbrella de chose San is imagining aging the day. She's going to see his ship on the horizon and know that he's coming back for her. This one beautiful day now. I probably don't have to tell you how this all works out or actually doesn't in her case but I've invited for guests to share their thoughts about this beautiful Aria first up is soprano Anna Maria Martinez. Tina's who doesn't just like Madam Butterfly. I Love Madam Butterfly and she has taught me beautiful lessons in life in loyalty realty encourage indignity. She has made me a better person. Composer and conductor Hong Ro Dolla sole source. He's writing an opera based on M. Butterfly. The Tony Award winning play. It's a modern take on the butterfly story to me has always been something I thought would be a great idea to update Madam. Butterfly to Contemporary Story Sandra Kumamoto Stanley. She's a professor of Asian American Studies at California State University. Puccini's Madame Butterfly is a kind of a psycho sexual fantasy about the nature. Sure of not just Asian women but also Asia itself and Kyoko Katayama a writer and former psychotherapist. WHO's here to share the story of her mother's life and her own? I was raised as Japanese on the other hand. I was also seen as a foreigner because my father was an American. Gi and now let's get into it own bell di Okay from Puccini's Madama Butterfly..

M. Butterfly Madam Butterfly Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton Madame Butterfly Anna Maria Martinez Sandra Kumamoto Stanley Joe American navy Puccini Tony Award Kyoko Katayama Hong Ro Dolla Suzuki Tina San Asian American Studies Nagasaki August San Falls Asia
"asian american studies" Discussed on First of All

First of All

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on First of All

"I feel very grounded right now. I don't know how to put I. I'm a firm believer. The big big things happen from little actions and We Sh- like the word should but I I would hope that. Nobody discounts the magnitude of a small action. Just one of the things that I'm not patting myself on the back for but I was actually really cringing about was I got irritated at T. mobile customer rep the other week because my bill was Incorrectly charged and then they my phone stop working and like whatever. It was a billing issue. It wasn't her fault in the person picked up my call and I was being a total ass to her and it was really not my brightest movement and I felt bad. I can't use even like she didn't duty. They knew. Jeez I'm having again as of the bad day and then it got worse and I took it out on her one of the things. I did my best to try to redeem myself because I had already been irate at her and been mean I apologize to her was like hey look. I'm really sorry I appreciate you taking the time to do this and again. I'm not praising myself but I'm sharing not as something like I ate crow and I had to deal with that moment. There are things that are that small that hopefully I pray to God I could somewhat rectify. How me knows mainly her causing her out and I was just being like not nice. Yes that's my name like. I know how is it can be and I know how big dig I can be so small things is someone was speaking me that way in any sort of regular fashion or even once like literally what happens on the freeway in La when you someone cut you off or like they get in your lane. Don't wave come on man like little things. Add up real quick and so while we're talking about very big things I I'm a firm believer in like action and I don't think that those actions have to be super super giant and also the fact that we live in an independent interdependent society. If your teacher your caregiver you give provide a service. Can you have clients whatever? Just be kind and be nice and like genuinely not to placate people enough to get them off your back but like remember that we're all humans and sometimes like the good stuff doesn't get as much attention. We are in a very like the things that get clicks and the things that get spread and re tweeted and shared a lot of the truly nasty narratives and we can all share our dog videos and everything that I genuinely appreciate. It makes you just remember. There are good things in life but whatever good you can bring. I mean any. I'm I'm just really glad that you you did the work internally and with others and through your teacher and like the art are you get to sit here with me and that like you've worked through a lot of that and and I've worked through my stuff too and I know that there are others out there listening. That are doing the same so I just saying that there are ways to get through it there beacons of hope. I at your honesty. You're one of them and also Where you have to go and you gotta go handle it more of your life Acknowledged that you have an award named after you at your college that you just got notified about. Not freaking huge deal at. I had no idea that like all this work that stuff that you and I've talked about for years at this point like it began in like that. You're getting nausea. That's freaking beautiful. So congrats thank you. It is it is still hard to comprehend that yet so back. What made you saying at the College? We marry The Asian American Studies Department is awarding. Me Visits Name and my name for student for activism and soon leadership because of the thing I mentioned before about starting the organization and also at the same time that was the first person along with France. We Co created the Asian American Studies Major. Because it didn't exist we had to make it up and so we just culminated that and then I became the first I became the first and then since I graduated in two thousand nine. There's been others that followed suit. And so now that they're about to. They have a minor now and they got a large funding for about to have an official department for you know. Now they're like. Oh we want to acknowledge you for that and like can you come to Williamsburg Virginia next year to make a speech about it and it just feels weird because it's just like you know I do understand I've done things but it's just like there are people in my life. He guys have done so much more. And I remember being in college being so aw of people in my you know in my environment who just like you guys. Are you know? Now they're like some of these people are lawyers human rights organizations and all this and and I've been actor in Los Angeles and so technology is like you know as much as wonderful as this award is. It does kind of make you 'cause I went the opposite way like not like crushing myself. I don't deserve it but also just be like it's it's as weird floating feeling like there's actually a fucking name in my is an award and it's overwhelming. It's still and I think it will continue to increase when next. May comes around but I can always speak so grateful. That's the only thing you can just be like. No no no. Don't give it to just be like just be okay to say thank you thank you so much even say thank you. I'm pretty sure my speech. I'm probably going to say I'm so silk confused. Why am I even here because probably not? So there'll be like dude dude. They're like people in audience. What the Hell is he crying so well? I also think you're getting it and this is what I'll say about people. I have admired greatly. People didn't do it for awards they don't do the they do. The 'cause they have purpose and they do it because they want to do it because they wanna make the movie because they WanNa make the program. They wanted like teachers that they did it because they cared about the students not because they deserve they wanted the recognition. The recognition can be the byproduct. I think it's really wonderful. I also know that there's a lot of things that happen out. In this universe that never gets proper acknowledgement. I hope that that doesn't stop anybody from doing it. They do it because it's the right thing to do. Believe it's a good thing to do with integrity But it may be that in of itself is the reward enough but the fact that you're getting rewarded for this. I think it is is a testament to you. Made a really big impact. And that's something to celebrate. So Eddie I know you're super when people like compliment us so I had to do it on the record. I have it for all eternity. Thank you so much for coming and talking with me about this. Thank you for having me. Yeah Working People Follow your journey. Do any plugging share my social media on Instagram. Facebook and twitter. I go by cinnabon monster swimmers. That's that's a whole other whole story of busy. I love that Fatty Pacer Product. A lot you can follow me on through that social media channel. We'll keep an eye on any. I really excited for all the Tacoma for you all the projects you'll do. We could work on something together down the line. We got a lower ahead of us stores to tell yet. Thank you so much for tuning into this episode of first of all and if you enjoy this if it spoke to you please share it with a friend and please leave a five star review and subscribe. It'd be great to keep the conversation going with my listeners. Appreciate endure all of you. Think you'd everyone's been messaging me. It's been really great to hear how these stories and journeys of all these friends of mine and amazing people that I know are impacting lies Eddie. I'm very sure that you're going to be touching. A lot of hearts album will make a difference together. So real quick shoutout. Thank you to me. My audio engineer producer. Thank you to Aquafina. Who's a hunt for the use of their music for the Intros and out and you can find for a civil on itunes. Google play stitcher radio public spotify and everywhere else you find podcasts and you have an amazing week take care of yourself. Meditates SLEEP DRINK WATER GET VITAMIN.

Eddie T. mobile Asian American Studies Departm Asian American Studies Major France Williamsburg Virginia Google nausea La spotify Tacoma Aquafina Facebook official WATER engineer Los Angeles twitter
"asian american studies" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on Aria Code

"The story of Madam. Butterfly has always reminded me of something that my mom used to say. When I was young she would say that illusion is harder to let go of then reality and I definitely find that in my life you know from relationships ships to my career? You know what I think I should be doing with it. It's really easy to build these ideas. About what something is or who someone is and to put all of our faith into that illusion. That's what today's Aria Bell. D is All about Joe Son. Also known as butterfly is a young Japanese girl. She became a Geisha to support her family. But an American navy lieutenant named Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton Hankinson who stationed in Nagasaki. Bought her as his bride. Yeah I said bought these were different times and women were still commodities. Anyway chose Kosan falls head over heels in love with him and they make beautiful music together. And also well a baby boy and then Pinkerton Pinkerton takes off three years pass. And she waits for him totally faithful her made Zouqi telling her to let it go like the guy's not coming back but butterflies clinging to the illusion of this life that they could have together and that's where today's hopeful and heartbreaking. Aria comes in in Bill De. Chucho San is imagining the day. She's going to see his ship on the horizon and know that he's coming back for her. This one beautiful day. Now I probably don't you'll have to tell you how this all works out or actually doesn't in her case but I've invited four guests to share their thoughts about this beautiful area. I Soprano Anna Maria Martinez. Who Doesn't just like Madam Butterfly? I Love Madam Butterfly and she has taught me beautiful lessons lessons in life in loyalty encourage indignity. She has made me a better person composer and conductor Huang row. The Laura saw saw. He's writing an opera based on M. Butterfly. The Tony Award winning play. It's a modern take on the butterfly story to me has always been something I thought would be a great idea to truly update Madam. Butterfly to contemporary story. Sandra Kumamoto Stanley Stanley. She's a professor of Asian American Studies at California State University. Puccini's Madame Butterfly is a kind of a psycho sexual fantasy. The about the nature of not just Asian women but also Asia itself and Kyoko Katayama a writer and former psychotherapist. I who's here to share the story of her mother's life and her own. I was raised as Japanese on the other hand I I was also seen as a foreigner because my father was an American. Gi and now. Let's let's get into it umbrella d from Genie's Madam Butterfly. I see Chinese Madam Madam. Butterfly as a story of someone who who's dreaming of a life that she wants and urines for Charleston is practically a child when we meet her in act one..

M. Butterfly Madame Butterfly Pinkerton Pinkerton Anna Maria Martinez Sandra Kumamoto Stanley Stanle Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton Ha Zouqi Aria Bell American navy Joe Son Tony Award Kosan falls Nagasaki Asian American Studies Kyoko Katayama Charleston Laura Asia Huang Puccini
"asian american studies" Discussed on Asian Americana

Asian Americana

10:10 min | 1 year ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on Asian Americana

"So that's the big deal about them. Excited bounded by Washington Street Centre Street at the best on the side of the east the interest after a freeway of aspects in concrete. Eight seventy six station that she plays figure out I mean final real estate plan Cleared out of here Americans at the the streets with history of community out pass understanding and respecting. It was around the three months later. Literally the city names that last remaining block. A part of a redevelopment zone of an eight square block project it it was a slap in the face right like the mayor was there. He pulled the covers off fully knowing that they're about to destroy everything and build a strip mall this stopping being just a short campaign for recognition. It became an indefinite effort to protect their community. It becomes this completely different thing because it started out of this preservation of Filipino in American history. But as we talked to everyone that was in that community there was only one Filipino. Family that lived there right the largest population Outside the Philippines from the nineteen twenty s and the nineteen sixties was now decimated down to one Filipino family. And so what we started to learn was that that this was a community that was always under attack. The city had not invested into that community into its infrastructure which basically drove down the values news of those homes and businesses so the lowest in the market and Stockton and so it was no longer just about Filkin American history. What does it mean to save? History Corre- right. It wasn't just about saving like culture or these nice set of stories but it was about bringing things out of the margins it was is about empowerment of a community about all these other things that organically happening around us. One of the reasons why. I did my book on Little Manila. Because I I believe that the neighborhood needed to be saved and I didn't want the neighborhood to be torn down and he didn't want people to be displaced anymore. And so I thought that if people knew the history of Manila because it you know it was a neighborhood that's worth saving did with writing about an organization. Little militarizing still continues to advocate for. You're and educate people about Stockton's Little Manila would Sir don's work went far beyond preserving little Manila Stockton Story. She also broke lots of ground in the greater study of History Don's impact on Philippine history. The and the study of it the sharing of the documentation out of it on campus and in the community in libraries and classroom But also around the kitchen table is amazing. That's a M- allows. My name is emily. Johnson and I am the lecture at at the University of Michigan in Asian Pacific Islander American Studies Women's studies and American culture. And I'm also being national vice president of the Filipino American Erkin National Historical Society Fun. We have thirty seven chapters across the United States and we do all kinds of educational programming and activities to preserve collect document and disseminate the history of Filipino. The American emily grew up in Seattle where she got involved in the Filipino. American national historical society or funds and Filipino Youth Association to organizations founded by legendary Kandara Filipino. American activists Fred and Dorothy Cordova. It was via those connections that emily met dawn. Oh It's a really funny story. How Don and I met I was a graduate student at UCLA. Los Angeles and she was coming in at the transfer student and she's actually really the niece of my mentor Uncle Fred Cordova Uncle Fred. Auntie Dorothy were my mentors since I was twelve years old and when I moved to La and they found out that dawn was admitted they wrote me a letter and said you'd better find her and you've you've got to take care of her and we found each other at an event in the community of course and said. Oh my God are you Emily Lawson. Oh my God are you dogma Pollen Volun- uncle to take care of you. Uncle Bread says it's fine. You my God. It was instant friendship because of the family connection that we both had. Emily explained a little more about how dawn came to be so passionate about this history. She started out as a student like many of us in Asian American studies classes classes. She took to heart a lot of these stories that we just did it. Read growing up right. We read them in our history books. Growing up Because because she was third generation Filipino. American she was reading about basically people. She had grown up with people in her family. who were friends with her apparent? She told the story often about how she was in a Asian American Studies. Class and realize that Claro in America work in the heart by Carlos do som- you know the ultimate work of so two American history in the nineteen twenty thirty on the left kind of. She realized that uncle car was her. Her Uncle Claro right was her friends with her grandfather. And so that's how she actually started. Any hint is history. We started doing this whole history project. People she grew up with and docked there. I didn't learn this history. I didn't know my dad was a friend of Larry Young. I didn't alertly alertly on lived in Stockton for several decades. My first book was about recovering. The history of Stockton. And that's when I stumbled upon Larry and how important his contributions ambitions were and the fact that he was Tony which blew my mind and it really took until I asked my dad you know. Did you know him. Then my dad lotto yeah seven fingers. That was his nickname. Even as dawn continued deter graduate study she was recovering more histories when she got admitted Dan into Ucla Masters Program. Graham Asian American Studies. She her master's thesis on Filipina Pioneers and peanut I in Stockton from like nineteen twenty nine to nineteen forty six and it was really the first study to thoroughly document Filipino. American women experiences in her hometown. And she took it to a a whole `nother level right when she got into dance or and decided to research her hometown of Stockton in that work she really put Filipino. Literally on the map because a lot of people really only knew the male migrant workers story but didn't really know the history of urban centers like Stockton or San Francisco and really didn't know the women story either of course done wasn't alone alone in this endeavor. She was part of crew of Filipina scholars who are all working to expand the field. And she knew they had to boost in reference each other's work we would all work together and support each other and she said you know we have to just fight each other. All of you know who were doing studies because there are so few of US match what the Old Boys Network does us. You know we need to do it to help the field grow. And so that's what we did. oftentimes when you read the history tax lot of them not not written by Filipinos Day. which site really outdated stores or they would louissant fictionalized source and we were all about lead site? The people we know who really did the pioneering work who we've interviewed and the people who have done that research and she said we're going to do and we'll get better as she was right right of course as we've covered. Don was doing all this academic scholarship while going back and forth to organize in Stockton. That was really what we call scholar activism because she was using the scholarship and the research that she had gathered in the community the and using that to take action before the city tried to pull those the remaining buildings. She understood that her history work wasn't just remember the past but to honor those who got her to where she was. Don always made it clear that we as scholars activists students we do. We came out of the tradition tradition of the struggle for ethnic studies that started in the nineteen sixties. A lot of those activists were Filipino. American a lot of them more are mentors. The elders in the struggle and so we knew that we had a legacy to uphold and and to give back to those who had literally paved and plowed those fields before dawn all is paid tribute and honored that and was clear. Sure that those folks those pioneers who came in the twenties and thirties and who worked the field where the ones who made it possible for those of us who were able to school study those of us who are able to write about that history Donovan. She became a trustee in in the national scholar at the Filipino. American National Historical Society. Doing a lot of her research.

Stockton Sir don Emily Lawson Filipino American Erkin Nation American National Historical S Manila Stockton Story Little Manila Filipino Youth Association Asian American Studies Uncle Fred Cordova United States Los Angeles Larry Young dawn Manila Asian Pacific Islander America Uncle Bread Philippines
"asian american studies" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

12:51 min | 2 years ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"We get started on our grade double decker lineup show today. Of course, remind everyone that it is election day here in Wisconsin. So get out and vote. There is something on everyone's ballot. There is a statewide supreme court rates. We talked with once you're prime court candidates last week, and there's also local races happening in every community here in Madison, we have Madison Madison elders are up for election, Madison mayor amassed in school board. But there is something on everyone's ballot. Everyone in Wisconsin should be voting today because there is a supreme court race statewide, so get out in vote polls open until eight pm throughout Wisconsin. Ari? I never that blabbermouth thing about that voting, blah, blah, blah, voter, not bode, well, I hope you vote, but let's get today show started. We have two guests joining us today. I we have Patricia k Hamill. She's joining us. She's an attorney a community organizer gonna talk to us about her work on the bridge case that is active right now in Wisconsin. It just went before the Wisconsin supreme court. She's going to give us an up-to-date remind us of what the substance of the conversation before the court is and and where it is right now. And then for the second part of the show, we're going to talk with professor Timothy is professor of English and Asian American studies at u w Madison recently there was a bit of a desktop regarding the showing of the production miss Saigon at overture. The show has a lot of race. Stereotypes in it. And there was an invitation for a panel conversation to talk about that. And the invitation guy retracted, and then reissued, and we're just gonna talk about challenges that the Asian American and Vietnamese community has with the missile gone production. So let's get started PK's here in the studio, Patricia Hamill, I know, raise PK, a partner at hurricane cazar law firm that I get to work with a one of my colleagues, but even beyond hair cazar of peaky Hamel one of our community leading activists since. Leading attorneys in the community, and she's working on the umbrage case PK. Hello, thanks for joining us. Hello, thanks for having me. It's great to have you. So can you start a little bit? Reminding us the basics. This is all a lawsuit acclaim between and bridge in Dane county. What are the issues? Well, it's between Amberjean, Dane county. But also, my clients are seven landowners who owned property within a mile of Enbridge line sixty one which is the largest tar sands pipeline in the United States currently in operation. It's been in operation since two thousand nine and it passes from superior Wisconsin down to Flanagan, Illinois, it try by sex the state from northwest to southeast and it a little bit of it passes through northeastern, Dane county around Marshall, Wisconsin. And when the pipeline was built in two thousand nine there was never an environmental impact statement done. They did an environmental assessment, which is kind of a shorter version and less comprehensive study and. They initially. It's forty two inch pipelines. So it's quite large initially. They only had about a third of its capacity flowing through it, and it's Canadian tar sands oil that's flowing through it. What they call dill bit. It's a semi solid. Crude oil that's mind in the Canadian tar sands. And then it's very thick like peanut butter in order to get it to flow through a pipeline. It has to be mixed with chemical diligence once which are some pretty toxic. Solvents. And then the exact composition is a trade secret, apparently, and that is heated up and pressurized to push through the pipeline. So for the first eight or nine years, they were only using it to one third capacity, but then as Canadian tar sands production ramped up, and and partly also because keystone was not going to happen. There seemed like it wasn't going to happen. Keystone XL through South Dakota, Nebraska. Something was held up here in the United States. It was held up by the prior administration. I mean, that's that whole situation has now changed its held up in the courts right now, the construction of keystone excel, but they decided to triple the flow of tar sands through line, sixty one. So Dane county looked at their application to build a new pump station they had to make a Bill twelve new pump stations across the line in Wisconsin to keep it flowing through to push more through the pipeline. Right. The increased flow. So it's one point two million barrels of tar sands oil a day that's going to be flowing. That is an insane amount. Right. Yeah. That's a large amount and Enbridge courses responsible for the largest on land oil spill in United States history in Kalamazoo Michigan flowed. It burst big. There was a big break in their pipeline. Six b which was the tar sands pipeline. And it wasn't just. Covered for seventeen hours. In fact, at first they thought there was an obstruction, and they cranked up the volume, but the locals found it because it was off gassing the Dili once the the toxic chemicals in their own community right there and their land, right? And in their water because it went into the Talmadge creek and eventually the Kalamazoo river, which is a tributary of Lake Michigan and tar sands doesn't float when it gets in water it sinks. So it is many times more expensive and difficult to clean up than traditional crude oil. So I didn't realize that. Yeah. There was a testimony before the Dane county when the Dane county zoning committee was considering whether to grant the permit they had to get a conditional use permit and data triggered all this is that right? Ron and the bridge bridge. Embry? Jodi has this this pipe already exists? It's over here. But they needed a conditional use permit to build the sub the station the station here and to keep this going. And that's when the conversation happened and Dane county denied them. Well, no, no, Dane county said well, you know, in order to grant a conditional use permit in Dane county. The zoning committee has to find six things that it's not going to damage the neighbor's property that it's going to be environmentally benign that it's compatible with the uses, and this is an agriculturally zoned area that it's going through. Okay. Northeastern Dane county, so this, well, maybe they should have some insurance because and bridge was saying, well, you can't regulate safety because the US pipeline Safety Administration is responsible for that. And your pre. From that they made a lot of claims about things they said this county was preempted from doing but insurance was not one of them. So the county said, well, we'll get a consultant and they hired this guy. David dip doll who worked on Chernobyl? He's a nationally known risk assessment expert, and he looked at a summary of their policies and said, well, these are going to expire at the end of April two thousand fifteen but I think there's some gaps then it's an unacceptable risk to the county. The county should have environmental liability insurance in addition to this and his fought that for the last four years, and they're still fighting that they don't want to get the pollution insurance. They say they might not be able to get it. It's unclear what church they have now because no one's ever seen their policies. And that's what our landowners position was was that. There was a statute passed in the budget Bill in two thousand fifteen by the state of. Oh, Wisconsin by the state legislature, and nobody will take responsibility for introducing. It was part of that what they call it real ninety nine at the end joint finance committee is considering the state budget at the last minute. There was this whole Pasol of six sixty three different things that they tried to add into the budget that most of which weren't related to finances at all there were the imminent domain exemption for end bridge that they admit lobbying for so they could use eminent domain to condemn Landon increase the to put another pipeline in if they choose to do that that was part of it. And then there was this provision said counties cannot require hazardous liquid pipeline companies to obtain insurance if they have coverage that includes comprehensive general liability with coverage for sudden and accidental pollution. So is that what this lawsuit is? Now, that's that's part of spout, and the other part is located very complicated. The Dane county board I remember voting in support of the provisions within the conditional use permit. Right. They appealed the the conditions. They wanted they the zoning committee was asked to take those conditions out. And they said, no, no. And then they appeal to the Dan county board which was the procedure at that time county board voted twenty seven to two to uphold the action of the zoning committee. They would have had one of the twenty-seven needed a three quarters vote to overturn it. Right. So. And even at that time. Nobody knew what insurance and bridge really had. They made a lot of claims about what they had. But did it actually meet the preemption requirement of the statute is the question that we asked? So now, the lawsuit happening who sued who will end bridge went to court to get the conditions removed. Even though the county's attorney said, well, we can't enforce this insurance requirement now, and I said, well, we can't have this in here. We want the court they filed what the caller Chareh reaction in Dane County, Circuit Court, we then filed an injunction request, a separate lawsuit on behalf of the landowners. We wanted the pollution insurance in there because our clients have the most to lose if. Yes, a spill. Then there's. Right under the policy that embers said it had. There was no coverage for damage damage, natural resources. There was no coverage for cleanup costs. And there was no coverage for for some other things that are, you know, emergency response. So are landowners wanted those things covered. They wanted the insurance that the county tried to impose and they didn't think it was too much to ask to to have some additional insurance. But n bridge has fought that so what happened on the circuit court level. So the gotten you up to now the supreme court, the judge Peter Anderson, the the cases were consolidated and judge Peter Anderson gave Enbridge everything they asked for. So he took those two conditions the one that required the insurance and the other one that required proof of the insurance out of the permit, and and then he dismissed our case. And and bridge we appealed and the county appealed as well. And those were again, consolidate. In the court of appeals. We won. We got a tremendous decision unanimous decision from the three judge panel. We had an oral argument there, which is pretty unusual, and they found that Enbridge had not demonstrated that it qualified for that statutory preemption because no one had ever seen their policies. So they said they were going to remand it to the zoning committee to look at the insurance that they had decide whether they could impose that environmental insurance or not. And if they couldn't maybe they would do something different like make them have a bigger spill containment basin right now what they have will only hold one hour of spill out of that pipeline..

Dane county Wisconsin United States Wisconsin supreme court Enbridge Patricia k Hamill Madison attorney Madison Madison keystone bridge bridge Dan county Ari n bridge Saigon Peter Anderson Flanagan
"asian american studies" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Ask what's best concert Ebersol ACDC. Were you wearing black today? Yeah. Black today. Except for my babies. Oh, wait a minute. I'm sorry. Was that that was probably a little bit much. Had a. What? The attorney general now in Virginia. Is admitting that he wore black face at a one thousand nine hundred eighty college party. Governor Lieutenant governor. Now, the AG who would be in line. Wow. Oh, my word. I know Domino's or fallen. What do they do? Just hit reset on the whole state. I'm just I I don't know. What happened? I mean. I I'm asking a legitimate question. What happens to a when you have to replace a governor? You'd think the Lieutenant governor would step up, right? Yeah. And then if that person steps down in the attorney general, and then if that person like what's the succession there? I would imagine be the Senate protect poor or the Senate president. And then after that, I think it's the third floor window washer and then after that, they'll just pretty much pick anybody up off the street. Fred your name's Fred come on here. Governor. We're at nine thirty eight in the morning Scotty, and I will reconnect with something a little bit more a little lighter before we head out today. But we are delighted that joining us today is also Felicia Wong and Felicia want to thank you for taking time out to join us here on KOA NewsRadio. Thank you so much for being with us. Good morning. On felicia. My bet I thought I took care of that Felicia you with us. There we go. My bet. I apologize for that. No, you're fine. Thank you so much for having me this morning. Oh, it's it's a it's a delight. And you know, as we do always like to start out if you mind sharing a little bit about yourself, and then we'll jump on in. So my name is Felicia long, and I work at the costumes on Asian Pacific American leadership are their programs villagers, I've been doing this for a few years working with Asian American native Hawaiian islanders students to collect them with public separates opportunities here in Washington DC, actually understand, but you have connections here at home. Here in Hawaii. Oh, actually, my managing director lived in Hawaii for upwards of twenty five thirty years, then she is the person who actually connected me to more of the latest one population and the issues that points out there. Tremendous your passion for education where where did that begin? Especially in college. I double majored actually in both neuroscience and Asian American studies. You can kind of see there's absolutely no correlation there between the subjects, but especially in my Asian American coaches, I began to learn a lot more about the history of Asian Americans Pacific. Islanders are a and HPI's and kind of wanted to spread that knowledge to other. You may not have had the opportunity to take those courses or attend college. In the first place. We're talking again with Felicia Wong and enjoyed our conversation program manager conference on Asian Pacific American leadership and public service scholarship and internship programs. Share with us a little bit more about her folks were dialed in right now their participation and your outreach outta they come together. And to what advantage what our local folks have. Right. So are what's one of Capone's? Major programs. There's a scholarship and internship program. Like, you said and through that we offer paid internships in two thousand dollars for an eight week program to undergraduate and graduate students with ties to the Asian American native Hawaiian and Pacific islander unity. I'm so young internships are offered where we select partners such as USDA. That are all rooted in public service. We also collaborate with your own profits this year, actually, we're partnering with. Which is a an organization that community Health Organization in Hawaii. And we're offering scholarships also announcing to three thousand dollars students who would like chips you careers in public health specifically. So there are a lot of benefits. I would say his students who want to have a true Dc experience thinking about careers in public service. What about tied to public health or to defend or environmental studies? So there are really a host of opportunities. We offer for students of all backgrounds. What is the best way far folks were a Dowden? I know there are probably there are a lot of parents. Of course that. What would you recommend for them to learn more and how they can take the next step? Right. So for parents, specifically I would say they can visit our website, WWW dot C, A P, L dot org. That's WWW dot dot work. That is where all the information on our program. There's some scholarship opportunities to the internship opportunities along with the application itself and from there. They can also direct people who may be interested up potential applicants if it has parents or grandparents their children. I get grandchildren are more than welcome. The check out the website as well from there, they confuse testimony blog post. I actually have a webinar that I recorded specifically answering questions from potential applicants this year. So we try and make it as easy and accessible as possible to all populations throughout the US has been any Felicia any statistical data that indicates those who participate in the scholar an intern programs of where they go professionally. Actually, really glad you asked that in the past five years we've trend. Where those who are old enough to have graduated since fair tenure the within the program. Thirty three percent of them have gone on into public service positions. Whether that is nonprofit or government local government, and those who are still in school thirty thirty two percent, actually continue on in courses or majors that will eventually lead to public service tuitions but looking at Caputo's three decades history. This is actually the Palestinians anniversary year, a lot of our alumni still stay within public service. We have we we have mayors within our alumni at work. We have heads of subtype Percy initiative that large profits. So I would say that the programming that go Paul offers is not only extensive and effective. But it's just incredible. We have alums coming back to us after having graduated from the program fishing news later, I to look into connect with members of my network or who have told us their next steps wants to utilize our. Various programs continue to further along in their careers. Tremendous. We're talking with Felicia Wong, and your dial didn't NewsRadio eight thirty cage. VH Felicia joins us out in DC. I understand the temperatures were about twenty below one day up about sixty degrees. The next is that about right? Oh. Has been a little bit crazy around here. I'm sorry. Horse, but the weather it's definitely taking taking a toll on on my health out here as well. But luckily, we have a warmer day today. A scorching fifty degrees. Oh, I I can only imagine the the temperature out there where you are. Well, we actually had an overnight out in mililani, which is about twenty miles out from downtown. Honolulu temperature was fifty eight degrees. So. I know right. Something I can only dream about for the next few weeks. Felicia just a couple more things before we go. And that is in regard to undergrad and graduate students is there a differentiation between the two is it all inclusive. It is all inclusive. Like, I said before there's so many opportunities, and so many, internships, we can select students with that regardless of education and major or field. We do have spots that could go to any student. Excellent. Are there any deadlines that we should be aware of at this point? Right. So the official deadline for the application is Thursday, February fourteenth at eleven fifty nine PM eastern standard time on Valentine's Day. Yes. On unbalanced nine days. So I'm going to be having a very very, busy Valentine's Day weekends. I think through all those applications. I would imagine. I can't thank you enough. And would you please share any other contact information that we should know about right? So as I said before. The website is WWW dot ca Paul dot org. But if you would like to Email us instead, we can be reached info at Kepala dot org. Paul is AP L again. Those would be the the main avenues I wish we could be reached the website as through are officially have you had a chance to visit us in Hawaii. I would love to visit actually we we send one or two insurance internship out in Hawaii actually each year and every single time I make plans in my head to create an event out there in Hawaii. So I can visit as well. If you need a broadcast partner, let us know, and we'll be there for you. Thank you so much. We appreciate you again. I hope you do feel better and all the best to you ca-, Paul and your mission. And I hope we can chat again soon. Me too. Thank you so much again. Thanks felicia. Aloha. Bye bye. Now, that's Felicia joining what a great opportunity..

Felicia Felicia Wong Hawaii Felicia long Governor Lieutenant governor Paul attorney Asian American studies Virginia Senate US Domino Fred Scotty mililani Washington HPI Honolulu
"asian american studies" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"And i think it's because alley wong is doesn't have the same stick where amy schumer is a little bit like airheaded shallow girl who sleeps around and allie wong is like bringing a little bit more critique to nick at ucla god yes oh there's a great line where she says you know when she was taking ethnic asian american studies ucla a classmate of hers says like do you do you want to study or do you want to be studied and that's when she felt like she wanted to go into this love of hers comedy and i like that to me also speaks to her dislike being like fuck it a do like i'm gonna i'm gonna though skews my freshman balls to the wall and you know be who i am and be that bro we like you know she reminds me almost like of a jewish you know white guy comedian if you think about if you take her exact acts minus the pregnancy the people that love out of santa will love it and you know like you said christina you would be discussed it and they wouldn't be okay so i guess my question to the both of you is do you think like a part of what is funny is because she's a petite asian woman doing this i think what i find funny about her humor is that i've never particularly had a comics speak to me so specifically because the jokes that she makes about being asian american no one else could make they wouldn't have that same perspective that she has where she can make the jungle asian fancies joke i mean certainly not everybody who's asian american loves that joke of course because it's a huge huge demographic and group of people but like you know what she says about her father who you know grip really really poor and like eventually hustled has to be a doctor and yet he still had some of these tendencies that she found supercrew like he would just far in the way she talks about that timing yeah i think that i mean just the the way she talks about things it's not because she's a reverend it's not necessarily just because she physically asian it's because the way she makes these jokes and just shapes them around identity is pretty unique right now.

alley wong amy schumer santa allie wong ucla
"asian american studies" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The value of asian american studies you can't talk about the immigration history of the united states without talking about the chinese exclusion act you can't talk about issues like world war two or even the current socalled were and tear without talking about the links between the world war two incarceration of japanese americans some scholars also say this goes beyond asian american studies it's about advancing other programs to african american studies latino studies suman penteker is with the race and equity center at the university of southern california this to me is part of being good citizens are we educated about power privilege opportunity access who stories do we know and whose stories do we not know penteker worries that ethnic studies are under threat and points to arizona where lawmakers recently tried and ultimately failed to ban next studies in a state where latino and chicano studies also have a presence that was an overt power play by the legislature they said they did not want a community to be empowered and at the same time they did not want other people to learn about that uganda experience at williams college administrators here that argument the college does offer black and latino programs now but they won't commit to creating asian american studies dean of faculty lee park whose koreanamerican says creating new program is complicated asian american studies isn't the only curricular area that there might be interest from students or from faculty in developing but we don't have unlimited resources as for the push here for williams to diversify its faculty park says the college is constrained by federal law we can't carry out race based hiring rate for for any group student activists though feel administrators have ignored them for too long i think being a person of color at williams definitely overall as an experience that is it really paid a lot of attention to regain is a sophomore from san diego and his chinese american she's taking a couple of asian american film and literature courses that williams it really helps me not only learn more about my own history but also just have like.

united states suman penteker lee park williams university of southern california arizona uganda williams college san diego
"asian american studies" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on PRI's The World

"And at the same time they did not want other people to learn about that uganda experience at williams college administrators here that argument the college does offer black and latino programs now but they won't commit to creating asian american studies dino faculty lee park whose koreanamerican says creating a new program is complicated asian american studies isn't the only curricular area that there might be interest from students or from faculty in developing but we don't have unlimited resources as for the pushier for williams to diversify its faculty park says the college is constrained by federal law we can't carry out race based hiring right for for any group student activists though feel administrators have ignored them for too long i think being a person of color at williams definitely overall as an experience that is it really paid a lot of attention to readjusting is a sophomore from san diego and his chinese american she's taking a couple of asian american film and literature courses that will you it really helps me not only learn more about my own history but also just have like a more holistic view or conceptualization of my position in relation to other communities of color within the us drinks is established program at williams would deepen her understanding of this part of us history this summer she and other student activists are planning to speak up an urge alumni withhold donations to williams unless the college commits to an asian american studies program for the world kirk error has a williamstown massachusetts let's get out of the classroom and catch them live music shelly if you're looking for a hot tip on summer shows here's one you got to be on the lookout for it's a ban from the democratic republic of congo a rock band really the called jupiter endo quiz.

lee park williams us uganda williams college san diego kirk williamstown
"asian american studies" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Ten percent asian or asian american that's why his group also wants to college to hire more professors who specialize in asian american studies having that legitimization of the asian american experience on an institutional level is very important for guiding how we interact with each other students as people on a daily basis this small campaign williams is part of a growing national movement for decades students and faculty across the country have been urging administrators to launch asian american studies programs but today there only about thirty and most are at universities in the west the ancient merican population is still heavily concentrated in the west coast particularly california paul wantanabe is a political scientist at the university of massachusetts boston which has the only asian american studies program in the state wantanabe who is japanese american says traditional and the league colleges like williams at harvard should reconsider the value of asian american studies you can't talk about the immigration history of the united states without talking about the chinese exclusion act you can't talk about issues like world war two or even the current socalled were and tear without talking about the links between the world war two incarceration japanese americans some scholars also say this goes beyond asian american studies it's about advancing other programs to african american studies and latino studies suman penteker is with the race and equity center at the university of southern california this to me is part of being good citizens are we educated about power privilege opportunity access who stories do we know and who stories do we not know penteker worries that ethnic studies are under threat and points to arizona where lawmakers recently tried and ultimately failed to ban ethnic studies in a state where let tino and chicano studies also have a presence that was an overt power play by the legislature they said they did not want a community to be empowered.

williams paul wantanabe scientist boston harvard united states suman penteker tino california university of massachusetts university of southern arizona Ten percent
"asian american studies" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Mhm stances we've often been pictured as though we were racial is the sort of india extremes either as perpetual foreigners never really a part of the american experience or as model minorities therefore not deserving of attention are not faced with problems both of those characterizations make it difficult for people to grasp the reality of asian americans the complexity in even the longevity of it while the population has grown as i pointed out steadily particularly since the nineteen sixties the fact is asian americans have been on our shores for nearly two hundred years kirk i'm curious about whether or how asian and asian american students feel about what's happening on the williams campus and whether the administration has been responsive to their demands the students i spoke with feel like they've been ignored for too long some students pointed to documentation that shows they've been demanding this for nearly thirty years and the administrators just kind of wait them out until they graduate but they're taking a different approach there pointing out that asians and asian americans now make up about seventeen percent of the student population but williams faculty is only ten percent asian or asian american and some asian american students told me that they often feel socially an academically marginalized on campus so that's why they're pushing the college to hire more social scientists who specialize in asian american studies people like vaunting wanting ave and kirke spoke to the of faculty right yes so far the dean has met with students and she says that they hear they're concerned but won't commit to creating an asian american studies program at this point dean of faculty lee park who is korean american told me that creating one of these programs is really complicated small institution and so we have to way different kinds of considerations when we think about starting up new program there are lots of different curricular areas that that we don't currently offer it williams that might be interesting to students so asian american studies isn't the only curricular area that that there might be interest from students or from faculty in developing and.

williams campus india kirk kirke seventeen percent two hundred years thirty years ten percent
"asian american studies" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"asian american studies" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The managing editor of our partner w h is higher education desk and he's been reporting the story and speaking to william students and paul what also joined us he's a professor of political science and director of the institute for asian american studies at the university of massachusetts boston i asked paul why aren't there more asian american studies programs to begin with have been in the country but took considerable extent i don't think they've been perceived of the country the effort by asian americans beginning in the sixties and continuing as you've noted to this day to try to get the systematic study and repression and understanding of that experience and of that history has been an ongoing struggle but it's a struggle that's important today when you think of asian americans as the fastest growing population within the united states the largest number of immigrants the united states are now coming from asia and soon this population will be the largest immigrant population of all within the united states within a few decades this is experienced it's been often marginalized and on the proof asian american center in terms of the debates are taking place within this country historically and right to the minute you talk about globalization you've talked about immigration you talk about race relations asian americans should be a part of those conversations and be a lens on which we discussed these larger issues of the moment and why do you think i mean outside of there being few asian american studies programs in the united states why do we as a country have so much trouble including the stories of asian americans into our history just collectively well i think part of it is the complexity within this population if you think about it asian americans are probably the most diverse population people talk to me they mentioned asian culture even sometimes talk about asian language well what's asian culture and asian language we think for example here in massachusetts we have nearly twenty different asian subgroups there that represent more than two thousand people within the commonwealth shoe sits alone with the versus theories diverse languages diverse cirque.

managing editor director paul united states asia asian culture massachusetts partner william professor of political science university of massachusetts boston