4 Burst results for "Ashley Walton"

"ashley walton" Discussed on 15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"ashley walton" Discussed on 15 Minutes to Freedom: A Warrior’s Daily Focus on Journals and Meditations

"It. And so would not being able to face it. Right. Not being able to face the cold hard truth of what was going on. I found it to be exponentially easier to run away. It was easier. To not deal with it. And that's why did with Columbus. Right. Certainly. It was a better move for me. In the automotive world, I had to fly the nest of the small domestic dealership to get down to Columbus. Ohio to sell the high end cars, etc. Etc. But in so many capacities. What I was really doing was running from the truth, which was that. I was a fucking liar. And I couldn't figure out how to put together the pieces. Well, dealership world turns into web hosting world turns into affiliate marketing world turns into clothing, right? And eventually turns into coaching and that old version of of my life and little Mansfield, Ohio. Just escapes me doesn't even exist. And so I have this coaching practice. Right. The podcasts at you know, me by I have all these things that now exist in my life that I have worked diligently over the past three four years five years to grow into the man that you know, me as today. And through Girling into the man that I am today. I've been fortunate to walk hand in hand side by side shoulder to shoulder with some truly incredible individuals across really the globe. Now. Right. New Zealand, Australia, California, really everywhere had this incredible opportunity. One of the clients that I got to walk hand in hand with side by side with is this brilliant woman named Ashley Ashley Walton. And Ashley is in southern California. Not only do I get to walk side by side with her hand in hand with her. We graduated our time together, and she decided she felt inspired enough from the change she made in her life that she too wanted to start to lead other people. So she wanted to become a coach. So I introduce her to the human potential institute right bulletproof training, some of the training. I'm going to right now she jumps in very quickly with her husband. We then have conversations about her joining life optimization group and be able to offer specific coaching inside of this framework, which she gladly accepts that was on incredible training protocol with her today. And so met the gym. Yesterday, Thursday morning. Nine twenty. Get a text message from my phone on my pocket. It's a picture of Ashley. With the woman that was getting married to the man. Whose parents house? I ended up staying in the same woman that got me the job inside of red bull. She side by side with Ashley. I sent me a picture you see, but I'm intelligent to realize that this picture is in full clothing. Right. Full workload ING, of course. Why wouldn't it be full clothing? But it's nine twenty here and there on the west coast so at six twenty so I know that pictures not from today. It's from yesterday. And Ashley proceeds to say just sends a picture. So my gosh, I've seen this woman for really long time. She's been credibly human being hope all is. Well. Says. Yeah. And we banter back and forth for a little while. And the most watered-down direct version the story possible the way that I perceived it. Was that this woman had some things to share with Ashley about the man that I was. Maybe some of the stories of my past. Lord knows from nineteen to twenty twenty one and twenty two I had a speckling of stories. I am certainly not proud of. And why wouldn't this woman if she shared these stories, that's who she knew me as I? But here I am as thirty five year old man, I don't embody any of those same traits. I'm not the same person. I don't think the same way operate the same way speak the same way or believe in the same things. But yet that's what she sharing with someone that I hold endear space. Well, without knowing the specifics of their conversation. I get the impression that Ashley who'd be my friend client alco worker shared some things back with her about. Maybe the man that I am today.

Ashley Ashley Walton Ohio Columbus Ashley Mansfield Girling California New Zealand Lord Australia thirty five year three four years five years
"ashley walton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"ashley walton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's here and now, and it wasn't long ago that advanced skin cancer was a death sentence with survival rates of less than a year. But in the nineteen nineties scientists began working on something, no one thought possible harnessing the body's own immune system to fight cancer. Leslie mcclurg for member station K Q E D met up with a young woman beating the odds. Thanks to these advances in science. In the unit at a UCSF medical center in San Francisco, a nurse wraps. A blood pressure costs tightly around Ashley Walton's, thin pale arm. She looks pretty young for thirty four years. Temperature. The nurse leads her. And her mother down a hall to meet Ashley's oncologist for a quarterly check in. Ashley warmly embraces. Dr Adeel doubt, so hard. You know good Mary now. For many years, Ashley, doubted marriage was inner future when she was twenty six she found a more on the back of her hip, and it started Morphing into this. Ugly, dark bleeding thing. That just I knew something was wrong doctors surgically removed it then a couple of years later, a tiny lump popped up and Ashley's abdomen and over the next few weeks. It started growing and growing until it was about the size of a walnut. A biopsy revealed. She had stage four melanoma in total shock. She scoured the internet and found the average survival rate was six to nine months. I saw that. And. I freaked out on colleges told her to ignore the numbers. Doctor Dowd told me if there's any time have melanoma right now is a pretty good time to have it. Because there's a lot of stuff opening up to you. The major excitement in our field is on using immune checkpoint blockers idea here is that if you have diesels turn off by what's known as the PD one one checkpoint. Okay. Let me try to simplify this. Normally when the body sees toxic material immune cells kill it, by cancer cells release sneaky, they put the brakes on the immune system, immune checkpoint blockers. Stop that from happening you basically, preventing that brake from engaging. It would it be kind of similar like cancer had kind of has like this invisible cloak that it like kinda hides under. And then you kind of take off that Claudio by think that's a great way to describe it since the cancer is no longer invisible. The immune system can mount an attack. It was a huge breakthrough in the food and drug admin. Ration- approved the first drugs to do this in two thousand eleven the science behind the miracle. Drug was developed back in the nineties by a guy named max krummel in a lab at UC Berkeley, I was very frustrated graduate student for few years trying to develop an antibody that would do something after many long nights krummel noticed. His antibody was influencing the behavior of immune cells. You can drive a car you can exceleron them or you can break them. And then it was really like playtime. He started injecting the antibodies into sick mice and essentially in the various first set of experience my antibodies caused tumors to shrink now fast forward a couple of decades to Ashley Walton story her doctors hope the technology developed in crumbles lab could be the key to killing her cancer. But the treatment was haring when Ashley started receiving immunotherapy the ninety minute drips or followed by a slew of side effects. I started getting really high fevers, I got a few skin rashes gastritis. Still her tumors were shrinking then after six months, new lesions cropped up Ashley's abdomen. So we're doctors added a second immunotherapy drug to the mix. And fortunately, she had a lot of the drugs possible side effects. Yeah. I just generally felt like the life was being sucked out of me. So you go into a really dark place for several years actually hitchhiked from drug to drug just to stay alive. There are so many advancements being made in the field of immunotherapy that even if it doesn't cure. You. It gets you to the next big thing that wild ride paid off. She hasn't had an infusion in the last ten months, so technically in remission. Yes. That's. Stories like Ashley is are really exciting to on colleges. Dr Leonard Lipton. Feld is the chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society. So imagine when we've gone from the time when we had nothing to offer to today, and they're talking about cure for some patients with advanced melanoma, scientists and big pharma are really hopeful about the future. There's about a thousand current trials to develop new therapy drugs to help more people fight different kinds of cancer about thirty to forty percent of patients still do not respond to immunotherapy remember worth the beginning of the stern. We're not at the end. We still have a long way to go. We're gonna have ups, and we're going to have Down's back in the exam room. Ashley and her mom receives the prising news at our latest checkup with Dr Dowd. So what do you think about pregnancy are trying to start a family? So I think it's time to get pregnant actually. Ashley crosses her fingers and smiles for here and now unless they McLaren. Good news here now is production of NPR and WVU aren't association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here now..

Ashley Walton cancer skin cancer Doctor Dowd UCSF Leslie mcclurg San Francisco Dr Adeel Dr Leonard Lipton American Cancer Society Robin young gastritis Jeremy Hobson Mary max krummel NPR BBC World Service Claudio
New strategy defeats cancer cells that evade chemotherapy

Here & Now

05:29 min | 2 years ago

New strategy defeats cancer cells that evade chemotherapy

"When the body sees toxic material immune cells kill it, by cancer cells release sneaky, they put the brakes on the immune system, immune checkpoint blockers. Stop that from happening you basically, preventing that brake from engaging. It would it be kind of similar like cancer had kind of has like this invisible cloak that it like kinda hides under. And then you kind of take off that Claudio by think that's a great way to describe it since the cancer is no longer invisible. The immune system can mount an attack. It was a huge breakthrough in the food and drug admin. Ration- approved the first drugs to do this in two thousand eleven the science behind the miracle. Drug was developed back in the nineties by a guy named max krummel in a lab at UC Berkeley, I was very frustrated graduate student for few years trying to develop an antibody that would do something after many long nights krummel noticed. His antibody was influencing the behavior of immune cells. You can drive a car you can exceleron them or you can break them. And then it was really like playtime. He started injecting the antibodies into sick mice and essentially in the various first set of experience my antibodies caused tumors to shrink now fast forward a couple of decades to Ashley Walton story her doctors hope the technology developed in crumbles lab could be the key to killing her cancer. But the treatment was haring when Ashley started receiving immunotherapy the ninety minute drips or followed by a slew of side effects. I started getting really high fevers, I got a few skin rashes gastritis. Still her tumors were shrinking then after six months, new lesions cropped up Ashley's abdomen. So we're doctors added a second immunotherapy drug to the mix. And fortunately, she had a lot of the drugs possible side effects. Yeah. I just generally felt like the life was being sucked out of me. So you go into a really dark place for several years actually hitchhiked from drug to drug just to stay alive. There are so many advancements being made in the field of immunotherapy that even if it doesn't cure. You. It gets you to the next big thing that wild ride paid off. She hasn't had an infusion in the last ten months, so technically in remission. Yes. That's. Stories like Ashley is are really exciting to on colleges. Dr Leonard Lipton. Feld is the chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society. So imagine when we've gone from the time when we had nothing to offer to today, and they're talking about cure for some patients with advanced melanoma, scientists and big pharma are really hopeful about the future. There's about a thousand current trials to develop new therapy drugs to help more people fight different kinds of cancer about thirty to forty percent of patients still do not respond to immunotherapy remember worth the beginning of the stern. We're not at the end. We still have a long way to go. We're gonna have ups, and we're going to have Down's back in the exam room. Ashley and her mom receives the prising news at our latest checkup with Dr Dowd. So what do you think about pregnancy are trying to start a family? So I think it's time to get pregnant actually. Ashley crosses her fingers and smiles for here and now unless they McLaren. Good news here now is production of NPR and WVU aren't association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here now.

Ashley Walton Cancer Max Krummel Dr Leonard Lipton American Cancer Society Claudio Gastritis Robin Young Jeremy Hobson Uc Berkeley NPR Bbc World Service Graduate Student Mclaren Dr Dowd WVU Feld Medical Officer Forty Percent
"ashley walton" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"ashley walton" Discussed on Here & Now

"It wasn't long ago that advanced skin cancer was a death sentence with survival rates of less than a year. But in the nineteen ninety scientists began working on something, no one thought possible harnessing the body's own immune system to fight cancer. Lessee mcclurg for member station. K Q E D met up with a young woman beating the odds. Thanks to these advances in science. In the college unit at a UCSF medical center in San Francisco, a nurse wraps a blood pressure cuff tightly around Ashley Walton's, thin pale arm. She looks pretty young for thirty four years. Temperature right under the nurse leads her. Enter mother down a hall to meet Ashley's on colleges for quarterly check in. Hello. Ashley warmly embraces. Dr deal doubt. Good Mary now. For many years, Ashley doubted marriage with inner future when she was twenty six she found a mole on the back of her hip, and it started Morphing into this gli dark bleeding thing that just I knew something was wrong doctors surgically removed it then a couple of years later, a tiny lump popped up Ashley's abdomen and over the next few weeks. It started growing and growing until it was about the size of a walnut. A biopsy revealed. She had stage four melanoma in total shock. She scoured the internet and found the average survival rate was six to nine months. I saw that. And. Freaked out but are on colleges told her to nor the numbers. Dr Dowd told me if there's any time to have melanoma right now as a pretty good time to have it because there's a lot of stuff opening up to you. The major excitement our field is on you know, using immune checkpoint blockers idea here is that if you have diesels turn off by what's known as the PD one pedia one checkpoint. Let me try to simplify this. Normally when the body sees toxic material immune cells, kill it. But cancer cells are released sneaky, they put the brakes on the immune system, immune checkpoint blockers. Stop that from happening. You'll basically preventing that brake from engaging. It would it be kind of similar like cancer kind of has this invisible cloak that it like kinda hides under and then you of take off that Claudio biting that's a great way to describe it since the cancer is no longer invisible. The immune system can mount an attack. It was a huge breakthrough in the food and drug adminis-. Gratien approved the first drugs to do this in two thousand eleven the science behind the miracle. Drug was developed back in the nineties by a guy named max krummel in a lab at UC Berkeley was very frustrated graduate student for few years trying to develop an antibody that would do something after many long nights krummel noticed. His antibody was influencing the behavior of immune cells. You can drive a car you exceleron them or you can break them. And then there was really like playtime. He started injecting the antibodies into sick mice and essentially in the very first set of experience my antibodies caused tumors to shrink now fast forward a couple of decades to Ashley Walton story her doctors hope the technology developed and krummel's lab could be the key to killing her cancer. But the treatment was hair wing when Ashley started receiving immunotherapy, the ninety minute drips or followed by a slew of side effects. I started getting really high fevers, I got a few skin rashes gastritis. Still her to Moore's worship, then after six months new lesions cropped up Ashley's abdomen. So we're doctors added a second immunotherapy drug to the mix. Unfortunately, she had a lot of the drugs possible side effects. Yeah. I just generally felt like the life was being sucked out of me. So you go into a really dark place for several years actually hitchhiked from drug to drug just to stay alive. There are so many advancements being made in the field of immunotherapy that even if it doesn't cure. You. It gets you to the next big thing that wild ride paid off. She hasn't had an infusion in the last ten months. Technically in remission. Intermission..

Ashley Walton skin cancer max krummel UCSF Dr Dowd San Francisco gastritis Mary Gratien Claudio UC Berkeley graduate student Moore thirty four years ninety minute nine months six months ten months