35 Burst results for "Ashby"

Celebrities and cocktails

Ask Me Another

05:18 min | Last week

Celebrities and cocktails

"So nice to see you again interior. It's been a long while I o spend the two years since I left new. York At, busy. So Nice to be you. I will say that I was like, what am I gonNa say I like you from that? I was like Oh everything. You've done is like one of the things that I love the most? Well, I was GONNA. Say. So you recently started a podcast it's called busy Phillips is doing her best showing Thira is a huge part of that podcast. It's very and yeah. So you interview celebrities and people of note, and just talk about how people are pivoting and doing their best. At it is very timely to now you started this podcast before. Well, I feel like we sold it almost a year ago with October of last year you know basically we had a whole idea for a new way of doing things and making stuff and we were working on this really big projects that had a lot of moving parts and we had like our big meeting with all of these money people in New York that was scheduled for March sixteenth. how and that was that you know, and so I we. Timing. Yeah. You know whatever we're I feel very blessed in my life to be a person that's able to have perspective and self-awareness and Ceantierre and I have been talking a little bit during that time also just like we've kept in touch since busy tonight and I always just loved like are writer's room and busy tonight was really small is only three writers which for those of you at home that's slowly insane. Very. Small I think we had more writers doing ashby another. For. Clear they were being paid less. Absolutely. No one was making a ton of money. Why it was so confusing that they cancel because I was like is this show is free. Just crazy. The shoe string that we were managing to do that. You know I feel like was a really successful show at the. But nobody uses the term like indie talkshow nobody that but it really wasn't indeed talk show that's like. We. Definitely should have gotten. Independent Spirit Award. One hundred percent. If we could go back. Let's get some games. We gotta get. Some Games. Can we can I say one more thing though about the podcast Ligo I have a theme song that I sang and Mr Jonathan Coulton wrote the theme song for me to how did you not tell us this? All of our meetings, Jonathan talking about busy and getting ready for this. You'd you felt no need to just mention that I. You know I don't like to Brag. I WANNA tell everybody. I love. Good the full picture. Okay. So you eighty first game, you're going to work together in this one. I know shed Thira cut it knows the drill obviously, but you're gonNA, work together. This one this is a word game So those are typically on the tougher side. It's also about famous people and alcohol. Great things I love, right yeah. Let's go. So my God. In any particular order depending on the day? I'll take either both of them lift my spirits. So, we're going to give you a cocktail recipe that describes a mash up of a cocktail in the name of a celebrity and you are going to give us the Masher. I'm ready heads up I drink a whisky. NEAT. So I don't know if we're going to be the best mix and let's go. Here's your first one. Okay. Mix Rum Curragh CEO, or is that and fresh lime juice and serve it to the super model and new host of dancing with the stars and maybe you'll get a smile out of her. Okay. I know it's Tyra Banks Ray. Rum. My tyra banks, my tyrod. She and yeah, that was. Yeah. Okay, okay You Know My grandmother my dad's mom my parents lived in Hawaii because my dad was in the navy and she used to like to go to the pink hotel and she called them high ties. And not my. High Time? Because after one, she started saying hi. Tie. Another high tide. Instead of tie and so I always call them high tides. Forever, I'm in Hawaii, I'd go to the Pink Hotel and I have one in her honour office.

Mr Jonathan Coulton Pink Hotel Mix Rum Curragh Ceo Thira Hawaii Tyra Banks Ray York New York Ashby Independent Spirit Award Phillips Ceantierre Writer Navy
How the Biden-Harris ticket will impact the 2020 race

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

02:58 min | Last month

How the Biden-Harris ticket will impact the 2020 race

"Joe Biden's choice of Camilla Harris as his running mate is being met with excitement and hope from many women in and around Sacramento. KP CASE Joe Michaels joins us Live in studio with more Oh Bill Bynes decision to add California's junior senator to the 2020 Democratic ticket brings a smile to the face of the only woman currently sitting on Sacramento City Council Councilwoman Anjali Gash be calling the choice, exciting seeing yourself reflected in leaders. Is just so empowering, not just for young people, but for all people. Women have never seen themselves in the Oval Office. In the White House. Never so to see a woman actually get to vice president of the United States of America would tell women and girls everywhere that it is possible and it is possible in our lifetime. Kendra Montgomery Block of the Sierra Health Foundation, is pleased to finally see an African American woman chosen as the running mate of a major party's presidential candidate as a black woman, how we are constantly looked upon as the backbone of the entire country, and in doing so So making sure that you have not only just a seat at the table, but a voice at the table means a lot in our democracy, and Camilla represents that voice, not only for us before the people Montgomery Clark believes Harris will also serve as a rule model for young African American girls. You always want to be able to look at folks and say, Hey, that's a path that I could take two And now that's incredibly connected to black women, Indian women and two women of color that we can take this path that we can build strong families, built strong education connections and then be able to take on top leadership role in this country. Councilwoman Ashby says Harris is well prepared for the opportunity. This isn't choosing a woman for the sake of choosing a woman. He was a candidate for the presidency herself. She's been the senator for California. She's been attorney general. She's been a D E A. There's no doubt that she's qualified to do this job. Ashby understands the possibility that Harris could be polarizing and doesn't out W naysayers were choosing the next president and vice president, United States of America. We get to look at them through a critical leads, but we need to look at them through balanced lenses, and that is what the people of this country are asking for. So many ways through protests through support of candidates. The things that you're hearing is a nation that just wants equity in its decision making. They want to see women and men have equal opportunity they want to see people of every race have equal opportunity. When you look at American history, it's been a long time in coming. From the women's suffrage movement that ultimately gave women the right to vote 100 years ago this month of the civil rights movement aimed at ending racial discrimination to 2020 when an African American woman now stands as the running mate of a major party's presidential candidate,

Camilla Harris Vice President Councilwoman Anjali Gash Senator California United States Ashby Joe Biden Sacramento America Joe Michaels Kendra Montgomery Block Bill Bynes Sacramento City Council White House Oval Office Montgomery Clark Sierra Health Foundation
Hamilton: Not the right time to negotiate 'big contract'

The Autosport Podcast

00:25 sec | Last month

Hamilton: Not the right time to negotiate 'big contract'

"Yeah, look as as you earlier, the other real big story of the day Valerie boss Ashby continuing with Mercedes next year he's on the new contract with the team which says in the press release thoughts for until at least the end of twenty twenty one so. Obviously Simonsen no contract yet he was also saying, now's not the time we leave contract negotiations, but we don't really expect him to be going anywhere, and if he is going to make a change, it's not going to be going to. The teams because they will full

Valerie Boss Ashby Simonsen
Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call

Ask Me Another

06:45 min | 3 months ago

Jane Levy and Alex Newell: Zoey's Extraordinary Zoom Call

"Oh! So what a great! Hello! That is! That makes a nice with. Commerce exactly. How's it going John? I've just turned the fan off in my office so that we can record which means we are counting down to the point when my body goes past one hundred and five and I pass out I. Know this this room to this room to is like freezing with the air conditioning on, and you turn it off and five minutes later. You are basically able to bake sourdot Brennan. Yes, and you know I I have ways of cooling fans. Air Conditioners can't use them well recording now, also I have to keep. The door closed in this room. Because let's just say I. Have A feral cat living in my office right now. So. We can't have the door open. Your that. Yeah. That's a meal. You're feral cat. Theory is that's betsy that sense? Betsy sounds okay. He's all. Right, now he's at the window and he's meowing I. Think what he's saying is help. Your. Guys. Your barrel cats. Maybe he say free food and here. Really Awesome. Sleep all day. Any Food I love it. Yeah. He's he's. He's doing great. As you know as you know, I have started taking care of the feral cats in my backyard, but the feral cats are now not in a crate. They are not in a basement. They don't have a towel over them. They are roaming freely in US recording studio. One has a skin condition and is staying with me awhile until the skin condition is soft, and it may not be solved I. Don't know I may not be solved, I'm not sure what's going to happen. Maybe he's going to be an indoor cat. Who knows at the window? Your indoor cat. Let's let's. Let's let's make it personal. It's not an indoor cat. You notice that. I'm trying not to say it because I've become too attached to this cat. While the cat does deep deep, deep, deep, deep, deep in its feral mind and heart. Can, you can see Betsy Beth. Everybody Radiator Watch I taught him a trick. Betsy. Betsy I. Do that looks at me, Really Cute, a loud noise and ahead turn studies Ya. Predator, so it looks at. The first sign of like threat approaching. I make that noise and he's like. Again. Once again we have nothing to. Show for you from the Netflix series working moms with the show's creators and stars Catherine Reitman and Philip Sternberg. Then we talked a longtime friend of mine comedian Baron Vaughn, and he shares with us his innermost thoughts on. Be Better, roommate, the hulk or Wolverine? But I. Really get things going with Alex Newell and Jane Levy from. The NBC Musical Dramas Zoe. Extraordinary playlist to show is about a woman who discovers she is the ability to hear people's thoughts as songs, so everyone on the show is a triple threat. They can act sing and dance, but Jonathan can. They won't their way through an asking other trivia game I hope so. I always thought triple threat was acting singing and Trivia. Would you say it's acting singing and dance interested? You know what? Maybe maybe it is. Maybe maybe Trivia is just woven in there. We'll find out. And like magic here. They are Jay Levy Alex. Newell thank you so much for being part of Ashby another. I have been watching Zoe's extraordinary playlist. Okay? No, that some of the cast are professional singers dancers like you Alex but the show features a lot of choreography that I assume you don't get a lot of time to learn. What was that like for you, Jane Yeah. There's a there's a an array of experience throughout the cast, Alex Newell comes in, and just does one kick and is like I learned it. It's fine. Under some of us who get eight rehearsals because it's a lot harder. Yeah. I do I do learn I have learned a music number. The day of but Jane has as well. While yeah, but mine are usually. My characters in every single dance number every musical number, because it comes through her superpower, but most of my choreography. If you WANNA, call it that in those numbers or just me like walking in a straight line so I can learn those on the day. You have a dance background. Don't Eugene. I danced as a kid. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, so you're not afraid of it. No I love it. I'm much more afraid of singing singing is. Really difficult for me. But she meals every time that's. After, the but but. Every time a period. Wow, thanks, Alex, but dancing is just fun and I care less about being good about good at it right? Yeah, because you can move and that's the most important thing. It's the rest of us who are when you start dancing cooper like oh no! Her dancing, Lake when we do the. Of The second episode when she was like. They were like nothing. Like dancing can. Like five steps. That's when I was in shape. So we have a couple of great games for you. Let's let's play some games. Okay so this first one. You're going to be playing against each other. We're going to go back and forth. This is a this is a game about characters every answering. This game is a famous character. Jonathan I are going to read you an excerpt of how the author described the character, and you just have to guess who is being described. Great Okay. So Alex will start with you. Here! Her stepsisters ridiculed her. AP's. stepsisters right? How many? How many. Honestly I, I wanna read the rest of it just for our listeners, and also because I did not when I, heard this description I had never heard this particular version that her stepsisters ridiculed her, and scattered peas and lentils into the

Jay Levy Alex Alex Newell Betsy Jane Yeah Jonathan Betsy Beth Betsy I. Air Conditioners United States John Baron Vaughn Jane Levy Netflix NBC ZOE Catherine Reitman Jane Eugene Ashby
"ashby" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

The Tennis.com Podcast

12:57 min | 7 months ago

"ashby" Discussed on The Tennis.com Podcast

"Panic joined in the lake known at US. Stayed National Campus Studio with my co host Irena Falconi. Hey guys. How's it going and our guest for this episode? Richard Ashby Richard. Welcome thank you. Thanks for having me. Richard Works here at the. Usda national campus. Richard tells a little brief bio about yourself then working for the for sixteen years before that coached on my own little bit privately with pros and Juniors Worked in some academies before that and so. That's my coaching background played. Junior Tennis Played College University of South Carolina. That's basically playing background played a little bit of pro after college but not that successful so onto coaching. That's relatable So what players. What age group are you targeting right now? Do you work with a specific group. Your work with the fourteen hundred girls. I'm here at the national campus. So we bring kids for camps primarily camps training weeks. We don't do a lot of traveling with kids that age. We don't have them come in. For long periods of time they usually come in for a week or two weeks of training And we work with their coaches. So we get the information back to the coaches things that we worked on here things that we see we go to tournaments have a chance to watch him play there and hopefully see them improving on things have a chance to talk to their coaches about things. We're seeing a lot easier when it's you know live where you're watching something and talking with the coach so the tournaments. It's a great option to do that. With coaches so you've been working with the USA for sixteen years. Have you been with the girls? Fourteen and under age single year no Started two thousand three so that first year and the next year we're primarily with Like junior pros so kids basically seventeen to eighteen sixteen eighteen and did that for a couple of years and then in two thousand and five started with the kids born in Nineteen ninety-one that age group so worked with an age group for few years through Two thousand eight then two thousand nine. I started with twelve and unders Jade Louise and other coach. I used to work with age group and He actually started working with kids older. So I Essentially switch places with him so from two thousand nine assorted with twelve and under and kind of grown to thirteen and then fourteen and fourteen under for last few years. Do some name. What are some players you've worked with? Amanda Anisimov was slow and Stevens. Cannon CICI Bellis Falconi yes all those players So yeah very fortunate. When we moved to we moved to Boca it was a good location. Had A lot of good players in the area so players Would come through in practice. We were able to set up a program where they're younger players. Come out and you know not every day Amanda I came out like once a week when she was younger Always worked with her. Dad was her coach. So work with her Same with Sonya and We did we actually had a pretty good set-up there where they in the morning to drilling and then the afternoons do match play and we'd be able to have kids kind of all levels. Sometimes older kids coming out in the afternoon but Amanda and Sonia. You know where kids at did that from pretty much. The beginning Sloan. I've done very little with her. I mean it's mostly been Camps or a little bit of training and Let's see who else has been out of there You know so. Yeah Irena Hell Coney for sure. Was there So when I worked with a ninety one group Sorry come and play matches Actually tell Ya arena like the first candidate when we were in key Biscayne arena. It's actually in the camp along with Alli Risk. So Mallory burdette there. You go so a bunch of kids That a moved on to play pros which is great. You know so. That's one of the things. I'm fortunate. I got to work with kids. That are the best in the country so you know a lot of them are going to be successful so I was actually mentioning that to see the other day. We were watching you practice with one of the girls. I don't I can't remember her name but she's pretty good. And I made a comment to see see I was like. Did you work with coach? Richard Like Yeah. I did and I was like. That's unbelievable when I was. I believe it was thirteen or something. I was still living in New York and I got this letter from the USDA. Do you WanNa do this. Camp Key Biscayne and sure enough it was with Alison riske Madison Bengal Whom all our top seventy have been top seventy players. It's not very common for a coach to be able to have that much of an impact on so many players that end up being professional. What is it that you have that makes that possible GonNa Know How much it is me. It's definitely good system where you know. We got a chance to see young players at an early age. I remember the first camp she came to. She was not the best. One they're You're maybe in the middle of the pack She had come to the some of the similar things she has. Now you know just the excitement. She always brings the cord and everything. So that hasn't changed. You know she's just gotten better as it's gone along so You know to be to be honest. Yeah I mean I enjoy helping the kids and you know if anything the you know. Try as much as possible for them to enjoy it as well and to try to guide them. I guess for game for the future. Now you know that's up to them to pile of things but You know most of those kids like I say we're good when they got there and you know they've gotten better they've gone long moved on to other coaches and everything so successful pretty popular name is big names that have come through the. Ashby system for all those players though that that you worked with. That didn't make it. Can you tell the difference between someone like an Anisimov an Kenan? Can you see or that early on the? Hey this kid's something different or is it more of quantity and then figuring out one or two that rice the top. There are many kids that I thought were going to be very very good. Maybe even better than those guys and they ended up not being ended up being good tennis players. But not you know making it into the pros. you know so. I've learned as gone along that. I'm not a very good predictor so We try not to pick try to just have lots of players coming through as much as possible and try to treat. Treat them all in a way that this is what you need to do to be great so they have that chance some apply while some were going to be great no matter what we did but Try to treat all the players. A came to come through with the idea that you know. Look at your game now and where do you WanNa go if you want to be a pro these things you to address and unfortunately getting to see them? When they're young twelve thirteen fourteen. They have a chance to you. Know make make those adjustments if they can. So you know the the ones that came in. Maybe I thought were really good and ended up not being so good as far as results. I think. That's just how tough the sport is. You know it's I remember the stout that somebody was saying that basically every year the top one hundred seventy six jobs available something like that. We're on the women's side so you know you have to be that good that you're going to take someone's job who's seventy in the world and that's not easy so many of these guys are good players but you know it's just not that easy to actually be a pro arena. Can you take us back to those days in that camp? Do you have any memories or things remember working on or or how you felt being part of that because you are based in New York right so you wouldn't even Florida girl yet What was that experience? Like as a as a young Irena. It was definitely. I think Not Necessarily Life Changing. But it was shocking. Because I thought I knew what I was doing on the court you know I trained with my dad for a couple of hours a day to know what fitness was and so I came in with coach. Richard and I believe was it coach Elke at the time I think we Katie's looking bear. She is Katie was Pretty much leading the campout was helping her with the camp I remember think. Jd Louis was around a little bit But I think it was mainly Katie. And either the two leaving the camp. I think that the level of competition was so high. It just was a very cool environment to be in and all the girls. Even at that age were very professional like we were there to work. It wasn't like Oh. Let's socialize and have fun it was. Let's get better which I think is one of the biggest differences in some of the camps. You see today like you know some girls. Just go out there whether it's a tennis camp whether whatever sport it is you know some people just see it as a social event and we were there to work. Even though we were very young you know that was our whole motive. There and I think coach Richard had a lot to do with it. You know one thing about that is going to bring the baskets from around the country and they all want to do really well so they all challenge each other in a good way. So everybody's you know. Basically really focused on doing their best and doing the training their best and that environment continues here so we had a camp last week where you know the kids came in and you know they enjoy working hard because that's the standard everybody. That's kind of good peer pressure and I think sometimes no some of the kids in some of their environments where they're the best kids. It's almost like they're going down to the level of somebody else because you know the. The group has a lower standard. But when you get all the best kids together they raise the standard so that definitely helps so we know Irena made the cut but how. How do you select players? How do you know which players you want in these camps and watching as it rankings results? Do you. I don't know asked our coaches their parents. Are you interviewing? Does this come together. Sure I think the main thing I look at his results so again the system we have right now. Kids go when they're say eleven twelve their instructional camps and coaches can wreck recommend them from their meaning. The coaches at work the camps might say. Okay we have these kids that did really well. And so young ones. Maybe that haven't played nationals. We haven't had a chance to see them but You know twelve's nationals. A lot of kids are playing so we a chance to see them there. And you inviting them I the camps that we have here are from basically from thirteen up For the national camps. And when I like results Kinda give you know they are okay. There have been beating these players. That and going far into tournaments. Then you see them play. And you're trying to match those things up Obviously a player. That's winning tournaments. Well it's kind of easy. They deserve to come somebody else. Who's maybe going pretty deep in the tournament but not winning them. You're looking at that and then you're looking at essentially. Do they play good tennis? Do they have good athletic skills? Do they all intangibles? You're kind of looking at with your eyes and matching that up but result is probably the like I said that's the first thing and a distinguished that from ranking because you know sometimes somebody's ranked really high because they do well in smaller tournaments but not so well national so sent you the results at you know the Easter Bowl National Claes Nationals Orange Bowl. Those types of tournaments. Those are the main results. Look at and then. You're looking to see somebody that he's not doing great but they're really fast or they have really good strokes where they play good talents. You have kids that maybe in the twelve. I remember First Time I saw clear Lou play she was ten years old and she was implanted clay courts and she's coming into the net and she comes in and you know she'll miss the volume miss the overhead. Keep coming in and you know. I remember talking to mom. After mom was shaking her head she keeps missing overheads. And Yeah but you know every time. She misses one. She's getting better not getting better and basically a year and a half later. She's winning eleven winning twelve ORANGEVILLE. So you know. And she won that tournament actually coming in and executing so again it's clear was already good but when you see a kid that plays a good sal tennis that also goes a long way and you try to bounce out results and you know up what you think. Maybe they can do. Hey everyone listening to the tennis dot Com podcast with special guest.

Richard Ashby Richard Amanda Anisimov US tennis Tennis Played College Universi Irena Falconi New York Richard Works Katie National Campus Studio Irena Hell Coney Usda Mallory burdette CICI Bellis Falconi Camp Key Biscayne key Biscayne arena National Claes Nationals Dad Jade Louise USDA
Richard Ashby on working with America's young tennis talent

The Tennis.com Podcast

07:44 min | 7 months ago

Richard Ashby on working with America's young tennis talent

"Guest for this episode? Richard Ashby Richard. Welcome thank you. Thanks for having me. Richard Works here at the. Usda national campus. Richard tells a little brief bio about yourself then working for the for sixteen years before that coached on my own little bit privately with pros and Juniors Worked in some academies before that and so. That's my coaching background played. Junior Tennis Played College University of South Carolina. That's basically playing background played a little bit of pro after college but not that successful so onto coaching. That's relatable So what players. What age group are you targeting right now? Do you work with a specific group. Your work with the fourteen hundred girls. I'm here at the national campus. So we bring kids for camps primarily camps training weeks. We don't do a lot of traveling with kids that age. We don't have them come in. For long periods of time they usually come in for a week or two weeks of training And we work with their coaches. So we get the information back to the coaches things that we worked on here things that we see we go to tournaments have a chance to watch him play there and hopefully see them improving on things have a chance to talk to their coaches about things. We're seeing a lot easier when it's you know live where you're watching something and talking with the coach so the tournaments. It's a great option to do that. With coaches so you've been working with the USA for sixteen years. Have you been with the girls? Fourteen and under age single year no Started two thousand three so that first year and the next year we're primarily with Like junior pros so kids basically seventeen to eighteen sixteen eighteen and did that for a couple of years and then in two thousand and five started with the kids born in Nineteen ninety-one that age group so worked with an age group for few years through Two thousand eight then two thousand nine. I started with twelve and unders Jade Louise and other coach. I used to work with age group and He actually started working with kids older. So I Essentially switch places with him so from two thousand nine assorted with twelve and under and kind of grown to thirteen and then fourteen and fourteen under for last few years. Do some name. What are some players you've worked with? Amanda Anisimov was slow and Stevens. Cannon CICI Bellis Falconi yes all those players So yeah very fortunate. When we moved to we moved to Boca it was a good location. Had A lot of good players in the area so players Would come through in practice. We were able to set up a program where they're younger players. Come out and you know not every day Amanda I came out like once a week when she was younger Always worked with her. Dad was her coach. So work with her Same with Sonya and We did we actually had a pretty good set-up there where they in the morning to drilling and then the afternoons do match play and we'd be able to have kids kind of all levels. Sometimes older kids coming out in the afternoon but Amanda and Sonia. You know where kids at did that from pretty much. The beginning Sloan. I've done very little with her. I mean it's mostly been Camps or a little bit of training and Let's see who else has been out of there You know so. Yeah Irena Hell Coney for sure. Was there So when I worked with a ninety one group Sorry come and play matches Actually tell Ya arena like the first candidate when we were in key Biscayne arena. It's actually in the camp along with Alli Risk. So Mallory burdette there. You go so a bunch of kids That a moved on to play pros which is great. You know so. That's one of the things. I'm fortunate. I got to work with kids. That are the best in the country so you know a lot of them are going to be successful so I was actually mentioning that to see the other day. We were watching you practice with one of the girls. I don't I can't remember her name but she's pretty good. And I made a comment to see see I was like. Did you work with coach? Richard Like Yeah. I did and I was like. That's unbelievable when I was. I believe it was thirteen or something. I was still living in New York and I got this letter from the USDA. Do you WanNa do this. Camp Key Biscayne and sure enough it was with Alison riske Madison Bengal Whom all our top seventy have been top seventy players. It's not very common for a coach to be able to have that much of an impact on so many players that end up being professional. What is it that you have that makes that possible GonNa Know How much it is me. It's definitely good system where you know. We got a chance to see young players at an early age. I remember the first camp she came to. She was not the best. One they're You're maybe in the middle of the pack She had come to the some of the similar things she has. Now you know just the excitement. She always brings the cord and everything. So that hasn't changed. You know she's just gotten better as it's gone along so You know to be to be honest. Yeah I mean I enjoy helping the kids and you know if anything the you know. Try as much as possible for them to enjoy it as well and to try to guide them. I guess for game for the future. Now you know that's up to them to pile of things but You know most of those kids like I say we're good when they got there and you know they've gotten better they've gone long moved on to other coaches and everything so successful pretty popular name is big names that have come through the. Ashby system for all those players though that that you worked with. That didn't make it. Can you tell the difference between someone like an Anisimov an Kenan? Can you see or that early on the? Hey this kid's something different or is it more of quantity and then figuring out one or two that rice the top. There are many kids that I thought were going to be very very good. Maybe even better than those guys and they ended up not being ended up being good tennis players. But not you know making it into the pros. you know so. I've learned as gone along that. I'm not a very good predictor so We try not to pick try to just have lots of players coming through as much as possible and try to treat. Treat them all in a way that this is what you need to do to be great so they have that chance some apply while some were going to be great no matter what we did but Try to treat all the players. A came to come through with the idea that you know. Look at your game now and where do you WanNa go if you want to be a pro these things you to address and unfortunately getting to see them? When they're young twelve thirteen fourteen. They have a chance to you. Know make make those adjustments if they can. So you know the the ones that came in. Maybe I thought were really good and ended up not being so good as far as results. I think. That's just how tough the sport is. You know it's I remember the stout that somebody was saying that basically every year the top one hundred seventy six jobs available something like that. We're on the women's side so you know you have to be that good that you're going to take someone's job who's seventy in the world and that's not easy so many of these guys are good players but you know it's just not that easy to actually be a

Richard Ashby Richard Amanda Anisimov Tennis Played College Universi Richard Works Usda Key Biscayne Arena Mallory Burdette Cici Bellis Falconi Camp Key Biscayne USA Irena Hell Coney Tennis Jade Louise Sonya DAD Boca Alison Riske Madison Bengal New York Stevens
The impact of coronavirus across industry and finance

Clark Howard Show

08:35 min | 8 months ago

The impact of coronavirus across industry and finance

"The news around the world is about the unknowns that we face from their corona virus and something that is one of those things that creates and some people like a visceral fear and others. It's like You know I'm not worried about that. And I wanted to address both angles on that with practical things that I'd like you to be aware of as to whether whether or not this is going to become a threat to life and safety in the United States in fact in the whole Western Hemisphere hard to know. Oh if that's going to happen and odds are that this will be. Even though they're isolated cases that have been found around the world that odds favor that this will not spread heavily in the United States and Canada but but that's just based on historical experience that people work in public health habit. They're always always extra vigilant extra concern. One industry is facing a lot of questions from travelers and end. That's cruise lines airlines anything to do with the travel industry is. It's almost like an hour by hour thing. A bunch cruise lines have cancelled sailings. They were going to sail specifically into China and peripherally to China because if you imagine a cruise ship the close quarters people are in someone comes on as a carrier of the corona virus where it tends tends to be No symptoms for up to two weeks that somebody's contagious. That could be absolutely a hideous situation. So the cruise lines sail in that part of the world which is pretty much. All the major ones are for now canning cruises that would've would've departed from areas close to the affected regions in China. And that is part of what you do anytime anytime. There's a potential for an epidemic is you isolate and I know because we've already had people posting questions Ashton's about what do they do about their travel and a number of airlines have come up with very good policies. He's on how to accommodate people who were flying to China or certain other spots in Asia and are offering people the option of getting a refund so far our our three full fare airlines in the United States that offer service to Asia American united and Delta have not done so their policies are confusing. They are not customer friendly and they are not protective of public health. And I think about how we need because these situations can arise we need some form of system and if necessary law aw that requires during a situation. That's a threat to public health. That people should have the right to cancel travel with a full refund but that is not the deal in the United States now and American united and Delta may come to their senses because think of what happens to them long term if they become a source of what brings corona virus into widespread You know a widespread kinda breakout in the United States. So it's really dumb to tell people they have to fly or they lose their money on that case though. There's something I want you to think about with travel. You may book for Spring Summer. Fall two places far afield because we don't know the extent of this where it may go if it's something that just peters out pretty quickly or becomes a greater global concern. There is an obscure kind of travel insurance. You can buy that you pay more for than traditional travel insurance but it allows house you to cancel for any reason so he doesn't have to be covered reason. Travel Insurance providers aren't gonNA say. Oh well you know you're going to. You're going to Bangkok so we're not concerned about that. Even if you're concerned about going to Bangkok or you're concerned about going to Tokyo or whatever we don't care that's not a covered reason if you buy a policy that says you can cancel for any reason your okay and you don't get back all your money. Typically Ali with cancel for any reason policy. You get back three quarters of your money which would be something that people might be willing to walk away from a quarter. If they're gonNA have no fun or worry on a trip they were planning to take stock market. The stock market here here in the United States and overseas has reacted badly to this. And that's because investors never like uncertainty. Obviously any any travel company or any company that does business heavily in Asia is going to be affected by the market a lot of. US restaurant chains have big presence presence in Asia. They're going to be affected. A lot of manufacturers will be affected and so is unclear what the long term arm implications are for the stock market but stock values in the ice as have been very very hefty and and little high by historical numbers. And this could be a time that people take an excuse to take a breather. And you could see a Little bit of a nick to your values in your 401k or other things but there's nothing about this says run for the hills with your investing and I just want you to know that that we don't know yet how this is all GonNa play obviously but eventually like all the other things we feared like Ebola and SARS and all that eventually public health people get it under control and the tragedy for people who suffer from it and family members who lose loved ones but in terms of the overall economic performance here and overseas. It is a temporary effect Oil prices which you pay to put gasoline in your vehicle lower diesel in your vehicle. You're going to see those prices depressed. At least for a good while by the effects of this on one how much travel people do which reduces the overall demand for fuel and as the demand falls the supply arises and it lowers the price for you and one other thing I want to mention is something that I may sound ridiculous to you. But it's something I believe in so we and our home have as I mentioned before a small amount of cash because of all the methods of payment were be hacked or anything like that having cash ashby valuable. We don't have enough. It's worth anybody trying to break into our house but we have enough cash to cover several days of spending if if we needed it and we also have a good supply of water in the event that we had to stay at home and we also have a good supply of non perishable food and taking precautions like that for so many different reasons could be a storm could be a a terrorist attack. Could be an illness spreading something I that I think you should be prepared. And these are simple simple precautions that I think just make good common sense.

United States China Asia Delta Bangkok Sars Canada Ashton Ashby Peters ALI Tokyo
Chasing Cosby

Dr. Death

02:03 min | 9 months ago

Chasing Cosby

"It's nineteen ninety one and Bill Cosby is one of the most famous and powerful actors and entertainers in the world in November. He's on Larry. King live show. Promoting a brand new autobiography called Childhood and sharing some of his favourite jokes. The old story was if you took it a little drop. It was on the head of a and put. It doesn't mega and the girl would drink in low American cosby's Ashby's doing this Spanish fly routine for Larry King one which he's performed onstage since the nineteen sixties in. It cosby jokes with audience about slipping an APHRODISIAC FOR DJ. Back into a woman's drink. A drug that renders her helpless. After a couple of SIPS. You know anything about Spanish fly no Dome Ema. While there's this girl crazy Mary it would some in her drink as you go to a party. She five girls standing alone. Spanish fly like that. I didn't know anything about the Spanish fly routine back then and the media didn't pay much attention to it either At this point in his career cosby had written bestselling books about parenthood and made the world laugh with family friendly comedy routines he was a humanitarian and philanthropist who donated millions to charities and colleges alike but it was his portrayal of Dr Cliff huxtable on the Cosby show that earned him the warm and Fuzzy Moniker of America's Dad. You're funny well thank you so you see the do of us. We have something in common cosby's long long seemingly happy marriage to Camille only added luster to a picture perfect image of a devoted husband and father. There was never a hint. Not even a whisper that he wasn't who he seemed to be. But that's banished fire routine. Was there hiding in plain sight all this time cosby talking about slipping drugs into women's strengths. If we'd only known back then it wasn't just a joke

Bill Cosby Larry King Dome Ema Mary Dr Cliff Camille Ashby America
Martini celebrates the festive season with a limited-edition Negroni chocolate collection created by Paul A. Young

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:23 min | 10 months ago

Martini celebrates the festive season with a limited-edition Negroni chocolate collection created by Paul A. Young

"The beloved Italian Coktail Negroni is one hundred years old this year and the Shuki pull a young has been asked by Martini to concoct brand new chocolate to mark the occasion. Well Uncles Ben. Ryland sat down with Paula. littler Elliot to talk about the creative and practical processes of marrying chocolate with such such a famous drink. Plus they enjoyed a little bit of tasting along the way I have the great privilege of being approached by fantastic brands And a half to love the brand and all I have to love the product that the brand of created and for me it has to be natural. Ashby pure and ask interesting. And I've known the Martini brand for for decades. I remember adverts in the nineteen eighties with a particular on roller skates. trae Martini and the any time any place. Any were to have a Martini so so it was. It was always a happy memory for me. So when they approach and said we've got these new reserve special and brought on Rubino for Moose my East pricked up because I'm not a beer drinker. Call volume alcohol drinker. Let one night champagne and spirits. But I like Negroni old-fashioned says bitter sweet flavors because you can have them over ice on their own stop blending them and for me. Obviously I have to blend into the chocolate. So the challenge for me was taking the two commutes on brought her which is a a number color and the Rabin which is this ruby color from youth and taste them dilute pair them with chocolate. Let's try and find a combination that celebrates negroni because the centenary celebration of Negroni without the chocolate distorting the flavors and characters in the botanical in the two Moose but also the vermouth are very complex. And they've got that distinct bitter sweetness to they can easily distort the chocolate as well so it was actually an opportunity for me to work with them on getting that balance. Absolutely right Let's take quite a long time. We always think about the delicacies Kasese that can go with a glass of wine for example. What it it's fairly common knowledge that certain foods should go with a glass of wine? Don't sit down to a lovely gloss of red wine and then and and then tuck into a box of chips not good idea that we often don't think about that same sort of methodology when it comes to pairing something something we chocolate. How do you know what goes well with chocolate? It's a really good question in two parts to it. When I when I first started in chocolate a quite few years I would be guilty? If you've ever analyzing and I think it it's the way some people take chocolate which is if you're doing it professionally or academically you do have to have a process of pinpointing and finding all of us delicate compounds flavors and tastes to the point where you're deciding whether this chocolate is fine. Quality with beans have been fermented well of picked well or and so on and so you really digging in Bolt for me when it comes down to it. I have to take it back to base level when I smell it smell texture to like the taste from beginning middle and end and Roy after the after taste does it work with ingredients and now you get people who will say what wine and chocolate hard to pair. I find it very easy to pair. That's because I've tasted a lot of chocolate and a lot of wine and I can think about those flavors starting out and you taste piece of chocolate. How would you know which one to pick their hundreds if not thousands of them on the shelf to boy Oy? It's really difficult and all I say is by and tastes and eat what you like. Try It if you think it doesn't work. You're probably right because you own your tongue on your taste spots. And if it pairs well great. An I have always with all my tastings and events set to people if you prefer eating or milk white or dark chocolate with a cup of tea fantastic few think it works for you. It probably does but when it comes down to do you like if you do great no matter what anybody else says because you a half to want to eat again and again and again I'm almost runner of the cadbury cream egg at with the woman dipping hurt chips into a cream egg. Yeah well salty and sweet is massive business. The chocolate industry tree lady is not as crazy as she looked. She has no But I I do have a box of beautiful chocolates in front of me and you just pulled me a gloss of the move which was very kind of you for this time of day. A little SIP exactly Tell me tell me first. What vermouth measuring? This has gone brought us. This is the amber colored very light fresh smell wise. I've got fruit and it has to me sympathy botanical. Medicinal that's not meant to be a negative Tiv- term. I remember as a child having buttercup Syrup as a medicine and Dundee Line serapis kind of things those botanical can pass over very successfully into a Moose yes and drinks and this has that element of bitter sweet to it which if you think about bittersweet flavor dark chocolate is bittersweet already got a really good foundation and having having having a taste It's light on the tongue but the aftertaste is really really long It's beautiful sweet as well. But not over not overpowering only switch cleverly made it very sweet not overly sweet at the beginning and then this kind of botanical bitter dryness comes in the end and the chocolate made with it is the blue and gold marbled finish which represents the best colors on the buttocks. It's a beautiful bottle. Ferry Italian design obviously and sticking with Martini brand absolutely. I think if you are familiar with the Martini a line of Vermouth e you probably would be impressed by this particular RESERVA SPATULA pull. Educate me on how I should be eating the chocolates with the truth. We've had a drink of Mussa. Still got the flavor. There have a bite of one of the chocolates list. It's the blue and gold when it has a very soft center of white chocolate. We've got some Bombay Sapphire Gin. We've the VERMOUTH in there. Got Some Madagascans chocolate. which is thought delicate fruity chocolate? And very little else the predominant ingredient in that is the vermouth because I wanted that flavor to to last on the tongue. And it's it's a gorgeous balance. The dark chocolate is just bitter sweet enough like the vermouth. Once you've had the first bite and it's melted and swallowed. I have a bit more. Vermouth just passed me. A A glass of Rabin now I suppose that means that well to be polite I would have to try some of this. You would have to try that one as well this array of full of flavor for me I get kind of a smell of time leaves and herb Leary is very very very smooth. A little a bit Rich in feeling flavor and that's represented in the chocolate as well. We've got that lovely Madagascar chocolate again. But they could nash the filling inside. I just heavier more full needs a bit more impact. Bit more strength to it. So it doesn't get lost in the Renault so now that we've had some of the redeem we should be tasting some of the chocolate or I'd have made the chocolates a half dome a very smooth surface and a dark chocolate can inside Very very different indeed this one. Yeah very dock inside and a much more pungent hit it take. It took a long time to find the right chocolates to work with the to the most because Kosta so complex for example. If you choose orange which I love chocolate and orange you instantly got. I honestly know which chocolate to put with it to get that nostalgic fail. I love chocolate orange. What this it was? Try again try again try again. It's absolutely fantastic. The opportunity to have something that is quite unusual all to work with both familiar. It's funny how I haven't had either the Vermouth to start with but the familiarity and some of the botanical in. I don't know where that's from. I'm from my many years past of tasting and eating but there is something in them and all my team who tried to. There's something in recognized but I don't know what it is. I think a lot of people might say I've I've never had vermouth on its own. I've had a Martini Shaken oster Martini or I've had it as a mix of had it in an aground. Have I had it with chocolate would would I tried it if it wasn't in the chocolate maybe not so my job and my responsibility is just to inspire people to try something different. Because that's what I've had the opportunity. It's due to create the chocolates. I think you've done very well. Thank you so much. That was really

Trae Martini Negroni Rabin Italian Coktail Negroni Rubino Ashby Kasese Ryland Cadbury Paula. Littler Elliot Bombay Sapphire Gin ROY Dundee Line Madagascar Herb Leary Mussa Kosta Nash One Hundred Years Milk
"ashby" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

15:31 min | 11 months ago

"ashby" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"Anime and and Cyborg Siri and so I had done in all my reading of Henry Jenkins and Janice radway and and all those theorists about fan culture and so I had really like I came to with with what I think is was a healthy dose of respect for both you know the tradition of fan fiction and the tradition of carrying on carrying on narrative narrative for people and also understanding that in the intervening years like probably people of their own head Canon of what was happening and I would really just be adding like one story story to this that that I had the privilege of working with a a whole lot of other writers on and having the blessing of the of the the creators and having Tatyana on board and and so I I sort of thought of it thought of it that way and and tried to be you know as respectful as as as they could be. The theme of identity is incredibly strong throughout often black. And it's also touched on in your novel company town. What is it about science fiction? The Healy Sifi that expose gender alongside identity as a whole that makes such powerful and compelling explorations of the the subject. Well I think Science fiction going back to the roots of it going back to two Mary. Wollstonecraft shelley is about. You know the the the beginning of all of this. You Know Science Fiction Frankenstein is about who gets to be human being and what gets to be a human mandy and what gets to be a man and now we sort of have questions about what gender actually is and science fiction is I think the one of the ideal genres for for exploring that. I think that most fiction is about you know what it means to be human being but science fiction takes that extra extra leap and says well how what are the borders of humanity and what are the borders of the things that make us. Human gender is one of those things and so that's always been a fascination of mine and So I think that that a story like orphan black was a good way to has always been been good at sort of looking at the limitations of the human especially in a story where WH- where these clones have their you know actually have their their genome patented in-copyright if they don't have they don't actually have rights to their own bodies which is for me such a story about women in general Not Having rights to to WHO and what they are and not necessarily being recognized as as people Depending on where when you are in in history and in space and and and so in company town I I really tried to also explore that from the perspective of somebody who is the only augmented a a person on a on an oil rig. That is that is full of augmented people. She The protagonist of that novel is the only person who who doesn't have really really a whole lot of augmentation and sort of is the last baseline human on on the rig. Is that what you would be the The lost augmented human. It's I mean it's possible I would probably I. I already have certain augmentation. I already wear glasses already. Take Medication Shen there are. There are things that are already sort of you know that I already uses as prostheses right In a certain way from from sort of Donna. Heroin Cyborg Syria perspective. Those are all prosthetic devices that that alter how I behave As human being and who I am in in relationship other people So there's so there's you know. I already use certain things like that. Depending on how you WanNa read post humanity entity or augmented bodies or or what have you I think that I would be deeply skeptical of of augmentation. I mean today It was either today or yesterday. The news came out that alphabet which is Google's Sort of Larger Company the the larger company. That owns Yahoo Google and facets of Google sidewalk in and whatever And WAYMO had acquired fitbit alphabet has acquired fitbit which means that Google has fitbit which means that Google has For for a lot of people are a growing number of people access to the things that determine their access says to health insurance private health insurance within the United States and so google now has access to that data and I've never owned a fitbit for exactly the reason I knew that eventually You know fitbit data was gonNA get fed until health insurance or fed into actuarial science in some way and you know whether it was a google or Microsoft or a or a facebook or whomever One of these big stacks was gonna it Kinda by it and and or gain access to it in some way and that would not be good for the people wearing those things and so I've always steered away from things like that. I don't have a Smart Watch. I don't I don't wear fitness devices. I don't Have I don't have an in home. Personal Assistant Things like that. I've it it took me years to get a mobile phone Took me years to get a smartphone. I was way behind a lot of other people in that and and it was in part because they could kind of see where you know how would be leveraged against people and so yeah I would probably be one of those Qamrun curmudgeonly curmudgeonly People who who just didn't want to participate or who didn't who didn't see everybody else doing it as a reason to do it. I guess US I find that interesting. I mean it is probably a stereotype to assume that people who are interested in science fiction or SCI FI writers is our into tech and like into the new changing world. But said you know it's quite interesting to to hear from someone who writes Sifi but with it might not be the first adopter Mutek well. I think there's actually kind of tradition of that. I think I mean I think famously. Like William Good Sir. Uh William Gibson composed neuromancer on a typewriter He He proposed the idea of cyberspace from a from a paper in ink medium and and what he said in interviews that. He's glad that he did it that way because if he had if he had written it on a word processor it would destroy. Destroy The magic of of Imagining Cyberspace. So he wanted to be separate from the thing that he was creating in a weird way so that he could still imagine the possibilities of it. His his imagining of what was possible was not `curtains curtailed or constrained by his own personal experience of technology. Oh Gee if he had had to deal with like an incredibly clunky word processing format he might not have had the same opinions as he did as as he was writing the book and so I think that there is something to be said for kind of holding back a little bit. But there's also you know as in my other career you know a look at tech trends all the time so I look at people being early adopters and I look at the purchasing habits of early adopters and what they get out of it but what they get out of it and what I get out of of something very different You know I'm I'm not into constant subscription services for example sample like I I don't you know I don't even get my nails done regularly so the idea that I would be subscribing to to to access you you know to attack thing is even like a whole other bridge to to cross nails I. I caught my nations because I played the piano. Yeah so the nail thing was never going to happen. No like the idea like will you can spend X. amount of dollars for this APP that gets you thus insurgents insurgents like well. You know I don't even do. There are so many things that I just opt out of naturally like. I think it's also just introversion right. It's also just as a species of of introversion but also I mean so In terms of like not having certain things like one I think my dad was. We're always sort of held back on things. We had a Betamax. DCR FOR LOW. You know into the time the DVD's were coming out. We didn't get a DVD player until my dad one one at a work party and And even then it was like we sort of had to crossover But the other thing is that he his job job was he was a sales rep for For companies like Sony Panasonic and others that made closer television surveillance equipment so our house was full of dummy surveillance equipment or or surveillance equipment that wasn't in use and so I had a real a close view of how that technology worked and what the trends were in that technology. And what the what the the what what that people were looking for out of it. And so when I hear about stuff like a Google homer or an echo or a an Alexa whatever you know whatever it is this month or whatever it is this season you know my immediate thought is. Oh Okay so so a thing listening device planted and planted squarely in your your home that you rely on increasingly for for your day to day life a thing that can knock on you. What a great idea? So so I call on this podcast to talk a lot about cliches stereotypes about all like most of the trips that we find most annoying. So do you have any. I mean I was going to say like since we're on the subject of identity An APP particularly kind of like talking about surveillance and people's People's Images online do you have any Like really pet peeves about trump's the continually really crop up in sci-fi that you'd like to see retired well one thing that we talked about We had a long conversation about this In the orphan black back sort of pseudo writer's room in our group chat Was the idea that Government surveillance works perfectly and looks it's really shiny and new and smooth and beautiful You know if you watch your average like CBS cop show or your the average Sort of science fiction movie about the NSA or or or you know a thing with the FBI or or whatever or if you look at something like like minority report or or what. Have you the idea you know. Or if you look at like agents of shield or something like there. There's a science fictional idea that that government technology -nology is easy to use worked perfectly and is beautiful and that is not the case The the deep missile scare that happened in Hawaii for example where where the people of Roy thought that they were the victims of a nuclear attack because of a false alarm that went out. That false alarm mhm went out because the interface that was used during the the drill. It is so old and so- Janke so decrepit and so So basic sick that it was an easy mistake to make from the interface design perspective from the from the user interface perspective and that is the case more often often than not with government systems. I think that people don't understand that all of those. You know technologies go out to tender. They go out for PS and and the winning. RFP's the thing that promises the most for the least money you know and and that's what budget cuts do and that's for all governments that's not the US that's not Canada. That's it's not Britain. It's not Australia. It's it's not China it's it's everywhere and and it's the same in corporate life and actually so this idea that lake that that a that a system that you would be working with Would work perfectly one hundred percent of the time and be smooth and easy to use and also also gorgeous is is ally in. It's one of the things that I really wish we'd get retired or I really wish that the opposite would get experimented with as a as as a fictional trope because it so it's the the opposite is so much more the case and has a lot more storytelling potential. As far as I'm concerned one. That always gets me is the whole zooming in on images and you're like Kay zoom in its old pixelated but then somehow yo computer you too magically just makes it super hi Rez. Yeah from not having those pixels already it just makes it up like how does that work. Well what's funny. Is that like enhance hance. That sort of like you know. The the the the blade runner enhanced function Is something that you know is something I've I've heard lots of people who work in in audiovisual technology is sort of rail against for a very long time. And what's funny is that there are Developers working hang on in photo enhancing technologies now that want to make that real but they need. They're using machine learning to do it and it's really really about a machine. A machine learning algorithm predicting. What else is in the photo based on other information and and it's not about like what the camera actually saw? It's what is predictable based on the other context clues in the image and and and it's it's almost sort of like looking into the dream of what the image is not necessarily. What's actually there? Yeah so a lot of questions about whether or not that would be admissible evidence reliable reliable in any in any way shape or form. Yeah Yeah I mean the other thing for me is a lot of things about machine learning coming and algorithms and all. This kind of thing is that a lot of sci-fi doesn't look at the fact that your data is only as good as what you put in right and you know a lot of these studies going about how if you put racist information into the Algorithm. What you'RE GONNA get out is like racist behavior of the machines and that's something? I don't really think I've seen much offense I fi- which I think would be a nice thing to explore he. I think that I think Angelov. More people are becoming aware of that fact that sort of garbage in garbage out counts for for these systems as well and we had this sort of vision and I was one of these people. I believe that the technology could in theory be neutral and and and then every study proved me wrong like every study sort of proved that that idea wrong that like the the biases of the Creator are replicated in the creation. And that's something that. Has You know that science fiction. Only we've talked about a lot in terms of a story like Frankenstein story about creating artificial intelligence that what we create you know we..

Google fitbit Healy Sifi United States Wollstonecraft shelley Siri Henry Jenkins William Gibson SCI FI Janice radway Heroin Tatyana Sifi WH William Good Angelov Yahoo Donna
Large Sums of Money That Maybe Transfered in the Fashion World

Pop Fashion

34:22 min | 11 months ago

Large Sums of Money That Maybe Transfered in the Fashion World

"On the line this is news that developed over the weekend. Lvmh if it goes through it'll probably be the biggest purchase ever by Lvmh to meet a total of fourteen point four billion dollars the US companies to get it LVMH has risen forty-nine percent giving it a value `tatoes compared to LVMH with its two hundred fifteen billion dollars I can't even imagine that number the show the brand has been around for one hundred eighty two years and it's not sixty dollars a share in two thousand sixteen it's Ben up at around one hundred dollars for the past biggest place for revenue as a conglomerate the US's second and pals so adding tiffany would give Lvmh more has lvmh had any failures no girl they haven't they can't might be a good move for Tiffany I think it would be a great move for Tiffany I I don't know if the impact is going to be there at such a great level it really stabilizes and helps them grow even more they've been struggling for a number of reasons they can't I'm trying to cater towards a younger audience but they haven't found their stride yet and they when you're trying to catch up with your ideal demographic like that takes some time right so do it on your own and say you did it on your own or do you want like the big brother to come in and like and even like for an art arnall cases full of money for like three other people do it just suitcases full of money they should take the deal they should take the deal we'll see we'll update you potting soil with like some of the Peat Moss in it is that what you mean right Oh yeah absolutely signed forever twenty one and things are starting to come out as more paperwork it's coming John and Jin Suk Chang they have two daughters they emigrated ended up coming back and working for the company there's Linda she was the executive vice president and in annual sales and employed forty three thousand people globally they're like actual old people I don't know elderly I don't know their lives slur management style as a significant reason the entire business collapsed give them a reality check in their headquarters in Los Angeles that top and just to give you an encapsulation of what what the problem could have it's micromanaging not seeing the big picture also it turns they had a lot of power over styles that landed in stores the home and do advising because they knew early on more than they let on that something stuff into consideration and implement it so it was just like their way man come in and be directors who had no retail experience so what they were doing this is very theranos what they were doing was like only giving it sounds awful no one knew the totality of what was going on with the business department stores. I didn't know this took over a lot of space that used to belong to borders he says we're not set to expire until twenty twenty seven and twenty twenty eight understand local labor laws. This is the big like money news that we found out stores per month girl so that's why it collapsed that's what happened expressed this Mr Chang you need to delegate Sir that is a Mr Chang the other thing is that this report any retailer not as the Chang's but it does take a little same time right it's losing steam and is losing popularity outlasting from perfectly one or they've heard about it from a friend and sell it it's very it's not that simple and so it's not just as easy as forever. I don't like you said it's not just about this narrative of fast fashion kind of slowly really implemented it became their scope would have been different their stores would have business what the family says goes and if you are not the top nobody could not sign expense reports fast enough kinds of fast no one's a delegate it so important helps you succeed because you know my one really clunky basketball analogy they voted unanimously on Tuesday the day we are recording this podcast to three separate divisions of the ANC AA and so they've all been tasked with figuring going to be the board is going to vote on those proposed change rules athletes I have a lot of restrictions around what they can and cannot do around the world When it comes to college sports those players who play for those big have a lot of our school expenses paid for by scholarships but they are duties are to time you have schools that are selling merchandise that may have for a t-shirt you might be able to find a college athlete who was here and says that per NCWA rules so this could potentially open Aa like just like snap his fingers and Saddle we're GonNa Change this so that it would no longer be illegal for students to earn money from their appearances punishing their athletes if they get endorsement money in that will start in January twenty sourced NC double a. into letting all student athletes southern names their images and their were passed in early twenty twenty it would go into effect in twenty twenty one and which is his way of saying out trust y'all yeah but how much play that pro athlete? Scott I've been watching the world series and Ashby and what they do on the field it's a lot about personality in this physical and so many pro athletes even after their off the field college sports a lot more sustainable for the student athletes that you have time for it but like the fact that you can't make any income while you're right apply the decision. I mean at the very least I think you should own the rights to your own ms how if people decide to delay going professional so that's really interesting to me Oh delaying going pro is such has a lot of potential to be a good athlete right now like I think a lot in four years or three years and and who knows what's going to happen to my career then to go pro and see what items come out I wanna see that fashion for that Shit I will buy all the stuff from the Maryland basketball team endorsements for whatever other sports news I dig up and shove into this show you inject oh it is your favorite subject within the song girl Yeah Apor so many things just ran through my head in the first thing I thought of was alligator baby alligators Milano orders a lot from Sephora and the past year she spent over five thousand ah find a dollar bill and it's folded really really well and then there's a straw aw there wasn't I will continue of a Sephora worker in the package and originated issued an apology one hundred dollars an online credit and she and and that Sephora has zero tolerance policy around illegal inside that box I can think of is that now former wjr like them having their ide- and that stuff shipped out okay so that was my first thought was that somebody got fed up or drop weekly I think it is a possibility and is a little convenient act also like who drops cocaine that's why I don't buy questions about the the state of the coq sounds like Sephora emailed her back yes if you worked at Sephora not give me an apology that's one thing I actually wish I would have gotten but she was like it's okay comment but like a personal touch would be really nice in this situation but orange objects or just on your teeth to see to see swish wine and then spit it don't you don't spit after you rub the coke on your yeah I've seen on TV up until this point lies Somali Yep one last story Swatch isn't going to renew their license with Calvin Klein so their parent company is called Swatch group they decided not to make watches or jewelry under Kwan's they are going to renew the collaborations because of uncertainty they are ending this program so what I'm interested in the story is not then tell us you know maybe that the deal was just they've just yeah we talked about this probably about six months ago like a lot a lot of turmoil. I will keep that in mind that the end of our fashion news we've not do listener letters isn't podcast it is the best part of my Friday commute home all my husband works for trek of sustainability came up my husband was horrified when the shoe company said trainable manufacturing or business practices is real or just marketing for the business it is get out of pain K. Vim Bar v. e. m. as a man heard because I'd like to tell that story it's appalling act together because it's the right thing to do that's he is hat men if there was a certain company name attached to it we may have to have a discussion but hi. I'm a new listener just discovered you guys a few months ago and I've been obsessed do you have any advice for me I'd love to get your insight in any advice you could have for a Newbie in lead you can't size up the other person don't know who you're dealing with you don't have body language you don't aw but I think the best thing you can do is learn a little bit about the company research on the company if you know who's interviewing you do a quick Google search just to kind of he's tried to write down like one or two things that are important to me that I would like to convey dead one of the big things that I wanted to convey was that I was like a team believing your knowledge base you being you as like the best thing you can do because it'll make you fit for your career is good fit for your interests and your values so don't hello you're not getting out now we got you sorry best pop fashion or on instagram at pop fashion podcast the Nouveau Tart with a splash of salted caramel With cinnamon toast and I'm not even sorry those toppings are incredible I have two product recommendations but I is Laurie Al Paris and I've really enjoyed this product it's not like a silver bullet product meeting like today it was less than five dollars it is a great product for that price point me a little bit of body which I really enjoy so it was just a nice delight my second product really quick is maybelline's superstate ink even that's the name of the color this particular line the is ink crayons awfully you could talk a bunch you could do bubble gum it will stay on that's kind of what I've gathered but it's been quite enjoyable I audited on your age even now Carne is slightly older than I am but like like nothing Just a question tell us about your eyesight we WanNa know discounts and have a good week this week. How good bye yeah?

Lvmh Tiffany Mr Chang Sephora United States Jin Suk Chang Peat Moss Executive Vice President Basketball ANC Los Angeles The Shoe Company BEN Google Linda Maryland Swatch Nouveau Tart John
Skanky Fragrances with Jason Carter

Natch Beaut

12:24 min | 1 year ago

Skanky Fragrances with Jason Carter

"Welcome and welcome everybody to Notch Butte. I'm so excited to have this hour with you. If you don't know who you're talking to it's Jackie J. The beauty talk shock jock the Queen Creams your host with the most assumes freshest fringe on the West Coast your favorite over thirty niche influence or the pop punk princess your favorite cookie southern aunt. I'm here and I'm allowed honey and I'm proud speaking being of being loud and proud honey my guest I mean we have so much to talk about. I'm I'm all anxious because it's been really. It's been a while since we're irl it it totally and there's so much to cover. My guest is living his best dream in his best life. He radiates positively. He's an inspiration. He is an on camera host host and journalist. He hosts e t live and honey. There's another side of this coin because not only does he have this job honey. He's also on the pit crew of Rupaul drag race okay so talk about job diversity. The resume is extensive my good friend. Jason Carter is highly. I'm so I've been trying to get your ass. When I did all male March last year? I try to get you but you were busy and hustling and you have twenty jobs and you know you know the struggle. Yes I know all about the struggle congratulations. You're you're killing the game for you. Love you five years yes happened in January of twenty two thousand fourteen knowing the date we met at was audition audition or we were already higher so we did that. Google chat audition remember last year and then I was like she's dope and CO Q. Bob Who's bat that's right right. I was rocking the Bob and it was awesome and so then we hired got hired the best and they hired us. They hired us to work on the first day of thinking in my best on lemon like sweater and we were like we're about to take over the hosting world honey right to say and then we didn't want law firm. We don't even want to say the name of it right. I don't people to Google it and find it wasn't bad it wasn't bad just the content was great. Experience was awesome Alfred that we would. They put on like this place anyways. We're not going to say well you know. God had a plan because here we are here we are here. We are in these streets. We are in these streets. We're slaying it and here we are together together again together again and I've kept up with you over the years. There's media I've watched you thrive. I watched you get married and divorced. Stop Ah now. I guess there was not a post on that but I'll tell you all about it on so yeah. Life is moving on. Are you married varied. We are Leeann. You've been long-term since two thousand and nine yeah yeah. That's my little Munchkin yes. I'm so happy that it's going well for you. You thank you you know relationships are work and I'm from lever that when they don't work dishes God or whoever he believe in whatever you know whoever finds you gives you sauce and spirituality retrial rerouting you to something that's better for you. Syria told y'all he was inspirational. fucking sad right. You live moves on. I I think the hardest thing about life moving on is when you make the choice to move on because it's being hurt sucks rejection sucks here and so especially when you invest vest because I feel like when you're a passionate person especially when you're a creative you invest in things in your life relationships investment so when the Roi the return turn on that investment is negative. You know you don't have a black head right and it takes a while to move on and the people get over it. That's the the worst thing you can say. That's from someone who doesn't understand basic bitches. I mean I think they need to exercise. Dan Gratitude and were yes okay. I have to ask you the first question I asked everybody on Ashby it. which is what type of skin do you have black skin? No no I have I have combination early to dry okay yes. I you know what most people enter that either they say black or they or they say boat. We're all combo guys. There's just stop asking that well because you're a product of your environment right. La Smart Toxicity Skins GonNa react. I mean and really who's really drinking all the water. They showed me. I'm guzzling at Dr Pepper and I was really impressed that you said that because I'm like the bodies on point and he's drinking soda I mean it's been a Dole's goals. Yeah you gotta gotTa have that sugar. The second question I always asked which is new is. What's your favorite feature about yourself physical? I can be anything it's open. It's open favorite feature I would say I definitely if I'm GONNA physical playing. I love my cheekbones literally of all these things because uh Google Jason Carter Y'all looks like there's also lots of photos of him in tiny underwear on his instagram scantly. You WanNa see what is best feature is on. I mean I was GONNA say. Maybe the APPS grow into your pushing forty. You Stop You stop relying on that body. I mean but I needs it looking good over him over here. I Look I've always cherished and really celebrated. just strong facial features like Kathy Ireland hello. Is that a strong draw. Why but it's beautiful so cheekbones? I've always I've always liked just a very defined. The Bone Structure Consent Heavens right answer okay okay. We have a lot to discuss but I kind of want to start with drag race sure because it's so interesting I was just telling some of the people out here who is coming again and they all just instantly knew who you were really core famous in Burbank I mean honey what a place to be slow love. TJ maxx marshalls Anna Nordstrom rack and target Walmart aw we got it all we do have a Sam's Club. So how did you get that Job Jack. That's a I mean because it's it's. It's go go right. Yes of course yes so. There's only three pit crew so there's only so there's been many yes. This story secret angels the right. Yes six mashed sometimes tire. We'll come back. We'll make exactly exactly. It's how key very colorful so two two thousand nine. I was just ending really crappy relationship. I was a dancer in. La So in the beginning of the year in people have a reset. I'm getting shape. Do this career bloody yeah so I'm like Hey I thought let me take these shots to try to make it as a dancer so I was teaching classes in Hollywood at Gold's gym the Gold's gym the awards it goes you know coal yes and no Co Co.. Yes how far close the shooter you're you're in Hollywood and you had to park and they have your car towed. Yeah so seriously happening twice and I was teaching dance classes had this one must have been the photos in January what they fantastic doc photographer named Michael Quyen who just really good at photographing people of Color and women such a I mean look he's awesome and so I was teaching class and and the dance room was glass window so there's a bunch of treadmills outside will elliptical so one of the executive producers are casting director of the show was was on on the treadmill peered INA saw his friend was taking my class so he sent my friend to ask me his friends to ask me like hey you well. How about modeling whatever you got discovered a little bit yeah the Hollywood kind of happened and so for this was February of two thousand ten and that was such a pivotal year for me? I'll spin while later but so for weeks gi mailing me. Send me a picture Blah Blah Blah so I finally did and I got a I got a request to go down to world of wonder it was on a Wednesday I happen to be off and this was after weeks of telling them of ignoring because when you're you're just like whatever believe the Hollywood casting couch all heard of like who send me photos maybe I'll model exactly ackley model mayhem partly no trae pick trade for pick and so I did and I thought that final day they were like you need to come in today and I was like cool whatever I winning world of wonder owns the headquartered illness amazing building awful Cherokee and Hollywood boulevard to six stories and so down the bottom of the basement they shoot a lot of their content and so they put me on green screen and told me to dance in my underwear. I'm thinking Whoa first of all professional dancer. He said Dancing Gogo boy and I'm thinking well. That's not really a compliment. Excuse me I write Larry Spencer. Would I think give you trouble Gogo boy move right yeah yeah you know just like no rhythm just crying really bad so I did. Ah thought nothing of it didn't hear anything. Did you do any pirouettes or did you throw any Prussians in there. No no no ronge jetties or the Full Chandelier Choreography Matt Ziegler. I could pull my leg my head but I didn't hear anything for for a week and you're just like what the hell did. I just exact whereas that footage going to end up green screen. They're going to put anything behind you to an ancient Egypt or some. It's like makeshift foreign and so in so I can hear anything back in that back when you're grinding its next the next train we've been trained to just close that that robot yes and move on right and so that was in March what was father's day mother's Day was in May of course in so I went to a brunch with a friend of mine a psychic and we've just been talking and so should ask me a question. She said I'm getting this energy from you that you are you in college. Did you are you. Are you testing for something or are you an actor. You're like I feel like you're being tested or you went out for something. You're waiting to hear a response or you're needing a response for something. I was like yeah. I have really bad allergies this time of year. That's only guy you're GONNA get it. You're GONNA get it. It's going to open all these. I don't know what it is. It was going to be really good it's going to be it's going to be really really big. I don't know what it is. It's going to be it's going to it's going to be very pivotal in your careers can do a lot for a lot of people and a guy when the guy with an f. and his name is going to call you like okay. Whatever whatever and you didn't know what this was four? I didn't tell me what it was but it was for a show right how insane and it's it ended up being ruining the most iconic shows of all time this cultural phenomenon land it yes yes and so fast forward to end of June throughout throughout that time waiting I had hosted event with Shangila who was on the season before she's into my first has a podcast on this network shunned July McQueen wildly and I hosted hosted a live event with her and people from world of wonder at the event bright so that never facetime facetime baby. I had no idea right then next weekend. I went to a pool party in Herat was at this party people from world wondering how yeah and so they're like the Visa Card everywhere where you WanNa be seriously and so I got a call end of June from a guy named frank that said Hey I'm so and so from we'll have under checking your availability L. Ability for a show called loopholes drag race. Have you heard of it. I was like yes we love you be pit crew member and I was like what does that entail just super cool so yeah torturing and what's interesting is that I grew up watching Paul. I used to secretly listen to supermodel of the world because being a little gay kid right you couldn't you that age. You didn't know what being gay was that you were drawn and people made you feel bad for liking that type of thing because of the ninety s we were on the Tel or we were in the midst of HIV AIDS crisis there wasn't as much representation and being a little boy row quickey New Mexico black boy from Albuquerque New Mexico

Hollywood Jason Carter Google Bob Who Notch Butte Jackie J. New Mexico Kathy Ireland West Coast Leeann Larry Spencer Alfred Dan Gratitude Syria Ashby Herat Dr Pepper
How Canadas Anti-Abortion Movement Recruits Young People

The Big Story

09:02 min | 1 year ago

How Canadas Anti-Abortion Movement Recruits Young People

"There are lots of myths, and lies and assumptions at their regarding abortions, especially these days, especially in the United States, where things are not going great right now for those who believe and a woman's right to choose what she does with her own body. The dominoes keep falling in the Bush to overturn Roe v. Wade, the Ohio governor signing today would critics condemn as the most restrictive abortion law in the country today. Missouri became the latest state to pass one of the order now becomes the third state since March to sign your loan, thirteen other states have introduced or advanced similar legislation to Alabama the lead. Est battleground in the newly energized abortion. But there is one myth in particular, that we need to talk about. And it's not about the medical procedure or who gets them or when or why it's about the people who oppose access to abortion. And this myth concerns, Canadians to it's very easy to look at the old white faces of the men in power in America who are imposing restrictive state laws and viewed them as the face of the anti-abortion movement. And that's fair. But it is not the whole story. And what you think you know about who exactly is out there in front of clinics or at their marches for life is probably wrong. So if you're a person who believes in the right to choose. And in the progress that has been made on that front over the decades, then it's important for you to take a really hard look at who is pushing the anti-choice agenda, and where they're doing their recruiting. I'm Jordan Rawlings. And this is the big story, Sydney Loni is a freelance journalist, she investigated the anti-abortion movement in Canada for flare dot com. Hi, said, hi, let's start with general question, how supportive are we of rate to choice in Canada? I always thought we were very supportive in this sort of non-issue. There was a poll in two thousand seventeen that found seventy seven percent of Canadians support pro choice, and that's a pretty good number. I thought it was on a low side. And if you compared to other countries like, France, it's actually eighty six in Sweden's eighty seven percent and support. So we're, we're still and we have a little ways to go. What is the typical image of the pro-life abortion activists anti-abortion activists in Canada? Gentleness conception out there that sort of, you know, angry white men yelling at side, abortion clinics. And when I did this piece, and I spoke to many anti-abortion. Vists. That's what they said that they wanted to sort of dispel, that myth at. That's what they are. And but I think that it's sort of persistent. We think that sort of a small fringe group. I know you know, when I was in university. It'd be the handful of people walk by maybe five or six people with signs you kinda give them wide berth, because there is sort of seen as these kind of weird outliers. And I don't think that that's the case anymore. What's changing, I think the biggest thing surprised me the most too, is just sort of the, the size of the movement now and the youth of the movement. It's, it's not it's, it's young educated women women university. Many of them when Wednesday spoke to many of the women, I spoke to are pursuing careers in healthcare, and that also surprised me, but these are sort of young articulate s- university, educated women. How do they come by these views because that does seem really in congress to me? Yeah. And that's a good question. I think one of the women, I spoke to some of it is based on religion. They've been brought up with these views and they say that their family is also PR. Prolife, but many, you know, in highschool, they've sort of set of tapped into this, and it sort of resonated with them. Many women, I spoke to said that they saw as being cool movement whereas really years ago. Yeah. Years ago, you know, the said that being pro pro choice was sort of the default everyone, you know, their grandparents are now pro-choice, and they see this sort of rebellious the new rebellion movement and whereas before it was cool to be pro choice. Now, they say it's cool to be pro life that seems so strange to, to be honest. Handle telegraphing my head around that one as well. But yeah, I think a lot of us who are pro choice or just in general progressive people. They see you, as the future of their movement. Right. Outta your member after the shooting and park land, Florida last year. There was this whole movement from these teens and the, the message around them from adults was youth. They're going to save us. Right. And, and it seems like you know, we see young kids fighting climate change and speaking out against racism, and I feel like abortion, just gets lumped in there, too. And maybe it shouldn't. Yeah, I, I think maybe I think maybe we've become complacent about it. I mean I certainly had no idea how big this movement was earlier in may that the March for life, which I'd never actually even wasn't really on my radar took place. And that sort of where I interviewed on these women who are preparing to go the March, and they're excited about the March when young woman, I interviewed was hosting a gala at in Victoria, the university after the March. So it's like a big it's a big cool party and the March started in nineteen ninety eight and were. Seven hundred participants in this last year, they were fifteen thousand and that's only an Ottawa. So the marches all over your city across the country, and it just shows the size of the growing Amenam of this movement. Tell me about a couple of the young women, you've met, if there are any who stand, particularly to you, and what they're like. Yeah. I think one woman in particular, she's she's eighteen eighteen and she was her first March. And she was just like a kid going on a trip. She was really excited about it. It was her first she's, she just graduated from high school. Her family is she told me was also antiabortion, but she was excited to be other people, our age who share those views, and she wanted to be part of the movement, and wanted to possibly in the future, maybe intern at some of these organizations. And that's the other thing is a lot of these groups have interns, who start very young and use of Ashby, where these people are coming from. They start out, you know, they were being recruited in high school to, to come into the offices and work there. And then they end up also out on the streets holding the signs. And the things that we do. See that was actually my next question is, is this, a conscious effort by anti-abortion organizations to get younger? I would say so definitely and even the place to everyone, who I talked to said that they had I'm been exposed to these ideas in high school and in some schools, one of the women, I didn't end up talking to her article, had followed her, and we had talked a little bit, but she actually goes into high schools and does talks about, you know, the antiabortion movement. And so there's that aspect as well. What are pro choice organizations doing to try to? They must see the tide turning than I, I don't know, if the thought that the right metaphor being possibly one woman, I spoke to was very concerned in and she had no when she found out, she wasn't an activist didn't think of his office when before the March for life. But then this was the first year that there was one in Toronto as well. And that kind of freaked her out a bit. And so she organized a counter protest in got on Facebook and got all these people involved to come out of warn people was happening part of it, and also to sort of. Have a have a voice for the other side for the pro choice side, and another woman in Berta longtime activists said that. Yes, there is momentum and that the people who are active in the movement are doing whatever they can about it. But the society is a whole has become a little bit on the complacence. I we don't really haven't really isn't on our radar, and we look so th and think, oh, that could never happen here. And I think the concern is, you know, if it can happen there, I can happen anywhere and you we have some very vocal pro-life politicians who've been elected, and people are electing them despite having them holding these views. So that is an issue. We did a podcast last week about Sam who Stor off who's, obviously interesting not female, but very young. And very vocally anti-abortion, and when we talk about this stuff, even people who are critics of him say, they would never actually change the law. Stephen Harper didn't change the laws. Andrew Scheer has no plans to change the laws. Right. So there is. It's not necessarily complacency. But there just seems to be a thought that this is a done deal. Right. I think that's maybe dangerous thought I think that the anti-abortion people spoke to said that their goal was to, to support pro life politicians into get into show them that they have a huge movement behind them, but there's also this sort of more insidious things terms of, you know, our, our side in tarot back to the nineties, and we're taking steps back everywhere else in related ways. And just how hard it is for women to access abortion in Canada. I think people don't necessarily realize that I mean, you've only been only got one MP is nineteen thousand seventeen and in other provinces. Well, it's not it's not easy there. It's hard to find clinics to find train doctors long wait times. So it's a lot of barriers that,

Canada United States Missouri America Alabama Intern Ohio Wade Bush Jordan Rawlings Facebook Sydney Loni Congress Andrew Scheer Stephen Harper ROE France Florida Sweden
Bill Hader on Barry | Interview

The Big Picture

07:20 min | 1 year ago

Bill Hader on Barry | Interview

"Double sized episode of the big picture. This is a conversation show with filmmakers, and we're talking to a few of them today. The first of which you may have heard of his name is Bill hater he is. Of course, the creator the writer producer, and sometime director of a little show called Barry show on HBO that we love here at the wringer. I talked to Bill about making Barry, but more specifically just about movies because men this guy knows a lot about film, and he's really fun to talk to you. He put me on to a bunch of movies. I think if you're interested in the wider world of movies in the history of the medium, you'll enjoy this chat. And then right after that, we're going to have another interview with two people. I really admire the actress Mary Kay place who you may recall from things like the big chill. She was an EMMY winner in the seventies. She's been steadily working as an actress for the last forty years and the critic turned filmmaker and documentarian Ken Jones. Kent's first film as a narrative film maker is called Diane and Mary Kay. The star of that movie, and it's a really beautiful intimate complex portrait of a person nearing the end of their life. And how things change around them as they approach that stage. So please stick around after Bill to listen to that one. But before that, let's go right to Bill Hader. Joined by actor writer, director producer all kinds of stuff ill hater, hey, buddy. How are you? I'm doing good. So bill. This is a show where we talk about movies, and you made a TV show, but you are like the all-time movie buff. Yeah. And so I wanna talk about berry as kind of a filmmaking property. What do you think? Yeah. It'd be great now. Most people kind of friends who were like, it's kinda just, you know, a four hour movie that we've broken up into eight is that how you can send it as like. Well, the way we write it. I had never written in a in a traditional TD writing room writer's room before the only one had really been in outside of Santa live of south park. And finally kind of knew what those guys did. And it was kind of like their their shows have, you know, a three acts, and so you were kind kinda just it was never really written in order. It was kind of. We know this needs to happen. Then at some point this happens, and then towards the end, maybe this happens, and then you're kind of finding scenes at connect these things, and then it all starts changing. So I kind of did that. But with with eight episodes, I would just put one two to four one through eight up on the bore whiteboard. I would just start plotting, and you know, season one it was like, okay. So, you know, end of episode to be really good. If you know, they had this thing for rhyme Addison embarrassed starting to realize, you know, e- seizes father speak in rhyme. Adam's, father speaking, he realizes. Oh, gosh. You know, he didn't you've never seen that side of it before, you know. And then maybe it's good if you know Vaujour's following them that'd be good. You know in the in the, you know, the the way call it his his friends from Chris in those guys military guys they come in around episode. Owed four or five. So question Mark, you know, more friends years, your puzzle PC, and you're just kind of laying it out, but you laid out as a full things. So, you know, by eight it's like, I just know eight forever just had moss versus berry at the end. And we had no idea where that took place or what happened. But I I've felt and we all kind of felt like they should have she should figure it out. You know? So we knew that was at the end of eight at the end of the last episode, but we didn't know how that would happen is that more similar to the way you'd read a movie, I mean, I don't know. I I mean, I everyone has a different way of doing it some people the idea out of outlining is for bowdoin in people. I think because screen play unlike a novel novel can be as long as you want screenplay should be about under twenty pages. And when you're structuring a story for film or. Television. There has to be like structure to it. You know, now that doesn't mean in asked to be kind of like what we do or you know, that kind of Billy wilder thing. Or I, you know, where it was every everything is set a payoff, everything is super clean, and you know, that what by I love that. It's really hard to pull off in. That's why I enjoy that kind of writing. But you know, I mean, I mean, some of the best movies of Hollywood specially in the seventies were really during didn't know where it was going, but they have a structure there. You know, be too great how Ashby movies being there and last detail fron tense purposely last details just kind of a a road movie quest movie quest movie in about these two guys finding their humanity in in and trying to show this guy a good time before he goes to jail in. Kind of forgetting their jobs is in what they've learned military men and all this and an in kind of shedding their the humanity that they have to repress when I put the uniform on and all that, and it's all very emotional. But when you look at it, it's got a really great structure, you know, has a really tight structure now, I don't know if Robert towne took that book, and you know, outlined it in figured it out. But if feels that way, and so sometimes the first draft is like an outline you're kinda like you're writing I've done it both ways we write a draft to something with no outline in it. It's got a lot inspired stuff in it. But it's kind of cranky, you know. Yeah. So then you kind of go over it you show it to a friend in the gonna will head of it there. You know, this would go here what you know in the new you'd try to because you want it to feel kinda we're Ganic. But when you're doing TD showing you got thirty minutes. It's it's kinda hard to do that. Because you have to keep a tight inside frame. It really tight. Yeah. And I'm also just someone I don't like wasting people's time. And so when we got the TV show actually went back and watch TV. But I would I would read short stories was really good. I would want. I would read like Tobias Wolff for Flannery O'Connor any these people and kind of see just pay attention to the structure, you know, in in not that far off the tone of those writers. I feel like to. Yeah. Yeah. Give me and hard to find. As like totally an incredible berry template as far as gets on this incredibly funding in very disturbing at the same time. But you know, trying to understand where the emotions coming from. I think we're Alec Berg, and I worked so well together as I'm kind of all emotion, and he's all logic. And my strong suit is as weak suit in my weeks at his strong suit. Not that he's not. National is he's he's comes up. I think some

Bill Hader Writer Mary Kay Director Producer Barry Emmy HBO Ken Jones Alec Berg Berry Billy Wilder Robert Towne Kent Addison Vaujour Hollywood Tobias Wolff Chris Mark
"ashby" Discussed on Z104

Z104

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"ashby" Discussed on Z104

"Ice. Nanomoles with these. Flashing lights and lights. Baby. Bill. Four. Raining raining grinding on. Wherever known Ashby. Surfing..

Ashby Ice. Nanomoles
Florists Fear A 'No Deal' Brexit Would Wilt The Flower Business

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Florists Fear A 'No Deal' Brexit Would Wilt The Flower Business

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from the UPS store, offering services from shredding to printing to mailbox ING and instead of closing this holiday. The UPS store is doing another ING altogether. Opening the UPS store every ING for small business. And of course shipping. Valentine's Day is huge for florists around the world. But in the United Kingdom the risk of crashing out of the European Union next month has cast a shadow over the industry mini shops, fear their lifeline to flour supplies in Europe could be severely disrupted. NPR's? Frank Langfitt reports from the English town of Whitney. Roseanne Ashby's wrapping up a bouquet of roses and lilies at our shop Rosa flowers in Oxfordshire near part of a wide selection of flower. She offers most of which come from the same place. These all come from Holland. The least come from Holland and the croissant. Spreaker sounds come from Holland up until now the flowers have flowed seamlessly across the border because the UK's part of the massive you single market, but the United Kingdom is scheduled to leave the U late next month, and there's still no deal on how to keep trade flowing. We're very worried we don't know what's going to happen. Twenty nine government. Don't know nobody knows. And I worry is. When will we get the flowers? What price will they tariffs? Go on. The government insists the majority of you plants and flowers will continue to enter the UK without health checks, but businesses of all sorts are worried about an ideal Brexit so have been filling up warehouses across the country with everything from auto parts to ice cream in case trade slows dramatically Ashby's industry. Doesn't have that luxury. We can't have a contingency plan. The cat stop piler goods because the fresh flowers. We're only a small business coming up to twenty second Valentine's. It's so sad abroad. Moves pope, an odd share the British frost association here in the United Kingdom wills. Pope who spoke over Skype says Ashby's plate is typical eighty percent of our flout. She come from Holland. So they come by the Eurotunnel or ferry and wills pope says that dependency developed over decades, while the UK has been inside the you now poses a threat to flower-sellers here. We are looking at something which is unprecedented in the forty years that we mean po- single market because has tons involved the English growers of soda up and initials of being built on and more more, but options being to homes regen, San no, no, no. Back in Whitney, one of Rosa Ashby suppliers arrived from Holland today's Barry, snapper, and he's just come through the channel tunnel with his refrigerated semi packed with flowers. Ashby and snapper haggle is they have every Wednesday for at least the past six years. I asked Napper what he fears most from a no deal. Brexit all the extra gypsies import duties charges waiting at the tunnel. Eurotunnel to to come across. It's never says that would force people like him to raise prices, which he thinks shops. Here will have a hard time passing on a lot of people will struggle to sell flowers to the public people. Well, they're still going to buy foods and everything, but they can skip the flower. How important is the UK to your business? I only supply today UK two moments. People say to me, do you want to expert to another county, but I think coming over for over twenty years to Britain. And yeah, it's too difficult. Think to go to another county now some snappers clients Valentine's Day orders are now, which they attribute to Brexit uncertainty snappers been trying to calm their fears. I always say the same affording, the February it's men and they come in Las minutes. And that's the same story every year. It's always on the bay itself today after British flower shops are planning ahead. They're ordering early for mother's day. Which in the UK falls on March thirty first two days after the United Kingdom is scheduled to leave the U. Frank Langfitt, NPR news, Whitney England. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

United Kingdom Roseanne Ashby Holland NPR Valentine Napper Eurotunnel Whitney Pope U. Frank Langfitt Comcast Rosa Ashby Europe European Union Oxfordshire Whitney England Brexit Las Minutes
Anne Cates, Ventura County And Daryl Ashby discussed on Leading the Way with Scott Murray and Angel Carlton

Leading the Way with Scott Murray and Angel Carlton

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Anne Cates, Ventura County And Daryl Ashby discussed on Leading the Way with Scott Murray and Angel Carlton

"Anne Cates. California continues to battle an outbreak of wildfires with the winds comes this concern on the Wolsey fire burning in LA and Ventura County. There's a lot of people didn't have not burn county. Fire chief Daryl Ashby says with the winds embers could be blown back behind the fire lines and within the lines threatening homes and landscape that has up till now been saved or spared. The that we're not concerned about. The devastation is overwhelming home after home from mobile homes to multi million dollar homes doesn't have been level fire knows no economic status or boundaries. These winds are expected to last the next three days. Decreasing the danger in Malibu, I'm Jim Roope. Or at least twenty five people have been killed by the wildfires in the northern part of the state more than one hundred are missing that blaze has charged one hundred nine thousand acres destroyed sixty seven hundred homes and businesses and his twenty-five

Anne Cates Ventura County Daryl Ashby Jim Roope Malibu California LA One Hundred Nine Thousand Acre Million Dollar Three Days
"ashby" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"That is one of the the most, the strongest in like most distinctive debut features from from that period. You mentioned that he was an editor for a lot of years really could have made that his his bread and butter heavy, not gun into directing. And I'm curious, you mentioned Bob Jones. What was it like to be an editor for Hal Ashby? Bob was his own. Like as an editor was a was a diff-. I mean, you know, Ashby had worked with other people previously as editors Jones cut the last detail he took over from somebody else. On that film where. Which had been going that well in post and and the, the cruelty that Bob has has was he was just he was really fast, but also just brilliant. And I think that he was the first person that that Ashby truly trusted as an editor so that he could kinda step back. But because if you look at both the landlord and a how to Maud, those are two films that that Ashby was very, very involved as director editor. He's credited on either film, you know, but they're both very consciously edited films there. There's there's a lot of cuts. They're the editing you might say is stylized. Whereas in the last detail, it's it doesn't sort of telegraph it. So it's not so consciously edited at, I think it was something where he could relax a little bit on the phone feels more relaxed. Bob Jones Cutler filming, kind of intuitively, whereas through, it's a ton of very conscious that is in. In the landlord and and held a Morton in terms of the way that scenes are intercut, where they go from one to another. There's those jokes, there's interplay between this scenes and sequences in the last detail, it's just is a sort of flows a lot more and feels like more of a natural narrative progression end that was the star of Ashby being able to be a less physical presence in in be in the editing room. He would go off and do other things and in a way his, some of the difficulties that he had in in the eighties was when Jones woods had had become a writer and and he had edges, he could depend on less in the editing room and he, he had to become more involved in that and and you know he was trying to at that time he was trying to give. Sorry, he's trying to give young editors a break and was sort of handing over the reins to people who had a lot of potential, but not necessarily a lot of experience and. His films suffered as a result of that, he would try always take things on himself, but he was dealing with the law projects, and you know, sometimes the material was with this note that great to start with, you know, the, you have a foam way look into get out, which I, I'm, I'm a big champion of the ritual released version of that foam is was kinda compromise. It was they had fifteen minutes chopped out of it against Ashby's wishes, but the the, the, the Ashby of that which which released on DVD like nine years ago, I think that really is as a special film, but his films, you know, when when people weren't cutting them appropriately in evidently did suffer. Great. A great deal. I was also curious about eight million ways to die. Did that ever get a release where it was more close to his vision? It didn't, unfortunately for the reason the that it was taken away from him before he, he caught a frame of it. He had a very clear sense of what he was going to do. But as soon as production. Ended on that. That film he was he was relieved of his duties, and so you know, it's, I think it's a film where you see flashes here and there of his work, but it's it. It's so integral to turn Ashby film that he is in some way, a presence in the editing room, but that his intentions are are manifest onscreen. Whereas, you know, the, the music was different..

Hal Ashby Bob Jones editor Maud Bob writer director fifteen minutes nine years
"ashby" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"So Amy, Scott talked about how much it helped hap to have editing experience. If you're going to be directing a film that's largely made of archival material like this one, which totally makes sense at any rate, if you're fan of Ashby or curious about the social and political climate around filmmaking in the seventies America, definitely check it out. And if you're in New York at the IFC center, they also have a retrospective of how Espy's films going on, how so if you get a ticket to the documentary, whatever Ashby film is playing after that you can do to for one double feature that you compared with it. So the great idea I'm interested in checking out. I've never seen Harold and Maude. Yeah, I think you'd like it. It's weird. It's it's stark. It star coming home is dark. Do the little stranger was one that kind of slipped under the radar last week. So we thought we'd mention it this week. It's Lenny. Abrahamson 's follow up to room and he'd he'd Richard Frank to. I mean, this guy's a proven indie director, but this is his venture into the horror genre. Donald Gleason plays a doctor who was called to visit a crumbling manor. When strange things begin to occur our own next winter sat down with the DP of the film ole brat Berkman. That's a crazy name. Willie is old brat. I mean, maybe maybe it's a labor at, but sounds like even better day. They talked about how he created the film's eerie mood. He explained one of their tactics as such quote. We try and play with the John RA in a sense that the camera was always slightly lower than you'd expect or slightly higher than you'd expect always trying not to be too, you know, conventional in our approach. So we were always trying to play with the idea. You know what normally would you do here? Oh, okay. Let's just move the camera a little bit over here. Let's make sure we're not always matching the eyeliner directly. We were always playing with the idea of what audience might expect versus what they were getting. And you can read that whole interview on the site how to block a ghost story DP ole brat, Brooklyn on the unsettling the little stranger, Brad Berkman. I love him. I love the tischler little stranger is someone to watch out for them. So we've got some grant deadlines for ya on September. Eleventh. The auspicious date is the deadline for the Thessaloniki Agora works in progress. If you are in the process of. Shooting or in post production on a film from central Europe Mediterranean and southeastern Europe register for this showcase for industry exposure and awards up to seventy thousand euros held in November. The Agora works in progress or sessions only for the industry professionals invited in Thessaloniki and are presented to invited sales agents, distributors, producers, and festival programmers. Where is this a looney key Greece and it's beautiful. I've been there. This would be a great excuse to just go there and potentially win up to seventy thousand euros, which was the only reason I go on vacations. The other deadline we have for you. This week is the BAFTA row cliff film call. It has deadline on September twenty. Sixth, if you are a UK based rider with a script, you could be one of three projects left it for the BAFTA showcase not only do the finalists receive a selection of fantastic prizes including an industry.

Willie brat Berkman Ashby Brad Berkman Abrahamson IFC center Thessaloniki Agora Donald Gleason Europe New York Espy Amy Harold Thessaloniki America director Agora UK John RA Maude
California to become first state to eliminate bail for suspects awaiting trial

02:10 min | 2 years ago

California to become first state to eliminate bail for suspects awaiting trial

"SP ten governor. Brown signed it. Eliminates the requirement it's really interesting you. Gotta read the detail in this you are not going to be required to pay bail to get. Out of jail after your arrested it's up to the judge to determine what kind of a, risk you are to the community and then the judge will, set it because up until now let's Be blunt there. Is no way of getting. Around this if you. Commit a crime. And you're wealthy us pay the bail. And off yo l bond industry makes money and if you're rich you just get to wander the. Streets and even if you get convicted your club fed anyway we have definitely a two-tier Justice, system on the criminal Justice system when it comes to that, topic So. If you were wealthy you just paid off you win if you're not wealthy you can't come up with the money you're stuck in jail you lose your job even if you're. Falsely accused that's where it becomes punishment before you've been convicted, of, anything you're a convicted but you're punishing can't maintain a? Job maybe, now you can't pay child support maybe can't pay you can't pay rent you're getting Vic did. Because you didn't have the. Money in the first place to pay bail. Because maybe you were in the wrong place at the wrong time and got, arrested maybe you are guilty that's. Up to the judge, to say hey what kind of a. Risk are you to our community you know if it, was really violent crime may be still leaves a ten million dollar bail the judge he or she So SP ten was? Signed this, was pushed by the state's judicial council in many others it's now actually opposed by a lot. Of people though A lot of people ACO you is against it saying SP ten cannot guarantee a substantial reduction in the. Number of Californians detained while. Awaiting trial nor does it sufficiently address racial bias in pre-trial. Decision making because it just leaves it up to

Ethan Bearman JOE Brown Attorney Monterey Kghm Marvis Fraud Ashby VIC Carlos Bill Keijo Sacramento Santa Cruz Sheldon Nowak
DNC votes to limit role of superdelegates in presidential nominations

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

DNC votes to limit role of superdelegates in presidential nominations

"Well Democratic Party leaders have. Now voted to limit their own influence and choosing presidential nominees the Democratic National. Committee overwhelmingly voted to limit the influence of so called super delegates starting in twenty twenty those party leaders won't be able to vote in the first round for a presidential nominee at. The party convention they will be able to vote if, the nomination takes multiple rounds however this gives more weight to state primaries. And caucuses changes come after two years of negotiations stemming. From the bitter nominating fight in two thousand sixteen between Bernie Sanders and Hillary.

East Bay San Francisco Bay Bridge Kcbs CBS Democratic Party Bernie Sanders Ashby Powell Francisco Cesar Chavez Amanda Reporter Clinton Treasure Island Steve Large Gilman Muny Oakland Mckee
"ashby" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Heavy and that's a bad spot on. A good day so, it starts at page mill you'll hit. Another slowdown Cupertino, a second, crash southbound before wolf road that's in the center divide heavy through that. Area as well San Leandro cleared a crash five eighty westbound past a hundred and fiftieth out of the left. Lane that's why it's heavy from two thirty eight where it's normally really good Richmond accident eighty eastbound at Richmond Parkway motorcycle down at least the second lane, from the, left block than a Berkeley, crash eighty westbound past Ashby reportedly in the right lane That's why that closure in Richmond. East, five eighty at eighty the right lane closed I tried to, head out towards the shore freeway, because of an accident in. The one o'clock hour big oil spill, quite the cleanup that needs to. Be done there and it's getting heavy in Marin but. San Rafael a new accident watch out one zero one, southbound past freightage is. Just happening blocking the left lane your next update for twenty eight on the traffic leader KCBS job again for the Sienese, Sleepworld six day forecast Mancini's Sleepworld invites you to rest easy during their triple. Bonus mattress sale visit Sleepworld dot. Com we're seeing sunshine, for. Most of the bay area this afternoon. The exception being stretches, of the coastline that have seen nothing. But grey all, day temperatures, ranging from the low sixties Cosi to the low nineties now inland tonight. Cloudy skies at and near the coast otherwise fairly clear with those temperatures in the fifties tomorrow we're going to. See some morning fog at the coast afternoon clearing just about everywhere temperatures tomorrow potentially a little bit warmer but in about the same Bracket. As we move into the weekend looks like waiting to cool. Things off a little. Bit for Saturday and Sunday fact sunny looks to be the coolest day of the week warmer temperatures, again on Monday and Tuesday it's hit ninety one and conquer it and it's the only city among, our reporting stations, that made it. Into the nineties today. Seventy four and Napa eighty four in Santa Rosa in downtown San Francisco at sixty to sixty six in Oakland sixty seven in Mountain View and Eighty-one in San Jose we have traffic and weather together on the eighth on all these one zero, six nine and AM. Seven forty KCBS KCBS news time four twenty seventeen years in. The planning the Salesforce transit center and downtown San Francisco opens, next weekend and one of its crowning glories as a five point four acre rooftop. Park, KCBS reporter, Holly Kwon joined a public sneak peek, of the the sanctuary in the urban jungle grass..

KCBS San Francisco San Leandro Richmond Lane San Rafael Cupertino Richmond Parkway Sleepworld dot Sleepworld San Jose Marin Holly Kwon Ashby reporter freightage Berkeley Napa Santa Rosa
"ashby" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"What I would have liked to see is some additional thoughtfulness around what are the implications if we proceed with this policy, the idea that you wanna have a policy that respects, the sanctity of our border, I think is important, but that has implications. And one of those implications is what you do when people come across as an entire family had additional. Thought and effort been put into this question of how do we deal with the children, vis-a-vis the parents and look. Maybe there was thought given to this. I'm not on the inside on this issue, so I don't know. But my sense is that there was a little bit of catch-up going on, and that's unfortunate because it did tarnish the policy and it made it much more difficult to make articulate argument for why one might wanna zero tolerance policy might be important to say, look, our border is our border and we're going to enforce it regardless of of the circumstance. So I do think that this is one area where the administration probably could have used a little bit more time and energy on the thought about what the second and third order consequences worth of policy. And I think sometimes focusing on the policy forget just the impact on the people. I mean, it's been a humanitarian problem for thousands of people and the trauma that might follow these kids for years, and let's not forget that the notion of there being difficulty around separations at the border. This predates this administration. There have been other administered. Nations where there have been crises of the border. Now they've handled it differently. It's been for different reasons that the crisis was created, but the border and immigration issues continued to perplex policymakers. We cannot seem to arrive at a permanent good fix for immigration system. I think it's a shame we spoke recently for my story on h. successes policy shop known as Ashby. The assistant secretary for planning and evaluation on the story was about some reports that have come out recently from the Trump administration Ashby that have been questionable projecting positive benefits from rolling back the reports that got killed because they would have been undermining the Trump administration policies in different way. You gave me some context on on Espy is a former person saying, quote, I don't believe the Trump administration Espy has put out reports that are a less analytically or methodologically rigorous than those of the Obama administration Ashby. And you also clarified that you don't look to ask me as an. Independent source for analysis, saying, quote, that's why we have studies from academics and analysts outside of government. So looking at your HHS, should we have trusted the reports that the George W Bush administration Ashby published? I think you have to put all of these reports in context, whether it's reports from Ashby from within government reports from the outside. Frankly, the role of Ashby is to promote the administration's health policy agenda. Now, obviously, you want it done in a sincere and thoughtful and yes, analytically accurate way. I don't believe that there has been anything. This administration has put out that does not meet those criteria that having been said, I think they've got an agenda. Absolutely. I think the Obama administration asked me had an agenda. The Bush administration asked me had an agenda and anybody who sees Ashby for anything more than that. A little naive because the role of that office is fundamentally to promote the president's policies. And I think if you see it as a neutral arbiter of whether a policy is good or bad, you're probably looking to the wrong place. So I think there is a role for people on the outside to be critical of what the administration is saying. And so far I think there has been criticism in spades of this administration. So I don't think there's a lack of perspective. I just think that people who say that they disagree with the methodology or disagree with the framing of reports coming out this administration, probably more disagree with the findings then with anything else. So I, I would just be realistic about what to expect from offices like Ashby about a year ago. Abbe put out analysis of the consumer freedom amendment, the Ted Cruz back rule that was going to create to risk pools and it was very positive on the impact of that on the market..

Ashby Obama administration assistant secretary for planni Trump Ted Cruz Abbe George W Bush HHS president
"ashby" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Top priority in HHS is certainly feeling pressure to show that they're making progress. It's hard to think of President Trump being fixated. I've never heard him be fixated on shoe before and bring it up over in this states back to even before as our was confirmed as even before you know, in those meetings, he would say, you know, I, I think you're great. These the issues we're talking about and it would always go back to, well, what can we do on pricing and how fast I, I went back and watched the swearing in it came up than than to that was one of the first things Trump said beyond the policies as are also has continued to remake the personnel had success. Sure. And there are a couple kind of overarching ideas that he's he's had in putting people. Onto place. One is you want private sector people. He doesn't want people from the hill. He wants people who have experienced in a real world who have the knowledge in the context to when they come into the agency. Really the way he puts his know where the money is to really be able to go after the parts of the industries that that can change in that can you know, kind of effect, structural change. And I think by and large, he's got everybody in place on, you know, on top upper levels, but there's still parts of the agencies where there are a lot of holes and you wrote you wrote a story about essentially HHS policy shop, and it's been a little chaotic in part because they don't have a permanent leader. And in fact that permanently I remember has been out there for, you know, waiting on his confirmation for more than a year. At this point you're you're talking about Ashby. The story that I had this week. So Abby, the assistant secretary for planning and evaluation. That's the brain Bank for itchy Chester. One hundred twenty people in this shop. When Alex azar says, I want to do something big on drug pricing. There are teams in Ashby who then try and substantiate that and come up with the policies that as our could then roll out and their other teams around the agency to, but Ashby's sort of the central brain nervous system for HHS what my story got into with some of the political meddling in Ashby over the past year where Trump. Administration politically appointed. People were either killing reports that were critical of of Trump priorities, like allowing refugees to come in to shifting the findings to make them more palatable to the Trump administration's goals like rolling back the now. Every Ashby has been politically influenced in some way. Obama has to be was the Jewish W Bush one was, but the bigger question is, has the Trump administration gone farther in shaping the evidence and data coming out of divisions like the policy shelter and this gets out a attention. I think that is going to be something to watch the next six months is you have an HHS with Alex as are very structured, very into planning, very into keeping everybody on message doing things the right way. And then you have a White House that often does not do those things. They have a very different philosophy. That's a lot more chaotic a lot more ad hoc. Yeah, the president wakes up. He says, he says, I want this done. And and everybody else is off just working on that. And so I think the SP SP is great example where there's a tension between doing things right, doing you know the research doing the policy and this urge to show results to get things done no matter what. And that is that tension between, you know, a more traditional HHS leadership and a definitively nontraditional. White House leadership is something that's, that's definitely out there watch and something that we've seen come up at times when HHS pursues one policy that might seem at odds with the White House. You are going down to just to cover the short term plan fallout. So we'll let you get to that. Listeners can find Adam story on association health plans. My story on Espy the policy shop in the.

Trump HHS Ashby Alex azar assistant secretary for planni White House president Obama Abby Adam six months
"ashby" Discussed on Living Regret Free

Living Regret Free

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on Living Regret Free

"Tell our listeners what it's going to be about radio show israeli interviewing people who have inspirational stories stories like mine i had my moment when i realized on the first of january two thousand ten does any one person who's hurting here and it's me and i'm not going to do it anymore and i just stopped it was like i turned to switch and i suddenly became the real man again instead of this sort of shameful person who every time i saw anybody in they said you know oh how so and so and they didn't know that we'd split up which would have not made back i became a real person again so the idea is that they share their stories may help people realize that that not in what i call to glass coffin which is where i felt after they lost event happened i thought i could see people i could hear people i could speak but nobody could hand me for nobody they could hear me but they didn't really listen so the objective of the show is to let people know that they're not on their own so to shows a month inspirational entities with paypal fascinating people have approached may i i'm overwhelmed by the the response i've had and then two shows with organizations that offer support or that the people have the cells have set up to offer support to other people it's it's it's i'm in a different world of inspirational people helping other people set it it with all the bad news around the moment this is inspirational an enlightening fhu if people wanted to get in touch with you what's the best way for them to do it okay they can always email me the email address is over the edge sue now over the edge looks a little bit funny because it's got to ease in the middle but over the edge sue as you e at g mail dot com well i wanna thank you so much first of all for being a guest today that's number one i want to give.

"ashby" Discussed on Living Regret Free

Living Regret Free

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on Living Regret Free

"Was to tell his towel her mother who was living with us she had on giant or not we i thought she was going to die we told because let's face it you you know you'll meant to go i the older person's meant to go first your your child is not meant to go i even if she was forty eight that's doesn't feel right so we got an onto in house and mine and we told her and she was okay but my father couldn't do anything so i took on the role of wife or home housekeeper if you lie not wife housekeeper and i had to do laundry i had to do cooking because my grandmother was too old and had angina and i had to go to school and i had to do homework and it was just very very difficult if i didn't fold shirts right he'd screw them up turn them on the front orange told me to do it again so it was hard he started dating shortly after my mother died he started dating his secretary who was again a wonderful woman i have to say if you didn't if he asked me he asked me if he if he could marry her which i thought was incredible i never thought he'd ask but he asked me and i said yes and do you know if he was gonna marry a witch i would have said yes because i was so dumb with doing everything and so tired and so exhausted it a he just had to have a woman in his life who would who would run his life phone that woman was not going to be made and not for long so it was hard but it you know you're just have to pick up an undo what you have to do we know one when what what you're talking about it's interesting because well first of all i have to say fortunate for me i never had any of that i did come from very loving and warm family my dad did work a lot because he was a pharmacist in the owned his own pharmacy and it was in a really small town so he would leave early in the morning and come late at night but still you know there.

angina secretary
"ashby" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

"Dj his hero moment everybody gets a hero moment sonya's early on when she takes out cain oh this is janis when he takes out goro linden ashby is my favorite actor in this movie his characterization his riley lines is humor everything about him is mediocre i think he really is the harrison ford of this trio now again i've grading on a curve here well you really are i just can't believe that you're going to give this star wars glow i would make the johnny cage of motor combat story prequel i'm really liking linden ashby so much i walked out of there wanting to be johnny cage but liu king is our hero he's our luke skywalker he doesn't act as well he's not as fun but he does get a fight with reptile that's pretty awesome once reptile becomes human yeah the deal was cut the final fight is going to be in the outland and that means rate in can't come so these two have to go off in their own and the point is is that it was a world like earth that was depleted because they lost ten rounds of mortar combat so this is what we will become and the scene with reptile the fight against the cgi creature was always there but when lukac through them in that body he was just going to be trapped there and that was the end of the fight the second fight which is the best fight in the entire movie against human reptile was the other pickup shot to increase the amount of fighting here and i'm so glad they did and the producer of this i mentioned laura.

cain janis goro linden ashby johnny cage producer laura linden ashby
Death toll 25 in Guatemala volcano eruption

Here & Now

02:47 min | 2 years ago

Death toll 25 in Guatemala volcano eruption

"From npr and wbz you're i'm robin young i'm jeremy hobson it's here now rescue operations in guatemala which continued today after the fogo volcano erupted over the weekend thirty two hundred have been forced to evacuate at least sixty nine people have died and we're seeing horrifying images of the scene here's reporter mark stevenson of the associated press several of the stunning images are the myriad ways in which people died in this rumps and some were burned to death when buildings were set of flame by fast moving flows of lava clouds and then the most terrible thing is that the ashes mixed with water and sent it flows of what appeared to be steaming mud down the river valleys and dan the creeks even reached as far as the capital guatemala city twenty five miles away from the volcano ruediger escobar wolf is a vulcanologist at michigan technological university he's a native of guatemala and joins us on skype ruediger welcome and i just tell us about frago this is what's called a bellwether volcano well frankly it's a very typical strata volcano that has a lot of frequent eruptions it has been active since there are written records standish colonial occupation of guatemala and it and it has continued to the present so it has been erupting continuously since one thousand nine hundred nine and in the last few years since about two thousand fifteen it has had about a large russian per month so it it has had a very high level of activity and that's also partly contributing to this tragedy but when was the last time it had a major eruption are one that is like the one we're seeing now probably in october nineteen seventy four that was probably an eruption of comparable size to what we saw yesterday is this volcano different than the one that we've seen erupting in hawaii yeah it is very different hawaiian volcanoes in this particular case till away i usually produces lava flows in this eruption there were also some explosive events in but it mainly produced lava flows it produces some some ashby very rarely at least from what we know produces this kind of pyroclastic flows which is the deadly phenomenon that caused all the deaths were there any warnings for frago we know that in hawaii they were having earthquakes a lot of earthquakes.

NPR Jeremy Hobson Guatemala Fogo Volcano Mark Stevenson Associated Press Michigan Technological Univers Hawaii Robin Young Reporter Ruediger Escobar Ashby
Syrian deputy FM: next target could be north or south

24 Hour News

02:09 min | 2 years ago

Syrian deputy FM: next target could be north or south

"Uc's the move as a boost for global trade in the face of increasing use isolationism talks on free trade agreements which will begin in coming months we'll censor on reducing the lava is flowing and smoking asher spewing during this latest round of the kilowatt volcano in hawaii leading to a new warning for residents who why you county civil defense administrator talmadge magnolias when lava hits the water it creates a chemical reaction releasing toxic gas continues at a high rate a lotta love out there still asking the folks to be cautious be prepared as lava can move around still got i guess continent so in warning to people that are down range of the events to take necessary precautions instead gases called lays and is made of dense white clouds of steam toxic gas tiny shards of volcanic glass it contains hydrochloric acid which is about as corrosive as diluted battery acid and can irritate the skin and eyes and caused breathing problems magneto says due to the remoteness and volcanic activity getting the word to everyone has been difficult here we still have a lot of officers national guard county staff on the ground so really utilize them to to get the message and well kill away has been active for the last couple of weeks generating earthquakes and gushing molten rock giant ashby looms and sulfur dioxide the us geological surveys jim quote he is says this is likely just to beginning this is still there early part of the eruption especially this the second phase we felt very fluid stop and usually interruption the first two or three days direct rate is quite high and that it will tell off so i think this is just a long sort of pre eruption before we got to the really below of stuff earlier this week lava entered and then stalled on the property of a geothermal plant earlier this month at that plant fifty thousand gallons of stored flammable gas was removed to reduce the chance of explosions for the ap i'm rob lowe friends with rimet welcome to total wine and more boy this beer out of the way how about if.

UC Hawaii Asher Administrator Talmadge Rob Lowe Fifty Thousand Gallons Three Days
"ashby" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"Smelly from him anything as we won't the red carpet with sort of fouling security around both of us i'm kind of i'm talking to my signing autographs ashby screaming shouting well not as whereabouts walk into cinema this policy squire and as report about can i for the life i don't remember what particularly i based in civic questions alliston but he stopped he turned and eat stop what he was doing and onto at length while in the doorway holding up the entire kua people trying to go in congress taking pictures i've never felt self conscious in my entire life on this amazing yeah it was not arnold i'll just go run and put some bikes and save for i'll just you say yeah it was fun that's incredible was last when you went to hell in the orange express i think murder murder murder royal over whole but it was a you know all all of the cast were there and it was very sort of star infancy which is to say that i completely avoided the red carpet in that case went in the back door and just went straight to my seat in wash all on the screen which you know i could have done but that's one of the most exciting things that was the extent i went to two black full sawakin premium tickies this once in a lifetime experience it can be the greatest of all time and i i won because all of our happened outside an did see footage on the screens no one came in we didn't see anyone i could have been home i mean it was a massive anti climax.

congress ashby arnold murder
"ashby" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on KOMO

"Avenue but will bring you more information as we get it it was a matter of maintaining hope threw her grief for ten years melissa ashby believed police would fighter fiancee's killer and last night she finally received the longawaited news komo jennifer solomon has more from efforts about this cold case arrest didn't deserve to diet wicket in his family didn't deserve that years of wondering years of debt and leaps here's of dashed hope it all came to an end when lewis ashby opened her email they arrested him every police told ashby over email that they had finally made an arrest a man was inch jail accused of killing her fiance jose luiz martinez more than ten years ago it's an awesome person he loved everyone here to help anyone police say martinez and another man had gone on june twenty seven two thousand seven to buy drugs when the person martinez tried to buy from didn't handover the droughts martinez reportedly pulled out a screwdriver another man than walked up shop martinez in the chest and martinez his friend in the leg was not naming the suspect because he has not yet been formally charged police spokesman aaron snell says the thirty four year old man they arrested is one name they had reviewed over the years a throughout the investigation you know there were people that we're persons of interest in this case people that we wanted to talk to you that we need to talk to the break in the case came in july a woman who had lived in the same complex where the shooting occurred told police that the man had told her that he had shot martinez she says the man claimed martinez had come at him with the screwed scrutiny however there's people throughout the years were able to come for the ulfa fried little bits and pieces of evidence unfortunately until this year we weren't able to put to get a probable cause the suspect was ordered held on one hundred fifty thousand dollars bail they'll ashby says she is relieved and arrest has been made she still has plenty of questions about what actually happened the night of the shooting in everett jennifer sullivan komo news 34 minutes past the hour komo aaa traffic every 10 minutes on the 4's threealarm blaze of kobe avenue in everett also busy activity were the red cross to.

jennifer solomon jose luiz martinez aaron snell jennifer sullivan everett melissa ashby lewis ashby ashby ten years one hundred fifty thousand dol thirty four year 10 minutes 34 minutes
"ashby" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Gene archer lift town we'll made him here sharper he'd games marlins game mutual and sharpen dolphins game said persona non grata he also rose on inaugural appearance rather than what we were saying before get him out of me my father way persona non grata as much better than though the the baseball people at the club there i spineless you know our and the guy who but the marlins is a carpetbagger out of the beast because of the of this failure because of anything else okay that's enough let's whisk him away because i don't want anyone to get in any trouble but that's how we are daddy of that are the mayor my ashby that's that's that's there is miami's voice right there yup yes mike is scared garros laughing you guys all heard what you're saying before that boise cleaned it up he clings up good we made our big bore with us now sorry sorry big boy boom averse check it out his album boomer versus available now is gonna make good music man i really enjoyed the last couple of albums he's put together and you could see tour dates big boy dot com is where you go big boy thank you for being on with a with us or you're smoking at gas sir yeah all right yeah all right where wake of big yacht yeah like i like the man in sale no it'll be left who have the bill you know what i mean so i'll meet has long right you can get titled career h straight wager the chair bureau the jail nate straight weeks nobody's done better than you method man came after year this year i think he did seven method man came after you but he stumbled at the end uh crowbar you're not.

marlins miami mike garros boise Gene archer baseball ashby nate
"ashby" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Me a cat moving in with a new human it took a little getting you still she sees weird game she likes to play like this giant fathur she stick seat in my face i swat it away she sticks it in my face i swat it away it's almost like she thinks i enjoy it let's see how much front she gets out of it well i can it makes and all were sent him heads a person is the best thing to happen to a shelter pet be that person adopt brought to you by the ad council and the shelterpetprojectorg oh back out to the roadways and we are following this horrible accident that occurred on the eu shor free eastbound eighty right near ashby about seven o'clock this morning a big rig hit the guardrail on the shoulder flipped onto its side it came to rest in the two right lanes debris in the lanes of traffic as well and this has been a very bad backup backed up to i hercules now eastshore freeway eastbound eighty as you at you take that trip from hercules and all elserino all the way down toward m rebels just really rotten matteroffact it's a traffic alert and there's no telling when the lanes of traffic will become lately reopened eastbound eighty right after this sterling street acts that got a broken down car and the right lane of traffic so watch for that also reports of a stall west eighty at the treasure island onramp it looks like a brokendown cars while but no lane information on that one north one a wide injury accident at the hell your avenue on ramp the the left lane on the ramp blocked there someone may have had a medical emergency there and north eight ad at the 23rd avenue on wrapped you've got an accident that occurred a while ago but it's still off on the side waiting for a tow truck southbound 280 right at southbound highway seventeen an accident there as well.

ashby
"ashby" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on KTRH

"Work on planning which is something else we talk about because it's not just one thing to be able to get in the market out of the mont market but to have a trading plan based on your needs and that's where you started this whole conversation off on john where we can now come up with a plan that may allow you to start working part time maybe some of you want more time with your kids maybe some of you want to go on these and collaborate vacations and you can do so you just have to have like you said the ability to be coach 'able check your thinking at the door and be very childlike because there's younger kids will be broaded and said where's the chart going they could tell us adults can do it too it's just important to do it sooner than later because the more time you take the harder it is to catch up and everyone listening right now could start off very slowly 'cause i think so many people get intimidated so let's talk about some of those baby steps that the average person could take in order to become a better investor let's start with a needs assessment this is what we teach our classes that you don't have to be trading like a bank in terms of their dollar positions sizing your trading like a bank in terms of your rules and so there's people come into the academy that are very happy making a couple of hundred dollars a day or make be a couple of hundred dollars a week because it can supplement their income enough that they can take a break i see so many of our students so grateful coming in that they had a work driving liberer they had to work a weekend job to make ends meet and now it's some of them become a family affair john they're bringing their kids in and they're actually all learning together where the family as a unit or trade together and now you have four brains instead of just one let's talk about the patent on online trading academy's education it is unique it is patented let's talk about why it is so unique because there is a certain way that you can identify how markets move and what we've done is ashby said we've created this simple stepped mythology processed of investing and trading that allows our students to have.

john ashby hundred dollars
"ashby" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"ashby" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"America's entertainment pop culture talk show with douglas vivian any ted david go in and where he with george anderson and everything old is going to join the discussion about life after death george what if these are some of the comes to you you are from beyond that was speaking another language heidi handle that what's that all about now for example if somebody comes through speaking a language naturally i don't have a clue about i've never heard be for all just sam hearing language because it was hysterical in a group one night i say gainers somebody that people from your family siege be speaking other than english and i guess the subject thought he was being wise guy but he said to me slobo anybody could say that everybody's family spoken of language before they came to the us i said you know i looked i said are you kidding me you can say to me look at listened to my wa ashby name including my middle name georgia pennington anderson the second there can be no question that everbody spoke english so it isn't something you can say to everybody but if it is a language i've never heard before all says i'm hearing something other than english but i can't make out what it is in but founded it's not an important issue but it always fascinates me that the souls have the ability to get in my head and find something maybe not right off the bat and many times i can overlook it i had of session with a woman via phone on few weeks ago and the son kept she had lost her son her son came through of his you know no volunteering of any information he said that this was his mother i was speaking to and he said he wanted to make sure she knew he didn't suffer at a time of passing and rai right after i said this and i made sure she understood this has nothing to do with religion but i saw saint joseph appear now in me going to real catholic school in it's day saint joseph's to patron of a happy deaf so he his the saints appearance came right after the woman's son.

America george saint joseph douglas vivian ted david george anderson heidi ashby saints