18 Burst results for "Ashley Vance"

"ashley vance" Discussed on Business Casual

Business Casual

03:30 min | 5 months ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Business Casual

"Product or even just developing a new idea. So today we're sharing an episode exploring the question of how to think about running businesses with mental models from one of the greatest business people in history elon. Musk if that sounds like your jam. Keep listening for to mental models that elon. Musk uses to run his businesses. And how you can use them to welcome back to founders journal my personal audio diary where i give you the business builder the tools you need to think better in order to build better whether that's building business a team or new product. Let's hop into it so as you may or may not know last week was ilan mosques. Fiftieth birthday and in celebration of that. I took time to go down the rabbit hole to better understand how the edison about our generation thinks. So i'm not going to give the elon. musk biography. We've all heard of him. He's an eccentric entrepreneur. Who's worth a hundred sixty billion dollars. C- of tesla spacex founder of neuro link boring company former. Ceo pay pal and while these are accurate ways to describe yuan. I believe that for us to learn from one of the greatest entrepreneurs of our time. The edison of our era. We need to study how he thinks versus study the products of his thinking. If that makes sense so in honor of ilan's fiftieth birthday today. I'm talking about the mind of elon. Musk and specifically. I'm going to break down two of the most important lenses through which ilan looks at the world. The first lens is something. I call some product thinking some product thinking is a mindset of collaborative societal progress over individual success. It's this idea of abundance over constraints. Let's compare that to zero sum thinking whereas zero sum thinking is a belief that your gain is my loss some product. Thinking is a belief that your gain or my gain. Both of our gains is all of society's gain so let's take that a step further. Some of you may have heard of zero-sum thinking and others may have not then there's one thing beyond zero something which is positive thinking and positive sum thinking is a belief that you winning doesn't mean that i'm losing and vice versa. So zero sum thinking is the idea that when we're competing were competing over a fixed pie. That goes to you or me. Positive sum thinking is about us. Competing actually leads to a larger pie that we each get to participate and have a piece of and so where does some product thinking. Come in here. Well the way. I look at it as some product. Thinking is positive some thinking on steroids. This mindset doesn't just accept a larger pie through competition it doesn't take a passive role. It actively invites competition in order to accelerate the pie. Getting bigger for all of us and that is exactly how elon musk thinks but to understand how. Some product thinking manifests in his work. We need to understand what motivates him. And if you have ever watched an elon. Musk interview or read his biography. By ashley vance. It becomes very clear very quickly..

elon neuro link ilan Musk spacex musk tesla elon musk ashley vance
"ashley vance" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

05:50 min | 6 months ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on The Daily Dive

"To help. Develop all this. Yeah i mean number was two hundred twenty eight. Investors passed on colonel Luckily brian a lot of people don't know him but he's actually rich individual. He sold a company to pay. How a few years ago and made about Three hundred four hundred million dollars sale. So he's as well he did. Yeah exactly and And so he put fifty four million of dollars of his own money into this basically for the first four years to prove to prove it is ideas work while everyone else was rejecting and then finally they got the devices to start working and they have the prototypes and investors. Put another fifty five million or so into the company So it has been this huge high risk. I mean basically people thought it was not really possible to make a device that was the could actually get any kind of decent data through the skull just from the helmet. The thinking has been that you really need to put implants in near the neurons to get Any sort of major breakthroughs right and we're seeing people like elon. Musk and his companies working on on things like that. I think they just had a demonstration. You know a few months ago with some pigs and whatnot with with these brain implant so definitely a much more non invasive way to go with these helmets. I always love new tech. I always love these types of things. These ideas these goals but just as interesting as the tech is itself. The people behind them are also pretty interesting. So tell me a little bit more about brian johnson. Because you spent a lot of time with him. And i mean he. He has an interesting health regimen. I mean you. You put in the article snorting stem cells. He constantly getting tested. I think he's about forty three but they you know his body through all of this stuff. He's registering more as a thirty year. Old man so tell me a little bit about him. Yeah quite the character you know. People might be familiar with the quantified. Self movement does idea yet. You're measuring your like a fitbit as a rudimentary example of it. But brian measures everything about his body. And you know of doctors working on all this stuff and he now has this this health regimen. Where he you know. He eats once a day very early in the morning. He's like twenty three hundred calories in one meal and then fast the rest of the day. He goes to bed at eight o'clock every night and wakes up at floor and and does his workout routine and then his breakfast. And you know he and i are. We're about the same age. We're both forty three. And i reported on the story for about three years and so over that time i stayed You know i went from forty two forty three and his biological age draw according to the doctors rum. Forty three to about thirty and he has to be Exercise potential of a twenty five year olds. It was very humbling story to report on as we went. I mean he's doing. Iv infusions of anti-aging fluids You know bunch of vitamins. There's a lot that goes into it more than just you know Eating healthy and exercising but Yeah just just an interesting. Look into the guy himself. As i said the goal overall with this thing it seems pretty good and if we can learn more about the brain. I mean that's going to help out in so many different ways. Yeah i mean there could be a huge breakthrough like you know like any powerful technology of is certainly going to be big questions they come with with all. There's a couple of the companies that are are getting early access to the helmets. You know they want to use them to find out like maybe what makes a hit song or which parts of like a movie trigger things and people's brains to make it more entertaining you. You could see where we get into black mirror territory. It pretty quick. Write off like that but But the at least you know. Brian's I believe him. Because i spent a lot of time with him. I mean overall goal really is it's word mental health. I talk about it in the story. You know he. He had depression very bad and had sort of suicidal thoughts at one point in his life. And that's kinda what triggered a lot of this and You know. I think he genuinely wants to help people. And so but yeah. He's he's He's quite interesting figure leading this. They're gonna start shipping out pretty soon. So i'm sure we'll start hearing more about these colonel devices you know in the next few months in in in short order so we'll keep an eye out for all of that ashley vance writer at bloomberg businessweek magazine. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you that's it for today. Join us on social media at nearly dive pod on the twitter and instagram comment gives us a rating. Tell us the stories that you're interested all of an iheartradio or subscribe wherever you get your podcast. This episode of the daily divers produced by victor right and engineered by tony. Soren tina mira's this daily died two local families at the center of the most notorious crime in ohio's history. An eight people dead all from the same family. She calculated foyer. Bush was cold now on the five year anniversary of the massacre and in the middle of production on this podcast breaking news right now. A shocking confession. None of us were expecting quite hitter. Listened to the pact and massacre returned to pay county a production of studios every wednesday on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

brian johnson fifty five million Musk Brian eight people twenty three hundred calories first four years twenty five year eight o'clock victor right thirty year ohio Bush twitter instagram Forty three brian one meal forty two tony
"ashley vance" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

08:49 min | 6 months ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on The Daily Dive

"Are calling hygiene theater. Think plexiglass dividers scanning qr codes for menus and the constant cleaning of surfaces despite surface contact. Not being a significant transmitter of the virus. These actions have much more to do with making customers. You'll better than it does. With science mark senior editor at the washington. Post joins us for how long this hygiene theater may laugh next. We have a new tech alert over the next few weeks. A company named colonel will be shipping out a high-tech helmet. That can read your mind. It can analyze electrical impulses and blood flow and researchers hope it can help gain insight into brain aging mental disorders strokes. And even what happens to the brain during meditation and even psychedelic trips colonel ceo. Brian johnson is an interesting character himself and hopes that these helmets can further our understanding of a brain ashley. Vance right here at bloomberg businessweek joins us for more news without the north. That's some places. We are moving back toward global in other places businesses Public facilities entertainment venues all kinds of places like that are kind of caught middle because on the one hand they want open up they want to give people a feeling of normalcy on the other hand they know that some of their customers are still very nervous about going out because now is mark fisher senior editor at the washington post. Thanks for joining us mark. It's great to be with you. Wanna talk about hygiene theater right now. The country is opening up from the pandemic and a lot of cases. The rollout has been slow in different from state to state city city. Everybody's kind of on their own right now but this hygiene theater You know this kind of over cleaning You know closing down or you go to a restaurant or a fast food place. And they closed down the fountain drink section walled off with police tape or something like that and everybody has to get everything for you. It's a slow roll back into getting back to normal but these are things that we probably don't need a you know we've found out more about the virus and it doesn't stick to surfaces and it's not as transmissible that way so a lot of people are looking for that moment when we can stop all of that and just get back to normal so mark. Tell us a little bit more about well. Let's exactly right and what we're seeing. Is that in some places. We are moving back toward normal in other places businesses Public facilities entertainment venues all kinds of places like that are kind of caught in the middle because on the one hand they want to open up they want to give people a feeling of normalcy on the other hand they know that some of their customers are still very nervous about going out. They don't wanna think they won't be safe. And so a lot of d- opting precautions. That really aren't scientifically merited. So you talked about things that The bars against touching things The the sort of heavy disinfecting of surfaces that we saw in the early months of the lockdown their transit systems in theaters and other public facilities. That are still doing that even though they know that. The virus is not transmitted by touch. So why are they still doing it with their two. Big reasons one is. They're doing it to make their customers. Feel more comfortable and the other is. They're doing to save money doing some of these things to save money so they're for example at restaurants. It's hard that some restaurants to get printed menu anymore. You have to aim your camera on the phone and pull up the qr code and pull up a digital menu. Well that was initially done to make people feel more comfortable and stop the spread but now that's no longer valid scientifically. It can be done to save money right in. The question comes now. What will stick. What's going to stay with us. After things fully reopen. And you were talking to some people about all of this and one of the big pushes or getting vaccinated was. Everything's gonna go back to normal right but with these things persisting it tends to degrade that customer experience. You know. you can't move around as freely as you wanted to before you still have plexiglass up and everything. So i kind of agree in that sense it. It's still all these. Barriers are kind of off pudding as you mentioned has to do with psychology. It makes customers feel more comfortable that the business restaurant whatever. It is putting more effort into keeping clean so the customers can feel a little bit better about it. It puts business owners in a really tough spot because on the one hand they don't want to alienate their customers. Who just want to feel more comfortable. Feel safer and so they wanna keep up some of those precautions to to communicate the sense that businesses. Taking this very seriously. I talk to and business owners. Who said well we're keeping the temperature checks Because it gives people that feeling of comfort. I think eventually much of this goes away. But there's a really cautionary tale in the aftermath of nine eleven. And if you think about all the things that we have become a permanent part of the landscape from showing an id card in the lobby of an office building to some of the restrictions at airports a lot of these precautions was to put in place. It's awfully hard to take them away. You mentioned the article too. That a lot of americans that want kind of clear rules about how things are gonna go forward. I mean we didn't get them throughout the entirety the pandemic and he really clear course on a lot of things but there are probably be a little more disappointment in the coming months as the reopenings are so even everybody's kind of all over the place and you know obviously businesses for themselves. They don't want to get caught in something in in an outbreak happened. And then they're held liable so there's going to be a lot of this kind of one rule set. Maybe taken back this jockeying back and forth is going to happen for a few months. At least i think that's right and and Probably at least through next winter. We'll go to see the sink metric that we just saw for example from southwest airlines were first. They said they're going to resume serving alcohol on their flights and then it just days later they scrapped that plan because they saw how help poorly passengers were behaving in the air these days. So there's gonna be a back and forth. we're seeing it in hotels and transit systems. And i think you're one of the main places we'll be seeing it as an entertainment venues in bars and restaurants in concert halls movie theaters. They really are caught. They don't know exactly what they can safely. Let go of and yet. I hear from a lot of people that they're just ticked off by some of these restrictions example at nationals park baseball stadium. Here in dc. They put in these touchless dispensers for the condiments replacing the old bins. Where you could kind of reach in and get a spoonful of onions to put on your hot dog. They replace that with these machines. That put down a huge. Pa- lop of ketchup or mustard. When you wave your hand under it and fans went crazy. Said they didn't know how to operate it and it was ruining their hotdogs too much stuff coming out of the machine and so Finally the team said okay. Forget it we won't do the touchless thing anymore. So there's gonna be a lot of back and forth and a lot of inconsistencies with that especially at the nationals park. Where you were talking about you know you gotta download a qr code to order some of your concessions well. The person is still manually handing you a hot dog. So you're not touching them for one part of it you're still interacting with them for other parts of it so it it can be very confusing you. It's up to. I mean in all of these cases. It's our local public health experts. Who are making these decisions without some type of big national ruler. Something it really is going to be down to being done at the local level and even the individual business level. I talked to some folks from the national restaurant association. And they're telling their members. Hey you can go back to printed menus. You don't have to do. The temperature checks and yet many of their members are deciding to kinda violate that recommendation. And go ahead and continue to have those restrictions of in part sometimes because they don't have the staff that they had before the pandemic and so they don't have somebody who can rewrite the menus and print them out and they don't wanna pay for that so it's going to be a mix of motives here. It's not just about safety. It's not just about curbing the spread of the virus it's also about what is individual businesses. That have been hit so hard to afford going forward. Well we'll see how much of this hygiene theater does continue. Mark fisher senior editor at the washington post. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you when the brightest minds at the university of florida come together. Something extraordinary happens. Engineering empowers medicine. Data science drives agriculture geology fuel. Space exploration and artificial intelligence transforms learning research. The ideas that go on to change the world. They're launching right from here. At the collision of big ideas and massive potential. Something momentus becomes possible at the university of florida.

Brian johnson Mark fisher mark fisher next winter two first mark days one rule set one part washington next few weeks nationals park baseball university of florida one Wan nine eleven main southwest nationals park
"ashley vance" Discussed on Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

12:29 min | 1 year ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

"Team you know under development team and then having all of those players were amazon has a different player for a reform the carry so You know we really wanted to make it a one place you know. One shot stop shop for library cardholders in libraries to get great content because the world world is kind of becoming blurred on what. What's what's the book. What scenario book you know. What's what's video and I think consumers really don't care they just want great content in the form that they wanna consume it so You know scaling was you know obviously challenge. We didn't launch originally was e books. We added them a couple of years later and then when we added them we comics was a very important category for us because we felt it was really being ignored in the public library world and we wanted to make that a mobile experience so we invested really heavily on in an immersive experience. So we go through the we have our own comic creator and our ingestion Assess for materials. We go panel by panel for the captions. So you can. Actually you know we call it action view so you can actually read comic book on your iphone or your android device You know in an immersive experience without having to pensions zoom. So you know as we got more sophisticated and we got more data points in solid. Are you know what consumers and cardholders were doing and how they were using it and we would constantly improve the uri. We would go after. Different types of content would have different merchandising strategies. So it's it's been a ton of fun because we you know you know we're a beat business all these years. Now i like to say were beat is see as a service to be to be And and it's been a it's been a fun right. Yeah i can say from experience that That comic viewer is very useful. When you're on a small like a phone you know. Would i remember reading my choose. Pele four at the time. maybe five. My daughter ioana comic and instead of having to pin and pin out all the time to see what they're saying but then the picture. It was nice to be able to break that page up into each frame filling the screen. So well done on that one. The other question. I was wondering was given this. Current situation with the covid. Nineteen crisis and in many parts of our country the limitations as to access to physical space has that impacted. Your business at all are are more people. Embracing technology like hoopla that access to physical spaces have been limited. Yeah i mean. The pandemic really has been a really made demeanor. Demand is surging you know and They're looking for libraries were adding new users constantly You know in public libraries have a tradition of back filling community needs so when the pandemic started at home learning materials children's and family materials extraordinarily popular extraordinarily popular now. So you know the emphasis on things like You know steam and stem of learning in early education homeschool markets. And you know so. We've seen spikes in an in almost every area in usage even adult usage but You know we really tried to emphasize You know what cardholders in in libraries are asking for and a lot of that is learning based children's and family materials. You know this kind of plays into that. And also into the success of some of the companies like amazon but it's it's that kind of user content that is able to be you know generated through a service like yours am looking at a couple titles on my hoopla app right now and there's quite a few reviews the couple books that i've been through have almost a thousand reviews each and i i think as hoopla grows in more users people reserve in you know and experience more of the content there and leave their feedback. I think that the service becomes even more valuable. Because it's almost you know. I'm here am on my looking at my phone on my own but i can read the reviews and comments from all these different people that have experienced that title in the past. And that's not something that i will get in a library necessarily same with the recommendation. So are you guys doing that all through yourselves or are you guys using a third party syndicator for that kind of user generated content. We're pretty much doing everything ourselves. You know we've created on you know we've done. All the programming are All the technology we own we do use some third party products from time to time But i think it's really important to control user experience in Really indefatigable a you know making it very simple and intuitive to use and You know that's really important to us. Well it seems like there's been quite a journey with hoople so far As you've grown it and seen success in this year seems to be something that will just accelerate that. What does the future look like for. Your organization needs pretty exciting. You know there's always the ability to add more content. So i like to say that our content offering is horrible in. It's only going to improve. Because every week every day we had content so we started with thirty thousand titles we have nine hundred thousand titles. I would love to have you know two and a half three million titles within a couple of years so there's always ability to add content and then you know new formats learning in for mation. Entertainment of i think is going to be coming in part of the future of hoopla. You know so. I mean wherever we can help. Libraries serve their communities better and empower people to discover learning things. I mean i'm just spitballing. But you know. I mean you know. There's lots of online courses now are tons of subscription companies that do all kinds of things on language learning You know i think the possibilities are endless to add more things You know you. On behalf of libraries to our out in dettori's or experience one of the things that people are saying that will be potentially a lasting change after the pandemic is over is some of the changes to the education. I'm interested to know because obviously most schools whether they're you know higher education or katie nine. They've got their own libraries within them. Are you mostly focused on public libraries in communities or are you looking to get into kind of the education world as well and potentially do some of these tailored digital learning experiences as part of the hoopla experience. You know currently. I mean we've been very you know close to our core intercourse public libraries. I mean they're they're wonderful institutions and they backfill communities in so many different ways so you know whatever the communities interested in the public libraries interested in so You know in a sense. We're serving all those emissions. Even though we're not directly doing business with others or or school systems directly Excellent great story and really looking forward to seeing how you continue to grow in shape. You're you're the hoopla business and service with the with the changing times. Let's switch gears here now and just maybe get a little bit of advice from your experience. You know as an entrepreneur and growing growing business if you were mentoring someone who is looking to grow professionally. And maybe looking to pursue a path entrepreneurship or even enterpreneurship. What's one piece of advice. You'd give him Be curious ask questions read learn. You know follow your passions You know i've never never met one curious person I mean that hasn't really been successful so You know. I think that's a really good skill. Completely agree and this will be a great one for this interview because you have nine hundred thousand on your app to choose from but what one resource be it a book or podcast or any type of content. That you guys are for. That's been especially a valuable to you and have has aided in your success. Well gosh you're gonna put me on the spot here. I'm going to name sir i. I can't name just one i love. I love certain subjects in books. I'll try to name a couple. I'm not sure if they're on hoopla. Probably not not yet. At least one is a book called zero to one. And you know kind of like a visionary feature is starting to procure. Peter thiel is a vc person as well. He's one of the founders of paypal. There's a lot of great people that came out of paypal elon. Musk is one. And we have is amazing biography on book on hoopla Can search for a believed spy ashley. Vance it's called moss which is amazing as well but peter. Thiel is like just very very inspirational in terms of that. He thinks differently. You know so. He has the vc. Perspective reese started successful. Companies is one of the initial events you know investors in facebook You know he really changes a lot of our conceptions on you know building a great product in not trying to copy product in in compete So if you really are getting being an entrepreneur. I think it's a great read another book that i absolutely love You know on kind of human behavior in learning more about yourself and how to communicate with other team members is thing called strength finders By tom rath and It's a great book because he take a quiz. And you know you learn your top five personality traits and we use it in our organization to communicate better with each other and to put deferred skill sets on the right place. The boss right job position. And i think it's a great book while to agree recommendations and i did see that zero to one book summary was available on so maybe a great way to stay to ease into that book but jeff. I can't thank you enough for taking time out of your schedule due to talk with us today. Incredibly insightful and inspiring. Thank you so much for being on the show. I really appreciate it. It was fun. Thank you for having me work. Inspired is brought to you by s a leader in commercial working environments and hayworth best in class dealership experience are three sixty approach. Discover the team tools and techniques required to navigate the complexity of your next workspace at b. o. s. dot com if you have ideas feedback or would like to be featured on our show. Please email podcast at. Aol dot com. Thank you for listening. This has been a workspace digital production. If you're interested in launching a podcast at your organization please email info at workspace that digital for a free consultation..

amazon Peter thiel development team paypal Pele hoople facebook mation hayworth dettori Aol Musk tom rath Vance reese ashley jeff
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Could walk with the talk. A help to say one of the most intriguing stories in this latest issue of Bloomberg. Businessweek has to do with bird brains and self driving cars and. You got you got you got me. Joe lever is here with us. He of course, the editor of BusinessWeek and the author of the story, Sarah McBride these reporter for Bloomberg. She joins us from our ninety nine one studio in Washington DC, and I have to confess Joel. When I first started I was like bird, braid is this, like some slang that I don't know, you're actually talking about glittering of bird Bertrand's. How did this all set the stage? So Sarah is deeply immersed in sort of VC world. And I think and she can speak to this. But my reading of it was, we're always interested to see, like where talent is moving and sort of raised her hand with this idea of neuroscientist. But neuroscientists studying animal brains. It really piqued our curiosity, especially when we learned that you can make a million dollars going to work for the googles and the Facebooks and the apples of the world. If you have an understanding of the brain, so, so Sarah, can you can you tell us how you found this story? Well, I can tell you, it was a number a lot bigger than one million that caught my attention. The first time I heard of a bird brain expert working for any tech company it was ten million dollars. And the salary was going to the chief engineer of Twitter. This was around the time that they're I Pio side thought, oh, that's so funny their logos. That's cute. Little Bluebird and here they have a bird, brain expert working for them. Didn't think too much about it. I made it a kick or to a story about the Twitter, I appeal at the time, and then several years later when Elon Musk started his company neural, Inc. He hired as the co founder another zebra Finch expert, I thought, okay, this is just too crazy. So I started. Googling it. And I found out that there were tech companies all over Silicon Valley who had hired zebra Finch experts and I just looked into it a little bit enlisted, my colleague, Ashley Vance who knows a lot about artificial intelligence, which is where a lot of these guys were working. We kind of went from there. And may I say we were very restrained in not using too many bird brain puns, are sorry, Sarah, you've piqued my interest dumb question. Alert coming your way. Why birds and not mice or rats, which is what typically we think of when we talk about experiments. Sure. And to be fair, there are some Mason this story, but the thing with birds. And in particular zebra finches is there, one of the few songbirds learn how to sing from their parents? They don't just in, they know how to grunt or squeak, the way, a lot of other animals, do they're actually learning process. So their brains. Are just small enough that you can get a very good idea of everything that's going on in their brains. While they're learning say to sing a song, but not too big like a human brain that it would be unwieldy to, to look at what's going on and try to figure out which neurons are firing when you can pretty much track all the relevant neurons, and see what happens if you try to get a bird to sing a note for longer or shorter and learn all kinds of very interesting things. I think it's safe to say that any study of Taylor rigs, his brain and everything that's going on in. There would be they told me my brain is like bad neighborhood. You can't go. Sarah talk to us about the applications current and potential. Right. So what makes these experts so interesting is basically two things one. They're all great at crunching numbers, data sets, you can throw them the biggest possible data sets and sips upset. They just know what to do how to crunch all those numbers and second Thursday, trend in artificial intelligence now where people think the best artificial intelligence systems will be modeled on actual brains. So learning how brains work, and how brains make decisions and real living things is considered key to developing artificial intelligence of the future, for example, when we need a car to decide something like should I prioritize the life of my passengers or this pedestrian? So self driving cars is one, a lot of sound systems being able to recognize is that a siren, or is that a crying baby. If you're trying to do voice based unlocking of a cell phone, things like that. And so is this one of these things being very cynical? Sarah, where you look at me think. All right. Well, this is peak Silicon Valley. This is one of these things that is so wind. Is it? On, on an episode. Right. Exactly. Like I feel like we're just writing a script here. I mean, is this something that is really sort of so out there or does this tell us something about where sciences going? Yeah. I mean it's actually happening right now, for example, if you use the voice command software, like Siri, some of this research is already at play that an auditory inputs, some of it is very kind of out there in the future, for example, at neural link where that one Boston University professor was hired. They're working on brain machine interfaces, and there are different schools of thought on how possible that is. And some people say, oh, you know, one day, we'll be able to download an entire language overnight. And then there are plenty of people to your point, who just say, no not going to happen. Well, it's a really really great read highly recommended to anyone. It is in the magazine this week already vailable on the Bloomberg terminal and at Bloomberg dot com, Sarah McBride venture capital, reporter Sara, I gotta ask where do you go next? Ten seconds. Where do I go next? Well, you can look up out for a story, I have unburdening man, hopefully coming up. From birds to earning man. Sarah McBride, VC.

Sarah McBride Bloomberg Twitter Silicon Valley reporter Businessweek Washington Joe lever Elon Musk Joel zebra Finch editor chief engineer co founder Mason Facebooks Ashley Vance
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Want to go build a robot. Ashley Vance that's for sure. You're listening to Bloomberg BusinessWeek coming up the latest installment of BusinessWeek talks, featuring a conversation with the C E O of UPS. This is Bloomberg. It only takes a minute to find out if you may have prediabetes, and you can do it at do, I have prediabetes dot org, but you're probably not going to know. I'm sure you've got a perfectly good excuse kids were. You're busy. So what better time than now? Let's begin raise one finger, if you're a man ladies, none yet. Oh, count in your head. If you're driving now, three more fingers for everyone over sixty two over fifty one over forty one more. If you're not physically active mother finger, if anyone in your family has type two diabetes another. If you've got high blood pressure, if you're overweight, raise another finger to if you're very overweight, and three if you're really overweight, you've just taken the world's first audio prediabetes test. And if you're holding up five or more fingers, visit do I have prediabetes dot org or talk to your doctor. There's no excuse because prediabetes can be reversed. Brought to you by the Ad Council and its prediabetes awareness partners after graduating from your old guests yard tools have met their match right now. The Home Depot has Father's Day savings on the ego, fifty six volt cordless, trimmer in blower, Kabul kit, just two hundred forty nine. Bucks. It has the performance of gas without the hassle. It's too powerful tools powered by fifty six volt lithium ion battery platform and right now it's at a price. No one can match today's the day for doing with ego trimmer, and blower combo just to forty nine only at the Home Depot. More saving, more doing while supplies last. Are were kids play? And gold split. Many provide the water.

Bloomberg Home Depot Ashley Vance BusinessWeek diabetes Ad Council Kabul C E O fifty six volt
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Welcome to the weekend edition of Bloomberg business week over the next couple of hours. We'll bring you news of the week, insights magazine, and so much more. It's the sooner than you think issue, Carol I love this because it's looking around the corner in a way, but just around the corner. These are really cool things that are happening all over the world. Exactly. And going to impact us big time in the future from healthcare to artificial intelligence. We take a look at how technology is disrupting everyday life. So getting your arms around. What really is sooner than you, think not an easy task and it fell to Jeff Musk's? He's the editor the technology section. He's here with us. So give us a sense of how you even begin to do this. Sure. We'll last year we were looking at the incredible moment that we're seeing coming out for a this year, you know, in the midst of, you know, sort of. Backlash against the conventional big tech industry. That's certainly heating up this, especially we're wanted to look at what new models of innovation and technological progress. Really look like. And one of the ways into this. It's so brilliant is that you use one of our best assets actually vans. Hello world. He's been all over the planet literally looking at these pockets of innovation and the comparisons that he makes to what he's seeing around the world versus what he's seen a new scene for so many years in Silicon Valley are pretty stark. Help us understand that perspective. Yeah, absolutely. The this is really in Ashley's wheelhouse, the story, he's kind of been been tailing in ways big and small for the better part of a decade, as you know, the, the was said in one of his stories, a few years ago, is the, the finest minds of my generation or figuring out how to get people to click on ads, you know, this is been the story of Silicon Valley for the past. Decade, which is. Several lifetimes in values but actually travels around the world of taking him to places that have reminded him of the valley of, of generations past and reminded him that innovation can can come in, in all forms. Whether it's in Australia or China or chillier, Palestine or elsewhere around the world. Well, let's talk about the Silicon Valley of past, and let's get into what he means specifically by that. And then we can talk about kind of where we are today, so he's talking about when hobbyists were involved builders involved a little bit about that. Hearkens back, I to, you know, the, the Silicon Valley of Bill Hewlett and Dave Packer zero. When people were experimenting in pre computerized era, with what electrification and the growth of electronics industry can do for the country. And people were, you know as as really trying to, to tinker. Invent their way to better future as opposing as opposed to sort of try to optimize it for quarterly shareholder meetings, well, and, and what changed I mean in, in your estimate and based on Ashley's reporting, where did that pivot happen, because as he says, the finest minds of his generation of our all of our generations. You know are now focused on on something very different even different from the nineties. What happened? Sure. As as actually points out in the peace. You know, there's a way of innovation and sort of Chris with an unless changes after, you know, Netscape, and then the dot com crash. Nineteen ninety five it's sort of all the comes apparent what the internet at least a potential is going to be. And then we take some hard left turn. That's right. Whereas, I think a lot of people would say it would look at the, the current slate of Silicon Valley, tech giants and say, well, you know, Facebook's the, the flagship problem, you know, the biggest arbiter of, of the kinds of ad models that, you know, we, we see reason to be worried about here actually, Google and says that, you know, the search giant more or less inventing the, the modern industry of accumulating as much data as possible about people to try generate more and more advertising. Ad dollars is really where. You know the industry started to lose its way. There's a line in this story that actually wrote the just struck me actually talked about it with my daughter. Any, he says the whole goal now is to pull people out of the real world and into an invented one. And I think that's fascinating, right? Because everybody's just spending time on their phones their computers or what have you just playing in this fake world. Right. Rather than out kind of exploring the world, right? Everything's. Gema. Fis. They're trying to solve problems in the real world as much as you're trying to solve the maze. Invented challenges of an unofficial era and the, the, the models of innovation that he's harkening back to here. We've tried to explore in this package or really more leaping out of the physical world. So let's talk about though he said, he's kind of not giving up hope. Right. So let's talk about the places around the world where he said, okay? There are people who are building things looking to make things even better more ideal in our world. Absolutely. It's a it's a long list. You know, the, the piece starts in, in Palestine a couple years ago at a tech conference that brought entrepreneurs from threat the Middle East SU pigeon. Some cases, we're already pretty regionally famous startups, and in some cases have have taken off since then, but she's also traveled to New Zealand. See emerging rocket and cume, satellite companies and, you know, China to see the the drone king of the world. And the, the masters challenge and tend to Canada to meet the modern godfathers and many other places. That's Jeff muskets. He was the architect of this entire show is really glad we got a chance to catch up with him and Ashley Vance, he was traveling. We couldn't catch up with him that I tell you his words, the.

Ashley Vance Palestine China Carol I insights magazine Bloomberg Jeff Musk Jeff muskets editor New Zealand Bill Hewlett Facebook Netscape Canada Google Chris Australia
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Next couple of hours, we'll bring you news of the week insights, the magazine, and so much more. It's the sooner than you think issue, Carol I love this because it's looking around the corner in a way, but just around the corner. These are really cool things that are happening all over the world. Exactly. And going to impact us big time in the future from healthcare to artificial intelligence. We take a look at how technology is disrupting everyday life. So getting your arms around. What really is sooner than you, think not an easy task and it fell to Jeff Musk's? He's the editor of the technology section. He's here with us. So give us a sense of how you even begin to do this. Sure. We'll last year we were looking at the incredible moment that we're seeing coming for a this year, you know, in the midst of, you know, sort of. Backlash against the, you know, sort of conventional. Big tech industry that's certainly heating up, especially we're wanted to look at what new models of innovation and technological progress. Really look like. And one of the ways into this. It's so brilliant is that you use one of our best assets, Ashley vans, Hello world. He's been all over the planet literally looking at these pockets of innovation and the comparisons that he makes to what he seeing around the world versus what he seen, and you've seen for so many years in Silicon Valley are pretty stark. Help us understand that perspective. Yeah, absolutely. The this is really in actually wheelhouse. It's the story. He's kind of been been telling in ways big and small for the better part of a decade. Now is, as you know, the was said, one of his stories, a few years ago, the finest minds of my generation or figuring out how to get people to click on ads. This is been the story of Silicon Valley for most of the past decade for several lifetimes, valley years, but actually travels around the world of taking them to places that reminded him of the valley of generations past and reminded him that innovation can can come in, in all forms. Whether it's in Australia or China or chillier, Palestine or elsewhere around the world. Well, let's talk about the Silicon Valley of past, and let's get into what he means specifically by that. And then we can talk about kind of where we are today, so he's talking about when hobbyists were involved builders were involved a little bit about that. Hearkens back, I to the Silicon Valley of Bill Hewlett and Dave Packer zero. When people were experimenting in pre computerized arrow with what? Electrification and the growth of electronics industry can do for the country, and people were, you know, as as really trying to tinker invent their way to better future as opposing as opposed to sort of try to optimize it for, you know, quarterly shareholder meetings, well and, and what changed I mean in, in your estimate and based on Ashley's reporting, where did that pivot happen, because as he says, the finest minds of his generation of our all of our generations. You know are now focused on, on something very different even different from the nineties, what happened. Sure. As as Ashley points out on the peace. A wave of innovation and sort of crests with an unless changes after Netscape. Right. And then the dot com crash nineteen ninety five it's sort of all the comes apparent what the internet at least a potential is going to be. And then we take some hard left turn because, like, that's right. Whereas, I think a lot of people would say it would look at the current slate of Silicon Valley, tech giants and say, well, you know, Facebook's the, the flagship problem you know, the biggest arbiter of the kinds of ad models that, you know, we, we see reason to be worried about here, actually Google and says know the search giant more or less. Inventing the modern industry of accumulating as much data as possible about people to try generate more and more advertising dollars is really where. You know the industry started to lose its way. There's a line in this story that actually wrote the Jess struck me actually talked about it with my daughter. Any, he says the whole goal now is to pull people out of the real world and into an invented one. And I think that's fascinating. Right. Because everybody's just spending time on their phones or their computers or what have you just playing in this fake world. Right. Rather than out kind of exploring the world, right? Everything's everything's game five. You're right. You're trying to solve problems in the real world as much as you're trying to solve the maze. Invented challenges of. More unofficial era and the, the, the models of innovation that he's harkening back to here. We've tried to explore on this package or really more. A out of the physical world. So let's talk about though. He said, he's kind of not giving up hope. Right. So let's talk about the places around the world where he said, okay? There are people who are building things looking to make things even better more ideal in our world. Absolutely. It's a long list. The piece starts in, in Palestine a couple of years ago at a conference that brought entrepreneurs from the Middle East to pigeon. Some cases we're already pretty regionally famous startups. And in some cases have have taken off since then, but she's also traveled to New Zealand emerging rocket and cume, satellite companies and. China to see the drone king of the world and the drone masters challenge and candidates to the modern godfather Isabey and many other places. That's Jeff muskets. He was the architect of this entire show. Was really glad we got a chance to catch up with him and Ashley Vance. He was traveling. So he couldn't catch up with him. But I tell you his words the ideas that.

Ashley Palestine China Jeff Musk Ashley vans Carol I Ashley Vance Jeff muskets editor Bill Hewlett New Zealand Facebook Middle East Jess Google Australia Dave Packer
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:56 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We'll bring you news of the week insights from the magazine, and so much more. It's the sooner than you think issue, Carol I love this because it's looking around the corner in a way, but just around the corner. These are really cool things that are happening all over the world. Exactly. And going to impact us big time in the future from healthcare to artificial intelligence. We take a look at how technology is disrupting everyday life. So getting your arms around what really is sooner than you think on an easy task and it fell to Jeff Musk's? He's the editor the technology section. He's here with us. So give us a sense of how you even begin to do this. Sure. We'll last year we were looking at the incredible moment that we're seeing coming for a this year, you know, in the midst of, you know, sort of. Backlash against the sort of conventional. Big tech industry, that's certainly heating up this, especially we're wanted to look at what new models of innovation and technological progress. Really look like. And one of the ways into this. It's so brilliant is that you use one of our best assets, Ashley vans, Hello world. He's been all over the planet literally looking at these pockets of innovation and the comparisons that he makes to what he seeing around the world versus what he seen an you've seen for so many years in Silicon Valley are pretty stark help us understand that perspective. Absolutely. The this is really in ashes wheel has the story. He's kind of been been telling in ways big and small for the better part of a decade. Now is, as you know, the, the was said in one of his stories a few years ago, the, the finest minds of my generation or figuring out how to get people to click on ads, you know, this is been the story of Silicon Valley for the past. Decade, which is, you know, several lifetimes valley years, but actually travels around the world of taking them to places that have reminded him of the valley of, of generations past and reminded him that innovation can can come in, in all forms. Whether it's in Australia or China or chillier, Palestine or elsewhere around the world. Well, let's talk about the Silicon Valley of past, and let's get into what he means specifically by that. And then we can talk about kind of where we are today, so he's talking about when hobbyists were involved builders involved a little bit about that. Hearkens back, I to, you know, the, the Silicon Valley of Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard zero, when people were experimenting in a pre computerized era, with what electrification and the growth of electronics industry can do for the country. And people were, you know, as as trying to, to tinker invent their way to better future as opposing as opposed to sort of it for, you know, quarterly shareholder meetings, well and, and what changed in your estimate and based on Ashley's reporting, where did that pivot happen, because as he says, the finest minds of his generation of our all of our generations. You know are now focused on, on something very different even different from the nineties, what happened. Sure. As as Ashley points out in the piece a wave of innovation and sort of crests with an nonetheless changes after Netscape, right? And then the dot com crash nineteen ninety-five. It's sort of all the comes apparent what the internet at least a potential is going to be. And then we take some hard left turn. That's right. Whereas, I think a lot of people would say would look at the current slate of Silicon Valley, tech giants and say, well, Facebook's the, the flagship problem. You know, the biggest arbiter of, of the kinds of ad models that, you know, we, we see reason to be worried about here, actually Google and says the search giant more or less inventing the, the modern industry of accumulating as much data as possible about people to try generate more and more advertising. At dollars is really where. The industry starting to lose its way. There's a line in this story that actually wrote the Jess struck me actually talked about it with my daughter. Any, he says the whole goal now is to pull people out of the real world and into an invented one. And I think that's fascinating. Right. Because everybody's just spending time on their phones or their computers or what have you just playing in this fake world. Right. Rather than out kind of exploring the world, right? Everything's game. You're trying to solve problems in the real world as much as you're trying to solve the maze. Invented challenges of more. Unofficial era and the, the, the models of innovation that he's harkening back to hear. We've tried to explore in this package or. Really more. Leaping out of the physical world. So let's talk about though. He said, he's not giving up hope. Right. So let's talk about the places around the world where he said, okay? There are people who are building, things looking to make things even better more ideal in our world, actually, it's a it's a long list. You know, the, the piece starts in, in Palestine a couple of years ago at a detect conference that brought entrepreneurs from throughout the Middle East SU pitch in some cases, we're already pretty regionally famous startups and some cases have have taken off since then, but she's also traveled to New Zealand emerging rocket and cume satellite companies. And you know. China to see the drone king of the world and the, the masters challenge, and then to Canada to meet the modern godfathers and many other places. That's Jeff muskets. He was the architect of this entire show is really glad we got a chance to catch up with him and Ashley Vance, he was traveling. We couldn't catch up with him that I tell you his words, the.

Ashley Palestine China Ashley vans Jeff Musk Carol I Ashley Vance Jeff muskets editor Facebook Bill Hewlett Google Netscape New Zealand Jess Dave Packard Canada
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of Bloomberg business week over the next couple of hours, we'll bring you news of the week insights, the magazine, and so much more. It's the sooner then you think issue Carol I love this because it's looking around the corner in a way, but just around the corner. These are really cool things that are happening all over the world. Exactly. And going to impact as big time in the future from healthcare to artificial intelligence. We take a look at how technology is disrupting everyday life. So getting your arms around what really is sooner than you think on an easy task? And it fell to Jeff muskets. He's the editor the technology section. He's here with us. So give us a sense of how you even begin to do this. Sure. Well, last year we were looking at the incredible moment that we're seeing coming about for this year in the midst of sort of backlash against the. Sort of conventional big tech industry, that's heating up this, especially wanted to look at what new models of innovation and technological progress for like, and one of the ways into this. It's so brilliant is that you use one of our best assets actually vans. Hello world. He's been all over the planet literally looking at these pockets of innovation and the comparisons that he makes to what he seeing around the world versus what he seen, and you've seen for so many years in Silicon Valley are pretty stark help us understand that perspective. Yeah. The this is really in ashes wheelhouse. The stories kind of been been telling ways big and small for the better part of a decade. Now is, as you know, the said in one of his stories, a few years ago, the finest minds of my generation or figuring out how to get people to click on ads. This is been the story of Silicon Valley for the past decade, which is several lifetimes values but actually travels around the world of taking them to places that reminded him of the valley of generations past and reminded him that innovation can can come in all forms, whether it's in Australia or China or chillier, Palestine or elsewhere around the world. Well, let's talk about the Silicon Valley of past, and let's get into what he means Pacific by that. And then we can talk about kind of where we are today, so he's talking about when hobbyists were involved builders involved a little bit about that. Hearkens back, I to the Silicon Valley of Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard zero, when people were experimenting in a pre computerized aero with what triplication and the growth of electronics industry can do for the country and people were as really trying to tinker. Invent their way to better future as opposing as opposed to trying to optimize it for quarterly shareholder meetings, well, and what changed in your estimate and based on Ashley's reporting, where did that pivot happen, because as he says, the finest minds of his generation of our all of our generations. You know are now focused on something very different even different from the nineties. What happened? Sure. As as actually points out in the piece way of innovation and sort of Chris with, and unless changes after Netscape, right? And then the dot com crash ninety five it's sort of all the comes apparent what the internet at least a potential is going to be. And then we take some hard left turn. That's right. Whereas, I think a lot of people would say would look at the current slate of Silicon Valley, tech giants and say, well, you know, Facebook's the, the flagship problem you know, the biggest arbiter of the kinds of admirals that, you know, we, we see reason to be worried about here, actually Google and says the search giant more or less. Inventing the modern industry of accumulating as much data as possible about people to try generate more and more advertising dollars is really where. You know the industry started to lose its way. There's a line in this story that actually wrote the Jess struck me actually talked about with my daughter says the whole goal now is to pull people out of the real world and into an invented one. And I think that's fascinating. Right. Because everybody's just spending time on their phones, their computers or one hundred Hugh, just playing in this fake world. Right. Rather than out kind of exploring the world, right? Everything's game five you're trying to solve problems in the real world as much as you're trying to solve the maze advantage of. Mortified era and the, the, the models of innovation. He's harkening back to hear that we've tried to explore in this package or really more. Leaping out of the physical world. So let's talk about though. He said, he's kind of not giving up hope. Right. So let's talk about the places around the world where he said, okay? There are people who are building things looking to make things even better more ideal in our world, actually, it's a long list. You know, the, the piece starts in, in Palestine a couple years ago at a conference that brought entrepreneurs from throughout the Middle East to pigeon. Some cases, we're already pretty regionally famous startups and some cases have taken off since then, but she's also traveled to New Zealand emerging rocket and cume, satellite companies and. China to see the drone king of the world and the Drouin masters challenge and then to candidates to me to the modern godfathers and many other places. That's Jeff muskets. He was the architect of this entire show. Was really glad we got a chance to catch up with him and Ashley Vance he was traveling. We couldn't catch up with him that I tell you his words, the ideas that.

Jeff muskets Ashley Vance Palestine China Bloomberg Carol editor Middle East New Zealand Bill Hewlett Facebook Netscape Jess Google Dave Packard Chris Hugh Australia
"ashley vance" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Business week over the next couple of hours, we'll bring you news of the week and such a magazine and so much more. It's the sooner than you think issue, Carol I love this because it's looking around the corner in a way, but just around the corner. These are really cool things that are happening all over the world. Exactly. And going to impact us big time in the future from healthcare to artificial intelligence. We take a look at how technology is disrupting everyday life. So getting your arms around what really is sooner than you think an easy task and it fell to Jeff muskets? He's the editor the technology section. He's here with us. So give us a sense of how you even begin to do this. Sure will last year we were looking at the incredible moment that we're seeing coming back for a this year, you know, in the midst of sort of. Backlash against the, you know, sort of conventional big tech industry that's heating up this week, especially wanted to look at what new models of innovation and technological progress. Really look like. And one of the ways into this. It's so brilliant is that you use one of our best assets actually vans. Hello world. He's been all over the planet literally looking at these pockets of innovation and the comparisons that he makes to what he's seeing around the world versus what he seem an you've seen for so many years in Silicon Valley are pretty stark. Help us understand that perspective. Yeah, absolutely. The this is really in ashes. We'll have the story. He's kind of been been tailing in ways big and small for the better part of a decade. Now is, as you know, the was said in one of his stories, a few years ago, the finest minds of my generation or figuring how to get people to click on ads. This is been the story of Silicon Valley for most of the past decade, and which several lifetimes in valley years, but actually travels around the world of taking him to places that have reminded him of the valley of generations past and reminded him that innovation can can come in all forms, whether it's in Australia or China or chillier, Palestine or elsewhere around the world. Well, let's talk about the Silicon Valley of past, and let's get into what he means specifically by that. And then we could talk about kind of where we are today, so he's talking about when hobbyists were involved builders were involved a little bit about that. Hearkens back, I to the Silicon Valley of Bill Hewlett, and Dave Packer zero and people were experimenting in a pre computerized era with what? Triplication and the growth of electronics industry can do for the country and people were as really trying to tinker. Invent their way to their futures opposing as opposed to sort of try to optimize it for quarterly shareholder meetings, well, and, and what changed, I mean, in your estimate and based on Ashley's reporting, where did that pivot happen because he says the finest minds of his generation of our all of our generations are now focused on, on something very different even different from the nineties. What happened? Sure. Well, yeah. As as actually points out on the peace. A wave of innovation and sort of Chris with, and unless changes after Netscape, right? And then the dot com crash ninety five it's sort of all the comes apparent what the internet at least a potential is going to be. And then we take some hard left turn because, like, that's right. Whereas, I think a lot of people would say would look at the current. Late of Silicon Valley, tech giants and say, well, Facebook's the flagship problem you know, the biggest arbiter of the kinds of admirals that, you know, we see reason to be worried about here, actually Google and says. The search giant more or less inventing, the modern industry of accumulating as much data as possible about people to try generate more and more advertising dollars is really where. The industry started to lose its way. There's a line in this story that actually wrote the Jess struck me actually talked about it with my daughter. Any, he says the whole goal now is to pull people out of the real world and into an invented one. And I think that's fascinating. Right. Because everybody's just spending time on their phones or their computers or what have you just playing in this fake world. Right. Rather than out kind of exploring the world, right? Everything's game five you're trying to solve problems in the real world as much as you're trying to solve the maze. They invented challenges of. Mortified era and the, the, the models of innovation that he's harkening back to here. We've tried to explore in this package or more. Leaping out of the physical world. So let's talk about though. He said, he's kind of not giving up hope. Right. So let's talk about the places around the world where he said, okay? There are people who are building, things looking to make things even better more ideal in our world, actually, it's a long list, the piece starts in, in Palestine a couple years ago at a detect conference brought entrepreneurs from throughout the Middle East pigeon, some cases, we're already pretty regionally famous startups and some cases have taken off since then, but she's also traveled to New Zealand emerging rocket and cube satellite companies and. China to see the drone king of the world and the they and masters challenge and into Canada to meet the modern Godfather's bay and many other places. That's Jeff muskets. He was the architect of this entire show. Was really glad we got a chance to catch up with him and Ashley Vance he was traveling. We couldn't catch up with him. But I tell you his words the.

Jeff muskets Ashley Vance Palestine China Carol I Bill Hewlett editor Middle East Facebook Triplication Netscape New Zealand Google Jess Chris Canada Australia
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:56 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We'll bring you news of the week, insights of the magazine, and so much more. It's the sooner than you think issue, Carol I love this because it's looking around the corner in a way, but just around the corner. These are really cool things that are happening all over the world and going to impact as big time in the future from healthcare to artificial intelligence. We take a look at how technology is disrupting everyday life. So getting your arms around what really is sooner than you think an easy task? And it fell to Jeff muskets. He's the editor of the technology section. He's here with us. So give us a sense of how you even begin to do this. Sure will last year we were looking at the incredible moment that we're seeing coming back for this year, you know, in the midst of, you know, sort of back. Clash against the sort of conventional being taken history that's heating up, especially we're wanted to look at what new models of innovation and technological progress. Really look like. And one of the ways into this. It's so brilliant is that you use one of our best assets, Ashley vans, Hello world. He's been all over the planet literally looking at these pockets of innovation and the comparisons that he makes to what he's seeing around the world versus what he seen an you've seen for so many years in Silicon Valley are pretty stark. Help us understand that perspective. The this is really an in ashes wheelhouse, the story, he's kind of been been telling in ways big and small for the better part of a decade, as you know, the, the was said in one of his stories, a few years ago, the finest minds of my generation or figuring out how to get people to click on ads. This is been the story of Silicon Valley for the past decade. You know, several lifetimes in valley years, but actually travels around the world of taking him to places that have reminded him of the valley of, of generations past and reminded him that innovation can can come in, in all forms. Whether it's in Australia or China or chillier, Palestine or elsewhere around the world. Well, let's talk about the Silicon Valley of past, and let's get into what he means specifically by that. And then we can talk about kind of where we are today, so he's talking about when hobbyists were involved builders were involved a little bit about that hearkens back, I to, you know, the Silicon Valley of Bill Hewlett and Dave Packer zero. When people were experimenting in a pre. Computerised era, with what electrification and the growth of electronics industry can do for the country, and people were, you know as as really trying to, to tinker. Invent their way to better futures opposing as opposed to sort of try to optimize it for quarterly shareholder meetings, well, and, and what changed I mean in, in your estimate and based on Ashley's reporting, where did that pivot happen. Because as he says, you know, the finest minds of his generation of our all of our generations are now focused on, on something very different even different from the ninety s what happened. Sure as as actually points out in the piece a wave of innovation and sort of crests with an unless changes after Netscape and then the dot com. Crash nineteen ninety-five. It's sort of all the comes apparent what the internet at least a potential is going to be. And then we take some hard left turn. That's right. Whereas, I think a lot of people would say would look at the, the current slate of Silicon Valley tech. And say, well Facebook's the, the flagship problem, you know, the biggest urban of, of the kinds of admirals that, you know, we, we see reason to be worried about here, actually Google and says the search giant more or less. Inventing the, the modern industry of accumulating as much data as possible about people to try generate more and more advertising dollars is really where. You know, the industry started to lose its way in line in this story that actually wrote the just struck me actually talked about with my daughter, any, he says the whole goal now is to pull people out of the real world and into an invented one. And I think that's fascinating, right? Because everybody's just spending time on their phones or their computers or what have you just playing in this fake world. Right. Rather than out kind of exploring the world, right? Everything's game of five. You're right. You're trying to solve problems in the real world as much as you're trying to solve the maze. Invented challenges of. Unofficial era and the, the, the models of innovation that he's harkening back to here. We've tried to explore in this package or. Really more leaping out of the physical world. So let's talk about though he said, he's kind of not giving up hope. Right. So let's talk about the places around the world where he said, okay? There are people who are building things looking to make things even better more ideal in our world, actually, it's a long list. You know, the, the piece starts in, in Palestine a couple years ago at a conference that brought entrepreneurs from threat the Middle East SU pigeon. Some cases, we're already pretty regionally famous startups, and in some cases have have taken off since then, but she's also traveled to New Zealand emerging rocket and cube satellite companies and. China to see the drone king of the world and the masters challenge. And then to candidates meet the modern godfathers and many other places. That's Jeff musk. He was the architect of this entire issue. Was really glad we got a chance to catch up with him and Ashley Vance. He was traveling. So he couldn't catch up with him that I tell you his words, the.

Palestine China Jeff muskets Carol I Ashley vans Ashley Vance Ashley Jeff musk Bill Hewlett editor Netscape Facebook Google Australia New Zealand Dave Packer
"ashley vance" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"To get it from the original company, the recording company because it's that's going to benefit the artist better than some pirated version. So I feel like my witnesses been raised. I think that's a good because when you search for stuff on any of these stories, you get a ton of crap the weird stuff to get an international versions, like I was listening to some music, Georgia was playing it, and it was song that I knew, but I was certain. It was not the right people. And it turned out it was like the Italian cover of this. No so many. Yeah. She pressed the buy button. That's a real thing because it's less than those that used to be. But like free for belongs time, if you wanted to get gene wilder singing the imagination song from really walking, the, and the and the chocolate factory for whatever reason the people who own the rights of that had not put into the tune store, but you would hear clearly somebody, a professional modern recording of someone clearly trying to sound like, gene wilder using the exact same sort of orchestration where it, it, it's an uncanny valley sort of thing, where it's you much rather have a different cover version, because your brain is telling you this is gene wilder but it isn't. And so whenever there's a vacuum people will will try to fill that vacuum commercially if they can get away with it. People are awful. So I, I heard it are free. I heard that's why you and I and e wander the streets alone. Why I don't we know let why this. we let this. Let's planet live. You know what we're big hearts is what we got. I heard it on three of the NBC Krieger, when senior research analysts that Roth capital partners around twenty thirteen apple bid for tesla through two hundred forty dollars a share which kind of intra interestingly is more than the current tesla shares are worth the analyst didn't disclose his sources. But he added this is something we did multiple checks on. I have complete confidence as accurate apple bid for tesla. I don't know if it got to the formal paperwork stage, but I know from multiple different sources, this was very credible. That's an interesting point. And especially now that Tesla's valued at less than two hundred forty dollars Yulon keep tweeting, and they can get it for steel. At fact, I remember I interviewed Ashley Vance about his biography of musk and right about that. Same time, March twenty thirteen Vance writes that musk reached out to page, Larry page of Google saying, maybe you'd like to buy tesla. He proposed Google by tesla outright would cost about six billion dollars, plus five billion in capital for fat factory expansions..

tesla gene wilder musk Ashley Vance apple Google Georgia Roth capital partners NBC Krieger analyst Larry two hundred forty dollars six billion dollars
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:35 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"From Bloomberg radio. So Taylor, Google has become synonymous with so many different things we use it all the time. But thinking about it in terms of space. That's new from satellites to that we have coming up, and it's called what I love about the name of Google's satellite orbital insights, because it's insights into how you can use that data to really benefit you. And so, when we think about space, we naturally think about Ashley vans. I confess I shouldn't say this on air. He's one of my favorite writers out there. He joins us from San Francisco's so Ashley take us inside this project because it's a fascinating one. So orbital insight is, is a startup that was founded in two thousand thirteen and the founders this guy named James Crawford. He he used to work at Google on the Google book, search project and a lot of other stuff. At NASA, and he got ahead this insight, which was that a lot of cheap small satellites were starting to be launched that we're going to surround the earth and start taking a lot more pictures of it, traditionally pictures, actually, of the earth, a rare and expensive, and he saw this day coming when there'd be tons of them. And that if you applied some AI software and some analysis all these pictures, you could start to learn some pretty interesting things about how the planet operates will. And as I was reading the story Taylor, I was, I started to think about the idea of, I remember, hedge funds tracking cars in parking, lots and things like that. And of course as I got through the story. That's exactly where Ashley ends up. So tell us about how and what the data are that are being collected. Interesting. There's a couple of companies doing this orbital insight is seems to be the leader in this kind of nascent market. But like you mentioned you the count thing. They usually satellite images to peer down at the earth, and so they can count things like the number of cars in a WalMart parking lot to see how busy the back to school shopping season is they can look at crops to see how healthy the corn is into predict the yield would be over the years. They've added a ton of stuff that they cow. They, they can track all the oil that's being stored in China. These days, they add GPS data. That's gathered from people smartphones to actually know how many people are working inside of a factory, how many people are actually visiting a mall. And so, you know, they take all this information and then start to make basically economic predictions about the health of the worldwide economy. Well, and I love, you can make financial insights into this. Right. And I mean who knew that at the time being able to take photographs of a car could give you insight into the health of a company of that parking lot, etc. And as we take a look at some other things that these are used for you also mentioned sort of a sub sector and they're called orbital go. Oh, which is where more personal users can go in as a self service application describe that to us as well. Right. That's basically what the company's launching as of this month and traditionally, the stuff has been pretty hard to us. And if you wanted to run analysis on these images that or below gathers a lot of cases you were working hand in hand with orbital to, to code this thing up. Tell them your specific problem, and they were almost like a consulting firm where they were walking you through what to do. So this product or go, let's take a few years to develop this. But it's much more like you what you would think of when you hop on Google or Google maps or Google earth, where you just get this console. You can say, I want to count. I want to count how many houses are going up in Houston, and I want it to be from January to June, and I wanted to be in just this part of Houston, and you literally just circle the map of the part that you're looking at, and then you click enter. And now the software just runs off and runs the analysis and then spits dancer back to you. And so this is this technology. It's taken a while for people to even know that it exists and, and that it was hard to use. And so this is a step toward regular people can hop on and poke around and see if there's anything useful in this type of data. So actually talk to us about the here, because, as you mentioned, Mr. Crawford, has a lot of AI background a tour at NASA working on the Mars Rover. I mean, this is some really cool stuff that, you know, a lot about AI involves ultimately a very simplistic level humans essentially teaching computers, had a think how does that work? And what are the implications of making machine smarter in this analysis? This is one of my favorite parts of the stories in the case of so they like the new houses in Houston. They'll get pictures where you see a foundation being laid where you see a frame going up. And then you see a final house being constructed, and they want to know each stage of this process, but the computers on their own wouldn't be able to distinguish one of these things from the other. So they have contract workers, who they've been training over the last couple of years. You will actually go in and click the ages and say that's a foundation, that's a frame, that's a finished house. And then over time the computer does that on its own candidate distinguish between these three different things, and what we've seen with orbital as it used to take them quite a number of months to do something new like track Corneille track housing starts. And as this team of contractors have gotten better as orbital zone. AI software has gotten better. Now they're able to fire up new things to counts in just a few weeks. And. Funny pretty much all this stuff that, that we see in the market. These days, there's always a human who has to train this machine. Right. Actually going to replace them. And you know, it's interesting to see how quickly Orbital's been able to, to speed up this process. I mean s we've been talking. I think the classic big data question has really come to my mind. Are there any concerns about privacy, you know, you wonder are able to search neighborhood and look for specific homes or parking lots? Are there any big data privacy concerns, or because it's from his satellite and space, it's free rein in, especially as they're connecting this as you said earlier, Ashley to GPS data presumed their state of being pulled from phones. This feels a little bit intrusive, maybe. Yeah. Now what the satellites most of the images? They can't see a person's face. They can barely recognize that a car is a car, and they can't see the license plate or something like that. So that might make you feel a little bit better. The rest of it can get a little bit creepy. I mean these guys are, are watching the world twenty four seven they know what's happening in a lot of cases before the rest of the world knows what's going on. The GPS data is anonymous is. But that's weird to be. They these guys literally. No, there's X number of employees is actually inside tesla factory. And then making go and look at the pictures of the number of cars that have been produced by that factory sitting in the lot, and so they can make a gas about how efficient the factory is. And so a lot of this is a non is that for far away. It is a little creepy is just as creepy as everything else seems to be going on these days. Ashley Vance Jason the story fascinated me so much. Because in my head the first thing that popped up is hedged. Funds shorting company, based on if they're parking lot is empty and consumers aren't going in there. For example, let's say like a back to school season. Right. And this really going to the next level.

Google Ashley Vance AI Orbital NASA Houston James Crawford Taylor San Francisco tesla factory Bloomberg WalMart China
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So Taylor, Google has become synonymous with so many different things we use it all the time. But thinking about it in terms of space. That's new. From satellites to that. We have coming up and it's called what I love about the name of Google's satellite orbital insights, because it's insights into how you can use that data to really benefit you. And so, when we think about space, we naturally think about Ashley vans. I confess I shouldn't say this on air. He's one of my favorite writers out there. He joins us from San Francisco's so Ashley take us inside this project because it's a fascinating one. So orbital insight is, is a startup that was founded in two thousand thirteen and the founders this guy named James Crawford. He, he used to work at Google on the Google book search project at a lot of other stuff at NASA, and he got ahead his insight, which was that a lot of cheap small satellites were starting to be lodged. We're going to surround the earth and start taking a lot more pictures of it. Traditionally pictures, actually, of the earth are rare and expensive. And he saw this day coming when there'd be tons of them. And that if you applied some AI software and some analysis all these pictures, you could start to learn some pretty interesting things about how the planet operates will. And as I was reading the story Taylor, I was, I started to think about the idea of, I remember hedge funds like tracking cars and parking, lots and things like that. And of course as I got to the story that's exactly where Ashley ends up. So tell us about how and what the data are that are being collected. Yeah. It's interesting, there's a couple of companies doing this orbital insight is seems to be the leader in this kind of nascent market. But like you mentioned the count things they usually satellite images to peer down that the earth, and so they can count things like the number of cars in a WalMart parking lot to see how busy the back to school shopping season is they can look at crops to see how healthy the corn is an predict the what the yield would be. Elver the years they've added a ton of stuff that they cow. They, they can track all the oil that's being stored in China. These days, they add GPS data. That's gathered from people's smartphones to actually know how many people are working inside of a factory, how many people are actually visiting a mall. And so, you know, they take all this information and then start to make basically economic predictions about the health of the worldwide economy. Well, and I love, you can make financial insights into this. Right. And I mean who knew that at the time being able to take photographs of a car can give you insight into the health of a company of that parking lot, etc. And as we take a look at some other things that these are used for you also mentioned sort of a sub sector and they're called orbital go, which is where more personal users can go in as a self service application describe that to us as well. Right. That's basically what the company's lodging as of this month. And traditionally, the stuff has been pretty hard to us. And if you wanted to run analysis on these images that or below gathers a lot of cases you were working hand in hand with orbital to, to code this thing up. Tell them your specific problem and, and they were almost like a consulting firm where they were walking you through what to do. So this product or below go. Let's take a few years to develop this. But it's, it's much more like you what you would think of when you hop on to Google or Google maps or Google earth, where you just get this console. You can say, I want to count. I want to count how many houses are going up in Houston, and I want it to be from January to June, and I wanted to be in just this part of Houston, and you literally just circle the map of the part that you're looking at, and then you click enter, and, and now the software just runs off and runs the analysis and then spits answer back to you. And so. So this is this technology. It's taken a while for people to even know that it exists and, and that it was hard to use. And so this is a step toward regular, people can to hop on and poke around and see if there's anything useful in this type of data. So actually talk to us about the AI here. Because as you mentioned, Mr. Crawford, has a lot of AI background a tour at NASA working on the Mars Rover. I mean, this is some really cool stuff that, you know, a lot about AI involves ultimately a very simplistic level humans essentially teaching computers, had a think how does that work? And what are the implications of making machine smarter in this analysis? This is one of my favorite parts of the stories in the case of so they light the new houses in Houston. They'll get pictures where you see a foundation being laid where you see a frame going up, and then you see a final house being constructed, and they want to know each stage of this process, but the. There's on their own wouldn't be able to distinguish one of these things from the other. So they have contract workers, who they've been training over the last couple of years, who will actually go in and click the ages and say that's a foundation, that's a frame, that's a finished house. And then over time the computer does that on its own can distinguish between these three different things, and what we've seen with orbital as it used to take them quite a number of months to do something new like track Corneille track housing starts. And as this team of contractors have gotten better as orbital zone. AI software has gotten better. Now they're able to fire up new things to count in just a few weeks and isolated funny pretty much all this stuff that, that we see in the market. These days, there's always a human who has to train this machine. Right. Eventually going to replace them. And you know, it's interesting to see how quickly Orbital's been able to, to speed up this process. I mean s we've been talking. I think the classic big data question has really come to my mind of are there any concerns about privacy. You know, you wonder are able to search neighborhood and look, I civic homes or parking lots. Are there any big data privacy concerns, or because it's from his satellite in space, it's free rein, and especially as they're connecting this, as you said earlier, Ashley to GPS data presume their state of being pulled from phones? This feels a little bit intrusive, maybe. Yeah. One what the satellites most of the images. They can't see a person's face. They can barely recognize that a car is a car, and they can't see the license plate or something like that. So that might make you feel a little bit better. The rest of it can get a little bit creepy. I mean, you know, these guys are, are watching the world twenty four seven they, they know what's happening in a lot of cases before the rest of the world knows what's going on. The GPS data is a not amazed but that's weird to be the these guys literally. No, there's X number of employees is actually inside a tesla factory, and then making go and look at the pictures of the number of cars that have been produced by that factory sitting in the lot, and so they can make a gas about how efficient the factory is. And so a lot of this is anonymous is that for far away. It is a little creepy is just as cata creepy as everything seems to be going on these days. Ashley Vance Jason the story fascinated me so much. Because in my head the first thing that popped up is hedge. Funds shorting company, based on if they're parking lot is empty and consumers aren't going in there, for example, say like back to school season. Right. And this really going to the next level in the sense.

Google Ashley Vance AI Orbital Houston Taylor James Crawford NASA tesla factory San Francisco WalMart China
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We Jason Kelly and Taylor rakes from Bloomberg radio. So Taylor, Google has become synonymous with so many different things we use it all the time. But thinking about it in terms of space. That's new from satellites to that we have coming up, and it's called what I love about the name of Google's satellite orbital insights, because it's insights into how you can use that data to really benefit you. And so, when we think about space, we naturally think about Ashley vans. I confess I shouldn't say this on air. He's one of my favorite writers out there. He joins us from San Francisco's so Ashley take us inside this project because it's a fascinating one. So orbital insight is, is a startup that was founded in two thousand thirteen and the founders this guy named James Crawford. He he used to work at Google on the Google book, search project at a lot of other stuff. At NASA, and he had this insight, which was that a lot of cheap small satellites were starting to be launched. We're going to surround the earth and start taking a lot more pictures of it traditionally pictures, actually, of the earth, a rare and expensive, and he saw the day coming when there'd be tons of them. And that if you applied some AI software and some analysis all these pictures, you could start to learn some pretty interesting things about how the planet operates. Well, and as I was reading the story Taylor, I was, I started to think about the idea of, I remember hedge funds like tracking cars and parking, lots and things like that. And of course as I got through the story. That's exactly where Ashley ends up. So tell us about how and what the data are that are being collected. Interesting. There's a couple of companies doing this orbital insight is seems to be the leader in this kind of nascent market. But like you mentioned the count things. They usually satellite images to peer down at the earth, and so they can count things like the number of cars in a WalMart parking lot to see how busy the back to school shopping season is they can look at crops to see how healthy the corn is into predict the what the yield would be over the years. They've added a ton of stuff that they count, they, they can track all the oil, that's being stored in China, these days, they add GPS data. That's gathered from people smartphones to actually know how many people are working inside of a factory, how many people are actually visiting a mall. And, and so, you know, they take all this information and then start to make basically economic predictions about the health of the worldwide economy. Well, and I love, you can make financial insights into this, right? I mean who knew that at the time being able to take photographs of a car could give you insight into the health of a company of that parking lot, etc. And as we take a look at some other things that these are used for you also mentioned sort of a sub sector and they're called orbital go. Oh, which is where it more personal users can go in as a self service application describe that to us as well? Right. That's basically, that's what the companies launching as of this month and traditionally, the stuff has been pretty hard to us. And if you wanted to run analysis on these images that or below gathers a lot of cases you were working hand in hand with orbital to, to code this thing up. Tell them your specific problem, and they were almost like a consulting firm where they were walking you through what to do. So this product or go taking a few years to develop this. But it's, it's much more like you what you would think of when you hop on to Google or Google maps or Google earth, where you just get this console. You can say, I want to count. I want to count how many houses are going up in Houston, and I want it to be from January to June, and I wanted to be just this part of Houston, and you literally just circle the map of the part that you're looking at, and then you click enter. And now the software just runs off and runs the analysis and then spits dancer back to you. And so this is this technology. It's taken a while for people to even know that it exists, and, and then it was hard to use. And so this is a step toward regular people could hop on and poke around and see if there's anything useful in this type of data. So actually talk to us about the AI here. Because as you mentioned, Mr. Crawford, has a lot of AI background a tour at NASA working on the Mars Rover. I mean, this is some really cool stuff that, you know, a lot about AI involves ultimately in a very simplistic level, humans essentially teaching computers, had a think how does that work? And what are the implications of making machine smarter in this analysis? This is one of my favorite parts of the stories in the case of so they like the new houses in Houston. They'll get pictures where you see a foundation being laid where you see a frame going up. And then you see a final house being constructed and they wanna know each stage of this process, but the computers on their own wouldn't be able to distinguish one of these things from the other. So they have contract workers, who they've been training over the last couple of years, you will actually go in and click the images and say, that's a foundation. That's a frame, that's a finished house that over time the computer does that on its own can distinguish between these three different things and what we've seen with orbital is it used to take them quite a number of months to do something new like track Corneille track housing starts. And as this team of contractors have gotten better as Orbital's own AI software has gotten better. Now they're able to fire up new things to count in just a few weeks. And. Pretty much all this stuff that, that we see in the market. These days, there's always a human who has to train this machine. Right. Actually, get to replace them. And you know, it's interesting to see how quickly orbital has been able to, to speed up this process. I mean s we've been talking. I think the classic big data question has really come to my mind of are there any concerns about privacy. You know, you wonder are able to search neighborhood and look for specific homes or parking lots. Are there any big data privacy concerns, or because it's from his satellite in space, it's free rein, and especially as they're connecting this, as you said earlier, Ashley to GPS data, presumably, their state of being pulled from phones? This feels a little bit intrusive. Maybe now what is the satellites most of the images? They can't see a person's face. They can barely recognize that a car is a car, and they can't see the license plate or something like that. So that might make you feel a little bit better the rest of. Can get a little bit creepy. I mean these guys are, are watching the world twenty four seven they, they know what's happening in a lot of cases before the rest of the world knows what's going on. The GPS data is a non amazed, but that seemed weird to be they these guys literally. No, there's X number of employees, actually inside a tesla factory. And then making go look at the pictures of the number of cars that have been produced by that factory sitting in the lot, and so they can make a gas about how efficient the factory is. And so a lot of this is anonymous is that for far away. It is a little creepy is just as cata creepy as everything seems to be going on these days. Ashley Vance Jason the story fascinated me so much. Because in my head the first thing that popped up is hedge funds shorting company, based on their parking lot is empty and consumers ongoing in there. For example, let's say like back to school season. Right. And this really going to the.

Google Ashley Vance Orbital Taylor AI Houston NASA James Crawford San Francisco tesla factory Jason Kelly Bloomberg WalMart China
"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"ashley vance" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Has become synonymous with so many different things we use it all the time. But thinking about it in terms of space. That's new. From satellites to that. We have coming up and it's called what I love about the name of Google's satellite orbital insights, because it's insights into how you can use that data to really benefit you. And so, when we think about space, we naturally think about Ashley vans. I confess I shouldn't say this on air. He's one of my favorite writers out there. He joins us from San Francisco's so Ashley take us inside this project because it's a fascinating one. So orbital inside is, is a startup that was founded in two thousand thirteen and the founders this guy named James Crawford. He, he used to work at Google on the Google book search project at a lot of other stuff at NASA, and he got ahead his insight, which was that a lot of cheap small satellites. We're starting to be lodged we're gonna surround the earth and start taking a lot more pictures of it. Traditionally pictures, actually, of the earth are rare and expensive. And he saw this day coming when there'd be tons of them. And that if you applied some AI software and some analysis all these pictures, you could start to learn some pretty interesting things about how the planet operates. Well, and as I was reading the story Taylor, I was, I started to think about the idea of, I remember hedge funds like tracking cars and parking, lots and things like that. And of course as I got to the story that's exactly where actually ends up. So tell us about how and what the data are that are being collected. Interesting. There's a couple of companies doing this orbital insight is seems to be the leader in this kind of nascent market. But like you mentioned the cow things they usually satellite images to peer down at the earth, and so they can count things like the number of cars at a WalMart parking lot to see how busy the back to school shopping season is they can look at crops to see how healthy the corn is an predict the yield would be. Over the years. They've added a ton of stuff that they count, they, they can track all the oil, that's being stored in China, these days, they add GPS data, that's gathered from people smartphones to actually know how many people are working inside of a factory. How many people are actually visiting a mall? And, and so, you know, they take all this information and then start to make basically economic predictions about the health of the worldwide economy. Well, and I love that you can make financial insights into this, right. I mean who knew that, if the time being able to take photographs of a car could give you insight into the health of the company of that parking lot, etc. And as we take a look at some other things that these are used for you also mentioned sort of a sub sector and they're called orbital go, which is where more personal users can go in as a self service application describe that to us as well. Right. That's basically, that's what the Cubbies lodging as of this month. And traditionally, the stuff has been pretty hard to us. And if you wanted to. To run analysis on these images that or below gathers a lot of cases you were working hand in hand with orbital to code this thing up. Tell them your specific problem, and they were almost like a consulting firm where they were walking you through what to do. So this product or go, let's take a few years to develop this. But it's much more like you what you would think of when you hop on to Google or Google maps or Google earth, where you just get this console. You can say, you know, I want count, I wanna count how many houses are going up in Houston, and I want it to be from January to June. And I wanted to be just this part of Houston, and you literally just circle the map of the part that you're looking at, and then you click enter, and, and now the software just runs off and runs the analysis and then spits the answer back to you. And so this is this technology. It's taken a while for people to even know that it exists, and, and then it was hard to use. And so this is a step toward regular people. Got to hop on and poke around and see if there's anything useful in this type of data. So actually talk to us about the AI here, because, as you mentioned, Mr. Crawford, has a lot of background a tour at NASA working on the Mars Rover. I mean, this is some really cool stuff that, you know, a lot about AI involves ultimately in a very simplistic level, humans essentially teaching computers, how to think how does that work? And what are the implications of making machine smarter in this analysis? This is one of my favorite parts of the stories in the case of so they like the new houses in Houston. They'll get pictures where you see a foundation being laid where you see a frame going up, and then you see a final house being constructed, and they want to know each stage of this process, but the computers on their own wouldn't be able to distinguish one of these things from the other. So they have contract workers, who they've been training over the last couple of years, you will actually go in and click. The ages and say that's a foundation, that's a frame, that's a finished house that over time the computer does that on its own can distinguish between these three different things and what we've seen with orbital is it used to take them quite a number of months to do something new like track Corneille track housing starts. And as this team of contractors have gotten better as orbital zone. AI software has gotten better. Now they're able to fire up new things to counts in just a few weeks. And funny, pretty much all this stuff that we see in the market. These days, there's always a human who has to train this machine write legibly going to replace them. And you know, it's interesting to see how quickly does been able to, to speed up this process. I mean, as we've been talking, I think the classic big data question has really come to my mind. Are there any concerns about privacy, you wonder are able to search neighborhood and look I acidic homes or parking lots? Are there any big data privacy? Concerns, or because it's from his satellite in space, it's free rein, and especially as they're connecting this, as you said earlier, Ashley to GPS data, presumably, their state of being pulled from phones. This feels a little bit intrusive, maybe. Yeah. What is the satellites both of the images? They can't see a person's face. They can barely recognize that a car is a car, and then they can't see the license plate or something like that. So that might make you feel a little bit better. The rest of it can get a little bit creepy. I mean these guys are, are watching the world twenty four seven they, they know what's happening in a lot of cases before the rest of the world knows what's going on. The GPS data is not amazed. But that's weird to be the these guys literally. No, there's X number of employees is actually inside a tesla factory, and then making go look at the pictures of the number of cars that have been produced by that factory sitting in the lot, and so they can make a gas about how efficient the factory is. And so a lot of this is anonymous is for far away. It is a little creepy is just as cata creepy as everything else seems to be going on these days. That's Ashley Vance Jason this story fascinated me so much. Because in my head the first thing that popped up. Is hedge funds shorting company, based on their parking lot is empty and consumers aren't going in there. For example, let's say like back to school season. Right. And this really going to the next level in the sense that we're going to be able to get on and really customize that information using all these.

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Amazon Announces All New Hardware

Motley Fool Money

00:22 sec | 3 years ago

Amazon Announces All New Hardware

"I'm Chris l. joining me in studio this week, senior analyst, Jason Moser, Matt, arguing her and Ron Bros. He was always gentlemen, hey, we've got the latest headlines from Wall Street. Bestselling author, Ashley Vance is our guest. And as always we'll give you an inside look at the stocks on our radar. But we begin this week with till Ray, be well known Canadian cannabis company. I've never heard of until this

Ron Bros Ashley Vance Jason Moser Senior Analyst Cannabis Chris L. Matt RAY