24 Burst results for "Asami"

"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:53 min | Last month

"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're listening to the BBC World Service. This is news hour coming to life in London with James Kamar Asami. Week after she was freed from house arrest of the end of a five year sentence. The British Iranian woman as a means of Gary Radcliffe, has appeared in court again in Tehran on new charges of propaganda against the regime. BBC's diplomatic correspondent Caroline Hawley is following the story. She told me what we know about the hearing. Well, we know that it lasted little more than 20 minutes. We know that all day yesterday she was trying to get hold of her lawyer. She couldn't get hold of her lawyer. But late last night, she was told to be at quarter to nine. A.m.. Husband, Richard had wanted the British Embassy to accompany her. That didn't happen. We know she was extremely stressed, because you may know that she has been diagnosed with PTSD with depression with O C D all of a Zara's ult of her ordeal. And that ordeal continues this horrific roller coaster just a week after her ankle tag was removed. She was elated. She came out of her Sarette. She's back in court now. Her lawyer said that the atmosphere in court was calm. He said he'd presented her defense. He hoped she'd be acquitted because she's already served five years on a more serious charge than these charges of propaganda against Iran's establishment. And we also know that she was given the opportunity to make a personal statement. She asked the judge that the trial be fair, and she was apparently told by the judge that a sentence would come a verdict within the next seven days on what are the details of the charges. The details, according to what the lawyer told the Iranian media is that she's she participated in a demonstration outside the Iranian Embassy London 12 years ago, and she gave an interview. To the BBC Persian service. Now I understand that she did go down to that demonstration in order to meet a friend of the Persian service that she didn't give a named interview to the Persian service. But this was all found on her computer. In any case, this is a less serious charge than the charges that she was convicted off and has served her five year sentence for This is the ordeal of one woman and her family. But of course it is in a much bigger diplomatic context. What is the British government saying about these latest charges? The foreign secretary dominant. Rob has put out a statement saying that this is a wholly arbitrary case that it's unacceptable for it to be continued. He said that Iran had deliberately put Nazanin through a cruel and inhumane ordeal. Called for her release said that she should come back to her family as soon as possible. Now the British government behind the scenes is certainly negotiating. We believe or conducting some behind the scenes diplomacy to get her released. And as part of that Prime Minister Boris Johnson called President Rouhani on Wednesday demanded that she be freed on did President Rouhani Apparently his response was to mention The tank debt. If you know about that, That's some £400 million that the UK host Iran over an arms deal that actually dates back to before Nazanin was born. It dates back to the 19 seventies. The UK was supplying Iran with some chieftain tanks. Then came the Islamic revolution. The tank deal was never fulfilled. So there is this money that Britain acknowledges that it owes Iran but it is disputing the interest on that in a court case. That is due to resume in April. So nothing means fate is tied up in that it's probably tied up in negotiations over reviving the Iran nuclear deal on her husband says she is a hostage that what's going on is not a real court case. It's an abuse. Was our diplomatic correspondent Caroline Hawley..

James Kamar Asami Caroline Hawley Gary Radcliffe BBC April Richard BBC World Service London Rob five years Nazanin Wednesday Tehran five year President yesterday 19 seventies Prime Minister Britain Boris Johnson
Gender Inequities Persist in Boston Politics

WBZ Midday News

01:29 min | Last month

Gender Inequities Persist in Boston Politics

"Is International Women's day to day when we honor the women in our lives who have inspired us loved us made incredible strides in the world. WBZ is Karen Regal spoke with the mayoral candidates in Boston about the women who inspired them and what they want to see in the years ahead. It's a historical time in Boston politics, with women dominating the race to replace Marty Walshes mayor who was expected to resign. Any day now. Counselor Michelle Wu says this pandemic has shown how many inequities persists. We are In a moment of crisis that has revealed how much of the often invisible costs are on the shoulders of women and mothers and caregivers in our society there, Andrea Campbell says women running for office This is how change happens. Women are trained, transforming politics and transforming the world and that is happening, of course in the city of Boston as we see or women Entering politics in and taking over other critical leadership roles, which is important. Anita Asami George, counselor and candidate for mayor says to be the first elected Mayor, female Mayor, Woman mayor of Boston and excited about that Kim Janey is expected to become acting there after mayor Walls departs for Washington. Now the mayor of Boston salary is set by ordinance, but you should know, according to US census figures, Ah woman still makes about 83 cents for every dollar A man makes in the Commonwealth. For the same work. Karen Regal WBZ Boston's news radio.

Karen Regal WBZ Boston Marty Walshes Michelle Wu Andrea Campbell Anita Asami George Kim Janey Washington United States
"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:50 min | 3 months ago

"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming to you live from London with James Kamar Asami. Europe is not the only continent where a new year has brought a new set of free trade arrangements, while the European Union single market may be shrinking with the departure of the U. K, a massive new single market in goods and services is setting up shop in Africa. 54 countries with a combined population of 1.2 billion have signed up to become members of the African Continental Free Trade Area, or Trevor Remember, is an economist in a former trade advisor to the Zambian government. He was a consultant on the in the process of setting up this new free trade area, and he told me what it hoped to achieve the Africa Free Trade Area, the Continental Free Trade area. Is trying to achieve a regional economic integration. And so the free trade is the starting block is the first block in the ultimate what we call the African economic community because that is the ultimate goal off the African Union. And so the free trade area brings together all the regional integration bodies that are found across Africa in tow, One free trade agreement. And so it will enable a free movement of goods and services across the whole African continent. It's a very ambitious project, given that the size of the population the size of the continent involved what other big challenges, though, to achieving the level of Integration. That's that is hoped for yes, and you're very right. It's a very complex and difficult process, but I believe that it will achieve the aims and objectives. What is important The biggest challenge is that already at the moment, intra Africa trade is very low. It's at an average of about 15%. If you compare that to the U. S, which is to America, for example to Europe, which is above 70%. Intra Africa trade is a big issue and the main reason is the infrastructure the connections between the countries. It is much cheaper to move good from Africa to Europe than it is to move goods within Africa. It is also much easier for for African people to move between Africa and Europe. On the US another continents but very difficult to move in between the countries so the biggest challenge will be to ensure that we can facilitate trade but then also more importantly, industrialized because if we don't industrialize, then it makes the impact off the free trade very minimal because a lot of the countries in Africa are producing the similar products. I think I might put us. So does this new to this new organization actually contain mechanisms for for removing the obstacles or improving the infrastructure? The Africa Free Trade Area. Secretariat on the agreement actually provides immense power to the secretary to be able to determine the rules of origin, which is very important in free trade. And then secondly They have established already a mechanism for dispute settlement. The African Union level. We have what we call the agenda 63, which is an agenda that includes a huge infrastructure program that is going to ensure that we have one stocked borders, you know, borders that allows similar straight. We're gonna develop Redway links and also seaports. On the roads that connect countries. What will be critical is the commitment. Off the member states, the African Union member states to fully implement the agreement. I think that is that is going to be very critical. I was Trevor remember former trade advisor to the Zambian government. He was a consultant in the process of setting up Africa's new continental Free Trade area now to time when so many of us grounded by the pandemic. The new BBC Radio Phonic Workshop, a group of composers and sound artists who became famous in the 19 sixties for Groundbreaking use of electronic music is providing an alternative travel experience through the ears are arts editor Will. Gompertz has been hearing more from the composer Matthew Herbert, who runs the studio We've created. Radio Phonic travel agency transporting people through sound to other parts of the world. Oh, just starting out, but it's already Getting quite exciting, so you can choose your destination and then you press go on. It will take you somewhere of your choosing. One of the things that we discovered quite quickly was how important the journeying was. So you take the tube to Heathrow. Then you hear the sound of taking the flight.

Africa African Union Europe Trevor Remember European Union advisor London James Kamar Asami US BBC Africa. Matthew Herbert secretary consultant U. S Gompertz
"asami" Discussed on The Woody Show

The Woody Show

01:33 min | 4 months ago

"asami" Discussed on The Woody Show

"Went to nominee number one. That's the other guy. Look at new porn business. Yay decisive win. Fifty three percent for him than it was Downing number two with thirty one percent the sneeze fetish guy then. Last one was the Sorry zombie check asami check so sorry grown in hair. Yeah thank you for your votes are now. We're going to go all right. What show every player. Unless they're in the same household has to bring their walls so that you don't touch other people with your hands you can kick their cancer. I'm going to do. What is your creating awkward moments between uber drivers in their customers fourteen. Show right back. We'll be right. Back to the woody show podcasts poise smart choice deed how about smart and final rows sponsor here on the show like everybody likes to celebrate the holidays differently every year but one thing that never changes is what i want to eat on holidays my favorite dishes you got tamales. You've got the mashed potatoes. You've got the green bean casserole. Mac and cheese and of course every desert you can imagine all of them and that's why you gotta love smart and final. They've got every ingredient that you need to make your family's favorite recipes from the fresh produce to the choice cuts of meat so no matter what the season brings we're all gonna be well-fed.

asami Downing cancer
How to Connect to Your Humanity and Change the World

Untangle

06:12 min | 6 months ago

How to Connect to Your Humanity and Change the World

"Today. We're going inside the head of Young Pueblo Aka Diego Perez. He's a writer poet and activist who explores his own mind to create poems about the mind. His poems or meditations in themselves and often talk about meditation teachings directly. He's also instagram famous with three hundred, twenty, nine, thousand millennial followers who receive as simple visual poems about meditation daily in their feet. Welcome young blow. Thank you so much for having me Emmett set of the year. Yeah, it's wonderful conversation. Awesome. So let's just start in dive right in because most people probably curious about the first thing they heard young Pueblo like who is this young logo is noted to meet the Guy Behind Proba tell us about young Pueblo on how that came out. was. Name that came to me a bunch of years ago. I'd say back sometimes it's funny thirteen I think the name came to me, and then over time I really developed a meaning. Around honey or team twenty fifteen I realized that I wanted to take great seriously as it was around the time where I saw that. Betaine is having a real effect in my less democracy game meditation course back in. July of two thousand twelve and after doing a few silence and David Austin courses I realized that a lot of the burden that was sort of limiting my mind's in regards to. Zaidi sadness where. They weren't totally radical, but there were decreasing and I was noticing that. I, was really feeling better and I felt like I had more choices in my mind as I could see the world a little more clearly, and then I can navigate my own actions in a way that was much more productive to my personal happiness. So In, sort of pushed me into wanting to righty might people now that healing yourself was actually a real possibility has to be. I know that for myself. I kind of went into meditation has an experiment just as I was always curious about it and it felt like the right fit so I didn't really know that's what I was Gonna get out I. Think I knew that I was going to learn a bunch of things but I didn't know that I was actually going to feel better and it wasn't until after of delving deeper into the process into the actual practice I started seeing that I so lows better sort of into writing. and. The idea of young Bible kind of really warm related around it's my understanding of the world that we are all very young collectively. If you take all humanity were all very young you know it doesn't matter if you're ninety years old is you take us as a whole giant collective we have so much to learn. The bucs Amina's for. Up when we were little children. When we went to school, we were trying to simplest things are teachers were really. Trying to get us to not hurt each other to tell the truth to be kind to one another and to generally just you know it's even like clean up ask yourself things are seem so simple that we can do as individuals but as a human collective e don't know how to do these things at all. A. Me. got. Sort of a signal that. We have a lot of growing up to as humanity and a lot of I. Think a lot of that growing up center happened during the century. We have so many big challenges ahead of us that will hopefully help us row. That this sort of. A. Renaissance, I would call it. That's happening around the mind. Is GonNa be a big big part of humanity mature. SO THAT'S A. Really helpful perspective. So somebody who has a two year old myself I spent a lot of time teaching him some very, very basic things like heating is bad. I'm sorry in some days he's amazing at it in Sunday's he just gets brought by his own emotions, his own desires and hitting back at the window. In it's interesting to look at our humanity as being a very similar place lessons that we've learned over and over again, our childhood yet they're returning in the adult hood of the individual, but still the sort of childhood of the collective. Beautiful by. Where do you see our evolution going? What do you think the path down that road is I think it's interesting because people have very different aspirations. So I wouldn't want to try to say you know all human existence is in this direction but I would say that to get to a place where we're not arming one another where we. Are Mentally ill in ourselves. That army another as arguing when sell it doesn't take. Much Work Right. Having that understanding that you know is literally to my benefits and not you is very different from what sailing Total Liberation Enlightenment's. That's actually a very easier accomplish many think that's where we're really heading as a humanity in our evolution that we're trying to lift ourselves up into that understanding that Oh right? It's not. It's not to my benefit at all to harm you in any way it actually helps my personal life to support you in your freedom, your sixty etcetera. So forth, so me I like to think about it in. In the immediate. Immediate future being like next year is not like the whole seizure. SABA. But it really is trying to get ourselves to that point where or. Individuals in because that's an idea that we've had. Throughout, all of history. Having an idea intellectually is very different from being out experiences, experience Adiba yourself or deeply being able to you'll that you know that it's your benefits are mothers I think Ruby's different practices Asami different people are engaging. Different introspective medias including meditation. That that will help get. To that point where it's like Oh right now, of course, not only do I in my mind but I. Feel my body and now I'm GonNa find better solutions than our.

Young Pueblo Writer Emmett Diego Perez Zaidi Amina David Austin Adiba A. Renaissance Ruby Asami
"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 10 months ago

"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming to live from our studios in central London. I'm James Kamar Asami. Vladimir Putin once said that he would never change the Constitution to stay in power. But what if the Russian people gave him permission to do so, or voting ends today in a weeklong referendum that's expected to approve dozens of constitutional tweaks, including Akie, one that would allow Mr Putin to stay in the Kremlin until 2036. The president's opponents say that the whole process is rigged. A Moscow correspondent Steve Rosenberg, now reports on a curious and contentious referendum, which will also prove to be very consequential. Third year at Moscow polling station 3079 Valentina shows me Her scratch cards. Valentina runs the polling station, but she sounds more like a game show host. Everyone who votes on the new Constitution gets a card, she says. You can win points and then prizes at the supermarket. Recently, one Russian voter one apartment, the lucky scratch card holder was a local election official. Funny that points make prizes. But they don't necessarily deliver a free and fair vote. This week Long plebiscite was designed to produce only one really winner, Sr Vladimir Putin come on down. Russia's president says that.

Vladimir Putin Valentina Moscow Steve Rosenberg James Kamar Asami president Akie London Russia official
"asami" Discussed on Do By Friday

Do By Friday

01:40 min | 10 months ago

"asami" Discussed on Do By Friday

"Why laughing. That's funny. Write it down, I because. It hurts it doesn't. Hurt. Anybody remember laughter. Oh. Remember all of the Meta my family can't grow beards, but all of the women are just covered. Everywhere! You guys you're so woke as a family Oh yes, I'm sorry. My male identified a brother. Sorry, I'm. Is happening right now. What is happening? What drinking today? What did you say? Oh, would you? Would you like a bullet list I? Suppose, I will yes. I have a plane dishonest. What else Asami yes I know I'm sorry I'm sorry to. If I know what's what's tiff drinking today tastes like it's filtered through a raccoon I think I'm I'm in? I'm in You know you you. You should like what you like I apologize. I Apologize. I'm trying to grow as a person Alex. People people mess up with pronouns and I am okay with this however respect my right to like the airport or because I think you could take you make you. But but I got a dishonesty here to sunny girl. Dishonesty with the a filled with the noon. Dissolve -able sports and Caffeine. Supplement that was words. Those were words sports new noon. Noon is the name of the project products the time. It's not neum. It helps you develop better habits..

Caffeine Asami Alex
"asami" Discussed on Champions 4 Life by JDC

Champions 4 Life by JDC

05:34 min | 11 months ago

"asami" Discussed on Champions 4 Life by JDC

"That you know every day, pick up! Everyday is GONNA be Sunshine and roses I I know that I'm. Fully wear that, but now more excited to get up in the day on look at my calendar and I caught up podcast with you. Excite the talk with you. Different things throughout the day that just keep me motivated so I'm just finding another joy in my life, and I'm so happy that I've made these decisions, and it's not easy, but every day take one day at a time and you know. Keep going, you know some days are harder than others, but you know you've got to be consistent you, gotTa. Keep going yes. Yes, while I'm also glad that you made that decision, because look, you're here now sharing it with the world right? Yeah, and you're going to help a lot of people. You're going to be the guy that's GonNa change a lot of people's outcomes that were than they might have been heading towards suicide about being heading towards a deep depression, sabotage failure divorce, and maybe been go bankrupt, and all that you're going to be genuine there live on really really go towards their best, and he's on excited that you made that decision also. In yet, the new smaller smaller sections of that you know, that's great I mean if people make that leap and. Help them. Get that part absolutely, but even smaller stuff like you know. I felt good the other day when I was talking with a client, he was Kinda down. You know our conference. Call that we did for an hour and by the end of the conference call. He was up in just that. Just that alone made me feel good. I was able to change his mind set I was able to. You. Know you point out some things that he's doing right and have realized that Oh. Yeah, you know what I am doing that right? You know and then Tsitsi in this mood shift. At Stallone, just having that little bit of positive boost, and hopefully the rest of his day, and hopefully the rest of his week went well. Because of you know a positive conversation that we have with each other, so it doesn't always have to be that big thing which is great if they can make those changes that you thought about, that's awesome, the if it's just I'm building better about myself. Lol Way. That's a victory for me that his power on. Yes! Yes, you find your calling. And you saw also your project, a genuine care for people and I'm sure that every client that you obviously really really good hands I can see that, and I can feel that through the conversations that we're having some really proud to know you all that and build this relationship. This won't be the last end. On a radio on more often, but we'll. Take a little bit more. Tell us about your you know. Because when we all start, business will start a practice. We'll start doing our passion. There's always now I. I think that we get to help. Never forget that I. For you. It was it was a person who wanted to start a business in his. Twenties a young man, a lot of lot of enthusiasm, but really didn't know where there's going this and that any any hit a point before he. Off with me, worms like you know I don't know about this anymore. You know all these roadblocks. In that maybe I need a hang up and you know. Go get a you know a nine to five job. You know he's like well. You know one less Asami on social media. We had a conversation signed up with me and you know I told them that I really like your idea. I think it's GonNa work. You know but what I preached to him was patience a lot of people. You know now one everything you know instantaneously one right now and when you're building a business, it takes time it takes sometimes takes years and years and years and you you just can't you just gotTa look at the big picture and look at. You're pushing that rock up the mountain. Mountain yes, and now he's now able to just do his business because he was doing all these doing uber all kinds of stuff you know it's just to make ends meet, and now he's able to do business full-time, which to me is a win I mean he's not a millionaire by all means, but he's able to do is business and make ends meet and know, and that was his first goal and he asked done that, so that was probably my. You know my first big win with with a client was the fact that he was. You know able to just do that. His One business and make it work, so that was great while powerful. That feels good that you help. You know when you see your clients. Becoming successful, achieving mirrored dream, achieving their goals will towards their destiny. Feels awesome. Reinforces you. Child absolutely and you talk about your your desk. Things change like you could be passionately when you get A. When you're in your twenties, Japan could be this. Could be a forties, and whatever and and that's. You know what I mean your change, and and he shouldn't feel bad about that. Like what about in your twenties was what you're passionate about and your choice, but it's not what you're passionate about your thirties. Forties so. You have too costly. Evolve with who you are as a person and find that new passion. If you lose that passion, it's all journey and I I. Use this analogy. You know you look at a little kid and.

Tsitsi Stallone Asami Japan
A Conversation With Uli Lorimer of the Native Plant Trust

In Defense of Plants Podcast

08:45 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Uli Lorimer of the Native Plant Trust

"Early. Lur thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. How about we start off with telling everyone a little bit about who you are. And what is you do? Sure thank you. Thank you for having me on. So I am currently the director for the culture for Garner the woods in Asami farm For Native Plant Trust and trusts was formerly known as New England. Wildflower Society But we recently rebranded and changed our name and so we are now nick plan. Trust still the same organization just to name right on. And have you always been playing person or is this something you kinda figured out later on Throughout your career education or life I think I'd like to think I've always been a plant person. I think I could trace my earliest influences back to my mother. And my grandmother who always had really amazing gardens My grandmother lived in Germany. And as a kid we used to visit quite a bit and I just really love being outside in the space and you know I didn't know it at the time that it would have such an influence on me and I grew up in Wilmington Delaware and we used to get along with gardens quite a bit and I so that was kind of like my backyard and almost two three times a month we would go visit and as a kid you kind of think of it as this place to kind of run around in the highlights were like the Koi pond you know not plants per se but definitely had an influence on me and then as I got older I began working some landscape nurseries and and kind of traditional and install crews in high school and then when I got to college I actually went to Ethica college believing that I wanted to get into sports medicine and I filled out my first semester utterly and spectacularly because I think I was probably just more excited to not be living at home anymore and not really not really mature enough to to know what I was doing and so then I came back to this idea that maybe you could make a career in horticulture and I went back to university of Delaware enrolled in the horticulture and botany program there and absolutely loved it and kind of set me on this path and I initially thought you know because of my experiences working landscaping. That's where I wanted to go that I wanted to be a landscaper that I wanna to have my own kind of Mon blow operation but having some exposure to some commercial and retail nurseries. I was kind of bored with the standard choice of plants. There's only like everybody was going the same one hundred plants and so I thought were can I learn about the greatest diversity of plants learn about where to get the really cool interesting things and then apply that to this design idea and so thought Public Gardens and Botanic Gardens where the obvious place and so I ended up at the national them in DC for year doing an internship there and then moved up to New York City and worked at Wave Hill for about five years as their woodland Gardner and you know this dream of being in commercial horticulture faded quickly as my eyes open to the you know the beauty and wonder of public arts and all of the amazing plants and things that in all the possibilities of working in that kind of context really was very attractive to me and you know the longer I stayed in public arden's a less interest ahead and going back to commercial horticulture and so that then sort of transitions in the way Phil was was Was the beginnings of focusing in narrowing down to work with native plants In that I was responsible for their woodland I spent a lot of time pulling invasive but didn't really have any concept of how to transition that into a functioning woodland garden And certainly not much of an understanding at that time of the college and and plank the plank community concept or even a real firm grasp of regionalism which is something that I think is really important and so had an opportunity. Then to switch over to Brooklyn Botanic Garden and was hired as their curator of Native Flora and spent fourteen years there in that role. And that's where my approach in my focus in my understanding Really sort of blossomed. And where you know my current ideas about trying to connect field botany with public horticulture really crystallized thanks in part In a large part to the fact that there was an act of Science Department at Brooklyn Botanic at the time and A group of really wonderful botanist and taxonomic who had the patience to mentor me and that and allowed me to approach this horticultural work in the sense of saying well if I can go see plants in the wild and a natural spaces then I can get all this kind of good cultural information about you know the conditions that they grow in what sort of plant associations communities to they exist in and the more. I began to do that the more. I was intrigued by these questions of patterns and processes on the landscape and then I realized that that understanding ends up being incredibly valuable for a gardeners to understand how plants may or may not behave in cultivation and kind of get a better sense of how to plan out You know on garden wide landscaped scale plantings that that really embody these ideas of ecological value and aesthetics and sense of place. And you know sort of taking that inspiration of of seeing natural communities in and trying to translate that in a way into a designed public art in context so that work was really fantastic and getting to work with with those botanists. And you know at the time. I was just amazed that there were people who could identify any scrap of a plant. That you can link to them that you know you. Could you could open up a leasing cronquist manual and say I want to see this plant and they'd be like okay next week. We're going to go to field trip and I can take to it just like blew my mind that like that level of detail and understanding was that out there and through that partnership and Mentorship I was exposed to the New Jersey. Pine Barrens By one of One of the directors of sides at the time there named Dr Gary Moore through grew up down there and you know arguably one of the most knowledgeable about pine barrens. They exist today and so that really kind of began. The love affair of that particular landscape and at Brooklyn Botanic Garden about at this stage may be about eight years ago. The card leadership undertook this process of expanding. The data plan collection and the decision was made to focus primarily on pine barrens habitats and coastal plain grasslands as these were really sun-loving communities that had suffered in a hundred year old woodland garden with closed. Canopy we also made the decision because of the background and expertise of the Science Department at the time that we would source all the plants from the wild we would collect seed from known locations as locally as possible and grow all those plants and put them together Into this you know expanded new collection and so that was something that I was fortunate. Enough to be very intimately involved in Seed collecting over five six years to target the about one hundred fifty species that were new to the collection that we wanted to grow and all of the sort of fun and frustrations and challenges. Go with Trying to find enough seed and timing of collections and then you know the challenges of unlocking some of the propagation issues for some of these plants that had not been you know they're not international nursery horticulture at the stage and so I kind of felt it was neat because we were pushing the boundaries of the kinds of things that you could grow in public gardens exposing the public to plants that they were unfamiliar with but that really charismatic and then also again trying to emphasize the value of preserving those plants and habitats in C- to as as being one of the core messages of this kind of garden so a really wonderful experience. And like I said it really kind of began to crystallize for me. The the approach of what I'd like to a larger sense call regionalism. Which is this idea of like deciding that you wanna work within the boundaries of eka regions or physiology physio graphic provinces and. That's what should motivate your decisions about. What kind of plants are appropriate for Native Plant Garden and with it? All the benefits of local adaptations genetic diversity and biodiversity and showing that there are lots of plants that you can welcome into your garden from the wild and have a garden that is ecologically functioning primarily and aesthetic and just good for for humans and for all forms of

Brooklyn Botanic Garden Director Native Plant Garden Science Department Botanic Gardens Asami Farm For Native Plant Tr LUR Germany Brooklyn Botanic Nick Plan Wilmington New Jersey Delaware New England University Of Delaware Native Flora New York City Ethica
4 teens escaped from Nashville detention center

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:20 min | 1 year ago

4 teens escaped from Nashville detention center

"There is an urgent hunt at this hour in Nashville and beyond after this newly released surveillance video tonight. Four teenagers escaping a juvenile detention facility. Two of them accused of murder. Authorities releasing this surveillance footage showing the teen sprinting from the building they're asking for the public's help and tonight new reporting and how they were able to make that escape here. Stevenson Zombie juvenile authorities in Tennessee are releasing these security camera videos afford fourteen. Seen here escaping from detention center in Nashville Saturday night. We had some youthful skate from the juvenile detention. Even though they're underage h police are identifying all four two of them sixteen year old. Korry US right. and Seventeen year old Morris Marsh are accused of murder and were awaiting trial officials. Say all four of the boys should be considered dangerous. The teens escape during a work detail when a Security Guard left a multipurpose room to respond to a fight right in doing so. She left the four youth in the recreation area unsupervised. According to a report as they're running out the door you see two of them throw off their there. Safety vests thirty five minutes between their escape and that'd be notified. Several staff members have been placed on administrative leave while authorities continue to investigate gate. How this happened? All of the teens are still on the run. Steve Asami. ABC News.

Nashville Murder Morris Marsh Steve Asami Abc News Tennessee Thirty Five Minutes Seventeen Year Sixteen Year
Three ways to implement interfaith dialogue from top official of UNs inclusivity wing

UN News

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Three ways to implement interfaith dialogue from top official of UNs inclusivity wing

"This is Natalie Hutchinson with you and news global communication understanding the value of religious freedom and a solid framework are all key in better protecting religious sites writes. That's from Miguel Moratinos High Representative for the United Nations Alliance of Civilisations U. N. referencing a Thursday announcement of a new plan to counter hate and violence around the globe he said that the main objectives are to raise awareness of the importance of religious sites and human spirituality and certainly it offers concrete ways that countries can come together to help achieve this. Mr Modena's spoke to you a newses Pascal Sim about UNCO Aziz approach to implementing the changes what I think of these action plan to safeguard release site the main objective choose to raise awareness of the public opinion about the importance of religious about imports and overly just city of speed the Detroit but a part of that we have of course identify a lot of recommendation Tara dressed to I'm Tony United entities. We have some recommendations on how the UN have to to to adopt some important step by tortured to member state governments also of course we have to address or religiously the society media and the private sector and I think the three main objectives that are going to be the one who are going to trigger the action of the of the plan is I is to really try to have a global communication plan in the to really get this semester of regard told the society that everybody seems the primary school to the jump people but also autour the whole society understand importance over DC shoes of important having places that you can go and Sergio Gripe to pray peace and safety and then sit con men recommendation is to have a mapping how to identify what are these for these aside how we are going to make the breakdown of the importance of certain site for study point-of-view for symbolic interview and finally we would prefer a conference a Global Conference Asami that for first time the leaders religious was legal and political leaders and she was so tired we'd be together. We are now going to have a very timely. Liam very important the the sightsee conference of Sammy Tha about climate change while we want for two to twenty twenty you too have a similar framework in order to address these issues and how will you be able to all countries accountable to actually act on the plane while governments are going to be the one who share a have the primary responsibility they are the ones who have to did they have some of them already some national strategy on really implement team. Bartok the recomendation. We had about some of the new recommendations they should they. They know they have not been informed about them so we can come with certain reporters and advice in other that they can't ameliorate and improve the way to examine the risk of threats how alert artem well or certain thread that can come to to decide how we involve everybody together. You know to really contact to save displaces so I think gover governments member state are the ones who have the main responsibility the by the UN and the UN or see I mean the United Nations of decision would be the one who could provide certain recommendation advice and support in order to implement the plan and how quickly do you hope effective changes can be made to religious. I think timers over for essence you know we cannot wait for goal to starting prevent the plan so we'd be very active and it is going to be a panel sequence. No we will reaping things adapt you know recommendation poteen developing in these action plan that can't really facilitate implementation process but at the same time we're trying to really come with concrete to support the twelve orient to mitigate this kind of act.

United Nations UN Natalie Hutchinson Miguel Moratinos High Represen United Nations Alliance Of Civ Unco Aziz Detroit Mr Modena Sergio Gripe Bartok Sammy Tha Tara Liam Artem
Language is key to a brighter future for region that inspired Tolkien, says ethnic speaker at UN talks

UN News

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Language is key to a brighter future for region that inspired Tolkien, says ethnic speaker at UN talks

"This is Matt Wells at U.. N. News career in the Russian Federation is a land of Lakes rivers and forests whose culture inspired Lord of the Rings Author J R token the community proudly says but is at risk from climate change you big industry and a language that is in danger of dying out in an interview with Daniel Johnson Alexi carry off from the Center for support of indigenous peoples in Karelya maintains that indigenous languages and centuries old practices need phone greater protection. We'll begin by hearing some poetry from Alexei in his mother tongue. One had I in Noel Vinyl are color Evelyn Conquer Hilla lowly viansa loudly by Livy Lower Light Bevan backs Houston. Yeah we see a lot of consequences of climate change for example the snow's melting earlier and I remember that when I grew up in my childhood dates we had snow snow already in October and I will have snow only in December December sometimes when January and it impacts the legs for example the ice on the lakes and the fishing it impacts forestry it impacts digital's people's hunting and many other other ways of life which indigenous peoples excise so we see also more wins than we saw before because of the intensive forest industry in Australia and of course the impact of industries which operate in the area for example mining. In or paper industry polluting the air polluting the rivers so this is big concern for indigenous peoples. How many Caribbeans are there then in this part of northwestern Russia and how many other ethnic groups and indigenous groups are they in part of the world in office Russia? We have quite many indigenous people so and we should understand that in Russia we have two types of indigenous peoples recognized a small number indigenous peoples which are people's with the population less than fifty thousand and big groups like mine for example Caribbeans so enough west we have bigger groups as Caribbeans commies and some others and small number does nets Asami vep science and also very very small number North Koreans who are only to sixty people our audience they are only eighty three people left goodness me so really much more needs to be done to raise awareness about the vulnerabilities of indigenous peoples and I know that in your part of the world take the protection of your language is very important and also the fact that there aren't enough caribbeans being born. You've got a demographic gap. That's really building up how you hoping to address those challenges so right. Now we are advocating for the proclamation of the international decayed indigenous languages because we feel that just one year one International Year of indigenous languages is not enough to accomplish our goals and action plan which UNESCO has created in collaboration with indigenous peoples and festival. First of all in my community for example with think that we need to rebuild confidence of indigenous peoples in their own languages because many parents for example don't want the kids to even speaker and because they think this is not necessarily it's not pragmatically useful and we should rebuild this mode to speak on language and we have some good projects community based projects how to do it and we need more support from the international community because as long as the international attention is in place the decision the Russian government for example and the Republican government and even local governments but even more attention to indigenous languages seem also good practices from other regions. Maybe you could tell me about one interesting traditional practice that really is struggling the moment mm two. That's reindeer breeding and herding practice of the brilliant people tell me that a bit about its history and why it's important to the region and how it might be perhaps a chance for re growth and rebirth for the Caribbean people. Yes another grill exercise reindeer herding in the past. Unfortunately this is not the case anymore because of some consequences of the Second World War of occupation of many Koreans in the region's when it came back to guerrillas so they settled in completely different places and the already lost the livestock of the reindeer and of course it would be great to revitalize this tradition because it goes deep to the roots of the cultural traditions to the cultural identity and the coat of these people and it's connected. Very much with the traditional songs for example with the Kalevala epic point which is well known in the world inspired even token to to create his own the rinker how Lord of the Rings to jail token he was inspired by the Kalevala epic epic poem which is our chameleon biggest hit big yeah of course <hes> I mean reindeer herding but also it's important but also of course fishing you cannot imagine millions without fish fish is the main dish for Caroline's and they have a lot of different dishes types of fish for example smelly fish smelly fish dish. What is a smelly fish? Is that a type of fish yeah. It's soccer you know take fish in springtime so then the story in the barrels and they can not only for example in August. It's a little bit smelly but you can still it. It's very tasty and some of the guests are afraid to eat it but it's very tasty I like see I can't say you're selling it to me but I'll come and check it out. Absolutely if you invite me over to Karelya certainly taste it. Maybe just one final question. Just set the scene for me. You step out of your house in the morning. What is it that you see? What is it that you think of in your mind's eye? Now you're speaking to us in Geneva. What is it that you what's the image that comes to mind? Guerrilla is the land of off lakes rivers the forest and that's what I see every single when I wake up and I would like to preserve this for future generations for my kids for everybody who lives in guerrilla or comes to career as a tourist or as.

Russia Karelya Lakes Rivers Russian Federation Matt Wells Alexei Livy Lower Light Bevan Daniel Johnson Alexi Russian Government Noel Vinyl Soccer Australia J R Geneva Republican Government Caroline Houston
"asami" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"asami" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"It was. But I love it. But I want to know I loved Elvis, and he was a great. And when he was a nice man, he was gonna give me a car, but gave it to the doctor ovarian. I had nothing to give. Well, so I wanna get back to the fact that you from there you went into television. He did TV motion pictures, what was your first movie was wrote or was it before that before? He worked with Mel Brooks on the history of the world. Yeah. I show. Love machine was was written by the girl that wrote the book of poems Jewish lady glances in Chuck Lynch. Right. Dennis. Creamier pick me up. I was picture. I played crystalline and the picture was terrible. I'm meeting. And don't they call him out here when it gets cold? Schmaltz. No. I do that picture. Movies. I was offered a Broadway show host. Production. Frank lists Asami where I was absolutely the worst. I've ever been really. It was because the owner was moron. And it just was not and I work with cold. Oh. And very. Anyway, I started but. Before. The movie the movie. No, no, no. Ninety three. So anyway. The listen. And I said this is not for me. Not for me because I can repeat the same thing night after night after. Because I couldn't do that to improvisation. So now. Standing on the corridor. I can't do that. I go back. Go back. They had to Saugus standing among. Yeah. But nobody stand on the corner. It was one of those became a big. Yeah. Well. Joe Sullivan was married. The Franklin, okay. It was about thirty pounds. For the part. But. Well, you know, it show business and your reputation on and off stage was colorful to say, the least now I always make you tell the story when you come on the variety show about and everybody knows the story the night that you drove the car, you gotta tell it because there's a lot of listeners out there that don't know the story, but. The funniest things I've ever heard. Types.

Elvis Dennis Mel Brooks Chuck Lynch Schmaltz Saugus Joe Sullivan Franklin Frank thirty pounds
"asami" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"asami" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"And police tell them John McCullough sent you. I could only whisper it. But I said I love you Muslim. I'm only words it would come out of my mouth, this is focused on the family minute. Ten today. Ken Davis remembers the moment, he found his granddaughter who had been missing for hours. Secondly, it hit me. That's how God feels about me. That's how he feels when a child finally comes to him after being lost. That's how he feels when someone is living the dead life of Asami when they should know better and suddenly decide to live fully alive. Think of God is this person who doesn't enjoy laughter fun, and we walk around sometimes acting like who would want to be a follower of Jesus. And instead she loves. He loves him. God is so good. And he loves you like, no other more from Ken at family minute dot org. That's definitely some Friday music that get you in the mood. Now, we have our second guest of the day. We get everybody. I mean think about it. And now, we're gonna go to sports sports slash politics. With none other than the legendary catch schilling for major.

Ken Davis John McCullough schilling Asami
"asami" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"asami" Discussed on Double Toasted

"Also, I was like man, you guys you put together this great concept, and you almost just kind of stalled out from there yet going wolf from this point. We'll just borrow things from other. The movies because we got the concept that people will will love that. And it's. It. It's heartbreaking. It is. Now, I I hate to make it sound. Like, I didn't enjoy it at all. 'cause I got some laughs out of it. Especially with the kills a lot of those things we end up being funny that that's what they got invented with it. Oh, that's numerals. Tell you. So one of the things talking to Nigel. He was telling me how he saw different cut to cuts. Really? Yeah. He's he went to different festivals. He saw one cut that was longer and in that cut. There's a took longer to get to the bees. And there was a musical number between the dad and the impulse the head master. Yeah. And I think was the last thing movie needed. 'cause I I was kind of like catches a flat, and we get to the ticket to your right? And you know, and, you know, something you you'll exactly right? And that's another thing with the film. This trait would Asami flick Agata the breakout happens I'm trapped in his one spot. I gotta get to my family on my love over at this other part of town where Norma somebody like me be like fuck him. All right. They can come to me. This your works. We can try to be that way. Maybe. We always say that works up. But I like that they were aware that they then try to creep act. Like, this was a new world as you know. Okay. We've heard the terms on be zombies exists. We know from watching movies. We gotta shoot him in the head and take the head out kill the head kill the man. You know, all that. And you correct that this did not need another musical number because I think later in the movie it starts to play into Israel strip. And that people must of course. But in that, it it becomes more of a real apocalyptic movie stops relying so much of the novelty of zombie musical and just becomes a good zombie movie. People look in our good apocalyptic film was that element of people coming together, they put that bullshit differences aside, and they work together to survive. Right. It doesn't happen until some of the main characters start to die. And you know what? That's what. Liked about a two because that's how they do it. That's how they make you start to care because once they start actually coming together. I think that's when they start to feel like real people. He got them saying. We got we got live. Down. That carbon dancing kill somebody. It's at that point you start coming together as a team you start to care about them as characters because I think they become real characters in that's win. That's major care to start dying. Because when they do now, I think every death that is meant to have impact has an impact. I gotta say in the movie, I I did not I could not tell who was going to die. And they got me with it, man. Because like right when I start to like, somebody are if somebody was being cool. Right, right. You shouldn't. I want to yell out so much doing the move. Oh..

Nigel Norma Asami Israel
"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Ari Shapiro. Women in prison are far more likely than men to get punished for lesser violations of prison. Rules NPR's investigative team has been digging into this disparity this week today. NPR's Joseph Shapiro takes us to a state that is rewriting the rules for discipline in women's prisons. Here's the sound we associate with prisons. Heavy steel doors shut. These are the doors at the entrance to the island Correctional Institution for women. But once visitors like us walk through these doors and get inside the prison. That's it. There are no more heavy steel doors for the women that's not Asami here. Because this prison is new, and it's different inside the razor wire this place. Cooks kind of like a college campus with redbrick buildings their new just a few years old connected by concrete pathways lots of open space and landscaped gardens with flowers and picnic batches for the inmates. They sit out here from Don until dusk. Depending on what level that are in. That's the warden show Tom showing us around and do what we do out in the community of our outside and our yard within reason. I guess it's still a prison. The warden is the first point that out and prisons are still harsh places in some ways women's prisons are especially harsh because across the. Country. Women get disciplined that higher rates than men for smaller violations of prison rules. They're often two to three times more likely to get in trouble for things like insolence disobedience talking back to a corrections officer that's with NPR and middle school of journalism at Northwestern University found when we collected data from women's and men's prisons in fifteen states, even small infractions can have big consequences. Women get time added to their prison. Stay go to solitary confinement or lose visitation or phone privileges. That matters because more than half of women in prison are the mothers of children eighteen or younger this prison in Iowa is notable it's trying to make change. But it's not easy, partly because there are so many rules. Even today, they could get tickets about wearing their sweat shirt inside out. And we're like why is that a security issue? That's really not a security issue. Maybe she had a coffee stain. I have one that's the warden shell Dom in two thousand sixteen aren't data found women at this prison compared to men of other Iowa prisons were three times more likely to get punished for the violation of being disruptive. Now, Tom toes corrections officers to give out fewer tickets like for breaking the rule that a prisoner can alter their uniform. It was written for a men's prison where a shirt inside out or Swedes rolled up might signal gang affiliation. But this isn't gang related. It's just women want to have some control over how they look about. How they present themselves dominance putting in place practice called gender responsive corrections. It's the idea that there are important differences between men and women in prison. Every corrections officers being trained that women take different paths the prison, they're less likely than men to commit violent crimes in prison through us likely to be violent and that women do better when prison. Is less punitive. So Donna's changing rules, especially about clothing and tone corrections officers to listen to the women more and to demand compliance less. Tell me about it..

NPR Iowa Tom Ari Shapiro officer Mary Louise Kelley Donna Joseph Shapiro island Correctional Institutio redbrick Asami middle school of journalism Northwestern University
Man returns home to Romania to find he's been declared dead

Mac and Gaydos

02:18 min | 3 years ago

Man returns home to Romania to find he's been declared dead

"Restraint luke air force base in glendale is opening up its doors to the public the loop dais airshow is this weekend you can expect military and civilian air act including the us navy blue angels as our headliner rebecca hi c with luke air force base says the blue angels are the navy's premier aerial demonstration team it performs at airshows around the world she says the tora tora tora demonstration will be another crowd favorites they do reenactments of the attacks on pearl harbor as well as some of the opposing battles fought by american fighters the two day event it's free and it starts tomorrow result us tino ktar news sixty three year old constantine really you is not asami but he is officially the walking dead a romanian court has rejected really claim that he's alive after he was officially registered as deceased really went to turkey for work and lost contact with his family in romania was wife had him declared dead two years ago after he resurfaced too late romanian court said he appealed to late and he's dead and that's a big problem for review who points out he has no income and 'cause he's listed as dead he can't get a job let's check on the traffic in the weather we'll start off with detour dan in the ktar traffic center thank you becky lynn here we go again on a friday afternoon and it looks like renewing it with a little bit of stumbling action but only two items in particular we got a carbon on the off ramp on the loop one one northbound at the thomas exit ramp at where it's going to be an egg you're gonna want to exit at indian school but it's going to be the northbound thomas exit you're not going to be able to use this until further notice it's closed until further notice due to this vehicle fire also a stalled vehicle fifty one southbound at mcdowell this is off right not blocking and then the other snags servicerelated crashes at twenty fourth street and just south of lincoln arizona avenue chandler heights forty three rd avenue at cactus and also scottsdale road a drink water this traffic report brought to you by p g p px g scottsdale is a golfer's paradise visit them at fifteen sixteen or eighty third way too shop there apparel or call eight four four.

Glendale United States Navy Romania Becky Lynn Indian School Tino Ktar Romanian Court Ktar Thomas Exit Sixty Three Year Two Years Two Day
"asami" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

The Flop House Podcast

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"asami" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

"Elliot asami movie i kinda like but it's not that good no zambia moving goods army moving out just now now good zambia lvmh okay what say good bad zombie movie levy return a living parts view or like a zombie lake maybe where half the movies this women stopping to adjust their stockings and then zombies coming out of a lake and eating them okay and what sorry bear berbera zombie movie probably the new the new remake of day of the dead pretty bad okay laminate easily did a remake a day the dead bob in it oh give i pretty sure bob would have to be on a ripe i don't know i've seen it all who wait wait you're a so maybe it's good how do you know this fat a just got so many bad reviews of okay okay a you know what else got bad reviews blaring in the city without hindrance and i analyse alishan assume his you could have the allies soum i take him asks and i may and you're you and we should be free to be you in may uh i was taught actually out of the next states i was i was talking to uh what is it new york magazines david edelstein and he was making a very strong case for valerian the city of a thousand planet so i don't think all critics say 'let now okay as fair and i was like saab yelling at be david stop yelling and he wouldn't stop.

Elliot bob zambia david edelstein
"asami" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"asami" Discussed on Adventures in Finance: A Real Vision Podcast

"In a new new concepts regulators say industry i know ark hopes to try really transform the economy and to try to generate i productivity growth so i think they are trying to do all the right thing um and really that that's really what you can do but you know the the the fundamental question is still is more if you have an on it'd be you know you've got too much that and now losses filmed the system whether you do with it and i feel asami not hasn't been can resolve and ask created kind of i guess the best ceases around china in terms of wet weather focuses great question that a turn it back to you on that one and just a and in the next mean there has been a popular their case on china agassi for for many years that becomes almost apocalyptic in in nature referring not to just trying to but all the global growth picture since it several line on china i guess where where are they obviously in terms of the debt but also what do you make of that kind is scary barricades that that we've all heard about china's debt is unsustainable and and they're going to have to go through some major shakeup that's that's going to threaten growth in every country in the world so i'm i'm sympathetic to to the logic 'cause obviously if you follow the train a logic food it does it doesn't make sense i think that the issue is more the assumptions that you make to the star and weather whether those about it friends so i think there's a few cases this special case about china right one is obviously a lot of that is on denominated in local currency an foreign currency so this is that this is very very important difference come has a lot of historical um kind of credit crises right so the the closest analogy probably being like japan well you know they're still running on the sea absurdly high levels of that to gdp but you haven't had this kind of crisis right you know shorting gay you'd be some she'd been the widowmaker trade but kinda of since two thousand and kind of uh a lot of microphones trying to.

asami china japan
"asami" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"asami" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"So not honors at the table who terminator salvi those the genesis what is that mrs yes so you know john connors there and it's this is and he's just staring at light serious it feels good to get attention from a man and she loves dead and she wasn't with him and i don't give a fog and and i'm just keeping peter bush it she just can't yeah she likes him alive and he like it like kinda likes her but surely likes him because he like she's boss mary yet and she wanted she was happy some was given attention which unhealthy senator time because everyone woman which is yet i get it at warnings i think great at just wanted as yahoo another important for itself forty six oils it must be the because the no no you're right it's forty is forty one right asami went s subway forty one covers forty one is forty one um so like you know then the brother comes back from school he went to like harvard asahi's look at he looks great he's like he's art as he the actor he's an actor ryan actor he's an act the an actor of year he's an actor they the do some shakespeare quotes said each other he's laws allow he's kind of flirting with his stanley this kind of flirting with her and and the he's flirting with his brothers girlfriend and arafat or fiance at this at the point was a girlfriend at applegate now now butler soho lana whip a notion fast forward to the end of the movie right but does this unspoken flirtation does it ever does it never really go anywhere yes remain in a he makes way than a huge way.

peter bush mary asami harvard asahi stanley applegate john connors senator yahoo ryan arafat
"asami" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"asami" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"Whoa oh on um in a murray remember norman at o'hare alone and what do they do terrible things they hung 'em up between two the after they tortured and ran him down ran down his reputation dislike they're doing to a great president what is the whole world he trump is because trump is bad and the whole world is good no i'm sorry the leaders and the world and the government are back they are evil and trump is good all we may have done bad things he may have made mistakes he might have gone a hideous character flaws but this is the man got there's no doubt about that and i knew it before he was elected him i knew it before hillary fell because i saw her so they're making this man's coming on he predicted donald trump would win flip a coin man's 5050 i'm telling you i know the he's the man of the hour and they're all against him and they're all saying these bad because he's could because he's four freedom and he's for the people and he's for america with all its fox with always brashness whatever he's done in the past he's our man and you better stop cutting them down because if they get rid of him your freedom is over i promise you your country is over and there are many people around the sherry asami might be listening and i know that that's okay with you you think america should go down and you think we should have a world government will sooner or later you're gonna get it because it is predicted in the bible and knows hebrew profits were never wrong so it is coming and i hope that you who are trying to bring it i pray and hope that you live to see and come to understand what freedom is and what tyrannies meanwhile it's christmas in america pray.

norman o'hare president hillary donald trump america sherry asami christmas
"asami" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"asami" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Should be almost i mean at least close to those to ask a goal that yeah no i mean all the total a give it was he'll it it then all of us it war would come out both backups or plan still would move their ios like okay well you know mike is in office these dealing with clients in for instance you have you have a plethora of college football game good were very good words of china come with one vocabulary were to a show but you have a huge card it was much more college football car last week it's like triple this week and i they were all sleeping last week on a whoever schedules these games it was like twenty games last week there sixty five seventy games this weekend so in terms of college football but does that mean the average guy out there with offshore counter local guy should overlook the one two three four five six seven eight nine ten eleven twelve fifteen hockey games on saturday no but he will in less a professional will howling him what to actually and i and i love my hockey and i presume in atlanta start i appreciate you bringing that up but again the thing that we've always talked about you alluded to is it the durban people that we've had great baseball seasons just great baseball season football started baseball's gondal although it doesn't even exist right you know it's and we're not any undue or others right right exactly that's the power of the football so what do you think the biggest trick is for a guy free information this is what call the free tips from brian blessing the kenny white the original the non imitated you sure you're the real anyway thinks of short there's so many bug cited by other guys calling me there you go i know us i spent a week with a day i was listen i was on with i was on the phone with bryant our uncanny went that last week and a guy called for kenny's office it doesn't exist asami kenny's plays why can't are actually giving me plays on the phone so you gotta go to.

mike china football hockey atlanta baseball asami kenny durban bryant
"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"asami" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Deadly impact of extreme weather conditions the renowned indian author amitav goche is a man with one foot in the united states and another in in india and a mind that's been grappling with the challenges of climate change for some time now he told my colleague jamie kamara asami that mumbai faced major cyclone risk and it was time he said for a new way of thinking of dealing with floods as climate change continued it's all from trigger topography they are more momberg you know or mary wore originally six or seven islands and it's building the festering landscape and if you're really only off the british troop position or for our moon berry imbert earth 1660s than after making contrary offer they started drinking these items together cuba from barre is is going to laker peninsular jutting out from the man these areas are strange very very low lying an incredibly vulnerable and in fact it's exactly those areas that are flattered that have theme the worst floods and it's perfectly predictable bitter gun goes on our the thieves you'd have we talk of these areas reclaimed learned britain tractor it's the city that serves going to regain beslan so what to do to mitigate that you can't move a city now county this is the enormous brand new really regrettable mary orix who work at a goal or huge concentration of risk among berry has a huge amount of the country's infrastructure especially mansur infrastructure the most important stock exchange of the number and yet they're moon barre is incredibly exposed and because of climate change is facing greater and greater risk it traces were really rising cyclone has earth satranegara deputy is increasing in the arabian sea this is one of the predictor outcomes of chairman change and it would be hit by a major factor on these floods would look girl very ordinary is this a moment where do you think minds can be focused on this because i know you know you've written very much about the failure of novelists but i guess of civil society in general to really get to grips with the threats that are coming when we see floods in south asia floods in sierra leone oversee what's been happening in the united states.

amitav goche united states india climate change barre stock exchange moon barre asia jamie kamara mumbai british troop laker peninsular britain mary orix chairman sierra leone one foot
"asami" Discussed on GroundTruth

GroundTruth

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"asami" Discussed on GroundTruth

"In asami village about an hour away from the mariah a 23yearold name perry yoenis is working to preserve samih ways of life we meet him in the restaurant of a hiking in tourism center perry on his hair blond and spiky and he's wearing chuck taylor's and skinny jeans he splits his time between attending university and hurting reindeer with his father and sister in the mountains he also chairs asami youth organization that speaks out on mental health and environmental issues river mumbo saw his heart bob compared with the my words society study a few years ago would say about one third of the same regardless has considered suicide thus far the law by thirty percent to walk is that accurate wishes have studied assessing this show hi so if wanted threeyear considering suicide youth majority are depressed in it and suffering from things icty software yes i mean that we feel that every winter also a number spring that reindeer's died reindeer on food and of course the the the change in the environment we confidently predict what is happening or what will happen food future he says the saami are still recovering from generations of forced assimilation in ongoing battles over who can use the land climate change adds yet another layer of stress.

asami village perry yoenis chuck taylor climate change icty thirty percent threeyear