23 Burst results for "Ashley Hamer"

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:44 min | 7 months ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Course a ghost tells us or we build the time machine or neck romandie. There's many possibilities. We got a listener question from Luke who asks. Why do we kiss do all cultures kiss great question Luke for a long time time? Scientists believe that a large majority of human cultures took part in romantic kissing like ninety percent of them. It was believed to be pretty much universal but in two thousand fifteen three anthropologists gathered a huge data. Set from a whopping one hundred and sixty eight human cultures to answer this question for real and wouldn't you know no it cultures that kiss romantically are in the minority. At only forty six percent of all cultures worldwide. They did find. Though that the more complex a culture culture social structure was the more likely romantic. Kissing was to be a thing that brings us to why we do it in the first place and to tell you the truth there isn't one answer to for that question. There are plenty of complicated. Hoity toity scientific reasons like getting close to one another lets us get a whiff of each other's sexy sexy pheromones which makes us either more or less likely to get to procreate and depending on whether we like what we smell saliva is also chuck full of hormones. Our bodies used to judge made compatibility. There's some evidence for this research suggests that women especially value kissing early on and are more likely to say that I kiss can be the decider between selecting a mate eight and you know ghosting that next text of course judging from the research on human cultures and the fact that humans are almost the only animals who kiss our closest relatives Timpson Timpson. Bonobos have been known to smooch each other to it's clear the kissing isn't strictly necessary. So maybe the answer is more simple than that. You've got a ton of nerve nerve endings in your lips and mouth and kissing just feels good. Thanks for your question Luke. Now let's recap what we learned today. Today we learned that moons that fly off their planets orbit it and start to orbit their home star are called pollutants and that the first chiropractor invented the practice because he was visited by ghosts and fixed a janitor sense of hearing and and maybe his son killed him totally normal and the not all cultures kiss in fact the minority of Cultures Kiss Romantically. And we're not a hundred percent. Sure sure why we started to do it. In the first place I mean other than that one time at Princess had to kiss the frog to turn back into a prince. But you know that's the most wholesome kissing joke. You could ever nothing if not wholesome join us again tomorrow to learn something new in just a few minutes. Have a great rest of your weekend. I'm cody golf. And I'm Ashley Hamer stay curious on the Westwood. One podcast network..

Luke Timpson Timpson Ashley Hamer Westwood
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:44 min | 9 months ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"We're here from curiosity DOT com. Help you get smarter in just a few minutes. I'm cody golf. And I'm Ashley Hamer Today. Learn about how the average phone typing speed is catching up to the keyboard how it can drizzle Antarctica even when it's cold enough for water to freeze and how an ancient Supernova could be the reason why humans walk upright but satisfy awesome curiosity. Remember how hard it used to be to type out a text message on your flip phone Ashley. You know what I'm talking about. Oh Yeah you had to like figure out the number you had to press a number three three times to get to the third letter. Oh Gosh that was really hard. It was rough. And if you're listening to this you know the struggle was real. especially if you're at least about as old as Ashley and I are obviously it is easier to tap out a text or email these days but just how quickly you can do that might surprise you. A new study crunched the numbers and found at the average phone. Typing speed is catching up to the keyboard. Seriously and this study comes along with some tips on how you can become a text. Think tighten the study using online typing test to analyze the typing speed of thirty seven thousand people from one hundred sixty countries on both smartphones phones and computer keyboards and it came to a shocking conclusion. These days were almost as fast at typing on our phones as we are laptops users typing with a two thumbs achieved thirty eight words per minute on average and that's only about twenty five percents lower than the typing speeds similar large scale study of physical keyboards now. Of course some people can type way faster on its traditional keyboard if you aced touch typing in school or work as a secretary you can probably knock out one one hundred words a minute on the computer. That's about how fast I type. The last time I took a typing test was in high school and I was like almost eighty words a minute and I was very proud of myself. It's probably way faster today. It's yeah probably but most people are nowhere near that fast. So smartphones speed is closing in on keyboards speed. The study also found on the teenagers managed ten more words a minute than people in their forties. One texting hero even managed eighty five words a minute on a phone. All this brings us to some tips to improve your phone typing skills. Firstly it turns out the two thumbs is significantly faster than one make sense. You should also rely on. autocorrect even though you will run the risk of autocorrect fails. But don't use predictive text. You'll end up spending more time evaluating valuating the options your phone suggests than you would have spent just typing out your intended message. So if all of these tips and you'll be whipping up messages on your phone. Nearly as fast as you cannot keyboard you can even track your progress with the typing test. The researchers used for the study. There's.

Ashley Hamer Antarctica
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"A lot of climate models actually treat human behavior as a given they assume humans have particular demands on the planet and researchers used those demands to figure out what they'll do to the climate and the future but environmental sciences professor maduro on on and his team from university of waterloo wanna see what would happen in a climate model they took stickle human behavior into account specifically they want to incorporate social learning that's the spread of behavior that happens when one person buying a programmable thermostat or biking to work inspires their friends to do the same peer pressure basically here's what they figured the way human behavior influences are warming planet isn't just a one way street are behavior influences climate change climate change also influences human behavior i mean if you leave somewhere with the rising average temperatures then you might be more likely to try to do something about it as more people do something about it social norms start to shift which makes it more acceptable for even more people to do something about it if enough people are inspired by others to take action it's possible but their choices could help slow the warming of the planet to figure out of this idea is true the researchers would have to create a model of it and that's exactly what they did this is the first model of its kind so they kept it simple they start by assuming the world is made up of two types of people mitigate earth did things to fight climate change non mitigated peter's did not they calculated the costs of things like installing solar panels permitted gators or paying a carbon tax for non medic gators along with things like having to move inland thinks the temperature fluctuations in the social benefits go along with following social social norms whatever those norms maybe the researchers modeled several different scenarios changing things like how much it might matter to follow social norms in how quickly people would pick up on the behavior of others and when they combined their social learning model with an established tablets climate prediction model they found the peer pressure to mitigate global warming could have a real impact when they ran a control simulation that took human behavior out of the formula temperatures rose forever but with peer pressure involved the temperatures began to level out when social learning was slow the rise in temperature topped out at three point three degrees celsius a devastating increase but when social learning was at its fastest the rise peaked at two point two degrees celsius that's still not great but it's at least closer to the two degree limits set by the intergovernmental panel on climate change or i pcc effects of social learning were even greater then gio physical factors like surface heat reflective eighty or soil or plant respiration the bottom line is that you're choices matter go ahead and buy those reusable bags ride that bike in switched energy efficient appliances even better talk to your neighbors and attend town hall meetings take to the streets if you like you only way we could make a difference is if everyone works to make a

cody goff ashley hamer twenty one week once w
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Of all things has peaked our curiosity.

Ashley Hamer Gortari Anjelica Ortiz Westwood One Jelica fifty years six hours
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Ralph coordinator Ashley Hamer Carnegie science center Julian Buell planetarium one hundred years
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

acoustic Resonator Ashley Hamer Yale Vivian science
What Determines How Others See You

Curiosity Daily

09:22 min | 1 year ago

What Determines How Others See You

"Let's set aside some curiosity. It's not just how we look how we act that determines how people see us. So what does determine what people think of us researchers might have some hunches based on some ongoing studies? And one of those researchers is Vivian Sayas vigil rector of the personality, attachments and control laboratory at Cornell University, she's back for another edition of our mentality Mondays miniseries, with some insights in how researchers study first impressions, but more than that, she has some surprising information about exactly how subjectively people really see each other, what she told us might surprise you. You know, a lot of the work on. I and Prussians tends to focus on some people are for example, more attractive than other people or some people are just more like than other people are some people more trustworthy than other. That's what's called a target effect. Right. And the suction is, if we are given ten people were asked evaluate those ten people, the three of us are going to generally agree. That's the suction, and there is some consistency in our evaluations some, but it doesn't explain all of it, actually, and actually, if you can break down, how much is due to the target versus there's another source of what influences whether we like someone or not. And that's what's called a perceiver effect. So some people might think that everybody's attractive, or everybody's trustworthy. Right. So that would be a perceiver effect. And then there's what's called the interaction between the, the person that you're viewing the target and yourself, we can call this, like chemistry. I might. At like person, a more than person b and Ashley, you might like person be more than personal personnel. And what we know from some of the work is that in terms of first impressions of like who do you like what we're seeing is that twenty percent of the judgment is based on. We tend to agree that some people are more likeable than other people. Forty percent is a person effect. Some people are just like everybody and some people don't and then forty percent is sort of idiosyncratic. We have preferences, and our preferences aren't all the same and that accounts for forty percent of the variability. We'll say that one more time just so it sinks him in terms of first impressions about twenty percent of the time, we tend to agree that some people are just more likable than other people. Forty percents is a person effect as in some people just like everybody and others don't and the final forty percent is personal preference. That's a lot of percents. And to me. That is really interesting and also important, because I feel like we tend to simplify things again. Right. And I think we tend to think that just some people are more attractive. Some people more likable. Some people have it, and some people don't and that there's a little bit of truth to that. There are people who are more attractive in some people, we tend to agree somewhat but there's a lot of idiosyncrasy a lot of preferences. And we see preferences in almost every aspect of our lives. We don't all want to live in the same cities. We don't all want to live in the same communities. We don't all want to live in the same type of house. We don't all want to wear the same types of clothes. We don't all the same type of restaurant even if we go to the same restaurant, we don't all eat the same type of food. There are preferences. And so why wouldn't we have these preferences, when it comes to who we find attractive in who we want to hang out with, and who do we to be friends with? But it's a little bit complicated. It's harder to get a grasp of these interactions. And so. So we tend to focus on target effects, and I think there's some importance to target effects, but I think it doesn't present the whole picture and to me, find it really interesting that there is so much idiosyncrasy so much that when we're meeting someone, and we're making a decision, for example, do I want to be friends with this person? A person's saying, does everybody necessarily want to be friends with. I'm saying do I want to be friends with this person? Am I attracted to this person and there's a lot of personal preference in that? So that's one part of the first impressions work, one finding there that I'm really interested in. So would you say then that probably everybody is attractive and likable to somebody? I have not yet looked at that would I might expect is that yes, there's going to be, maybe I am hesitant say everybody. But the majority of people are going to be attracted to the majority of other people, I might also expect that so. Some people will draw more people to. And so I, I do think that there is some complexity to these analyses that we haven't done yet. Here's one takeaway from this research. Maybe don't worry so much about whether you're broadly likable, to other people all the time, and instead, just do your best to make a good first impression on the next person you meet. There's probably not a person out there who everyone likes, although to be fair. Patrick Stewart comes pretty darn close. Anyway, that was Vivian Sayas. The director of the personality attachment and control laboratory at Cornell University. You can hear her and lots of other interesting people on Cornell university's podcast series called, what makes us human it just backed up its fourth season, and their episodes are really interesting not to mention even shorter than ours. You can find links to that podcast and more in today's show notes, and you'll hear from professor science again next week one way to get someone to like you a whole lot more is by giving a gift from. Today's sponsor paints your life. That believe I know somebody that recently did this. I did. I got a portrait of my great grandmother, great, grandfather, and grandmother, as a baby turned into a painting for my mom for mother's day. And so when I called my mom on mother's day, and she had just opened her present. It was like she didn't even answer. The phone really is like the phone turned on. And then it was just her talking to my brother about how amazing it looked and comparing, you know, his facial features to like my great grandfather's facial features. And I was like, mom. She was so delighted and I just can't wait to go home for the holidays and see it up on her wall. That's super cool. And that's mean you can pretty have much an original the whole idea, painting right? of I yourself, your children family, a special place or cherished pet all at a price you can afford, by the way, from painter life dot com, and it's a true painting done by hand by a world class artists that has created from a favorite photo. Like the one you talked about, and there's no risk. If you don't love the final painting, your monies refunded. It's a work of art. And right now is a limited time offer. You can get thirty percent off your painting. That's right. Thirty percent off and free shipping to get this special offer. Text the word curious to forty eight forty eight forty eight that's curious to forty eight forty eight forty eight one more time text. C. U. R. I O. U S, two forty eight forty eight forty eight. Message and data rates may apply. According to research you can. In fact, ask for too much advice. Sure you can help your career by asking your experienced co workers for advice on the job. But you may wanna think twice before you ask multiple colleagues about something in the same way. You'd read a bunch of yelp reviews before you buy something online. Here's why when you ask someone for advice, you're creating a vulnerable interpersonal interaction and you're asking that person to spend time offering their thoughts in return your advisor might expect a level of control over the outcome. In other words, they might want to tell you what to do, even when you were just hoping to tap into the wisdom of the crowd by talking to a lot of people without ceding control to anyone when the advice giver, and receiver have mismatched expectations like this relationships can sour. So asking for advice is actually a risky endeavor getting multiple perspectives. Is even more risky, for example, for one study, researchers surveyed two hundred people who are asked. To recall a time when they gave advice. The researchers found the participants felt flattered when they were asked for advice, but they also felt less close to the person receiving the advice afterward. If their advice was ignored similarly, when compared to people who are asked exclusively for advice, people who are just one of many Astra advice were more likely to feel offended, and less likely to continue their professional relationship with the person seeking that advice to the researchers these two problems are clearly related asking multiple people for advice makes you less likely to take any one person's advice, which means you're advisor has less control and a higher chance of being ignored. So, yes. Crowds can be wise, but they can also be controlling even downright domineering, if you value your relationship with your advisers, only ask for their advice when you really think, might take it read about today's stories and more on curiosity dot com. Join us again tomorrow for the award winning curiosity daily, and learn something new and just. Few minutes. I'm Ashley Hamer, and I'm Cody gov. Stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network.

Cornell University Vivian Sayas Ashley Hamer Advisor Patrick Stewart Westwood One Astra Professor Yelp Director C. U. R. Forty Percent Twenty Percent Thirty Percent
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Dry ones chain Gieszi explained to nature news that pruning fingers are basically rain, treads, our ancestors likely needed help catching food in wet conditions and their wrinkly toes helped with footing. But one thing is still puzzling. Researchers if wrinkling improves grip in wet conditions and. Makes no difference in dry conditions. Then why don't our fingers stay permanently pruning? The current hypothesis is that wrinkling could make our fingertips less sensitive, which would make it easier for us to hurt our selves. So the next time you're enjoying a nice, bubble bath or soaking in a hot tub. And you reach for delicious beverage, you've got Evelyn to thank for the fact that your glass doesn't slip from your

Gieszi Cody Ashley Hamer Westwood One Evelyn
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

partner Westwood One Ashley Hamer Cody Davis
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

partner gunman institute Ashley Hamer Westwood One Walker ninety percent ten minute
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Thousand two it was called the Poincare conjecture and in the simplest terms. It basically asks whether a fully closed shape is always considered a sphere. No matter how many dimensions you build it in the solution showed that all simply connected. Closed shapes share, a nice orderly set of properties that can be categorized, albeit in a very complicated way. Yeah. I told you these weren't simple one problem down six to go here. A few more examples the p versus N P problem. It basically asked this. If it's easy to check the solution to a problem is correct. Is it also easy to solve that problem in the P verses N P problem the P stands for polynot meal and the N P stands for non deterministic polynot mealtime. This problem is one of computer sciences greatest mysteries. And we could dedicate an entire episode to it. And you still wouldn't even know the solution. One other millennium problem is called the Riemann hypothesis. It has to do with prime numbers. And according to the clay mathematics institute, it's been checked for the first ten trillion solutions to solve this. You need a proof that it's true for every interesting solution. And the point of this problem is that the solution would shed light on many of the mysteries surrounding the distribution of prime numbers. Grab that graphing calculator and good luck about to these stories and more on curiosity dot com. Join us again tomorrow for the award winning curiosity daily and learn something new in just a few minutes. I'm Ashley Hamer, and I'm Cody gov. Stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network..

Westwood One Ashley Hamer clay mathematics institute
The Psychology of Circles

Curiosity Daily

06:54 min | 1 year ago

The Psychology of Circles

"You can play along at home with our first story just draw a circle simple as that grab a piece of paper and something to write with and get to it this might sound weird. But you can actually learn quite a bit about someone's background from the way they draw circle. There's actual data and science behind this. So don't worry. We're not just talking about some pseudoscience handwriting analysis kind of thing. Okay. Did you draw your circle? Well, here are a couple of fun facts. If you're American there's an eighty six percent chance that you draw your circles counterclockwise. But for people living in Japan eighty percent of people draw their circles in the opposite direction. This data comes from November twenty sixteen when Google released in AI game called quick draw. It was kind of like the game pictionary you'd start to draw something and then Google's algorithm would try. Guess what you were drawing in twenty seconds or less courts. Use data from the game to look at one hundred nineteen thousand unique circles to see how different people draw them. They found that the direction that you dry. Your circle is quote linked to geography and cultural upbringing deep-rooted and hundreds of years of written language in significant in developmental psychology. And trends in education today, unquote, the clockwise and counterclockwise patterns, probably come down to language Japanese and Chinese writing follows a strict stroke order with characters drawn from the top left in the direction of the bottom. Right. A nineteen eighty-five study showed that most people living in China druthers circles clockwise, possibly because of the clockwise strokes in semi cursive, Chinese calligraphy stroke order is so important in these countries, it can even signal your level of education on the flip side Americans are taught to draw shapes counterclockwise to prep their motor movements for what's called magic see letter formation as in the curve in the letters C G Q and oh test this out on your friends. And see what happens weirdly, my initials are c g and I just drew a circle, and I started at the bottom and did it clockwise. That's so weird. I know. Well, I I can't do it now because I'm too aware. I hope everyone knew drew a circle drew a circle before. I started talking if you dislike being cold as much as we do. Then you come to the right podcast because we have some tips from the world of physiology to help you understand how your body stays warm in the wintertime, or you know, whenever it's cold as reported by exercise physiologist, John Eric Smith for the conversation. Your blood does a lot of things while it's coursing through your body. It's carrying nutrients and oxygen and other important stuff. And it also brings heat produced in your muscles to your skin where it gets released when it gets cold around you your body moves blood to your torso to keep your vital organs warm at the same time. Your body sends less blood flow to your skin that means less heat makes it to your skin. Celeste heat gets lost here environment. This helps you hang on to your internal heat longer. You know, how you shiver and your teeth chatter when you get really cold that's because bodies cranking up your muscle activity to help you stay warm that movement actually helps you break down more nutrients to crank. Up your internal heat. People lose heat at different rates, depending on their body size body fat and metabolic activity to smaller people with less body, fat lose more heat than larger people with more body. Fat more muscle. Mass means more heat gets produced and more body fat works as an insulator. So there's less heat loss. So let's get into how you can stay warm, obviously, warm clothing as helpful like, a hat and coat and gloves. But believe it or not it's a myth that most of your heat escapes through your head. Remember how I said your blood rushes to your torso to keep in vital organs worm? Well, that's why a coat will do you a lot more good than hat. If you had to pick one of the other, you'll keep your limbs warmer. If you keep your torso warm since that'll help, you keep a steady blood flow something else, they can help you. Stay warm is being physically active doing jumping jacks or running around makes your muscles contract, which breaks down more nutrients, which dinner is extra heat, but layers of clothing and physical activity can tip the balance past what you need to offset heat loss. If that happens. Get an increase in body temperature. And your body will start sweating to try to cool down, and that's bad. Because then you'll deal with more heat laws when your sweat evaporates one more thing that can help you stay warm though, eating your body. Temperature will go up when your body is busy breaking down food. That's why if you go camping you may want to have a snack before bed. So you stay warmer while you sleep hope that helps us they warm this winter or next winter if it's warm wherever you are right now, we'll wrap up today with a trick to keep you from choking under pressure choking is the thing. Researchers have actually studied for years they've found that we perform better the more. We have to gain. But only up to a certain point when we have too much to gain. We tend to mess up. Even if we're doing something we do every day. In other words, we choke. You might get sweaty palms or even feel nauseous, but choking is mostly a mental affliction the potential reward or loss of reward distracts you from the task at hand and your performance level drops choking shows up on brain scans as heightened activity in the ventral. Stratum that's the part of your brain where you analyze risk and reward. So November twenty eighteen a team of researchers from the California Institute of technology published a study on how to change your thinking to stop from choking. They gave participants hand eye coordination tests, which came with rewards ranging from zero to a hundred dollars for successfully completing the challenge in some cases, researchers asked participants to reimagined their situation or use what's called cognitive reappraisal strategy. The reward structure didn't change, but they were told to imagine the reward amount in cash already sitting in their pocket as they perform the task, basically, they imagined they already had that reward and participants choked substantially less when they used this reappraisal trick than when they thought of themselves as striving for a prize MRI scans also showed that reappraisal reduced the amount of activity in that risk and reward focused ventral stratum. It's not a perfect fix reappraisal didn't prevent all choking. But for an easy purely mental shift. It was a surprisingly. Effective antidote. So the next time you're trying for a major reward whether it's the World Series or a lifetime supply of chicken nuggets. Just imagine. It's already yours. You're not trying to prove you deserve. Something new. You're just confirming you deserve. What you have in the first place. This ad free. Episode was brought to you by our patrons special. Thanks to Bob. Buckley, read and Emily for your support on patriot. We really appreciate it. You can support curiosity. Daily to my mom just did. She did just visit our patriotic page at patriotair dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out. No amount is too small. And we've got lots of cool bonus rewards to say thanks to our patrons. One more time. That's patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. Join us again tomorrow for the award winning curiosity daily. Learn something new in just a few minutes. I'm Cody gov, and I'm Ashley Hamer and stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network.

Google Japan China Westwood One California Institute Of Techno John Eric Smith Cody Gov Celeste BOB Ashley Hamer Buckley Emily Eighty Six Percent Hundred Dollars Eighty Percent Twenty Seconds
Is there a difference between weather and climate?

Curiosity Daily

08:08 min | 1 year ago

Is there a difference between weather and climate?

"Do you know the difference between the terms weather and climate? It's an important distinction. If you follow science news, and we've gotten a lot of questions about it lately. So today, I've got you covered as reported by the conversation weather, basically refers to stuff happening, right? This second like cloud, cover and temperature. You know, the day to day conditions of the atmosphere. Climate is a more macro view. It describes the average atmospheric conditions over many years. In fact, the World Meteorological Organization says that figuring out a climate record. Takes a minimum of thirty years of data. This includes things like average annual rainfall overall direction of the wind or what time of year, you're most likely to see snow. Here's. An analogy that might help. It comes from Jennifer Fitchet, who's a senior lecturer in physical geography at the university of the Witwatersand. The climate is like your wardrobe. You got a winter coat and scarf, or when it's cold flip flops in shorts for when it's warm and everything in between whether is the individual item of clothing you choose to wear you change what you wear from day to day. If it snowing you put on boots, and if it's really hot you might wear sandals. The thing is everyone in the world doesn't have the same wardrobe. If you live right on the equator, then you probably don't have a winter coat, and that brings us back to weather and climate the conditions in one place are different from the conditions far away from wherever you are. Here's what that means for how we can understand climate projections and climate forecasts the weather forecast, you see on TV or on your phones weather app is there to help you figure out what to wear on the other hand climate projections. Tell you what scientists think the climate will be in forty fifty maybe a hundred years climate projections are a war. Warning that we might want to change up our wardrobe. Maybe we won't need such heavy coats. And maybe it's a good time to pick up some shorts or umbrellas or raincoats. There's no need to switch up your whole wardrobe overnight. Just take your time look ahead and plan and adapt and hopefully stay dry a sect is a real astronomical unit of measurement with cool origins. Yes. It measures distance not time. Yes. The term was used improperly in the original Star Wars. Yes. I will. Absolutely get to that in a few minutes. No, Ashley, you're not getting out of this one. I love Star Wars that I'm cost played Star Wars character. This is true. Well, we're all gonna love stores by the end of this. Here's the deal. One person is a quivalent to three points to six late years. That's nineteen trillion miles or thirty one trillion kilometers, if that seems excessive that's because it absolutely is. But when it comes to measuring astronomically large distances between. Objects that are beyond our solar system. Excessively large is just right. I said beyond our solar system, by the way for you to travel one parcel from earth. You would have to go from here to the sun and back two hundred six thousand two hundred sixty five times, I told you it was big the word purse that comes from two words Pera lax and our second para lacks describes when an object's location seems to have changed because your location changed. Astronomers use para lax to judge the distance of object in the sky, if you know, how far the earth has moved and you can measure how far the object moved across its starry backdrop you can judge distance. You actually use parallel to judge the distance of things all the time. You're too is see the world from slightly different angles, and your brain crunches, the numbers to tell you how far away everything is from you. The second half of Parsi refers to an arc second in arc. Second is part of a measurement of an angle. You know, how a circle is three hundred sixty degrees. Imaginer standing with a full view of the horizon around you if you sliced the horizon into three hundred sixty degrees each degree would be about twice the width of the full moon divide one of those degrees into sixty pieces, and you get the width of an arc minute divide. One of those up by sixty again, and you get an arc second. Putting it all together. A par sec is the Pera lacks of one arc second. In other words, if an object in the sky moves by one arc second when the earth moves by one astronomical unit. Then the object is one par cycle way to put that in perspective. Proxima centauri is the star. That's our closest neighbor, and it's one point three par away for more perspective the millennium falcon made the kessel run in twelve par sex, and I'm sorry pedants. But before you go criticizing stores for this, quote, unquote mistake, I you need to understand what the kessel run actually is you'll feed skip forward thirty seconds or so if you can't handle my nerdiness in Star Wars, Ken. In the kessel run is a route used by smugglers to transport in illicit substance from minds on the planet kessel through a region of space that belongs to the galactic empire. So it's an illegal smuggling route. And this route includes a cluster of black holes known as the Ma as you know, the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. So when Hans solo said he made the kessel run in twelve par sex. He was referring to his daring knish and piloting skills and the sophisticated computer on the money on falcon that he was able to use to navigate close to those black holes while not getting sucked in I was aware of this reading books from the Star Wars expanded universe. And I was a kid, but thanks to Disney. They are no longer canon. But they also address this in the twentieth. Eighteen films solo Star Wars story, which I still have not seen. But they address all of this after the movie happened. Does doesn't matter doesn't make just made it up afterward to make that line? Okay. To work. No, still works. That is art. That's how you craft a story. I think this is the biggest debate we've ever had in this. The kessel run. Obviously makes Cody happy, you know, who else is happy by most metrics Scandinavians, the annual world happiness report consistently rates the Nordic countries of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Iceland among the top ten happiest nations. So today, we'll wrap up with some life philosophies from Nordic countries that might make you a little happier in your own life. I is hugging. The Danish concept of Hooda translates to something like coziness of the soul. It's the feeling you get when you're snuggled up under a blanket with a loved one drinking cocoa by the fire as a life philosophy. It's all about allowing yourself guilt free indulgences, especially when the world is dark and dreary anything from getting together with family and friends for a meal to spending time on your own reading a good book like from the Star Wars expanded universe to sand. The next philosophy is Logam logo is a Swedish word that roughly translates to just right or optimal. You probably heard the saying everything in moderation, including moderation. That's what logo is all about. Whether that's how much sugared add to a batch of cookies or how much of your life. You devote to your work. This philosophy urges a healthy balance. That doesn't swing too far in any direction and one other philosophy is see sue. It's a unique finish concept. That's about persisting through challenges until you reach the end the term roughly translates into English as a strength of will, determination perseverance and acting rationally in the face of adversity. It's not about courage in the moment. But the kind of courage that has to last over time after inspiration has sputtered out. And the real challenge has shown itself, you can read about these and other philosophies in our full right up on curiosity dot com and on our free curiosity app for Android an I o s but none of these pique your interest. Then you can always turn to fica. That's just another word for coffee break a new. Doesn't like coffee or breaks? Today's ad fiasco sewed was brought to you by our patrons special. Thanks to carry Greenwald. Anthony highland. Maximilian rate in Johnson and Julianne Gomez for your support on patriot. We really appreciate it. To learn more about how you can support curiosity daily, please. Visit patriarch dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out. Join us against Moore for the award-winning curiosity daily. And learn something new and just a few par sex. I'm Cody Goth, and I'm Ashley Hamer, stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network.

Kessel Ashley Hamer World Meteorological Organizat Cody Goth Westwood One Disney Jennifer Fitchet Senior Lecturer Witwatersand Greenwald Anthony Highland Proxima Hans Solo Moore Canon MA Logam
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Buds know best when it comes to judging the strength of your drinks. Then you might wanna think again, are you good at this? I mean, clearly, I'm not. But I mean, I feel like this is a really important thing for people to know. Because a lot of the time if you're drinking a drink, and you can't taste the hall, you're liable to drink way more than you should right. 'cause he think there can't be very much in here because I can't taste it. Right. But that's not true. Exactly. So studies done in the nineteen eighties showed that people can't really tell the difference between regular beer, light, beer and even non alcoholic beer. And in two thousand thirteen study showed that wine drinkers couldn't tell the difference in alcohol content in different wines, either. But let's focus on mixed drinks starting with a twenty fourteen study published in the journal alcoholism, clinical and experimental research. This study found that how well people can distinguish the strength of a cocktail depends on how much alcohol is in. It roughly sixty to seventy percent of volunteers could tell the difference between plain orange juice and orange juice with a splash of vodka and the same number could tell the difference between a pills ner with point five percent alcohol and a week. Gear with five percent alcohol. They were slightly worse at actually judging. How much alcohol was in each drink? But once the alcohol content started climbing people started failing only forty percent of volunteers could tell the difference between vodka and orange juice at forty percent alcohol by volume versus fifty percent. A twenty seventeen study found that called students couldn't do much better in that study less than sixty percent of all in tears could order vodka drinks from strongest to weakest on their I try and in a second experiment. So called super tasters were able to correctly rank the strength of sweep drinks, but not vodka tonics. When it comes to judging the strength of your drinks. Don't trust your taste buds. Instead take time between drinks to see how they're affecting you drinking water. In the meantime, if you keep a level head, you're more likely to make it a night to remember.

Ashley Hamer Westwood One forty percent five percent seventy percent fifty percent sixty percent
What is folie deux

Curiosity Daily

02:57 min | 1 year ago

What is folie deux

"You live with someone. It's common for a bug like a cold or flu to spread from one person to another, but mental illness believe it or not it's possible. Here's the scoop on the phenomenon it's technically called shared psychotic disorder. But is most famously known as fully ado, the first case of the condition was documented in the nineteenth century with a thirty something married. Couple named Margaret and Michael they shared a delusion that people were sneaking into their house at night spreading dust, dropping pieces of fluff and wearing down the souls of the couples shoes shared psychotic disorder. Most often affects people in very close relationships like married couples siblings, and parents and children. They're also usually socially isolated and a lot of the time. They have a pre existing mental illness. The condition has lots of different forms, but the most common and oldest known one is called fully impose AI or imposed madness. In that form, the more dominating person in the pair spreads his or her delusion to the more submissive person. And that person doesn't resist the ideas another version is called fully stimul- tahnee or simultaneous madness. That's where two people with deep connection both experienced the delusion at once luckily in most of these forms. The cure is simple just separate the two people when that doesn't work psychiatrists can resort to medication or electro convulsive therapy. But you know, what? We all tend to share mental eccentricities with others. And that's not always a bad thing as Esther Inglis Arkell of I o nine puts it quote. There are few old married couples who don't share eccentricities there are few families or even close friendships that don't require both people to work with various mental glitches of the other. We all go a little crazy for the other people in our lives unquote, commune just give Ashley round of applause for nailing. All this French pronunciations. Hey, I took French in high school I can't pronounce anything anymore, but I can sometimes understand it. And if we mispronounce something, please be gentle. We try our hardest. We do I can't at least guarantee that we spelled everything correctly. Enter full rate up on this on curiosity dot com and our curiosity app, Android NIO s that's all for today. But there's plenty more. You can learn about on curiosity dot com. This weekend this weekend. You'll learn about why you get pleasure from the misfortune of other people in ancient supernova that may have triggered a mass extinction on earth the humble that interesting origins of. Key lime pie the most addictive substances on the planet and more and don't forget to. Visit our Facebook page at Facebook dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out to see what Ashley and I were up to at the consumer electronic show unless Vegas this week. You can also find exclusive photos and videos of our trip on our patriarch page at patriotair dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out. Come hang out with us again Sunday on the award winning curiosity daily. And learn something new in just a few minutes. I'm Ashley Hamer, and I'm Cody gov. Have a great weekend and stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network.

Ashley Hamer Psychotic Disorder Facebook Esther Inglis Arkell Cold Westwood One Vegas Margaret Michael
What is the Peter principle?

Curiosity Daily

06:47 min | 1 year ago

What is the Peter principle?

"You you ever ever felt felt like like everyone everyone in in the the world world was was completely completely incompetent incompetent at at their their jobs? jobs? He He to to break break it it to to you. you. But But this this might. might. Actually, Actually, be be the the case. case. That's That's according according to to the the Peter Peter principle principle your your favorite favorite principle. principle. You You may may not not have have heard heard of of this this kind kind of of cynical cynical and and kind kind of of funny, funny, but but kind kind of of logically logically make make sense sense it it does. does. So So the the Peter Peter principle principle is is simple, simple, and and it's it's also also the the name name of of one one thousand thousand nine nine hundred hundred sixty sixty eight eight book book by by educational educational scholar. scholar. Dr Dr Laurence Laurence j j Peter Peter the the Peter Peter principle principle says says that that in in a a hierarchy hierarchy like like a a government government or or a a corporation corporation every every employee employee tends tends to to rise rise to to the the level level of of his his or or her her incompetence. incompetence. Here's Here's a a different different way. way. Dr Dr Peter Peter put put it it rather rather than than the the cream cream rising rising to to the the top top the the cream cream rises rises until until it it sours. sours. It It makes makes sense. sense. If If you're you're good good at at your your job. job. You'll You'll be be promoted promoted if if you're you're not not good good at at your your job, job, you you won't won't people people are are rarely rarely demoted demoted regardless regardless of of their their job job performance. performance. This This means means that that an an employee employee will will keep keep getting getting promoted promoted until until they they reach reach a a position position they're they're not not fit fit to to do. do. Well, Well, since since they they do do poorly poorly in in that that position. position. They They don't don't get get promoted promoted to to a a higher higher one. one. So So they're they're stuck stuck being being incompetent incompetent at at their their job. job. This This principle principle may may sound sound tongue tongue in in cheek, cheek, but but it it has has sinister sinister implications implications in in the the real real world world from from transit transit delays. delays. Internet Internet outages outages to to oil oil spills spills and and rocket rocket explosions. explosions. How How many many of of the the world's world's errors errors come come down down to to people people rising rising to to the the level level of of their their incompetence incompetence companies companies have have come come up up with with a a couple couple strategies strategies to to come come out? out? This This some some have have adopted adopted an an up up or or out out strategy strategy where where they they periodically periodically kind kind of of cleanse cleanse their their company company of of people people that that aren't aren't advancing advancing up up who who so so there's there's some some ways ways to to deal deal with with this. this. But But I I don't don't think think it'll it'll ever ever have have a a perfect perfect solution. solution. It It kind kind of of seems seems like like it's it's just just the the nature nature of of things, things, unfortunately. unfortunately. Yeah. Yeah. Before Before we we get get to to our our last last story. story. I I want want to to mention mention a a free free service service that that is is totally totally free. free. That's That's not not trying trying to to actually actually sell sell you you anything anything and and who who sponsored sponsored today's today's episode. episode. Yes. Yes. Today's Today's episode episode is is brought brought to to you you by by capterra. capterra. It's It's the the leading leading free free online online resource resource to to help help you you find find the the best best software software solution solution for for your your business. business. Seriously. Seriously. I I recently recently learned learned about about capterra. capterra. And And I I cannot cannot tell tell you you how how much much I I wish wish I I had had used used them them in in my my last last couple couple of of jobs. jobs. The The software software you you use use it it your your work work can can make make or or break break your your business. business. Think Think about about all all those. those. Clunky. Clunky. Workflow Workflow tools tools you've you've used used or or convoluted convoluted CRM's CRM's or or sub sub par par scheduling scheduling services. services. If If you're you're like like me me than than you you have have straight straight up up wasted wasted hours hours upon upon hours, hours, just just trudging trudging your your way way through through the the wrong wrong applications. applications. Capterra Capterra is is there there for for you you to to find find the the right right tools tools for for your your business. business. They They have have over over seven seven hundred hundred thousand thousand reviews reviews of of products products from from real real software software users users to to help help you you find find everything everything you you need need to to make make an an informed informed decision, decision, and and you you can can search search across across more more than than seven seven hundred hundred specific specific categories categories of of software software from from project project management management to to Email Email marketing marketing to to yoga yoga studio studio management management software. software. Seriously, Seriously, no no matter matter what what kind kind of of software software your your business business needs. needs. Capterra Capterra makes makes it it easy easy to to discover discover the the right right solution solution fast. fast. So So visit visit capterra capterra dot dot com com slash slash curiosity curiosity for for free free today today to to find find the the right right tools tools to to make make twenty twenty thousand thousand nine nine vegan vegan for for your your business. business. Capterra Capterra that's that's C C A A P P T T E E R R R R A A dot dot com com slash slash curiosity. curiosity. One One more more time time start start twenty twenty nineteen nineteen on on the the right right foot foot and and show. show. Her Her sponsor sponsor some some love love for for free free by by visiting. visiting. Capterra Capterra dot dot com com slash slash curiosity. curiosity. On On yesterday's yesterday's episode. episode. We We talked talked about about domesticated domesticated animals animals and and Ashley Ashley mentioned mentioned that that most. most. Fox's Fox's haven't haven't been been teamed. teamed. Well, Well, that's that's because because there there is is one one team team population population of of FOX's FOX's on on earth. earth. And And today, today, we we have have the the story story of of the the Russian Russian geneticists geneticists who who made made it it happen. happen. Although Although there's there's one one question question this this story story won't won't answer. answer. Ashley Ashley is is it. it. What What does does the the FOX FOX say say darn darn it? it? While While you you got got me me Dmitri Dmitri K K beleive beleive was was a a Russian Russian geneticist geneticist who who wanted wanted to to treat treat the the evolutionary evolutionary pathway pathway of of domesticated domesticated animals animals by by trying trying to to domesticate domesticate some some FOX's FOX's specifically specifically silver silver black. black. Fox's Fox's he he and and his his intern intern traveled traveled around around to to different different FOX FOX farms farms where where FOX's FOX's were were being being bred bred for for their their for for and and they they took took away. away. Fox's Fox's that that showed showed one one key key trait. trait. Friendliness Friendliness around around ten ten percent percent of of the the FOX FOX is is in in these these cages cages had had a a week week wild wild response. response. Meaning Meaning they they were were docile docile around around people. people. They They ended ended up up with with about about one one hundred hundred thirty thirty FOX's FOX's for for the the first first generation generation of of friendly. friendly. Fox's Fox's and and when when they they had had cubs cubs the the team team hand hand fed fed and and pet pet the the little little foxes foxes for for a a strictly strictly measured measured period period of of time. time. The The friendliest friendliest of of the the FOX's FOX's went went onto onto breed breed the the next next generation generation and and so so on on and and so so on on by by the the fourth fourth generation generation of of friendly, friendly, FOX FOX litters. litters. The The researchers researchers started started noticing noticing dramatic dramatic changes. changes. Fox's Fox's were were wagging wagging their their tails tails eagerly eagerly looking looking for for human human contact. contact. And And licking licking the the scientists scientists like like puppies. puppies. And And as as the the generations generations of of foxes foxes were were getting getting fend fend Lear Lear and and more more dog dog like like they they were were changing changing physically physically to to not not only only did did they they start start making making different different vocalisations vocalisations than than wild wild foxes. foxes. These These FOX's FOX's also also developed developed a a more more delicate delicate appearance appearance with with fob fob ears. ears. Why Why didn't didn't heads heads shorter shorter legs legs and and Kearlier Kearlier tails? tails? In In other other words, words, these these foxes foxes were were just just getting getting cuter. cuter. The The team team had had successfully successfully created created a a genetically genetically distinct distinct population population of of FOX's FOX's which which remains remains the the only only one one in in the the world. world. And And with with intensive intensive selective. selective. Beating Beating the the team team had had compressed compressed a a thousands thousands of of years years process. process. And And just just a a few few decades decades that that taught taught us us quite quite a a lesson lesson in in evolution. evolution. Remember Remember selection selection is is only only based based on on tame tame ability. ability. But But the the FOX's FOX's changed changed in in their their physiology, physiology, anatomy anatomy and and behavior. behavior. Oh, Oh, and and if if you you wanna wanna FOX FOX the the friendly, friendly, FOX FOX operation operation is is still still up up and and running running you you can can import import one one of of these these FOX's FOX's through through an an agency agency in in Florida Florida for for a a cool cool eight eight thousand thousand nine nine hundred hundred dollars dollars give give or or take. take. You You can can find find a a link link to to that that in in our our full full rate rate up up on on curiosities curiosities out out calm calm and and under under fee fee curiosity curiosity app app for for Android, Android, s s Mark Mark your your calendars calendars because because we've we've got got a a cool cool announcement announcement this this week week we're we're going going to to be be on on the the ground ground at at CAS, CAS, the the Consumer Consumer Electronics Electronics Show Show in in Las Las Vegas, Vegas, and and you you can can watch watch us us podcast podcast from from CAS CAS live live on on Facebook. Facebook. That's That's right. right. We'll We'll be be talking talking to to experts experts about about the the latest latest and and greatest greatest technology technology and and learning learning about about the the tech. tech. That That powers powers your your favorite favorite gadgets gadgets and and devices, devices, keep keep an an eye eye on on her her Facebook Facebook page, page, Thursday, Thursday, January January tenth tenth and and Friday Friday January January eleventh, eleventh, and and if if you you missed missed the the video video live live than than don't don't worry worry you'll you'll be be able able to to watch watch the the replay replay on on our our Facebook Facebook page page whenever whenever you you get get around around to to it. it. We're We're super super excited excited to to be be at at CAS CAS in in cooperation cooperation with with EM EM de de performance performance materials materials a a business business of of Merck. Merck. Darmstadt Darmstadt Germany, Germany, and and if if you're you're not not on on Facebook, Facebook, then then just just keep keep listening listening to to our our podcast podcast because because we'll we'll be be bringing bringing you you special special Saturday Saturday editions editions of of our our show show and and a a few few weeks weeks to to share share what what we we learned learned it it CAS CAS to to make make sure sure you you don't don't miss miss out out on on the the excitement. excitement. Stay Stay subscribes subscribes to to curiosity curiosity daily daily on on your your favorite favorite podcast podcast app app or or visitor. visitor. Facebook Facebook page page at at Facebook Facebook dot dot com com slash slash curiosity curiosity dot dot com. com. All All spelled spelled out out again. again. We'll We'll be be live live January January tenth tenth and and eleventh. eleventh. We We hope hope to to see see you you there. there. Join Join us us again again tomorrow tomorrow for for the the award award winning winning curiosity curiosity daily. daily. And And learn learn something something new new in in just just a a few few minutes. minutes. I'm I'm Ashley Ashley Hamer, Hamer, and and I'm I'm Cody Cody gov. gov. Stay Stay curious. curious. On On the the Westwood Westwood One One podcast podcast network. network.

FOX Capterra Capterra Facebook Peter Peter Capterra. Capterra Dr Dr Peter Peter Ashley Ashley Cas Cas Dr Dr Laurence Laurence J Merck Ashley Ashley Hamer Kearlier Kearlier Germany Westwood Westwood Lear Lear Dmitri Dmitri K K
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

graduate student Seligman Westwood One Ashley Hamer depression
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Today. You learn about what would happen if you could actually stop time, scientifically speaking, the incredible benefits of leaving your phone out of your bedroom and one of our favorite scientific discoveries of the year, a new world beyond Pluto. Let's discover some curiosity, you know, how some superheroes and super villains can stop time. Well, it turns out the real world effects of stopping time wouldn't be very practical. But there are pretty fun way. To learn about physics say I loved this article. Yeah. Me too. I loved writing it. I'm really big into time stopping because I played a lot of mega man to and I was little flash man is iconic. Really good music too. Yeah. Actually, you helps me with this article. 'cause I was like what's an example of a time where you stop time, and you're like mega man, I remember and then time stopped, and I thought to myself now is my chance. Anyway, good before we get into this. Let's define what we mean. By stopping time. We're talking about when you stop time for everything, but you of TV shows or movies where everything's frozen and a character walks around moving stuff, Adam Sandler and click Keanu Reeves in the matrix stuff. Like that will for the Stephen work you need to account for every molecule of fluid and air inside and outside of your body. If you're able to move around then we have to assume the molecules inside you can move around too. And if the air and the rest of the room stopped experiencing time, then every molecule would stay suspended precisely in the same location. So you wouldn't be able to move because you'd be trapped in a prison of air molecules. So let's say the time keeps flowing normally for the molecules near your body and beyond that time standstill. All right. Well, there's still a problem as you listen to this particles of light called photons are traveling at the speed of well, light, obviously into your eyes. You're also hearing this podcast at the speed of sound through. The air as pressure waves that eventually get your ears to vibrate. Your eardrums these stop time than all light and sound would stop to which might leave you instantly deaf and blind. Not super helpful, right? Okay. Let's say that any photons said it already been omitted from a source like a lightbulb your cell phone or the sun. Let's say that those photons got to keep traveling. Okay. Well, then you've got anywhere from a fraction of a second to a full eight minutes where you could still see, but we want unlimited time. So let's not stop it completely instead of stopping it. What if you slowed it to a crawl well that wouldn't work either? When he slowed down electromagnetic waves for light and pressure waves for sound you get waves of a lower frequency, but at a low frequency you'd hear sounds that dropped below the range of human hearing and light at a lower frequency moves into the infrared microwave and radio waves realm. So you wouldn't be able to see that either. In the end, maybe the ability to stop time is one of those superpowers in the. The be careful what you wish for category like reading thoughts and turning everything you touch into gold still who said science fiction can't help us. Learn about science today. Curiosity wrote about a new study, and we've got some really bad news. If you're a dicta- dear phone, oh, no participants in this study, you kept their smartphones out of the bedroom for one week showed a marks improvement in their happiness and overall quality of life. Wow. I'm not done. The also showed fewer signs of smartphone addiction, plus many of the participants reported that they slept better experienced less anxiety and improve their relationships more than ninety percent of the participants. Who did this said they might keep it up? I can't imagine being a person that would say they'd keep it up because I can't imagine being in person that would even do that. Okay. So I do have a suggestion for breaking the habit. Okay. And I learned in college that when you change a habit you have to replace it with something. Right. So you can't just stop doing a thing without replacing it with. Sure, obviously, you can swap out your phone for a book. It turns out that when you sleep after you learn something new you're able to remember it better later anyway. So if you're reading nonfiction book or a philosophy book, then you're gonna process that more, which is really cool. Here's another life hack on a more personal level my wife realizes the I'm really into gadgets. So like, I like Nintendo switch, and I like, my gaming PC's, and I just like techy stuff. So she got me an e reader she got me a kindle now. I've got a gadget I can bring the bed. Right. But at the same time also reading a book, so it's kind of like cheating. So if you at home are sleeping with someone. Who's tech obsessed like me, then get them in ear, and it'll even let you read in the dark, depending on the model like if it's got a back light, just don't use a tablet anything that emits blue light will actually disturb your sleep rights or there's a couple of suggestions. Do you have any reader? I don't you know, I've been wanting to read more books, and I use my phone too much. It seems like a simple fix all do it. I'm saying it right now on the podcast. I'm going to leave my phone out of my room when I sleep for the next week. I will check back in a week or two. All right. Today's episode is sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Everyone knows about the risks of driving drunk. You get in a crash people would get hurt or killed. But let's take a moment to look at some surprising statistics almost twenty nine people in the United States die every day in alcohol, impaired vehicle crashes. That's one person every fifty minutes. Even though drunk driving fatalities have fallen by a third in the last three decades drunk driving crashes still claim more than ten thousand lives each year drunk driving can have a big impact on your wallet to you could get arrested and encourage huge legal expenses. For example, you could possibly even lose your job. So what can you do to prevent drunk driving plant a safe ride home before you start drinking designate, a sober driver or call a taxi if someone you know has been drinking take their keys at arranged for them to get sober ride home. We all know the consequences of driving drunk, but one thing is for sure you're wrong. If you think it's no big deal. Drive sober or get pulled over. Astronomers have just discovered a new planet beyond Pluto, really not burying the lead hero we. Nope. This discovery hasn't been published in a peer reviewed journal yet. But the astronaut journal is considering the paper submission that talks about this discovery. And we found this planet by accident when we're looking for a different planet. So let's back up in two thousand sixteen. Astronomers got the idea that there might be a planet about as big as Neptune somewhere far away in our solar system. They call this world planet nine and astronomers all over have been looking for it. Nobody's found it yet. But it's probably worth remembering that spaces, you know, kind of big. So it might take years and years of searching before we confirm that planet nine exists. And in the meantime, we've found another tiny world out there. It's officially called twenty fifteen t g three eight seven, but astronomers took the T G part and ran with it. So they gave it the nickname. The goblin. The goblin is a dwarf planet that orbits the sun eighty times further away than earth one trip around the sun on the goblin would take about forty thousand years that's one long year. I mean, the last time the goblin was where it is now in its pather on the sun, we hadn't even invented civilization, let alone telescopes or spacecraft, but check this out even though we didn't find planet nine the goblin might tell us a lot about our solar system a straw. Owners ransom simulations of the goblin while assuming a planet the size of Neptune or a super earth was also out there long story short. It looks like if planet nine did exist than it actually shepherded the goblin along its orbit, in fact, planet nines gravitational influence might keep a bunch of distant worlds far away from it. Would you avoid the chance of a nasty collision? And here's another cool thing. There are other dwarf planets in the zone where we found the goblin these little worlds all travel in their own zone far away from the main massive our solar system where you find the eight planets closest to the sun that you know, in love taken together at the orbits of these dwarf worlds. Could be a powerful argument that planet nine is a real thing. Now, again, the planet's discovery is still waiting for peer review, but it could have big implications. And it's a good reminder that space is pretty big. So don't ever feel like looking up at the skies a waste of time unless you're staring at the sun don't do that to these stories and more on curiosity dot com to in this again Sunday as we recap a few. More of your favorite stories as part of our countdown to the new year on the award winning curiosity daily. I'm Ashley Hamer. I'm Cody gov. Stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast

Ashley Hamer Westwood One forty thousand years
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Drunk driving can have a big impact on your wallet to you could get arrested and encourage huge legal expenses. For example, you could possibly even lose your job. So what can you do to prevent drunk driving plant a safe ride home before you start drinking designate, a sober driver or call a taxi if someone you know has been drinking take their keys at arranged for them to get sober ride home. We all know the consequences of driving drunk, but one thing is for sure you're wrong. If you think it's no big deal. Drive sober or get pulled over. Astronomers have just discovered a new planet beyond Pluto, really not burying the lead hero we. Nope. This discovery hasn't been published in a peer reviewed journal yet. But the astronaut journal is considering the paper submission that talks about this discovery. And we found this planet by accident when we're looking for a different planet. So let's back up in two thousand sixteen. Astronomers got the idea that there might be a planet about as big as Neptune somewhere far away in our solar system. They call this world planet nine and astronomers all over have been looking for it. Nobody's found it yet. But it's probably worth remembering that spaces, you know, kind of big. So it might take years and years of searching before we confirm that planet nine exists. And in the meantime, we've found another tiny world out there. It's officially called twenty fifteen t g three eight seven, but astronomers took the T G part and ran with it. So they gave it the nickname. The goblin. The goblin is a dwarf planet that orbits the sun eighty times further away than earth one trip around the sun on the goblin would take about forty thousand years that's one long year. I mean, the last time the goblin was where it is now in its pather on the sun, we hadn't even invented civilization, let alone telescopes or spacecraft, but check this out even though we didn't find planet nine the goblin might tell us a lot about our solar system a straw. Owners ransom simulations of the goblin while assuming a planet the size of Neptune or a super earth was also out there long story short. It looks like if planet nine did exist than it actually shepherded the goblin along its orbit, in fact, planet nines gravitational influence might keep a bunch of distant worlds far away from it. Would you avoid the chance of a nasty collision? And here's another cool thing. There are other dwarf planets in the zone where we found the goblin these little worlds all travel in their own zone far away from the main massive our solar system where you find the eight planets closest to the sun that you know, in love taken together at the orbits of these dwarf worlds. Could be a powerful argument that planet nine is a real thing. Now, again, the planet's discovery is still waiting for peer review, but it could have big implications. And it's a good reminder that space is pretty big. So don't ever feel like looking up at the skies a waste of time unless you're staring at the sun don't do that to these stories and more on curiosity dot com to in this again Sunday as we recap a few. More of your favorite stories as part of our countdown to the new year on the award winning curiosity daily. I'm Ashley Hamer. I'm Cody gov. Stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network.

Ashley Hamer Westwood One forty thousand years
Incredible Benefits of Leaving Your Phone Out of Your Bedroom, Stopping Time

Curiosity Daily

08:35 min | 1 year ago

Incredible Benefits of Leaving Your Phone Out of Your Bedroom, Stopping Time

"Today. You learn about what would happen if you could actually stop time, scientifically speaking, the incredible benefits of leaving your phone out of your bedroom and one of our favorite scientific discoveries of the year, a new world beyond Pluto. Let's discover some curiosity, you know, how some superheroes and super villains can stop time. Well, it turns out the real world effects of stopping time wouldn't be very practical. But there are pretty fun way. To learn about physics say I loved this article. Yeah. Me too. I loved writing it. I'm really big into time stopping because I played a lot of mega man to and I was little flash man is iconic. Really good music too. Yeah. Actually, you helps me with this article. 'cause I was like what's an example of a time where you stop time, and you're like mega man, I remember and then time stopped, and I thought to myself now is my chance. Anyway, good before we get into this. Let's define what we mean. By stopping time. We're talking about when you stop time for everything, but you of TV shows or movies where everything's frozen and a character walks around moving stuff, Adam Sandler and click Keanu Reeves in the matrix stuff. Like that will for the Stephen work you need to account for every molecule of fluid and air inside and outside of your body. If you're able to move around then we have to assume the molecules inside you can move around too. And if the air and the rest of the room stopped experiencing time, then every molecule would stay suspended precisely in the same location. So you wouldn't be able to move because you'd be trapped in a prison of air molecules. So let's say the time keeps flowing normally for the molecules near your body and beyond that time standstill. All right. Well, there's still a problem as you listen to this particles of light called photons are traveling at the speed of well, light, obviously into your eyes. You're also hearing this podcast at the speed of sound through. The air as pressure waves that eventually get your ears to vibrate. Your eardrums these stop time than all light and sound would stop to which might leave you instantly deaf and blind. Not super helpful, right? Okay. Let's say that any photons said it already been omitted from a source like a lightbulb your cell phone or the sun. Let's say that those photons got to keep traveling. Okay. Well, then you've got anywhere from a fraction of a second to a full eight minutes where you could still see, but we want unlimited time. So let's not stop it completely instead of stopping it. What if you slowed it to a crawl well that wouldn't work either? When he slowed down electromagnetic waves for light and pressure waves for sound you get waves of a lower frequency, but at a low frequency you'd hear sounds that dropped below the range of human hearing and light at a lower frequency moves into the infrared microwave and radio waves realm. So you wouldn't be able to see that either. In the end, maybe the ability to stop time is one of those superpowers in the. The be careful what you wish for category like reading thoughts and turning everything you touch into gold still who said science fiction can't help us. Learn about science today. Curiosity wrote about a new study, and we've got some really bad news. If you're a dicta- dear phone, oh, no participants in this study, you kept their smartphones out of the bedroom for one week showed a marks improvement in their happiness and overall quality of life. Wow. I'm not done. The also showed fewer signs of smartphone addiction, plus many of the participants reported that they slept better experienced less anxiety and improve their relationships more than ninety percent of the participants. Who did this said they might keep it up? I can't imagine being a person that would say they'd keep it up because I can't imagine being in person that would even do that. Okay. So I do have a suggestion for breaking the habit. Okay. And I learned in college that when you change a habit you have to replace it with something. Right. So you can't just stop doing a thing without replacing it with. Sure, obviously, you can swap out your phone for a book. It turns out that when you sleep after you learn something new you're able to remember it better later anyway. So if you're reading nonfiction book or a philosophy book, then you're gonna process that more, which is really cool. Here's another life hack on a more personal level my wife realizes the I'm really into gadgets. So like, I like Nintendo switch, and I like, my gaming PC's, and I just like techy stuff. So she got me an e reader she got me a kindle now. I've got a gadget I can bring the bed. Right. But at the same time also reading a book, so it's kind of like cheating. So if you at home are sleeping with someone. Who's tech obsessed like me, then get them in ear, and it'll even let you read in the dark, depending on the model like if it's got a back light, just don't use a tablet anything that emits blue light will actually disturb your sleep rights or there's a couple of suggestions. Do you have any reader? I don't you know, I've been wanting to read more books, and I use my phone too much. It seems like a simple fix all do it. I'm saying it right now on the podcast. I'm going to leave my phone out of my room when I sleep for the next week. I will check back in a week or two. All right. Today's episode is sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Everyone knows about the risks of driving drunk. You get in a crash people would get hurt or killed. But let's take a moment to look at some surprising statistics almost twenty nine people in the United States die every day in alcohol, impaired vehicle crashes. That's one person every fifty minutes. Even though drunk driving fatalities have fallen by a third in the last three decades drunk driving crashes still claim more than ten thousand lives each year drunk driving can have a big impact on your wallet to you could get arrested and encourage huge legal expenses. For example, you could possibly even lose your job. So what can you do to prevent drunk driving plant a safe ride home before you start drinking designate, a sober driver or call a taxi if someone you know has been drinking take their keys at arranged for them to get sober ride home. We all know the consequences of driving drunk, but one thing is for sure you're wrong. If you think it's no big deal. Drive sober or get pulled over. Astronomers have just discovered a new planet beyond Pluto, really not burying the lead hero we. Nope. This discovery hasn't been published in a peer reviewed journal yet. But the astronaut journal is considering the paper submission that talks about this discovery. And we found this planet by accident when we're looking for a different planet. So let's back up in two thousand sixteen. Astronomers got the idea that there might be a planet about as big as Neptune somewhere far away in our solar system. They call this world planet nine and astronomers all over have been looking for it. Nobody's found it yet. But it's probably worth remembering that spaces, you know, kind of big. So it might take years and years of searching before we confirm that planet nine exists. And in the meantime, we've found another tiny world out there. It's officially called twenty fifteen t g three eight seven, but astronomers took the T G part and ran with it. So they gave it the nickname. The goblin. The goblin is a dwarf planet that orbits the sun eighty times further away than earth one trip around the sun on the goblin would take about forty thousand years that's one long year. I mean, the last time the goblin was where it is now in its pather on the sun, we hadn't even invented civilization, let alone telescopes or spacecraft, but check this out even though we didn't find planet nine the goblin might tell us a lot about our solar system a straw. Owners ransom simulations of the goblin while assuming a planet the size of Neptune or a super earth was also out there long story short. It looks like if planet nine did exist than it actually shepherded the goblin along its orbit, in fact, planet nines gravitational influence might keep a bunch of distant worlds far away from it. Would you avoid the chance of a nasty collision? And here's another cool thing. There are other dwarf planets in the zone where we found the goblin these little worlds all travel in their own zone far away from the main massive our solar system where you find the eight planets closest to the sun that you know, in love taken together at the orbits of these dwarf worlds. Could be a powerful argument that planet nine is a real thing. Now, again, the planet's discovery is still waiting for peer review, but it could have big implications. And it's a good reminder that space is pretty big. So don't ever feel like looking up at the skies a waste of time unless you're staring at the sun don't do that to these stories and more on curiosity dot com to in this again Sunday as we recap a few. More of your favorite stories as part of our countdown to the new year on the award winning curiosity daily. I'm Ashley Hamer. I'm Cody gov. Stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast

Stephen Nintendo Adam Sandler United States Westwood One Ashley Hamer Keanu Reeves Forty Thousand Years Ninety Percent Eight Minutes Fifty Minutes Three Decades One Week
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Com and on the curiosity app for Android us. But let me paint a picture in the theater of your mind right now, a spec the size of a pencil eraser travelling at orbital velocity can punch a hole in a chunk of aluminum and the whole would be five inches deep. That is very dangerous. And it's not just a straight whole like if you drilled a hole in the wall. It leaves a small crater. This was from an object that only weighed about half an ounce, and it punched a five inch deep crater in solid aluminum tiny trash orbit can be so destructive because in order to keep from falling to the ground. It has to be orbiting at about seventeen and a half thousand miles per hour. And while this aluminum damage was just a simulation. This kind of stuff isn't completely hypothetical in two thousand sixteen a paint. Chip left a spider web crack in one of the windows of the international space station and that same year, the European Space Agency's sentinel one a satellite was hit by a millimeter sized chunk that left ident one hundred times bigger than itself. The big pieces of junk can be tracked and orbiting satellites can be moved to higher or lower orbits to avoid them. But the small pieces like flecks of paint and other articles less than four inches in size are a lot harder to track. We've just got to make a best guess for them in planning Cordingley. But this kind of danger makes a heck of a case for the universe's. I trash collector read about today's stories and more on curiosity dot com. Tomorrow for the award winning curiosity daily. And then something new in just a few minutes. I'm Cody gone, and I'm Ashley Hamer, stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network..

European Space Agency Westwood One Ashley Hamer Cordingley Cody Chip five inches four inches five inch
"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"According to a recent study, the center of the earth must be younger than its surface. Like by a lot ready for some physics. Am I going to take a journey to the center of the earth? So I you need to understand time. Dilation? That's the result of Einstein's theory of relativity that makes gravity distort time in the nineteen sixties legendary physicist Richard Feynman said the because of time dilation, quote, the center of the earth should be a day or two younger than the surface, unquote. Well in two thousand sixteen a team of Danish physicists decided they should probably check that math. They performed a back of the envelope. Calculation and found that due to the effects of physics and not say geological processes the earth's core is in. Act two and a half years younger than its surface. This isn't just a mathematical abstraction time dilation actually affects things you use every day take keep ES maps, for example, GPS satellites orbit the earth at twelve and a half thousand miles up which is way further out in earth, gravity. Well, then everything on its surface. Is that means that time moves faster for GPS satellites than it does for clocks here on earth, the one snag in this factoid is that satellites are also moving at eight thousand six hundred seventy miles per hour. And acceleration slows down that means time isn't as fast for satellites as it would be if they were stationary, but these two effects don't completely cancel each other out gravity has a bigger effect on the satellites than speed does as a result clocks on GPS satellites run a few nanoseconds slower than clocks here on earth and get this. We can also see the effect in humans astronaut Scott Kelly came back to earth younger than his twin. He spent eleven months aboard the international. Space station, and because the ISS moves so fast around the earth that shaved thirteen milliseconds off of his earth age in the process. So the earth's core got younger because of gravity, but an astronaut got younger because of speed physics is wild. If you wanna live longer start digging really fast kind of ironic when you think about it read about today's stories and more on curiosity dot com. Join us again tomorrow for the award winning curiosity daily and learn something new in just a few minutes. I'm Ashley Hamer. I'm Cody gov. Stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network..

Ashley Hamer Richard Feynman Westwood One Scott Kelly physicist ISS Einstein eleven months
"ashley hamer" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"ashley hamer" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Westwood one podcast network the curiosity podcast cody gov and ashley hamer as we sit down with crack to talk tv rick and morty is a funny very entertaining show about the pursuit of meaning perhaps the futile pursuit of meaning you're gonna see satirical points in south park that can't come up in most media and hollywood a curiosity podcast subscribe and download free on apple podcasts and google play from the westwood one podcast network everyone's listening we now continue with murph and mac on cayenne biard six eight moment well there you go and it was some ramones see if the giants can do something tonight with mac williamson warriors just being eastleigh leone right now there's no emotion there's just decisions being made games being one joyce dude i'll make an i'm talking big now in the middle of april but i'd like to get down there i'd like this i've never seen a game or any other event for that matter at the old la calcium and i'd like to like set foot in that joint at least once your boy move out of their your boy murph's had some rough days in their murph i like the october fifth granted it's a road game it's also a night game is at the thursday the green bay sunday night monday night.

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