35 Burst results for "Asher"

Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 08

Daily Dose Football

07:21 min | 4 months ago

Is Tutu Atwell Too Small to Succeed in the NFL? - burst 08

"Now to god. The i know that you are extremely enthusiastic about Terrence marshall going to the panthers. Twenty seven th pick of the second round just a few picks after escorts from lsu tears marshall to the panthers. What are your thoughts on this cal. I'll pick it a fantastic lang spot. you know. I think i was super high on marshall. Probably highest of just about anybody in the industry All all college season. And all you know predrag and my my enthusiasm is not where one bit. I love the landing spot where some people might be turned off on it You know I know that he is not maybe going to be immediately. Be the number. One with robby anderson and with dj more there. But i think he's going to have a clear role from day one because if you look at his body type and how profiles ios not just a big bodied receiver he also is a a burner to i mean he is true burner and You know high jump. High catch radius any any provides the wide receivers did not do as your which was give a teddy bridgewater. Now is going to be darnold. But they didn't have anybody to score in the red zone. You know everything. They they scored was from like you know deeper out or the the running backs the mike davis or you know. But they really didn't have anybody in the red zone that they could produce. So i think marshall steps in right away and could be. I bet he has a real legitimate chance at leading all rookies in in receiving touchdowns ex year. So you know it's somebody that i like. As far as a talent. I think he can easier to age. Well in that offense because He is going back with his former college coach. Now the head coach of the of the panthers. So i think that this guy drafted him whereas he might have fallen a little bit in. Nfl draft because there was a little bit uncertainty right before the draft about some of his medical history. I don't think coach takes them at high if he has any type about about the about his foot injury so i think that this is going to be the guy that's going to be all help you. Now you're gonna have some flashes. He's going to be probably inconsistent. Probably a lot like a like. I kind of value him a lot. Like the where i had claypool asher whereas i kind of knew that there was going to be a lot of competition for targets but i knew that there was gonna be a lot of upset especially if somebody gets hurt And i just think that there's gonna be a lotta touchdown and he's a big guy when people start really understanding how much of a freak athlete is. Don't be surprised if this guy is being compared as maybe even number one wide receiver in this class next year. That's that's how upside. i see you know. I do think chases a better prospect but you know they were on the same team and You know even on the team with jefferson and chase He marshall was extremely valuable piece of their natural shape team. I mean he. I think he had like fourteen touchdowns or something you know. And he had costa twenty yard per catch average on the team. I mean he he really is a tremendous player and then when those two guys left last year you know he played over about a. I don't know about six or seven seven games. you opted out. And he averaged one hundred and fifteen dollars. You're talking about more leading devante smith. It was really. I believe tears marshall who bleeding the country in yards per game you know before he opted out and he also was averaging close to two touchdowns a game you know and this same competition is all those. Stc guy so. I just liked body. I can't i hate to sound like a broken record. But i really do like big receivers. It's not the smaller wide. Receivers can't thrive in that bayer wide receivers don't bust. I just think that when you historically look at all the body types of players that are generally over six foot in there like over two hundred pounds to twenty six. I'd say two to twenty is about the average. You know we get the top hand wide receiver fantasy for fancy standpoint every year. That's probably about the average. So i like my guys. That profile big catch raises. So i just feel like they're more consistent with a when when you get that's capable of being a possession receiver getting first downs and touchdowns. I i like their consistency versus having a field stretcher. We might put up forty points in a game lake. You kyle i am. I am feeling good about carrots. Marshall and about what he's gonna do in his nfl career. The only hold back that. I have with taras marshall and again this could be viewed as a positive based on what i'm going to say in a second is so terrorist marshall hops into offense with dj more lobbying said in christian. Mccaffrey already there. So you're already looking at the possibility of being the fourth target there in carolina which i deal and add that to the fact that sam darnold who i think everyone considers at this point to be in the bottom. Half of the starting quarterbacks is throwing the ball to terrence. Marshall this is this is clearly not ideal so short term. There are some concerns. I do think like you that he's going to be great in the red zone. Short term era. You're gotta be thinking while sam. Donna already has connected to robinson clearly. The carolina organization views. Dj moore's or number receiver cj. Metcalf a christian mccaffrey a year a year ago. He broke the record for the most receptions for running back in a single season ever. She has to view him almost as a receiver. At this point with the matt of receptions which is insane that he's getting one hundred receptions i think it was a year or two ago so that that's not ideal but dynasty football dicey football so not necessarily great redraft person. In my opinion but dynasty football is about the long game and the long game. I see in the long game i see turns marshall absolutely thriving because we don't know a five we anderson's gonna be in carolina long-term. We don't know what the scenario is going to be with. Sam darnold or with christian mccaffrey. Dj more but we know the is one of the best receivers in this class in. He is talented enough will were at some point career. He will get an opportunity probably sooner rather than later if not this year to really showcase what he can do and he has the talent to be a number one receiver. I love his size. I loved as a big bodied receiver. That's a great fan a red zone. There are a lot of good things about terrence marshall and so what i was saying earlier is the fact that not going to be good in the short term is almost a positive here for you as a dynasty are because now we're seeing him fall to the third fourth fifth round pick of the second round which is lower than it should be gone if anything. This guy should be going at the back half of the first half so now because the term concern that comes with marshall. Now you're gonna be able to go up there and gets terrorist marshall and you're not gonna have to reach from either he's probably just gonna fall right in your laps and you're gonna walk is one of the biggest winners in your dynasty graphs. Because here's a guy that has a potential to be a top five receiver in this

Robby Anderson Mike Davis One Bit Day One The Panthers ONE Marshall Panthers Terrence Marshall Claypool Asher LSU NFL Taras Marshall Sam Darnold Dj Moore Carolina Jefferson Chase
How To Manage Stress, And Adapt To Change

The Daily Meditation Podcast

05:36 min | 8 months ago

How To Manage Stress, And Adapt To Change

"This is episode two thousand two hundred and twenty. Six of the daily meditation podcast. I'm mary medically and welcome back to dave five. We are mid week in our series. And i wonder how you're doing with your quest this week if you're new here every week we do a challenge where you go on a quest to take you a little more deeply into today's theme well on day five of our theme to manage stress triggers. You're going to be guided in a meditation to focus on one of the biggest stress triggers out there and that is how to manage stress from job loss or loss of any status. Having to do with how you view your self image so this could even do with a volunteer position or a few go to school not participating in a sport or activity or something where you gain a lot of value and a source of your identity so your challenge is to look for the opportunities in regard to stress. There's usually a hidden silver lining that. I'd you may not notice right away because you could be so absorbed in managing your stress but in hindsight when the dust settles you can usually find opportunities. That weren't there before even if you had to learn a hard lesson you've gained so much value. And that makes you a little wiser and it also usually requires you to reach out for additional resources that you may not have had previous to the particular stress you're experiencing today with the corona virus. Many people have changed the way they work. Or if you're a student out there the way you go to school you might not be able to go to the meetings where people looked up to you or take part in sport where you stood out and you gain so much value from being on a team. Many of you have reached out to let me know you feel like you're going through a bit of an identity crisis. I want to share a message from my fellow meditators. This is from kim who's reaching out from baton rouge louisiana and kim says that she is stuck at home. She says that even though many people tell her how lucky she is that she's able to finally work from home. She feels like it's a big loss in her life. She says when. I wake up in the morning. I don't feel that same urge to get up and start my day. I feel a sense of drag feeling stuck at my makeshift desk in my home. I miss seeing my colleagues. I even miss things such as the rickety chair at work and the coffee maker. that never worked correctly. I miss connecting with people. I realize how much of a sense of identity. I gained from simply being in a different location. I felt like when i would go to work. That i was up to something important that i had a mission that i mattered. And now i feel like i live in the shadows. Thank you so much. Kim for your honesty for sharing your heart in this message. I think we all feel a little like we're living in the shadows because we're trying to be so careful with the coronavirus. I take a walk at least once a day. Where i live and i was just noticing the other day how it now seems normal to see someone approaching and to distance myself as far as i can from the person so this is definitely a different way of life that we're living and even if we're out there among people were still most of us being careful trying to distance ourselves as best as we can. So that's what this episode is all about and asher guided in today's meditation. I'm going to guide you to feel a sense of opportunity or freedom if you're experiencing a loss of status or a sense of feeling as though you're not able to be fully who you are so as you get ready to settle yourself down and meditate set up street and closure is

KIM Dave Baton Rouge Louisiana Asher
Families of Negro Leaguers rejoice in MLB's decision to recognize league

ESPN Daily

05:48 min | 10 months ago

Families of Negro Leaguers rejoice in MLB's decision to recognize league

"On wednesday. Mlb announced that it was quote unquote elevating negro leaguers. Two major league status within its official historical record which helps explain why google searches for the name. Josh gibson suddenly started spiking. Baseball says it's figuring out how to include negro leagues statistics into its canon of sacred numbers. And there is no resume quite as legendary or as mythical as that of the late josh gibson. The catcher that satchel page once unambiguously deemed the greatest hitter. Who ever lived. So i called up shawn gibson. Josh's great grandson and the executive director of the josh gibson foundation to understand what mlb's decision to elevate his great grandfather means to him. Well first of all. I don't like the word elevating. I think it should be more of a merger because niggly baseball player or major league players as well. So that's first and foremost this. And i want to bid tuesday night as josh gibson's greg grants and i woke up as josh jacobs. His grandson asher to cerebral calls questions about this happened. Literally when people say happen literally overnight it literally happened overnight and to wake up and see that in lobby made the announcement and josh gibson. Now what we consider not just one greatest league baseball players he. He'll be considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time and so for us in our family. It's a great honor. Ona understand josh. What you heard growing up from family from friends about how your great grandfather considered his own career compared to those who had the opportunity who were afforded that opportunity to play in the majors for jars. You know and the other great negro baseball players you know. They knew they were great players. They didn't even know by to tell him that it was just a decision At that time it was in that era. that kennesaw mountain land is denied the opportunity to play in the majors but did not stop him. They barnstorm against a lot of white baseball players. And you know as well as we know. I know is that a lotta times. They beat the white ball players in. So that's something right there. And so when i totally stories just in our family. There's we call josh gibson big josh. 'cause josh gibson junior of course is the sense that you can't say jockey get confused. I wanted to ask you about one of big joshes more famous nicknames. He was called very famously. The black babe. When you hear that sean about your great grandfather how does that make you feel you know. Let's say this bridge. Stevens bakers great grandson. He's one of my good friends. We go back and forth back and forth on this all the time. I didn't know that okay. Tell me about your relationship with him. And what you guys talk about on this regard. That's great so burn. Stevens is bait roof. Great grandson and so we always talked about. You know josh gibson's compared to my grandfather. And i'm like well that's what you but if you ask me about. Bay roof is a white josh gibson. So we go back and forth. Is we always say our people always say Yankee stadium was called the house. Ruth bill in ice t's brent are okay but who hit the furthest home running stadio i give them on that one. Well i mean. I want to even push that. Story further sean. Because i grew up going yankee stadium. He's the only human being to ever hit a fair ball out of the park out of the house. That babe ruth ledley built. I don't want to rub it in his face to. I don't go that far. I just say the furthest rebel. We all know he headed out. The ballpark. we know is over near babe. Ruth kane close no all seriously. I've heard several stories two different stories. I heard it. It's out of the ballpark. Been a heard from some players that hit like the top tier of moammar. So you wrote a piece of the undefeated in august about your grandfather's name being on the mvp trophy. And that may have been unthinkable at one point but now it does feel like there could be momentum towards that. Why is this important to you and your family. Then the peak kinda fell on our lap on. This happened to read an article about terry pendleton barry. Larkin and mike schmidt. Making a case to remove kennesaw Mountains landers name off the mvp award and it gets to okay. Well here at a names that they're considering replacing the name with in his frank robinson branch rickey and go shoot josh gifts literally again on the phone with my board directors. I said listen. We just found herself in a race. Let's see how we can win it so for us. I'm hoping that the vwa taking consideration of this and really think twice when they make a decision to rename this after josh gibson but this mvp war if this may not. The jaw is just about josh gibson. This will carry on the legacy of all the other great players as well. Who were denied the opportunity. So josh gibson is carrying several thousand players on his shoulders but his vp award the page. Family the buck leonard. Cool up a bail family. Turkey stars fan oscar charleston. Family all great players will all celebrate. It'll be named after josh. But every time i speak about this i'll make sure represent all the family members who were denied the opportunity

Josh Gibson Baseball Shawn Gibson Josh Gibson Foundation Josh Jacobs Josh Satchel Kennesaw Mountain Bay Roof Yankee Stadium Stevens ONA Asher Ruth Bill Major League Sean Ruth Ledley Ruth Kane Google
"asher" Discussed on The Knife Junkie Podcast

The Knife Junkie Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"asher" Discussed on The Knife Junkie Podcast

"And we went for a hike I wanted to try it out I- baton tree. It was still sharp I mean still split hairs you know. So I was happy that DC fifty three. I've never heard of DC fifty three. Yeah. I wasn't too familiar with when I when I first saw it either but after reading up on it. I decided to take a risk on it. It's like a step up from tune has finer. The grains are finer seeking at a finer edge and it holds just as long if if not longer of Nejd than we do and it's just easier chartered. So that was always my Gripe v two is can never get a sharp enough now you could. Get a great cutting edge. Now, it'll cut all day long keep that edge, but I can never get it make actually for see I. Love I love sharpening that. A. You can get light a razor scalpels and you know I don't mind touching up late you're in there Yeah. That's why I went with it worked out because I do like it a lot I mean it's it's a nice laid deal and there's not much of it either I mean there's not much out there. Yeah. No no I haven't. I haven't heard much of it, but there are lots of different blades deals. Recently wwl suddenly started hearing about that. Yeah. So so Asher knives, where do you see yourself going with this? Is this going to be a family company is is your son? A high. So tell tell me where you see the the company.

Asher Nejd
An Experimental COVID-19 Vaccine Begins Human Clinical Trials

The Bio Report

05:34 min | 1 year ago

An Experimental COVID-19 Vaccine Begins Human Clinical Trials

"May May Peter Thanks for joining us. Great to be any pleasure. We're GONNA talk about Kovacs Peptide vaccines and the company's efforts to develop a vaccine for covid Nineteen Kovacs is a division of United Biomedical which has long produce. Vaccines May maybe you can begin by just talking about how Kovacs came about. He Asher. So it started about six months ago when cove nineteen was coming across ocean and essentially how you know my husband, my Lou gave Peter a content listen i. think we could do something about this curve nineteen we we were ground SARS, the first one almost twenty years ago, and thankfully for the world never win anything anywhere but this covid nineteen doesn't appear to be. Letting down. So I think we can leverage our platform for both diagnostics vaccine's what do you think and of course Peter was like absolutely let's do it. So that was the birth. Origination of Kovacs. Now here we are in body told for one vaccine later. Up there you're you're both in investor and vice chairman what was the relationship? How did you know me and what led you to become involved? So I had met may may an Lou years earlier through the X Prize Foundation they were at our annual visionary event, which is our big get together with sort of world leaders and Philanthropists and Ed became really super close friends. We have kids same age and I joined their board of a sister company called United Neuroscience, which is now rebranding as back sanity. and. I found them to be just absolutely brilliant passionate dedicated biotech leaders who had a very different mindset from the beginning that that redneck was very. Resonated with me from a perspective of things I care about about demonetizing democratizing healthcare, and and. So I joined their board at this other company. And in March when they called me a like of course, let's jump in and I helped pull together the Capitol to kick Kovacs off. And then May. and Lou who are co CEOS of Kovacs and also the other company vaccine entity. You'll have an amazing science team. Globally around the world and end within thirty days will was extraordinary from a standing start being able to use and leverage different parts of the of the previous companies. May Enter team first of all developed what is now the most sensitive most Pacific blood antibody test? This is not PR. This is have you developed antibodies right? The blame by test serology and they developed thirty different vaccines. And started. Looking at those the efficacy, those vaccines and ended up with a lead candidate, which is pretty extraordinary. Think of you as a a fairly big vision guy people may know you as the founder of the x prize earlier singularity. University. Also co-authored a very optimistic view of the future in abundance. Bestseller really a good guy who's embraced technology is making a better world. In some respects you you're interested Kovacs's understandable given the scope of this pandemic at the same time it. Almost, a bit mundane in that. It's it's not a problem necessarily in in need of a new technological solution. Is there something about Kovacs that? Inspires you in light of the other things you do. While they're is the it's the platform. Here in the platform, something, that may his mom? Who is the you know the? Founder of the company and and really the inventor of the technology. So we're living in a world right now that is healthcare isn't healthcare at sick care and the system takes care of you after you're sick and while we spend an extraordinary amount of money. In the United. States. Are Healthcare is awful I mean really is terrible. It's comparatively to other countries money we spend we should be ashamed of what we get result

Kovacs Peter Thanks United Biomedical United Neuroscience LOU Peter Asher X Prize Foundation Sars ED United
Egypt's organ traffickers: 'I woke up screaming'

BBC World Service

04:26 min | 1 year ago

Egypt's organ traffickers: 'I woke up screaming'

"A BBC investigation into further exploitation of migrants migrants who are forced to sell organs such as kidneys. To pay for a passage to Europe senior gang member in North Africa told the BBC that nearly half of those who give up a kidney I never paid. The kidneys are mostly solved by African migrants and refugees who use the money. To pay people smugglers if, of course they get the money was also reports of people having organs removed against their will reporting on this trade, and it's a difficult listeners. You'd imagine Richard Bilton. It is an ancient city at the heart of a vile trade. Cairo one of the hopes for the illegal market in human flesh around the world, there is a shortage of transplant organs. Here. They're harvested from the poor. Migrants and refugees sell their kidneys to pay to get to Europe. Many a tripped like Asher, who says she was drugged and then operated on to protect her. Anonymity were using an actor. I found myself in a room with blood everywhere. The door was locked and I started kicking it. Then I called the police and they came and got me. They took me to the hospital there. They told me that my kidney had been removed. There are thought to be five million migrants and refugees in Cairo. These are the people that the gangs prey upon. We want to get to the criminals. It's difficult. This's a dangerous world, and Egypt is not a country that welcomes investigative reporters. We get a break through. One of the main gang leaders agrees to meet, he said. They're arranging between 20 and 30 illegal transplants a week. His words were spoken by an actor. It's busiest in the summer because kidney patients get sicker. They drink a lot of water because of the hot weather. We have a lot of work during that period from all over the world and the people who don't get paid with their promised. How do you feel about that? I give them their money of the people agree a price but never pay up after the surgery. Does this happen often about 40% of the cases globally between five and 10% of transplants are thought to use black market organs. That's thousands of illegal operations every year. It is lucrative for the criminals. There's no protection for the donor's Adnan Sharif is from doctors against forced organ trafficking. It's illegal. It's unethical. It is immoral. They're exploited for their organs. Some from May receive a very small financial remuneration. Something will receive absolutely nothing at all on this is exploitation and so form ofthe modern day slavery. The Egyptian government says it's one prays and approval internationally. For its strategy to eliminate this heinous crime. It's made arrests and says the illegal operations happen in private clinics and hospitals rather than government hospitals. This trade is worth millions of dollars and victims say rules they used against them. They have to sign forms, saying they're donating their organs for free, but this paperwork can be used to keep them quiet. He bought sold a kidney but was never paid. I found myself in the room after the surgery. I woke up screaming. I got so scared. I was screaming. This is wrong. You cheated me. People called the doctor and told him there's a patient you did surgery on and she wasn't paid. He took the documents I signed to a lawyer. So if I tell the police they comprise, prove I donated my kidney voluntarily. I made this mistake and I don't want another girl to make it. The Egyptian government denies he Burwood have been arrested. It says victims have the right to report these gangs without fear on its hotlines. And it has increased the maximum punishment for organized criminal gangs Toe life imprisonment. There is no shortage of desperate people tonight in Cairo. The latest victims are preparing to go under the knife. Human beings butchered for profit. Richard Bilton with that BBC investigation.

Cairo Adnan Sharif BBC Richard Bilton Europe Egyptian Government Asher Egypt North Africa Burwood
Los Angeles - Bobcat Fire In Angeles National Forest Approaching 30,000 Acres

Leo Laporte

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Los Angeles - Bobcat Fire In Angeles National Forest Approaching 30,000 Acres

"Burning in the West. The Southland is in for another day of smoky unhealthier because of the fire. It's burned through more than 29,000 acres in the Angeles National Forest Smoke and Asher expected across L. A and orange counties. More than three million acres has burned in California since the beginning of this year. That's an area Larger than the state of Connecticut. The U. S Forest Service is temporarily closed all 18 national forests in the the state state because because of of safety safety concerns. concerns. This This also also applies applies to to all all campgrounds campgrounds and and picnic picnic areas. areas.

U. S Forest Service Asher Connecticut California
Interview with Thriller Writer Andrew Allan - burst 1

The Crime Cafe

12:28 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Thriller Writer Andrew Allan - burst 1

"Hi. Everyone may guest is the author of the wall Asher Thriller series you also right to grind house hulk. We've gotten talked about. He is an infomercial writer and director is also into wild cope movies making them I believe. And runs a website called daily. Grind House Dot. com I guess today's Andrew. Allan. Hi Andrew. Thanks for being here. It's Sure thing I love your resume I mean you're you're by it was fascinating to me because I love sill as well as books I assumed that you were infomerrcial rendered director before you started writing books. Yes. Yeah I, my career is little bit weird in the sense that I went to film school and then I, broke two commercials while I was working on developing movies and I ended up getting a job at the home shopping network, which is based here in Saint Pete Florida and. It's bizarre. Everyone presumes it is, but it was really great experience and I learned how to do a lot of things including sell on TV and that often into doing infomercials, which is selling on TV so and I have to say I love it as ridiculous as it sounds I it's great profession. Sounds. Really cool actually. What made you decide to do infomercials and what prompted you to start writing books? Money prompted me to start doing infomercials. Is You know we all need it. We all like it. But three Oris was. Like I said, I. Learned to basically sell on television when as at. and. That is a natural transition into infomercials and when I decided Lake Age San. I knew I wanted to make my writing or sorry make my living still riding in. If, directing producing commercials. In what was great about infomercials was at a Niche. So instead of just saying, Hey, I'M A. Commercial writer and there's ten thousand other people are competing with. I said been infomercial right better and maybe ten people on meeting with. So now I can like authentically say one of the top it from our show writers world and I've got a ton of experience done thousands of commercials in the ask aid and all that sort of stuff so. It's great and that's how that came to be the reason I started writing books. was because I I remember reasons when I was creatively frustrated had been making movies had been writing screenplays in. which were fun and some of them got made some of them did. But all of them required collaboration and I had reached a point where I didn't really want to collaborate anymore. At least for a while, I needed a break. And that's even on projects that I absolutely loved movie that was aching with my best friend and. Even then like we would get into arguments and about I just needed a break from that. So I wanted to do something on my own and that's when I decided to write a book had a story. Kind of kicking around that I'd never been able to turn into a script. I finally figured out how to make that work in book form, which was the first of Asher took and. Took it from there, the other the other part of that story is. I was actually reading a book by. A very famous author that we all know who I'm not GONNA name and Not to sound Eric and I thought it was terrible house like a weight. and. I actually caught myself saying I could do better. And? You know a very arrogant thing to save for someone who's never. But I decided to see if I could back up. And I think I did. unbelie speaking I didn't think I was right. Funny because a lot of writers actually do start offers those kinds of thoughts I do this. Anyway it wasn't even looking down at the writing it was in fact. The looking at the idea of being writer was more like this story is not entertaining be and. I know enough about story structure from screen plays and things like that. where I could look at this and say, really was about me thinking this guy should be doing a lot better for albig their name is and how much money. Yeah. You points for originality on coming up with a protagonist is infomercial writer. Director. But I see that you've drawn from your own background or at least I assume you have. Tell US little about wall. Ask How is it? He gets into the kinds of situations that would lead to thriller. Series. What I had to figure out. As. He is comes from my background. I did go down the road of right now and that's because. As confident as I was writing commercials in his confident as was writing movies I had no confidence whatsoever writing a book so I figured I ought to. Rely on everything that I could get off the so. And then plus the idea. Of Him being an infamous rider was intriguing. You know. I. Like all of us had written read million books about cops and lawyers and soldiers, detectives and reporters. That's great. People are probably doing it better than me. So let me try something completely different. And I worked at it worked because I think wall what I like about wall. What I like about these books is that he has to rely persuasion to kind of get by doesn't mean he's not physical. There's a lot of action in the books and But. But he is a true amateur sleuth who has nothing to do with. Justice and basically starts out he lives on the Rainbow River, which is a real. River Donnellan Florida about two hours north where I. In he's he's in the river because data's friend's house by the water and finds his friend dead on the Bank of the river. With an alligator in the process of Jim up. But it's clear that the alligator did not kill him so. One thing leads to another and the villain in the story overplays its hand. And attempts to kill. Walt. And it becomes very clear that he has to do. Something a balance it's no. A- paranoid. It's legitimate in in the Diet figuring out. took. Let's see you also, right. Does poke at the series also correct. Those books like you fun. Grind House. I I. Guess. Okay so Basically the Grind House was forty second street movie theaters in the Sixties Seventies in eight Times Square. And They Kinda just show like all the really gross horror movies the karate movies, all kinds of stuff you know movies that were generally looked down upon, but also provided extremely visceral thrill. And I love those movies I think they're A. A love cult movies, and so my grind house pulse series is basically me coming up with ideas for grind house movies, it putting them at goes. It's different than like the wall Asher stuff is war. Thriller Mystery Thriller Suspense Ryan How's Paul is pushed things over the edge a little bit more. you know there's more violence and there's You know just like you'd see in those insane movies and they're really they're. Their books of movies I would love to see. Yeah Yeah. You. Should check public domain deserves some really crazy things that you probably already know that. That's for sure. Oh my gosh. If you receive Nanos hands a fate. Badly. I had yes. Oh my God. That's all say about that. There's some movies that are just so bad. You have to see them. That's one of them. Well, that's a little part of my resume I produced Herschell, Gordon Lewis's last movie. Own Donahue Herschel is he's the guy. He was the first guy to put Gore in a move back nine hundred and sixty three in the movie blood feast. and He did other movies like wizard of Gore or girls and two thousand maniacs. E, Kinda started it all and he was. Low budget exploitation filmmaker and I had the great fortune of. Meeting him in basically getting to produce a movie for one of my heroes. While that's fantastic. That's wonderful To get back to Walt. Is there an overall story ARC in series? So the first book was really just a test to see if I write a book. Well and that feeling. Of. Really sort of rabbit story. There was a slight. Subtle hints. To where it could go beyond that story. Then after I thought about it and I liked the process and I thought the book went well and I didn't get demolished by reviews as like yeah I'll continue the so. As it exists now there's a three book. Arc. Where each is a complete story of their full length novels, but the villain is the same in the three of them. The Antagonists Casino tag is more of a secret organisation kind of thing than just one person specifically. So there's arc with that and then in between each novel. I, I wrote an Avella. And those are side stories, featuring walt and some of the same characters from the boat but not related to that big overarching story. So. Just kind of Nice it's sort of like a breather in between, but you still get to spend time with the characters. That's cool. Yeah. Most of those are. Rooted in the fact that. Waltz basically best friend up on the river where he lives. Dining digi who is actually a criminal biker. And he's into all kinds of criminal stuff but he's just Kinda like one of those Florida Good Ole boys who are fun to be around and for whatever reason he likes wall is completely not of his world. So in the NOVELLAS. Those. Tend to focus on D. G. Getting Wall to do something for digi in that usually on the danger things like that, and and that's what cell shock which giveaway book for this interview is one of those things. Lead. US

Writer Walt Director Grind House Asher Saint Pete Florida Andrew Allan United States Rainbow River ARC River Donnellan Florida Gore Lake Age San Florida Eric Donahue Herschel D. G. JIM Paul
"asher" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"asher" Discussed on Food Psych

"In our culture to want to look for solutions when we feel bad and we're so ingrained also to want to eat in a disordered way because there's so much. Much cultural praise for that and sometimes internal validation that comes from that, too, because not just of internalized weight stigma Oh. That's often a big piece of it, but also like like you said for people who are Trans and non binary who don't really have the language or the you know are not in a place to be out about that or accepting of that. It's a way to kind of feel more feel estes for work and. That's a tricky thing is of course you deserve to feel less dysphoric? Of course you feel. You deserve to feel more at home in your body. And like there's different ways to do that. Don't involve hurting yourself correct. Yeah, OH, my Gosh! I love this conversation I feel like we can talk for like another hour and a half. The stuff, but yeah I want to be mindful of everyone's time, so thank you so much for sharing all that you did. And can you tell us where people can find you and learn more about your work? Well thank you too, and thanks for everything you do I really I feel like we're collaborators. In some of these efforts so I appreciate that yeah people can find me I'm basically on instagram in my website, so in gram is living in the square body. All one phrase and my website is living in the square body DOT com. And that's where I post all of my workshops, and where you can listen to my podcast, and you can also listen to my podcast anywhere else to like anywhere you listen to podcasts. Yeah, wherever you're listening to this. If just type in living in the square body and the search, it should come up right away so and we have some overlap between people. We've interviewed so that's fun too I. Know Totally I was looking through your your list of people recently. My Gosh, this is great. Yeah, well, I'll put links to that in the show notes so people can find it and thank you again so much ashes. Great talking. Thank you, too. So. That is our show. Thanks again so much to Asher pange eras for joining us on this episode and thanks to you for listening. If you're looking for some practical tips to help you get started on the Anti Diet Path. Grab my free audio guide seven simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food..

Asher pange instagram
Elon Musk names baby X Æ A-12

Dana Loesch

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Elon Musk names baby X Æ A-12

"So it on my skin and Grimes had a baby and they named the baby S. H. E. eight twelve months although it is a is a pronounce after an away Asher to I don't know I don't know it's that child will hate them for that they're going to change their name to something like Tim later on that's what their baby's going to

Grimes Asher TIM S. H.
Travel to Senegal and The Gambia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

09:20 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Senegal and The Gambia

"Welcome the image traveler. I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about West Africa. I like to welcome to the show. Brian Asher from the world hiker DOT COM. Who has come to talk to us about Senegal and the Gambia in West Africa? Brian Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you for having me. I know you were surprised that we had not previously done in episode of Amateur Traveler on this region and as we were talking about before we started recording. We don't get as many pitches but also there aren't as many travelers who tend to go to west Africa East Africa. Southern Africa tend to get a little more tourists in general. Why should someone go to that region before we focus in on Senegal? Gambia I think. West Africa's really vibrance several my friends. Who have been there for years in the Peace Corps? Said it's about the People? It's about the markets it's about the color it's about the way they treat you just the life that's on the streets of West Africa. I think we hear of animals. Safaris maybe eastern Southern Africa West. Africa's is really the beating hearts of the continents with some of the most populous countries in the fascinating region with lots of smaller countries grouped. In that you can visit In the whole region there will. We've chosen to talk about Senegal and the Gambia one. Because you've been there recently and we always try and focus on someplace. That wasn't a ten years ago trip. The you've been to all the countries in Africa. Yes four fifty four nations and Africa hats off to you. Thank you and people may be wondering why we're talking about the two of them. This is one of those very odd places where one country actually completely surrounds. The exactly the Gambia's inside of Senegal. So the Gumby has no other neighbors have Senegal to the North East. The South and the West is the ocean. So it's completely involved excellent. And why should someone go to Senegal Gambia? I think Senegal and the Gambia great introduction to Africa and especially to West Africa. They're safe countries. They're countries that are kind of a soft introduction. They're not quite as hard hitting some the other countries in west Africa. Very safe to visit for me. The the weather was very nice after coming from kind of more tropical and intense heat in the Sahara for example movement way across and the people. The people are very friendly. There's not vowed kind of lively music in the streets that you can listen to all the time and there is a decent number of Europeans between but a large French population. There's quite a few Lebanese. That live there a special indy car in the capital of Senegal. And it's it's very soft welcoming place that would not intimidate so I think most people when they think of Africa that would be a great place to start and by contrast. Then what you're saying is there's some of their neighbors. We're them might be a little more. You think twice about going because of poverty terrorism Civil war or disease. Yeah those those are the only reasons I can think of not to go to some of the areas over the last ten years at least in western Africa and I think the Transportation as well kind of infrastructure with having made my way of public transportation there are a lot of Africa can be extremely slow and the Senegal Gambia. Our little breath of fresh air to be able to get around quite a bit easier than the light of the countries in the region and I'm fascinated to hear about this. I have technically been indycar but really only in the airport. And they didn't let me off the plane so I really knew very little about the area. So what kind of itinerary would you recommend? I think that Senegal be the one that you'd want to spend more time in. The car has quite a bit to see in there quite a few beaches right there. Outside of the city I stayed in a neighborhood called walk. Tom Which is nicely placed next to the African Renaissance Monument which is the largest statue and all of Africa. That kind of looks down on the whole region there and Indycar and you can take a couple of really nice day trip south from the car so if you stayed there for two three or four days I think that would be an ideal amount of time to spend their most people like I went to a place called Goree Island which is very famous for being one of the biggest places that had slaves that were coming out to the Americas and you can learn a lot but the history. They're easy to walk around. There's a ferry that goes every couple hours to get there and place it almost everyone. The cousin Senegal visits during the first couple days sides stay for the car to three days with the city and the surrounding area and then a couple of days up to St Louis which is about four hours for five hours north by bus. Okay and you could spend a day or two. They're known for its famous. Saint Louis Arch known. Not that Saint. Louis Okay the other Saint Louis in Senegal. It takes a good six to eight hours going by bus. You could take a private car if you want. Or if you're on a tour to get down to the Gambia assume that's GONNA take up half or two thirds of a day and then I'd be down in Bonn Jewel and area right below it whether it's nice speeches and a monkey parking things for two to three days so I think you could easily piece together somewhere between eight and ten days which would be kind of a nice length of a visit between Senegal Gambia. Excellent so you started us into car and you mentioned going out to the island whose name I've already forgotten it's gory island heart ee. Eileen with just one of the biggest hubs for the slave trade and they have fairies that go out every couple hours and that's definitely Come a must do if you're in Dakar. I think almost anyone I've talked to has done not visit for half day or two thirds of the day and real easy to walk arounds. Thinks about a kilometre too long. And that's locals there with colorful art kids playing soccer in slave museums. That are there that you can visit as well and so I assume there's a fourth year which is where they keep the slaves locked up. Yes and what else are we going to do the two or three days in the car? How are we gonNA spend that you mentioned the monument and there's a couple of monuments there the country it's about ninety six percent Muslim and so there's several nice mosques to visit as well in the lot of fishermen that go out and I love think West Africa? One of the images of the coastal areas. Are these colorful fishing boats that you can see like dozens of guys sliding off into the water and then sliding back up with their catch from the day and there's a lot of seafood that they bring in so these real colorfully painted. Boats is one of the images that you'll see on the coast there in Indycar and their fishing from the there than rather than from okay and is there a place you would go to see that. There is a mosque called the mosque of the divinity which had a bunch of these colorful boats right next to it and it's right there in the car about five or ten minutes from where I was staying in the neighborhood of calm and I stayed AIRBNB. There's lots of airbnb options there for budget travelers and there's all different ranges of accommodation but there are inexpensive options for those looking for him as well and I stayed with a local man there and enjoyed always like state local people to give you all flavor of what it's like will what I usually find when we're talking about. Travelling in lesser developed areas of Africa is that we're talking about not an inexpensive flight to get in relatively expensive for the distance intra country flights inside of Africa. Compare for instance or a US but then really cheap food and really cheap housing. Is that right? Yeah that's true. And so that's the Pros and cons. I always way between local transport and the flights I think the flights between the Gambian cars forty minutes so in say but I just checked in it's still upwards of one hundred forty to one hundred eighty dollars for a forty minute one slight. It's not too bad for Africa standards. It can be a lot worse a lot worse or west African flights but bus. I WanNa say it was about eighteen dollars that took me there so you just have to pick and choose. What's worth more your your time or your money. Well and that is going to be an individual choice. Yeah another thing. A lot of people like to do is there's a pink lake there several of these in the world. There's one in Mexico unless Jerry I believe and there's one about Sarah outside of Dakar. That is is another kind of one of them. Must do things on the visit. That would take you maybe about a half day and so that is really really pick. Yeah if you look at pictures online. There's one called Rainbow Mountain in Peru or I don't know how much instagram or things put filters on it and this one depending on who's pictured is it's pink. It was quite pink but sometimes the pictures make it. Look even more amazingly think depend on. The season tends to be kind of lighter darker shades of pink. That has the salt miners. That are out there. And kind of local people selling artwork in tourist items. So and so this is Lake Ripa. Yes my GRANDPA Loch rose. I think in French shore the lake what it can go by. I would say gory. Islands and Pink Lake would be to half day trips. That would make sense to have with your day or so exploring around the car so to make it two or three days for the car and it strives. You might say

Senegal Gambia Senegal Africa West Africa East Africa Southern Africa Chris Christensen Brian Asher Dakar Gambia Amateur Traveler Peace Corps Pink Lake Sahara Goree Island Soccer Louis Arch Airbnb
Is this country ready for 2.5 million jobless claims in a week?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Is this country ready for 2.5 million jobless claims in a week?

"Know there is a thing that happens when a big story like this lasts for a while and I figure we are just about at that point now where it's happening so it's time to clue y'all in so we all know what's going on everything starts to sound the same like you've heard all the news updates before us for instance you've probably heard on this program. I don't know half a dozen times in the last week alone. That a number we are going to get tomorrow morning called first time. Claims for unemployment is going to be gigantic. Maybe two and a half million people filing claims against a normal week where it's two hundred and fifty thousand tops. I send that again because the big rescue bill that Congress still hasn't found a way to pass is throwing billions of dollars at unemployment insurance but every one of those two and a half million people who are GonNa Follow. More is a story in an unemployment system that is deeply deeply stressed from our bureau in Portland Oregon Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman Gazza's go so when we want this to go on here yeah okay. That's violin last. Friday was Steve Bench. Eros last day of work at the violin shop where he's fixed instruments for thirty years with music performances cancelled and business down. The shops closed indefinitely. We could use some work at home and we can do repairs but yeah. It's not exactly a Tele Commuting Business Ben. Shapiro didn't apply for unemployment right away. He'd heard horror stories of the Oregon website crashing. He finally tried last night and after some initial glitches got his claim. Filed Congress is sending money to the states to beef up staffing and administration but many states make qualifying for and receiving benefits. Difficult says Michael `grats at Columbia Law School since the great recession some states have reduced unemployment payments and eight states. No longer offer the standard twenty six weeks of benefits. So we've got poor and inadequate finance very inadequate coverage. It's just an archaic ineffective system. The Senate's new stimulus bill will send billions more to the states. Says Michelle Evermore at the National Employment Law Project? I think this will go a long way to smoothing the transition into into the next recession. It will pay benefits to workers staying at home to care for family members plus the self employed and independent contractors. This bill also will give everyone whether they're on the new pandemic unemployment assistance program or traditional unemployment insurance an extra six hundred dollars a week for four months that increases huge evermore says the goal is to replace workers pre corona virus paychecks and make sure people remain eligible for benefits without having to go out and look for work the last thing they should be doing during a pandemic. I Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. Another thing that people who two weeks ago had jobs but now don't have another thing they have to worry about is how they're gonNA get healthcare coverage from the workplace cultured as Marketplace's Megan McCarthy Carino has that one one week ago Sonia Zanardi was laid off from her job as a bartender in Washington. Dc. She's scrambling to apply for unemployment. Figure out how shall pay rent and what she's going to do about health insurance since her employer stopped. Subsidizing it on April Eleventh. Probably the scariest part of it for me. Because has we're going into a pandemic. She figures she'll get insurance on the health care exchange but in the past. That's cost four hundred dollars a month for a plan with a four thousand dollar deductible. She hasn't figured out. If she'll qualify for Medicaid but for now Cobra is just too expensive. I don't ever been this scared about my financial situation. But at least her former employer has paid for insurance for the next month. That's what Asher. Scofield is doing for five former employees of his shuttered gift shop the Frog toad in Providence Rhode Island being covered at a time. Like this is very scary. And we just want to make sure that everybody's taking care of through this that even before the pandemic more than twenty seven million people in the US had no insurance that includes many part time freelance and GIG workers who don't get health care or other benefits through an employer but might not qualify for public assistance. What is transpiring now is underscoring the critical need for us to refashion the social safety net. Nyu Business Professor Aroon soon. Dhiraj on says the reliance on traditional fulltime employers to deliver safety net benefits for workers was breaking down long before the current crisis. I'm Megan McCarthy Carino for marketplace. There was big rally today on Wall Street on news then. Economic Rescue Package was going to get done and then it didn't get done still up though we'll have the details when we do. The

Congress Oregon Steve Bench Mitchell Hartman Gazza Megan Mccarthy Megan Mccarthy Carino Shapiro Mitchell Hartman Michelle Evermore Senate Portland Day Of Work Economic Rescue Package Asher Columbia Law School United States Self Employed Dhiraj
Google joins Hedera Hashgraphs Governing Council

Insureblocks

08:05 min | 1 year ago

Google joins Hedera Hashgraphs Governing Council

"Man's. Thank you for joining us today for our listeners. Thank you great to be back. It is great to have you back and for our listeners. Who Haven't heard you on our previous podcast. Can you please give them a quick introduction on Yourself Asher So my name is harmon? I'm one of the CO founders of their Hash craft alongside Dr Leeman Baird We've been working together. Lehman I for twenty six years always in deep tack. The we've done reinforcement learning or machine learning research for the Air Force. We talked computer. Science at the Air Force Academy cybersecurity managed massive software program for the Missile Defense Agency and then decided we wanted to become entrepreneurs and this is our third startup we to prior startups in the space of identity and access management and sold one to Fortune. Five hundred the other private equity and Leman wanted to solve a really hard math problems specifically how you can achieve the limits in terms of security in a consensus algorithm distributed consensus algorithm simultaneous to maximizing performance. How you can do both at the same time. And after of hard work he invented the Hash. Graph which is consensus algorithm like blockchain is a consensus algorithm. Has Graph is an alternative approach that has fantastic properties again both in terms of security and performance and we decided to take that tha market and here. We are years later now with their hash graph. Brilliant end in that one answer. You've athlete answered the next two questions. All I can one so fishing deeper interested. Yeah Yeah I mean I think it will be useful is because one of our typical questions is please define what is blockchain and Like we did in the last podcast if you perhaps could have another go at it and at the same time point out the differences between Blockchain and a hash graph. Why Hash crowd is so much more efficient than Blockchain system sure well blockchain as a term refers to two things it refers to a data structure. Which is a chain of blocks of transactions? And it's very serious just like it sounds in the way it's created and it also the the term also refers to a consensus algorithm that enables a community of of participants each of which that holds a local copy of that chain of blocks to come to agreement or consensus on which block to put next on the top of that chain in their by everyone keeps a consistent chain of blocks and often. It's proof of work. You know the use of a really hard cryptographic puzzle into novel ways that makes it possible for the community to to come to consensus on on which blocks you go on top of of the chain. But it's designed to be slow and it. The use of proof of work causes it to be slow and The the fact that there is a single chain that everyone uses also limiting in terms of its architecture hash graph similarly is a term that refers to both a data structure in this case. It's a graph in the mathematical sense. It's a graph that is whose nodes are or verticals are linked together with Hashes gripped graphically in. So it's a data structure in there's also consensus algorithm. That makes it possible for those that have a copy of the Hash graph to calculate how each other how the other nodes in the network would vote on the order of transactions and so they come to to agreement on the order of transactions that get captured in this in this graph because it's a graph rather than a chain all of the transactions. They're flowing into the network can be processed simultaneously. There is no need for proof of work. This process that slows down blockchain to give the community time to come to agreement. There's no need for any of that and so we've basically eliminated the too constraining factors. Proof of work is no is not there. And it's a graph. Instead of a chain and the result of that is fantastic performance in it's got some great theoretical properties specifically it does achieve the limit in terms of security at something called a synchronous. Byzantine fault tolerance. It's the best one can do and in its novel in those ways Brilliant thank you very much for that and we had actually gymnasts or very recently. Come on our show. He's the CEO of core and he was telling us about how he build his colonel virus tracker using Darah Hash craft for exactly the same properties. You just described now. We've had you on this show for about ten ten eleven months ago. What industries and geographies are we seeing the most adoption of our has graph? Well I wouldn't say that there's geography necessarily. That is adopting. Maybe more than than another and the industry's when thinking about the industries. It's it's also it's more like this. It's not really that there is necessarily one industry. That is adopting faster than another but the way I would sort of segment the market or break it down in terms of what is adopting versus. Not Is that. There are a lot of enterprise use cases that are being presented in that. We're you know we're working on with partners and council members that are kind of boring in nature in some ways. What I find interesting is that while most of the market is looking for a really sexy killer. Commercial consumer focused use case. You know everybody's looking for that killer APP. That is primarily focused on building a big consumer focused use case. Our experience is just the opposite. It's for example as a category just audit based applications where you WANNA take some information in get a consensus time stamp on it and use that in various ways maybe their regulatory related. Maybe you need to be able to to just store information improve that it. It was what you claim. It was on a on a given date. There's just a whole broad range of business to business process optimization focused use cases that I think are the ones that are going to end up being the ones that take the whole market Mainstream or result in its mass adoption. And so that's the distinction that I'm seeing. It's it's not a one particular industry or one geography is more focused on B. Two B. process optimization versus consumer focused applications

Blockchain Dr Leeman Baird Harmon Lehman Missile Defense Agency Air Force Air Force Academy Leman CEO
11 Trivia Questions from 'The Office'

Trivia With Budds

05:28 min | 1 year ago

11 Trivia Questions from 'The Office'

"Time for some office quotes. I am going to give you the quote and you tell me who said it. You're GonNa have some fun if you like that. Show here. We go all right here. We go guys. This is question number. One for office quotes. I'll read you the quote and you have to tell me who said it. I will give you the hint that none of the names from the show are used more than once. You're not gonNA hear a bunch. Did you. Different quotes from Dwight. May here one quote from Dwight or none at all. But I do that. Maybe maybe not. Here's question number one. Sometimes I'll start a sentence and I don't even know what's going. I just hope I find it along the way question number one. WHO said that on the office? Sometimes I'll start a sentence and don't even know where it's going. I just hope I find it along the way number one question number two. If I don't have some cake soon I might die if I don't have some cake soon. I might die number two number three for my new year's resolution. I gave up drinking during the week week number three for my new year's resolution I gave up drinking during the week. I gave up drinking for my new year's resolution but it's February so here the Margarita. Not a huge fan of margaritas myself. But that's what they had here at Grandma's number four get a friend loser. That's the whole quote a friend loser. number four. Get a friend loser. WHO said that on the office number four number five? What is so stupid about wanting to name a baby asher? What is so stupid about wanting to name a baby usher number five question number six? There's a lot of beauty in ordinary things. Isn't that kind of the point. There's a poignant quote from the office number six. There's a lot of beauty beauty in ordinary things. Isn't that kind of the point number seven. This is a documentary. I thought we were like Specimens Simmons and a Human Zoo. This is a documentary. I thought we were like specimens in a human zoo. WHO said that on the office number seven questionable? I haven't proposed to anyone in years number eight. I haven't proposed that anyone in years question number nine Michael is leaving and apparently they already hired a new manager. And we're meeting today. It's a lot to process paperwork. Wise wise who said that number nine. It's a lot to process paperwork. Wise number ten. Holly is ruining joining. Michael's life he thinks she's so special and she so not. Her personality is like three number ten. WHO said that Holly's ruining Michael's life? He thinks she's so uh-huh special and she's so not. Her personality is like a three and number eleven for two points. How many pranks the gym pull on Dwight in the whole series? Now this is one you just have to kind of guesstimate. I had the person who guessed the closest without going over. Got Two points in my life five trivia nights but just take an educated guess for two point how many pranks do you think Jim pulled on Dwight in the entire series I did get the number from office wicky. Ah Fan page. That counted up every prank. So I think it's pretty accurate. Those are all your questions for office quotes. We'll be right back in just a second with eleven answers we're back with the answers to office quote Trivia. Let's see if you've got these right. Who said what on the office number one? Sometimes I'll start a sentence and I don't even know where it's going. I just hope I I find it along the way I almost couldn't finish that sentence. It was Michael Michael Scott Right off the bat number one Michael Number two of I don't have some cake soon. I might die. I was Stanley Stanley. Love Cake and Pretzel Day number. Three four my new year's resolution I gave up drinking during the week. That was meredith. Of course meredith. Who was just stan dancing with the stars? Not that long ago number four get a friend. Loser was Dwight. Dwight says. Get a friend loser. I just got the Dwight. CPR dummy mask or he cuts off off the face and wears it like silence of the lambs. They made a Fungal Papa that can only get an Fye at store at the mall and I pre-ordered one and I picked it up like a month and a half late but I did get it earlier earlier today and I'll post it over on the discord APP chat. If you want to see what it looks like go try and find it number five. What is so stupid? About wanting to become a baby usher that is Kelly. Kapoor wants to name her baby with I think Ryan she wants to name their baby. Usher number six. There's a lot of beauty ordinary things. Isn't that kind of the point. I think that's the last quote of the entire our series from Pam and zoom in the picture of the office building that she painted on the outside number seven. This is the this is a documentary. I thought we were like specimens in Human Zoo. That's Kevin Kevin from the office number eight. I haven't proposed anyone in years. Andy Bernard who proposes to a bunch of people on the show. Andy number nine. Michael School is leaving an apparently. We've got a lot to process paperwork. Wise that was Oscar Oscar always looking at the paperwork number tallies ruining Michael's life. He thinks she so special. And she's not her personalities like a three. That's Aaron on the office at the Front Desk. Aaron and number eleven for two points how many pranks to Jim Dwight in the entire series according into the Wikki a page for office it is one hundred fourteen pranks hopefully you were close to nailing that number. That's what she said

Jim Dwight Michael Michael Scott Michael Number Human Zoo Michael School Andy Bernard Asher Wise Oscar Oscar Kevin Kevin Aaron Meredith Holly Stanley Stanley FYE Simmons Front Desk Stan Kapoor PAM
Managing Anxiety When Facing a Serious Medical Test

Anxiety Slayer

08:47 min | 1 year ago

Managing Anxiety When Facing a Serious Medical Test

"We're GONNA talk about how to learn to care for yourself before during and after a serious medical best. Yeah this is becoming a lawyer in private facebook group. Hasn't it last few weeks yeah fears. The White Coats Their tests waiting for results connects a particularly challenging time. It's challenging for anyone but if you're living with anxiety then of course it's gone to I in the exile so I think we begin by as we so often do Just expressing self appreciation and self compassion that nobody likes to be scrutinized tonight in this way softening towards yourself most people uncomfortable with medical scrutiny. We don't like being focused on. I'm in a place. That's south to examine about his potential problems. Even if I'm at the dentist I'd Rather. He gave me the lowdown on each individual tooth. That one's okay. Okay that one's okay. Really WanNa wait while they go the round for fifteen minutes and then tell you if it's okay or not and I could be of instant feedback so self self. Compassion comes first knowing ourselves understanding ourselves being kind about anxiety and accepting I we feel with no the judgment because judgment just brings awesome and increased suffering. Does one of the things that has been helpful for me over the last year. Because I've been in this position of a few times in the last twelve months was to also communicate with Mike Caregiver. Let them know that. I suffer from health anxiety. Sometimes that I get the more anxious that I do have that that White Coat Syndrome is we've talked before in the past about what happens to my blood pressure when I go to the doctor blood pressure Asher just fine when I'm not at the doctor and so sometimes just letting them know how you feel in the process because for them it's second nature nature something that they're doing every day and they're very black and white sometimes and we are not we are not all black and white be. I need just a little bit more support in sweetness from our caregivers. And if you're not getting that it's time to find a new caregiver absolutely because it's there in the word caregiver anxiety give not lecture giver right. We absolutely have the right to to shift around until we find somebody that we're comfortable with and I think also what you've just described is to form of self compaction because you're going in and saying okay. This is how it is for me so you. We'll give them the chance to respond. Yes an adjust how they deal with the patient that needs some consideration in the area and absolutely right right to to say that I think it self respecting I had experience with a dentist. Awhile back and he's fairly new to his profession and before that we've been seeing the same guy for a long long time. And and he was on his way out new guy on his way in well new guy on his way in is trying to be extra communicative initiative about everything. meaning that if you need to go in for a crown. He's going to tell you that it's it's possible that while he's grinding down the tooth that there will be a crack in the tooth and if there's cracking the tooth and he won't be able to do the crown because then you can't do the crown and they might have to remove the tooth and you you might need it in and Right so by the time he's doing that you can just see me sitting there putting my fingers in my ears going non on. Because I don't WanNa hear that I don't WanNa take that story to wear. He's telling me it might go so we'll if because it's a what if it kicks. Accept your anxiety so I asked him. I said please if you think I need a crown then tell me that you think I needed ground because is my tooth is crap period and if I decide to get the crown and if we're in this position and something happens will deal with it then but by giving me all of these. What if chances of me doing this are very slim and the chances of me finding another dentist who it will respect? My wishes is very strong. Anyway that I know went off on a tangent. I think he's an again. You Oh you and I were discussing earlier. Willowy share what we think's helpful to others. Yes and this is that you know. We're all in the same boat. Yeah so I think it's good to know that and absolutely important to know that if we're not happy with one healthcare practitioner or the doctor dentistry will ever the profession. Is We have the right to voice our concerns to express the support we feel we need and we have a choice and we can go elsewhere. Yes and I think that's very important to go somewhere where you are most comfortable. Yeah I'm grateful my my primary care. Physician actually has her practice in a beautiful Victorian home setting. And there's just something and I would still my blood pressure would still go when I go there but when you're in the waiting room is is like a living room and then her office is like a beautiful bedroom. I guess with the exam table well. And it's up to you whether you want to disrobe or not and it's up to you whether you want to get on the scale or not and the way that she sits with you and stuff but it took me a few Doctors to find her again. This could be an entire episode unjust. This but I've finally found the team that I feel most comfortable with and that's not not to say. Oh Yay I get to go to the doctor. Because I don't ever feel that way but that to know that I had these people in place who get it who get that. I might be more more sensitive than than somebody else coming in And that's okay. Yeah on treated with respect Because that doesn't mean that I'm weak. It doesn't mean that That there's anything Eric what's wrong with me. I just happened to be in that particular form where my mind can go and get very uncomfortable in that space. I don't like it. If they know that then they can be sweeter with me. Yeah and I love our Chil- you are with your cellphone route. I think it's really important so again. It comes back around to self compassion not for us to be harsh ourselves ourselves because we're uncomfortable and of course a resilience can be up to eighteen so that so important tonight. You don't worry if at some point you find that your coping with test not so well as previous ups and you might think a. Why am I been like this this time when I coped with the last last one okay? That's just a very similar thing to when we were recently discussing anxiety relapse. We need to look at what's going on around us. Has An attrition has our Environment Howrah Stress Levels. You know. Maybe we're not opening as well took a lot going on right now. So you know to know that resilience fluctuates. It's it's not set in stone. It doesn't come into guarantees certificate. It's no it's not going to expire so we need to really keep with the self care and the things that helps opus feel calm and comfortable and if we've got something coming up this challenging than we need to take even better care and that's why it's important to talk to a trusted friend or family member about where you're at and how you're feeling along with the self care it's also incredibly important to stay busy busy during this time so that you're not allowing yourself just to sit and stew and worry and create stories with the way that our it will carry us off into story land stay busy and and of course pray

Anxiety Facebook Asher Eric What
Microsoft Q2 earnings: Beats on top and bottom line on strength of cloud

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Microsoft Q2 earnings: Beats on top and bottom line on strength of cloud

"Trade let's start with Microsoft because that sucks up a little bit higher what we need to know about those results right Microsoft is all about cloud software that's the really big be that we're seeing today that stock now up about two percent in after hours trading the really big significant thing to know here is the word to know here sees me is Asher that's their cloud computing software platform there really competing against us Amazon web services Microsoft really closing the gap with Amazon that being said we're watching here they just reported a one billion dollar beats now compared to Amazon web services they do at nine point nine billion in the fourth in the fourth quarter so it's still very small compared to their competitor but really making up the gap of about sixty two percent during this period that's up from a fifty nine percent jump the last reporting period so really great things here for Microsoft in the cloud space well and it has been amazing creepy to watch that and there is a great story care on to your member ID in Bloomberg businessweek so in the past six months or so members of the golden or around such an Adela the hole that was on the cloud and it certainly seems to be

Microsoft Asher Amazon Adela Bloomberg
Beverages and Your Body

Living Healthy Podcast

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Beverages and Your Body

"So Debbie Let's let's go through some of these liquids kind of one by one. Let's start with with the most basic liquid to humans water. How much water should we be consuming daily? If you think about an easy way to measure it would be taking your weight in pounds and dividing that and half and that's how many fluid ounces you would consume on a normal regular basis so not extreme exercise exercise not extreme environmental conditions. So if somebody is wow one hundred twenty pounds and there's sixty kilos so or whatever whatever so seventy ounces. Oh my gosh. I have so much more I thought I drink plenty of water but that makes me feel like I need eight fluid ounces in a cup and when we when we you say cup we mean like Measured Cup and most people will pick up their glass. Remember glasses can be like ten twelve or if you're looking at you now. Whatever this is I have in front of me books tall or something you know they can get up to sixteen ounces for glass sitting in front of you so it's not like you have to have eight of those right Do people drink water out of glasses anymore. Do you realize that he did do at all. It's always out of a water bottle but like I said you know I'm Pretty Brennan. Dan Class I just find it very interesting because there's always been from what I've heard like a set standard amount of water during the day but I've never heard it had somebody break it down by. I bought Biwati way but that kind of a perfect sentence. Well my gosh in clinical. When I used to work in a hospital we would? Yeah we would do it. Based on anything from their you know their condition and they have surgery and all these other things So if you're looking at just an average person that doesn't have all lows lab works and things like that. Well you know. Take your body weight in pounds divided in half Pluto's it that's a pretty good start right you'll find other people. That's it's not enough for me like I really am thirsty. I drink more Some people will drink too much and flesh out more of their vitamins and minerals. So then you go kind of by urine color and try to get that Nice Pale yellow that amber deep and it's not like just tinted water because then you're probably the drinking too much. Yeah that's that's what I'm all. I'm like constantly gauging. That and I need to drink a lot. More water is what I learned this morning. They're doing great Downing Gallon. Itunes Ooh no you know you need to electric. Let's keep them in the right so interesting because there's such a healthy balance he never really think about it with water. It's just it's just like you can't toxication so much of a good thing. So how. How does shrinking water kind of affect your overall health or can it the same with not having enough so how does proper hydration? Why is it important? Kind of view. Shuna cell in your body uses water whether it's for the cellular processes assesses and metabolism but as a whole fluid. You've got water in your blood supply. You've got water in your back of your are fluid in your eyeballs in your Bursa sacs of your joints transporting nutrients with your blood. Your using your lymphatic system which is another liquid transport so you really have it critically everywhere. I'd say probably if you feel my hair my hair dryers news no water in there. But I'll consider that outside bodies out. So what happens when you get when you don't get enough water. Hydration Yeah Oh man Initially really you can no lack of concentration and you just don't feel you don't feel right. Can you get headaches because I feel like I definitely it makes it can affect long longer term or more severe if you're talking about percent body weight loss then it's GonNa Affect your fluid volume put pressure Asher on your heart to pump out more beats to compensate for the lack of the volume so it can get quite significant. But that's more like say in rapid heatstroke right. Yeah I get really tired. I notice if I'm not drinking enough water I it's the weirdest thing I've noticed lately if I'm not entering enough water I'm tired I'm more tired. And then I can have a whole bottle of water or glass water whatever it is and yeah. It's great up. I think you feel it in your head had quickly and then maybe even your I mean without water. You're going to get constipated right. I was going to say like how quickly because I think oh I'm dehydrated and I've heard like you're almost hydrating for a day ahead of time like rather than drink a glass of water and you're gonNA start feeling a lot better immediately but I wonder that's still seems like a pretty quick remedy because liquids absorbed better or quicker found the body. Yeah and there's something called Osmo Lara's morality. Sorry it's probably it

White House attacks Lt. Col. Vindman while he testifies in Trump impeachment hearing

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:18 min | 2 years ago

White House attacks Lt. Col. Vindman while he testifies in Trump impeachment hearing

"Certainly everyone was moved by Lieutenant. Colonel von Men's close to his is opening statement really invoking his father invoking that we do right here as he said in his testimony and it was really quite scurrilous that while he was chest define line using the White House. Twitter Account the White House's tweeting out a vicious things about Lieutenant Colonel Vin men. He's now under protection of the. US US army he and his family. That's really outrageous. In this day and age. They're treating him as if he is disloyal American when he is in fact a true Patriot a tree it. They talked about whether in fact by being offered to be the Defense Minister for Ukraine he was disloyal to America. I'd I'd remind your viewers that Madeleine Albright when she was secretary of State afterwards was urged by the Czech Republic her native land though she has been an American for a very very long time time now to become president and she liked Vin Vin. Men Thought it was quite amusing and I don't think Republicans believe that Madeleine. Albright is disloyal to America. And neither is Lieutenant Lieutenant Colonel Vin and the other thing in terms of this afternoon that I really want people to understand is the Republicans. Keep saying that Zilenski. The ski never said that he was under pressure. Of course he didn't. He needs the United States he needs Donald Trump. No matter how awful the president is now no matter are how corrupt or how much of a bribe this is. And if he admitted he was under pressure he weakens himself as the president. So we're never going to hear him say that he was pressured Asher. It is a misunderstanding of the bargain. That leaders around the world fuel they have to make with this president because they have air national interests at stake even and if our president does not have our national interest in his mind. Let's let's what Colonel Vin been said in his opening statement about some of the other witnesses who've come forward I wanNA take a moment to recognize. The courage of my colleagues were appeared and are scheduled appear for this committee. I want to say that the character tax on these distinguished and honorable public servants is reprehensible. It is natural to disagree and engage in spirited debate. This has been the custom of Ah of our country since the founding fathers but we are better than personal attacks and John Holliman. The personal attack was coming to him from the White White House from the White House. Twitter account while he was testifying indeed and you know I mean at this point unsurprisingly given the way the president behave last Friday even though the attacks that he in gauged anonymous were seen widely as being as backfiring as undercutting. The Republican cause made Republican congressman as vicious and vitriolic. As they've been made them uncomfortable recognized their strategy was being undercut by the president. And yet here we come around again two days later and the same attacks being launched against Colonel Benjamin I just I don't think we should expect anything other than that now but this is going to be the. It's an appalling a state of affairs that this has become conventional but the president has it has no shame when it comes to who determines to be his targets and I just think we should assume for as long as this process plays out that the president if the president can attack colonel a purple heart. You know he can. He can take anyone and he

Lieutenant Lieutenant Colonel President Trump Lieutenant Colonel Vin Colonel Von Men White White House Madeleine Albright Donald Trump Twitter United States John Holliman America Congressman Ukraine Czech Republic Two Days
Microsoft forecasts cloud sales above expectations

Bloomberg Best

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Microsoft forecasts cloud sales above expectations

"Microsoft posted sales and profit above estimates lifted by demand for the as your cloud computing program as well as internet based versions of the office productivity suite profited Microsoft rose to a dollar thirty eight per share market expectations were for a dollar twenty four at the same time sales of subscription based office three sixty five jump twenty five percent Asher's sales meantime were up fifty nine

Microsoft Asher Twenty Five Percent
Microsoft earnings and revenue beat estimates

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:10 sec | 2 years ago

Microsoft earnings and revenue beat estimates

"Tesla Microsoft posted sales and profits that topped analysts' projections lifted by demand for Asher cloud computing programs and internet based versions of office productivity

Microsoft
"asher" Discussed on Launch Left

Launch Left

19:21 min | 2 years ago

"asher" Discussed on Launch Left

"In Phoenix a space for fame creatives launch the next wave of music rebels and also an intentional space to highlight and empower all artists room radical creativity American dream and personal freedom that people are feeling is being taken away from them if you talk about their rights and their go to bear arms can bear arms without having assault weapons in the hands of everyday citizens play ching fire girl you're in a rural area and you don't have any neighbors and you don't feel safe alone which I might not I would want a gun I don't know that I need an ar seventeen or whatever they are that like that anniversary of the Vegas shooting like it's just appalling hauling that we have two years on done nothing there's just nothing will do anything until dirty monies out of Washington probably incrementally so small talking about like putting one foot in front of the other and these legs slow slow progress toward abyss winning the race thorough there's like small things happening for even gun control right I feel like more Walmart just announced that they are not going to carry the assault weapons like that's a huge thing saw store not lyrics to a song but talk about this it's really good Foale right thank you for sharing that US lilting with lil launch leg Zak yeah the new segment I'm gonNA cut together UNSCOM from our resident Music X. Launch Left Music expert and staffer Chris Tucci who has great tasted nick and always great questions he asked bat for lashes a few questions as well so we're going to give his questions ago here today maybe we'll just do one if you're like I'm done I don't WanNa ask him he wanted Daddy's hard hitting now that we're living in an age I'm just GonNa hold my iphone for all to see now that we're living in an age where anyone can produce distribute and promote their own music is it's still worth it for emerging artists to pursue a record contract question it is an excellent question and very timely because it is right in that at least I personally leave it to be a complete sort of choice now do you WanNa do that because they have distribution and they can push really far they have the ability to take a good thing and make a great and vast or do not want to have a contract with a label that arguably could give you like us short shot like a you know a month or six months and then if they decide not so much you you know languish in sort of the back of their show elves with no way to get out of your contract you know necessarily kind of tied up legally so and everybody's doing the Patriots stuff like there's a lot of different ways I think again it's totally personal now whereas before in the nineties you had have a label you weren't GonNa do anything without a label and it was the they knew it and they had a good hold over you you know the terms especially after napster happened and everyone could get music for free the whole industry was changing they were trying to lock artists up into three sixty deals so like anything you did would be you know through the label flicks so any merch any live performances anything you could possibly do as an artist would come through them and they would like benefit from that revenue stream and they would have a sir control over it so like I currently don't have a label and am trying to see how far I can go without a label to try to be my own poor but at the same time I would hope if I get some juice going on this next record and we need more help that that would be an option so I think they still perform a very vital function nobody has the reach and ability to do the kind of things they do but I don't think it should be the kind of thing that you desperately begged for contract and sign anything and sign it all away because you just don't need to and they're not a magic bullet they can't make success just happen doing great okay question to when you were a young twenty two year old looking to make your mark in the industry how does that influence your writing how does that energy responsible for the creative.

Phoenix twenty two year six months two years one foot
"asher" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"asher" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"So we do have to be holding all these complex pieces at once and it's so complicated. The, the place that we've we find ourselves in at this juncture, these really troubled times. It's so complicated. And we're so intertwined on every level to this very resource extractive system that creates so much pain for humans creatures, the planet, the waters sky. And so the more that I saw occupy I think was really the moment that I decided to commit all the. Way. Because before I was come like here, I was kind of in a kind of not I was floating and I felt chronically dissatisfied in a feeling of floating and not being grounded to a mission. Not being committed not taking the house and saying, I commit to something that is inservice as something in which I am totally in love with and occupy was a catalyst for me to, to go all in, and then from there, I mean, I've can you can you educate me? Then I guess. How did you incorporate what you wanted to do with the environment in the Occupy Wall street movement because I'm having a hard time seeing the correlation between it. But I know isn't me being naive to what exactly you're doing within that. So can you educate me and then our listeners of how you guys enter twenty environment in the Occupy Wall street movement, Asher? This is this is such a good question. And there are so many ways in which I could take it, so I'm like, okay. A young getting all excited. I need to this myself. Mussa who for instance, like we're mad at the bankers. And the bankers have spent all this money, and they bankrupted people and people have lost their, you know, security, and, or were or jobs or like there's less unions. And so people are being taken advantage of, like I was a lot of, you know, a, a lot of people I was talking to just feeling the rich getting richer, and the poor was getting poorer. And so the poorer having less and less resources less than less access to any type of security out, you know, work hours overtime. I mean you could just kind of go on and on and on the list of like how workers in this country and elsewhere are being treated really poorly. Also, kept in this place of poverty, basically are just above the poverty line and never really been able to get out because of that, you know, debt and servitude, and like all of these issues that come with the economic system, but were in, but. We have to understand, like, well, what's beneath the economy, like what actually creates an economy, how do any of us make money? How I mean like in the answer is, is the air. There's nothing without resources. That's what we buy and sell we buy and sell, and we trade resources globally will wear to those resources, come from. Let's just talk about a few of those resources water. There's a huge issue of privatization of water all over the world or multinational, companies will come into countries like the United States. Take Nestle, for instance Nestle will come in to town bell by the rights to the water and in a own the water you could think about, like anything, there's a documentary on the Nestle thing. What's the Juno documentary on the Nestle water thing a look, but there's a really really documentary on the privatization of water that people should want. Yeah. And then you think about like anything our computers. Like I mean anything around. It's like where does it come from it's connected to the fossil fuel industry?.

Nestle Asher United States
"asher" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Science sort of episode two hundred ninety four and our theme. This time is all hollows eve. Host ryan. And joining me talk about things that were science things sort of science and things that wish they were science in just a moment is maneuvering Asher, who's going to talk to us about his scientific reporting and how he got into journalism and folklore mythology and some of the things we share in common having grown up in the south. So look forward to that discussion in just a moment. But before I get into that if you live in the United States, you know, that the mid-term election is upon us. And I would just like to encourage all of our listeners to make sure they have a plan intend to go and vote. There's been a lot of talk about how historic and elections promises to be and I would courage everyone not to let themselves be put on the sidelines of history. If it indeed as as historic as we think, it might be I'm not going to tell you how to vote, but if there are candidates that maybe say that climate change is real and want to do something about it, which will probably be Democrats and less likely to be Republicans. I think voting for those not that I would encourage anyone to be a single issue voter. But all things being equal from scientific perspective that to me is a very important issue. Obviously other issues are important to me as well and I- factor. Those into my vote, but they generally all tend to trend in that same direction. So take with that what you will. And with that we are going to dive into my conversation with Asher enjoy. All right. So I'm being joined by Asher L Bine who promotes himself as a storyteller for higher based out of Austin, Texas, doing some science reporting. But also some comic book reporting, which is how I first became aware of his work, and then had the pleasure of meeting up with s VP so Asher. Thank you for joining us. It's great to be here. All right. So because we are a science shown because at least the word science comes before the word sort of I fully anticipate that we might get into the comic book realm, and especially because we're going to be promoting some work that you have coming up. But I want to start talking about your science reporting. So maybe to play on a comic book trope? Do you want to tell us if your origin story of how you became? You know, what were you bitten by a radioactive science reporter or how did you first enter the world of science journalism. So what happened was I spent a very productive childhood running around creeks in in Dallas and Atlanta and harassing various local wildlife, mostly lizards and snakes on a couple of notable occasions, armadillos and skunks and bringing them home and letting them roam around the house to my parents, deep consternation and kind of along the way, I just I got incredibly interested in the natural world in all various permutations, and one of the things that really interest me and still really interests me are done and other sort of like prehistoric organisms, which led into a greater interest in prehistoric, ecosystems and modern ecosystems. And so most of my my sort of science background was all based around what you might call macro biology. If you can't see it if you don't need a microscope to see. I'm probably really interested. If you do need a microscope, man, I try, but it's just it's it's hard for me to it's hard for me to to give it as much attention as it probably deserves a similar line that I use. And I say that if I can't tackle it and hold it down that I'm probably less interested than I would be. So for me, it's not super interested. You're not super interested in elephants. Then is what I'm hearing. We'll see in my mind that counts because I could at least try to tackle it..

Asher Asher L Bine ryan United States Texas VP Austin reporter Dallas Atlanta
"asher" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"And then this artists Kato who's part of OD was very close with and I just financed everything for a long time. I mean, a paid for the mixes, the masters, the housing. I mean, it was just like I was understanding how to develop an artist, and I learned a lot from that experience because I failed. What were some of the big lessons you learned anything with that? I learn how to make records. First of all. I mean, I learned mixing the mastering. I learned the radio promotion sighed independently because I was working record independently. I learned you know how to trust my gut at the right time and I and I hear all the time of like, oh, everything you sign, you know, blows up, but I had a lot of failures before Asher Roth happened, and Asher was kind of a new beginning for me because it was the first time I did it without so so def. So my back was against the wall I had it was all my money. I had no income coming in are fused to do parties, had everything to lose, but it's everything. I mean, literally, I will never forget. I'm moving into my new house. My wife now and I looked around. I said, I can't believe we live here because I remember paying for pizza with change. You know, I remember I ordered this pizza and realized I didn't have any money, and I had to wait until the next party the following week, and I paid for pizza would change. And then I was quick parties cold Turkey because I said, if I have to throw a party failed. So I had enough money when I signed Asher to live. For about thirteen months, my lifestyle, and then I was going to go broke and I signed Asher and Justin within four months of each other, and I put everything into them. I mean, well, housing studio time paying for the Tudor paying for the furniture, paying everything. And I really believed in these guys and it makes it all worth it now because it was I was far away from home. I couldn't go home and ask him for money since I was eighteen and had to make it from my own. In the idea, failing wasn't an option. Did you ever think that one of them wanted or both of them want to be successful in their own way or that you want they wouldn't work out or you would have to find another way to make money? No, I really. I really believed in both of them when I found Asher, I knew exactly what it could be. What Asher also told me though, is sometimes artists don't want to be as big as you want them to. Asher was super happy being who he was. And I had this vision to make him the biggest artists in the world, and we had so much hype and he just that wasn't what he wanted. And one of my closest. Now he's my brother for life and you just put out a video the other day kind of chronicling the whole journey we've had together for himself, and it was really nice to see because you know he just wanted to make music and enjoys life and never really be famous. And you know, he's achieved that and he's done very well from self and he had the big hit. He had the number three album and it was a struggle for me which Justin Justin was like, make me big. All right. Let's go, you know. And you know, he was very much like me and we, you know it and he was a young man and no it was. It was a different thing. But you know, when Asher mate, I love college. It was in the basement of this house. I was renting his crap hole like rats every called the greenhouse because truth he was smoking so much weed, but that night he wasn't spoke weeks. Never smoked with Justin was around, but he recorded. I love college and just in actually was in the studio. He was would studios like a little crop room in the basement. You know, my buddy doing engineering, but we all. All kind of came together, and there's this really great picture of mea Asher and just on the front porch of that house and no new Justin was. I mean, there's videos of Asher EMMY with ludicrous and everyone's hyped because ashen ludicrous in the same room and they don't notice there's this little kids sitting behind us children's Justin..

mea Asher Justin Justin Asher Roth Asher EMMY Kato Turkey thirteen months four months
"asher" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on Accelerate!

"It's time to accelerate difference. This is Andy welcomed up six hundred seventy eight. That's six. Eight of accelerate the sales podcast of record. I've got a fun show lined up free today. Joining me as John Asher. John is CEO Asher strategies keynote speaker and bestselling author. And also I'm joined again today by my great friend, Bridget Gleeson might have noticed. Bridget hasn't been on some recent episodes. We're both working hard to grow our respective companies traveling a lot. So it's been difficult to sink our schedules to record, but Morris coming up, I guarantee it. So we get to John. I wanna talk to you about the sales house. I'm in sales house. As I've talked about in the past is the BB sales education accelerator created the sales house for the curious smart Beata be seller. So take a moment here, picture self ten years into the future. Think about what you want to have accomplished at that point, how you've succeeded financially personally, careerwise now, right down physically, right down, take a pen, write down what you think you need to learn. In order to make future reality because they come to sales. That's what you're gonna learn at least for your sales career. I mean, this is not just an education. This is this is a movement movement. We come who you want to be to become the best version of you. Great on your terms. So come invest few minutes a day in the sales house. You get unlimited access to me in every bit of sales.

John Asher Bridget Gleeson Andy Asher Beata CEO Morris ten years
"asher" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So you talk about demand prediction for a car marketplace. That's that can be generalized to all car providers that want to manage fleets. He talk about navigating a car from point eight, two point b, that is something that is generally applicable to all all cars. If you wanted to get in the food delivery business, you would probably have to figure out all of the data points for a given. Like we did a show with door dash recently and they have all these different factors for matching a, you know, a delivery person with a potential order that's in the queue, and it takes into account like the restaurant and how long the food takes to make at the restaurant and all of these domains Pacific signals. So it's not like you just be able to port the ride OS software easily to solve all of door, dashes problems. It isn't necessarily. I think the the problems that we're solving with vehicles don't necessarily or sorry, cars don't necessarily map exactly to to the ones with door to Asher food delivery. But I do think that they all are encompassed by fleet management. And this is what I guess. I mean by like the kinds of problems we're focusing on are not necessarily only limited to routing vehicles round. I think when you when you have any system where you are taking part of the autonomy, that was, you know, agent driven where, for example, if you, if you have cars that are driven by humans that have their own design. Here's on wants. That's a very different thing than if you have, you know, delivery, buts, or a swarm vehicles going about and accomplishing bunch of tasks. There's a whole host of new problems that come with. Just how do you, how do you optimally route fleet not just how to optimally route a car and an abstract way? Any notion of, you know, sleep did in that case. So if you're working with a variety of OEM's, you can potentially leverage the data from all of those different. Oh, yes. If they're willing to to share it with you, is there any concern from the OEM's that this? I think the optimistic case from the OEM's perspective would be that we're going to get to take part in this data sharing this economies of scale, and we're going to benefit from the data of the other OEM's if we give our data, but the more pessimistic view might be well, if we control enough of the market, we don't wanna be giving away that data because then we're giving a competitive advantage to. Other people, what's the conversation around the data sharing and the economies of scale of the data with the OEM's? I think that actually OEM's are not as averse to data sharing as we might have..

Asher
"asher" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"You there either you can then migrate and then grow into the rest of it so i like this is a great first step into using note on asher sounds good do we need to sort of talk about the fundamentals noda bit because i think anybody coming at this from an is perspective like it's almost the anathema of the swiss army knife that is s yeah there's that's a good point richard there's some basic things about know that i think really help define what the problem statements are forgetting to the cloud or for you know just developing or deploying these apps first self node when you run it as a web server a lot of people use express is by far the most used package out there at least it's been for here's that you can use an express effectively adds in the web server aspect that you can use with note so a lot of people run node with express to launch itself but the way node works you've got all these middleware packages that you can pull in ad features so like i s we use that example since you mentioned it it's it's a web server that kind of comes with all these features built in right and then was road you only get what you ask for so you're not getting security logging and the ability to serve jason html all the stuff or consumer jason out of the box you pull in middleware and you tell it how to behave the nightside about that is you're never getting extra stuff that you're not familiar with the downside is you have to make sure you know what you're asking for sure this is also the way as core is kind of go on or less clears to pull them which with middleware yeah i it's it's sort of this off by default mentalities opposed to on by developmentally but now you have to know what you're asking for yeah and went when you do that the challenge comes in and you think about as dot net with new get node we have in pm which you're just packages you have to make sure when you deploy to the cloud that the packages that you want our deployed to the cloud as well yeah and one of the struggles is okay let's say you put together in application with knowing dodge a s in using whatever on the front end is fine i can speak to mel even if you do that and you whole bunch of packages do you want your package is to be zipped up on your local machine and sent to the cloud or would you prefer that the cloud actually installs him packages of their instead and to kind of answer that i think even think about well what's the consequences of both ways if you take it locally and use it up and you bring it up to the cloud some packages actually are operating system dependent on some of them also how do you know the version of note in mpn that are running in the cloud are also the same versions of node and a package manager running your machine right you do have some control over that though right in azure yeah you do you can say basically look this is the version i've got here let's go hits in set that up azure what if you've got a team now you know in richard scott windows in you've got debbie and lennox i've got mac you just don't know what's going to be there so another option is to just say you know what let let the cloud do that for you so you're not worrying about these kind of things when you link to other things that are running in the cloud of course now you have dependencies that may or may not change right i mean it's the same java script everywhere if you're linking to something that exists on another domain you're susceptible to to whatever happens over there yeah you really want to control your dependencies is really the the story of a right knowing what those look like and it's just good to not trying to scare anybody i'm just trying to say that this is things you have to think about when you're deploying any app whether it's done it or not sure or whatever but i mean what i pre not that i'm node fan right like javascript is never been my first language of choice really rather couldn't see sharp but what i like about nodes philosophy is this could figuration as code mindset that everything is explicitly turned on like you talk about.

asher
"asher" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"You there either you can then migrate and then grow into the rest of it so i like this is a great first step into using note on asher sounds good do we need to sort of talk about the fundamentals noda bit because i think anybody coming at this from an is perspective like it's almost the anathema of the swiss army knife that is s yeah there's that's a good point richard there's some basic things about know that i think really help define what the problem statements are forgetting to the cloud or for you know just developing or deploying these apps first self node when you run it as a web server a lot of people use express is by far the most used package out there at least it's been for here's that you can use an express effectively adds in the web server aspect that you can use with note so a lot of people run node with express to launch itself but the way node works you've got all these middleware packages that you can pull in ad features so like i s we use that example since you mentioned it it's it's a web server that kind of comes with all these features built in right and then was road you only get what you ask for so you're not getting security logging and the ability to serve jason html all the stuff or consumer jason out of the box you pull in middleware and you tell it how to behave the nightside about that is you're never getting extra stuff that you're not familiar with the downside is you have to make sure you know what you're asking for sure this is also the way as core is kind of go on or less clears to pull them which with middleware yeah i it's it's sort of this off by default mentalities opposed to on by developmentally but now you have to know what you're asking for yeah and went when you do that the challenge comes in and you think about as dot net with new get node we have in pm which you're just packages you have to make sure when you deploy to the cloud that the packages that you want our deployed to the cloud as well yeah and one of the struggles is okay let's say you put together in application with knowing dodge a s in using whatever on the front end is fine i can speak to mel even if you do that and you whole bunch of packages do you want your package is to be zipped up on your local machine and sent to the cloud or would you prefer that the cloud actually installs him packages of their instead and to kind of answer that i think even think about well what's the consequences of both ways if you take it locally and use it up and you bring it up to the cloud some packages actually are operating system dependent on some of them also how do you know the version of note in mpn that are running in the cloud are also the same versions of node and a package manager running your machine right you do have some control over that though right in azure yeah you do you can say basically look this is the version i've got here let's go hits in set that up azure what if you've got a team now you know in richard scott windows in you've got debbie and lennox i've got mac you just don't know what's going to be there so another option is to just say you know what let let the cloud do that for you so you're not worrying about these kind of things when you link to other things that are running in the cloud of course now you have dependencies that may or may not change right i mean it's the same java script everywhere if you're linking to something that exists on another domain you're susceptible to to whatever happens over there yeah you really want to control your dependencies is really the the story of a right knowing what those look like and it's just good to not trying to scare anybody i'm just trying to say that this is things you have to think about when you're deploying any app whether it's done it or not sure or whatever but i mean what i pre not that i'm node fan right like javascript is never been my first language of choice really rather couldn't see sharp but what i like about nodes philosophy is this could figuration as code mindset that everything is explicitly turned on like you talk about.

asher
"asher" Discussed on Congratulations with Chris D'Elia

Congratulations with Chris D'Elia

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on Congratulations with Chris D'Elia

"Whatever happened at asher roth with that song college one fires playing asha roth in the background like just what happened to him does he still wrap he does do it right he probably has fucking he probably owns like a chain of print shops or something how weird is it when like a child star or something like that he was job star but like when somebody grows up like what are these fucking some of these vine guys going to do like what are these guys going to do who are big on instagram and then when instagram goes away with the fucker they going to do like what's that guy who always made that fuck in that pasty white guy that was like fucking guys name i don't even know his name anymore he was like thirty one when vine describing me but like he was like thirty one when vine was going on it was charles or some shit i don't remember it was fucking awful though whatever the fuck was he had tattoos and shit what's he doing now and then he got in trouble for cause some girl said he raped her the fuck set guy's name whatever it was it was awful what's he doing now he's like forty now and just being a print shop i don't know but anyway yes so what he got a vine tattoo jesus christ that's him i won't even say his name that doesn't serve while we still got a lot of grandfathers jesus christ.

asher roth asha roth instagram charles
"asher" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Three in in seventy keeps you up at night and he said he said a breach of asher right which totally makes sense that the the one thing that could truly damage civilizations moved to the public cloud like this is a change in the way civilization functions would be a significant breach of a public cloud of structure which cross your fingers has never happened so far but when i looked at the specifications on these vulnerabilities especially for meltdown i'm like this is exactly the kind of scary thing a breach were you could peek into somebody else's virtual machine on the same piece of hardware potentially in in the cloud that the big who's nothing to pick what you potentially could and that yeah scary stuff and you say the patches came hard and fast is it's just amazing how many of a roller abilities come from era where they weren't thinking about security i look at all the dns issues we've had just very fundamental infrastructure just has this law that's been baked into how worse for so long and you know you comes out a decade later i was like oh this thing that we all rely on is now just fundamentally broken was built with the best intent that we most part like they were academics the web was a bunch of akkad emmys just trying to link their papers together you made it into porn how did that happen right i'm always fascinated how when you guys improve performance right that it just seems like magic to to us but you know what kinds of things do you i mean you just simply doing telemetry and on how long everything takes you look at the things that take the longest time and have the highest latency and say how do we improve that i mean is it just that simple just going down the list and in what kinds of improvements do you do do you move memory around human things into the same process like what's involved in that yeah i think in some ways you're exactly right that is all it is it's unwin lovely really is just profiling what's at the top of the profiler and going after that i mean that's really the best thing you can do.

asher
"asher" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Three in in seventy keeps you up at night and he said he said a breach of asher right which totally makes sense that the the one thing that could truly damage civilizations moved to the public cloud like this is a change in the way civilization functions would be a significant breach of a public cloud of structure which cross your fingers has never happened so far but when i looked at the specifications on these vulnerabilities especially for meltdown i'm like this is exactly the kind of scary thing a breach were you could peek into somebody else's virtual machine on the same piece of hardware potentially in in the cloud that the big who's nothing to pick what you potentially could and that yeah scary stuff and you say the patches came hard and fast is it's just amazing how many of a roller abilities come from era where they weren't thinking about security i look at all the dns issues we've had just very fundamental infrastructure just has this law that's been baked into how worse for so long and you know you comes out a decade later i was like oh this thing that we all rely on is now just fundamentally broken was built with the best intent that we most part like they were academics the web was a bunch of akkad emmys just trying to link their papers together you made it into porn how did that happen right i'm always fascinated how when you guys improve performance right that it just seems like magic to to us but you know what kinds of things do you i mean you just simply doing telemetry and on how long everything takes you look at the things that take the longest time and have the highest latency and say how do we improve that i mean is it just that simple just going down the list and in what kinds of improvements do you do do you move memory around human things into the same process like what's involved in that yeah i think in some ways you're exactly right that is all it is it's unwin lovely really is just profiling what's at the top of the profiler and going after that i mean that's really the best thing you can do.

asher
"asher" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

Giant Bombcast

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"asher" Discussed on Giant Bombcast

"I like just after after everyone watched it r and earned clipped it and sent that around to be like we did this fake as shit the van had the audacity to just sent it out without acknowledging the reality of it in a way that is just like are you guys seem like bozo's this this is horrible this way to get your game off to a start like i don't want anything to do with this mess that he sima versed in the game at oil i did not widely watched a ton of it's all about thirty six kinda watch some of the clips was just like all right uh that's right up of looking at implies that he was occasionally like talking to the person off camera who's actually playing the game yes it's a great way to maintain the facade and i mean you know that some point like why why have the the facade at all and myg it's probably better that they didn't just try to pass it off completely as that made it pretty pretty plane asher but then to send out things trying to get by coverage of it lifted snoop dogg playing her name and held a snoop now uh i'm gonna see mid to late 40s okay i was wondering if he'd had fifty a w in there and he's getting these probably going close but man there it he's fantastic anna ufc that's all i know but waited oh so yes let us he's he's in he's knockout mode which they had in the previous game or they've they've changed it up a bit here it's it's a view of see mode that kind of gives you fighting game style life bars though grappling it's just it's just striking straight striking it's it's kinda was alive is a fixed to aside when i gave although it always is.

asher
"asher" Discussed on Windows Weekly

Windows Weekly

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"asher" Discussed on Windows Weekly

"So if you think about what makes us talked about they they're idea is there to use failed per gram a bold gate arrays fpgas inside their own data centres what it hey what if we could let that others developers outside the company use fpgas on asher like what if we could give them access to that capability so what kind of workloads might they want to run maybe ai stuff because you need super high end processing power for that so that's what brainwave is brainwave is bringing uh deep errol networking framework put it on top of these fpgas and asher and then ultimately making it available to customers so it's almost like here's how microsoft makes asher an ai cloud kind of crazy if you think about it and and you know before you think oh yes someday rate next year like next calendar year is when we think they are going to have fpgas be available to out external developers on asher brainwave probably sometime shortly after that or even at the same time now the where my mind first went when i read the story was just last week microsoft basically announced that they've nailed context speech recognition so they they've they've got that down the one part they don't have four a real quote unquote universal translator is idiom recognition that's that's an little trickier i i may know what word you said i don't know what it means if you're using an idiom.

asher microsoft
"asher" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

AppleInsider Podcast

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"asher" Discussed on AppleInsider Podcast

"I mean uh alphabet themselves don't make a watch alphabet themselves make one phone into different sizes they make one home pa home speaker they make a couple yo three different to av devices and that's that's kind of it right so there are indeed spending is being spent on things other than those things that are similar apple microsoft are spending on asher they're spending on their cloud services their spending on office an xbox and a surface and we'll gets talking about surface in a moment in intel are spending on things that they want to sell to others like cook but but not directly to consumer necessarily their spending on parts that go into the other people's products whether that's mobilize in the selfdriving system stuff or or their processors facebook unsure what to say bots yeah bots so it's it's really difficult to make a good solid comparison we we know a lot about apple's rd and apples are andy some of the compares while the samsung some compares well to intel but there are a lot of these where where there's less cross oilbased analogy could compare any companies with one another because all companies a different things we'll based on now these are these are but he's companies that all play in the tech space and has just a comparison of the numbers that's all yeah okay and presumably there is not a whole lot of our nego into the dishwasher from samsung although that was one of their big flagship products at last losing us.

microsoft asher cloud services intel apple flagship products samsung
"asher" Discussed on Women Inspiring Women

Women Inspiring Women

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"asher" Discussed on Women Inspiring Women

"Because asher said in these goals air saying to yourself i wanna be of an elite or premier or elite ted but your goals are only to work an hour a day or you just want to run challenge groups you don't wanna really building organization your diving leadership will you are not gonna set at leadership golkar's premier li are leadership goals you're gonna say goals based on customers and helping them with with challengers sending says so part of this be realistic is education is understanding how i heard money and how do i get income and where my commissions coverup aware is is breakdown coming from when you begin to understand it becomes real to you than a goal is for it's more tangible you're able to set up the guidelines around it in order to get there all right okay the next thing is accountability so we always talk about you know you devin accountability partner somebody that i can share my goals lead and not rates at everybody should have it's spouses significant other a success of people they find within your organization or your business and it's already that you have to find and it's not an accountability part is not somebody that is going to tell you to work because that's your job your job is to get the work done the accountability par is somebody you're gonna share these goals with somebody that's gonna hold you accountable and say hey this would you pull your radio housing gully where have you progress with that whole where are working on this week it somebody that you can share i didn't say what do you think about this but it's somebody that knows what you want to accomplish enzo you that person is the person that is going to say melanie you're not getting it done let's go let's go year you can do more can do better be need that count ability that person deke you in check.

asher golkar melanie partner