36 Burst results for "Arts"

Fresh update on "arts" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

01:02 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "arts" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Carries out a series of rockettes almost the rocket carrying a hypersonic glide body failed to launch during a test at kodiak Alaska according to a U.S. official The U.S. Military has been developing weapons systems that can travel at hypersonic speeds which is 5 times the speed of sound while the test on Thursday failed to launch a test of three other rocket systems on Wednesday was successful We Martinez ABC News The Pentagon Attorney general Garland says he is extremely proud of the work the Justice Department is done with the January 6th investigation As the committee is well aware the department is engaged in one of the most sweeping investigations in its history in connection with the January 6th attack on the capitol Garland was just fine before the House judiciary committee he did admit concerns at some January 6th defendants could be radicalized in prison Southwest Airlines says it's October meltdown cost the company's $75 million in an earnings call the carrier says along another 40 million due to lingering effects of the delta variant southwest canceled more than 2000 flights over the Columbus day weekend A Virginia museum is proposing to melt down a statue of confederate general Robert E. Lee which was the focus of a violent white nationalist rally in 2017 in Charlottesville and to create a new work of public art The Jefferson school African American heritage centers have been at its proposal to Charlottesville city council This is ABC News Common news time 8 O four traffic.

Garland Kodiak U.S. House Judiciary Committee Abc News Alaska Justice Department Pentagon Southwest Airlines Robert E. Lee Columbus Jefferson School African Ameri Virginia Charlottesville Charlottesville City Council
Go Visit and Check out SchoolBoardWatchlist.Org

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Go Visit and Check out SchoolBoardWatchlist.Org

"There's a great website I'm putting on my social sites on getter and parlor but I'd like you to write this down It's called school board watch list dot org School board watch list dot art part of the turning point USA group School board watch list dot org I want you to go over there and check it out Everybody should go over there and check it out School board watch list dot org I want the attorney general not of the United States The attorney general the Democrat party in the American Marxist movement to understand something We're not invigorated more resolute more motivated than ever before We are a free people Men and women have died for this country So that we can speak at school board meetings without being intimidated by union thugs by educational bureaucrats by radical school board members and by the FBI The FBI That's acting like the East German Stasi We're not going to put up with this There's not this widespread violence at school board meetings I mean hell the national school board association writes this long outrageous letter to Biden which finds its way quickly within days to the Department of Justice that issues a memo It's an inside job And they have no examples They want example of one guy hitting somebody and based on that We need to federalize our school board meetings How we do

Org School Board Usa Group School Board American Marxist Movement Democrat Party FBI National School Board Associat United States Biden Department Of Justice
Exposing the Swampy Motivation Behind Merrick Garland's School Board Strike Force

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:32 min | 2 weeks ago

Exposing the Swampy Motivation Behind Merrick Garland's School Board Strike Force

"Is merrick garland conflicted. There's a conflict of interest here. Clearly as his daughter is now married into the family and as part of the family of the company that parents are speaking out against and merrick. Garland says oh. Don't worry i'll throw the feds at them. We're just going to send the fbi and intimidate and chill future speech since two thousand september. Two thousand twenty one. But just last month. Panorama educations anton. Tanner raised sixty million dollars to expand operations. His father in law merrick garland then tells the fbi to investigate any potential parental interference or disruption. That might impede his daughter and son-in-law business interests we used to have laws against the sort of stuff but it's no surprise that the same thing. How joe biden creates chinese policy to benefit his family. So same thing hunter biden says. Oh i don't know who's buying my art. Even though breaking news stories shows today he's hanging out with the people that are buying but always follow the money everybody that there is a profit motive and there's an incentive behind the clampdown merrick garland. Being a scorned man is using federal police. The fbi to go after you regular parents so that his family could potentially remain

Merrick Garland FBI Merrick Garland Hunter Biden Tanner Joe Biden
Texas high school shooting suspect has been taken into custody, police say

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

Texas high school shooting suspect has been taken into custody, police say

"An eighteen year old student has been taken into custody hours after opening fire during a fight at his Dallas area high school your linkedin police department says Timothy George Simpkins was taken into custody without incident and charged with multiple counts of aggravated assault with a gun Kevin Colby is the Arlington assistant police chief was a fight between the student and another individual in a class audio courtesy WFAA Colby said four people were injured two of them with gunshot wounds and three of them were taken to the hospital about nineteen hundred students were evacuated from timberview high school and taken by bus to a local performing arts center to be reunified with their parents I'm

Dallas Area High School Linkedin Police Department Timothy George Simpkins Kevin Colby Wfaa Colby Arlington Timberview High School
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra Chooses Wokeness Over Art

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:30 min | 2 weeks ago

San Francisco Symphony Orchestra Chooses Wokeness Over Art

"Okay. I want to read to you. And i'm gonna try to take jim in scranton by the way just for the record and i want to read to you. A letter sent to the members of one of the leading orchestras of the country. The san francisco symphony orchestra. I have friends in many of the top orchestras of the country because of my interest in involvement in classical music dear. All i won't read the whole letter as we start the twenty twenty one twenty two season allen when i say alan on the air you know it's serious. I wanted to take a moment to address some questions about the nature and future of our d. e. I work together. i will note after many sentences. Something the assumption is the members of the orchestra. No what the diversity equity and inclusion so there have been some questions will. Who is the person here. The person who wrote it is matthew. Spivey interim ceo of the san francisco symphony orchestra. 2-0 one van ness avenue san francisco over the last three years. The san francisco symphony has been on a remarkable journey of learning self reflection and change. The entire letter is pablum the entire letter it is unworthy of adults. It is or william pablum. The san francisco symphony has been on a remarkable journey of learning self reflection and change The journey there the symphony orchestra is on a journey and of lot learning self reflection and change. All of that is a euphemism for over the last three years we have made the san francisco symphony orchestra. More and more awoke.

San Francisco Symphony Orchest Scranton San Francisco JIM Spivey Allen Alan William Pablum Matthew
Caller Says We Have to Blame All Involved Who Got Joe Biden in Office

Mark Levin

02:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Caller Says We Have to Blame All Involved Who Got Joe Biden in Office

"Mark A sun tzu 2500 years ago wrote in the art of war armed conflict is the most primitive form of warfare Out of that you get economic warfare which could cause an economic collapse You get brainwashing or destroying the use of the country All of these things are many of them were thousands of years old the ideas and this is exactly what the Democrat party is implementing It's very serious very diabolical but it is brilliant not that AOC is brilliant but the strategist and tacticians who planned this and carried it out we have to crush the Democrat party as you know And then I hope we could work together with loyal American Democrats to work together to get the creeps out of the Republican Party and decrease out of the Democrat party The never Trump was the admiral of the general as all those people that attacked Trump They're the cause or part of the cause Biden's in there So they're as responsible as Biden is what Biden is doing We can't let Biden get all the blame All the people that put them in office Chris Wallace during the debates that the hurt Trump all of those people were working together knowingly or just being stupid They put Biden in the office They're all responsible Let me just say it's going to be a little bit more complicated Jimmy as you know And the reasons this They've created this massive government Leviathan which is loyal to the Democrat party Democrat party takes care of it takes care of their income protects them grows them expands their authority And so there is this relationship between the Democrat party and the bureaucracy So when a Republican comes in Reagan or Trump and so forth And they're trying to scale back the size of government They are sabotaged In the saboteurs work with the media we saw that with the FBI most recently but it's all the time The sabotage leaked tax returns of the president of the United States to the media They will never do anything like this of course To Joe Biden because Joe Biden's going to expand their authority and give them money more resources

Democrat Party Biden AOC Democrat Party Democrat Party Chris Wallace Republican Party Mark Donald Trump Jimmy Reagan FBI Joe Biden United States
Ep49 Angel Espino  - Art is Therapy

Art Unknown Podcast

01:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Ep49 Angel Espino - Art is Therapy

"But a for me is therapeutic in a way where of always said it before. Where when i paint to me. It's a painting is like yoga for the mind. No the people yoga for the mine also physically but for the body you know and things like that but for me painting is so relaxing. I have to after literally shutout. You know all the noise you know your everyday noise whether it's work or bills or issues or you know social issues whatever's going on in around your world in your life When you pay you literally have to shut everything off. You have to meditate. Before or at least i meditate before before i paint have to be in a space where i'm not affected by any kind of Energy so it's always positive energy so when you paint. Someone's like letting go of all this that you compress than hell back and you just let all this positive energy or you try to create positive image to me. I need it you know i needed like jogger needs to go run.

Yoga For The Mind Therapy Paint Meditation Positive Energy Art Is Positive Art Therapy Therapeutic
Mike Will Star as Daddy Warbucks in the South Carolina Children’s Theatre Production of 'Annie'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:39 min | Last month

Mike Will Star as Daddy Warbucks in the South Carolina Children’s Theatre Production of 'Annie'

"I am very excited. That plans are coming together. Tickets are on sale for anne and south carolina the south carolina children's theatre and yours truly will once again be playing. Oliver warbucks the billionaire. Who adopts little orphan. annie. They're gonna christian this beautiful new theater. That was ready to go but was of course delayed because of the pandemic. We were supposed to do this last year. But now the production of annie is going to be presented in all of its glory. Listen a lot of challenges. But we're going to do it. And we're going to do it safely and effectively and powerfully. And we're going to have a great production in a brand new theatre on gusta in greenville south carolina and is gonna take place between thanksgiving and christmas. Which is the perfect. Time to mount a production of annie. One of america's most beloved musicals. I make a pretty good daddy warbucks. And i'm going to get my head shave so you're gonna see me bald as a cue ball pretty soon and i'm going to give you a heads up if you're in the upstate. I'm already been trying to snag. Some tickets for friends and family and tickets are going pretty quick so s. c. children's theatre dot org is the site for the tickets to get It's it's only a couple of hundred seats in the theaters brand new theatre beautiful intimate theatre state of the art. And i can't wait. This is going to be a great celebration between thanksgiving and christmas in the upstate. south carolina. If you listen to his on ninety four five the answer let me give you a quick heads up. You wanna snag tickets quickly. Probably good espec- children's theatre dot org. Se children's theatre dot

South Carolina Oliver Warbucks Annie Anne Greenville America
Breaking the Formulaic Mold of Contemporary Christian Music

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:28 min | Last month

Breaking the Formulaic Mold of Contemporary Christian Music

"To andy irwin of the famous irwin brothers. You probably remember the film. i can only imagine. There's a new film out called the jesus music movie obviously self explanatory. It's about jesus music. We were just talking. Andy about this strange moment in the culture and to me. It's there's something sad about it where we had people mainstream figures. Billy graham to some extent was a mainstream figure. But we had johnny cash. We had chris christopherson singing unapologetic. Jesus music maybe the issue is that we have separated it into a. I think a lot of people think sometimes that when you do that you sort of marginalize yourself in other words it would be wonderful if everybody in the country was listening to the music rather than just people who listen to ccm. So i don't know where. Do you think we're going with that because i feel like you don't reach people if you're just in your own little genre. Yeah i think we explore that in documentary for sure because there was there. Was this purity where it started And you know the people that there wasn't an industry around. It was his people. That kind of organically started kind of expressing their fate. And then they're kind of became something where it became a little bit more for formulaic and then people blazed trails in new directions and then it will become formulaic. And then you know that was always the struggle between you know the commerce of it of just kind of play into your base and then being able to do really great art. And i think you know the exciting thing about it. Is i think you know we try to find something. That was universally relatable and the idea of You know outside of it being genre of these trailblazers that said hey. My voice is represented and i would like to form something that doesn't exist That's incredibly romantic. But along the way you know it can get kind of formulaic and just kind of play to the base. I think the exciting thing that's happening now. With the arts you know across the board Not just with with music but also hopefully you know heading that direction in film is there's been an opportunity To kind of branch out beyond the walls and so we kind of go into where it has been the started to make those steps in that direction. Like with the lauren bagels. And the you know for king country. Mcrae's there's these modern artists that are beginning to kind of blur. Those lines a little bit more and reach a broader

Andy Irwin Irwin Brothers Chris Christopherson Billy Graham Johnny Cash Andy Mcrae
The Establishment Welcomes Godless Hollywood Liberal Jeff Daniels

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:34 min | Last month

The Establishment Welcomes Godless Hollywood Liberal Jeff Daniels

"Now you may remember jeff daniels from the movie dumb and dumber and if you ever wondered while watching that movie will who's dumb and dumber. Let's listen to this clip and you will know exactly who i think. The bloody sunday for people of color was george ford's murder and white people said. I had no idea that we were only taught one side of american history. Better look into that. So i started reading isabel. Wilkerson tana coats. Carol anderson get educated. Because there's a whole we have an opportunity in this country right now to welcome in a america we really do. I feel the same way that there is strangely. Not only in america not in our the way we approach our civic society but in the arts There's there's reasons and opportunity where things are reopened. That never closed ever before to re dedicate yourself to first principles and white people are the ones who need to hear it. So mockingbird is harper lee to white point of view and it certainly is the story of atticus coming to grips with the fact that one of the big central questions of the play is. There's goodness everyone you just have to care enough to look for it. Is that true today. In two thousand twenty one. Is there goodness everyone not so sure. But you have to choose. Now you have to decide whether you're for eliminating or at least marginalizing systemic racism or you against you have to choose. You can't just sit back and go. Please cut my taxes. Look the other way. Well there's also a choice before that which is to acknowledge exists acknowledge it exists

George Ford Wilkerson Tana Carol Anderson Jeff Daniels Isabel America Harper Lee Atticus
2021 Emmys: Winner Predictions for Outstanding Drama Series

Daily Pop

01:56 min | Last month

2021 Emmys: Winner Predictions for Outstanding Drama Series

"Let's talk about some of the nights. Toughest categories the emmy for outstanding drama series goes to margin. Which show do you think is going to take it. I hate to be so predictable. But i honestly think the crown i know. Aaron doesn't like it which tells me it's the only thing we've ever really disagreed on show. Well written is so well active. It's so well depicted. You get a sense that you are in one of the most iconic and well known families and what they have gone through so i just think that. They deserve their roses. I'm not gonna say fully dislike it with the full. Stop a man. He just hasn't evolved yet. Let me let me let me. Give you the pallet cleanser. You need less fresh. let's night. I will turn you onto the crowd. I'm gonna make sure that. I took four naps that day. Prior and then i'll be fully energized and ready. And maybe maybe i should do it post pregnancy so i really don't falsely anyway moving on as we're snoozing on the and made stale like handmaid's him when they're up for a nomination they take it home. They sweep in many categories. So i'm just excited that they're back on this platform to again. Really good picks. I'm leaning more towards handmaid's tale because it was so action packed. And i felt like elizabeth. Moss's directing debut was unbelievable. However we love to give a sendoff. We love to give a proper send-off pose this final season. The cast the story lines. What was written on that paper and what came to screen was so unbelievable. Right and it was life imitating art and art imitating life with billy porter storyline. So i think if you weren't oppose fan when you heard it was a final season. I feel like a lot of people got into it and i think they're going to be able to take it and they did already take home. Some creative arts emmys. the word drove. I mean it was to die for. That show was fully entertaining. You went through all the fields with that so don't really anyone's game. Yeah really out out of all three of those. It really could

Emmy Aaron Handmaid Billy Porter Moss Elizabeth
How to Handle Tough or Tender Conversations

The Small Business Radio Show

01:14 min | Last month

How to Handle Tough or Tender Conversations

"Well communication with team members has always been a difficult part of any small business owners job but working remotely has made it even tougher. But what will happen when we head back into the offices later. This year help is mary. Jane nester who has been speaking out all their life. Her new book and amazon dot com number one bestseller. It's called say now said right. Have a handle tough and tender. Conversations provide a straightforward look at the problem people organizations phased by not practicing the art of communication. Mary welcome to the show. Well thank you very so wonderful to be here. So it's communication gun talk. I since now. We're all working remotely. Oh it has. It's you know we are not used to speaking face to face anymore and you talk about going back to work. This is going to be one of the toughest things that we're going to have to face is that we don't have that screen anymore. We don't have that separation and so we and we've kind of lost our skills of being able to speak face to face and when somebody's right in front of you So i think we're going to face a lot of tough conversations and a lot of tough situations where we just don't quite know how to handle those conversations we're going to have to have

Jane Nester Amazon Mary
Ep 142: How Kindness and Community Empower Todays Nonprofit Leaders (with guest John Hoffman) - test

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

07:59 min | Last month

Ep 142: How Kindness and Community Empower Todays Nonprofit Leaders (with guest John Hoffman) - test

"Came to twenty twenty one kind of annoyed annoyed that nonprofit leaders and their remarkable heroics in twenty twenty didn't get the spotlight or the recognition. They deserved we all fussed. In twenty twenty about the dearth of leadership in our society. I think folks just looking in the wrong place overlooking leaders around this country who educate advocate feed the hungry provides shelter bring beauty through the arts lead congregations to help us keep the faith all of these people right here in front of our eyes. I see it every day and it makes me kind of angry that others don't or worse still. We talked about staff board. Volunteers of these nonprofits the backbone of our society we talk about these people as nice. Nice really rubs me the wrong way. It feels really pass to me now. Kindness is a word. I can brace but i don't know that i had ever spent that much time thinking about the distinction between the two until i watched a documentary on amazon prime the film. The antidote offered me an aha moment. And i just love a good moment is i learned that the reason i embrace the word kindness is that implies action it requires commitment and in this documentary. We see through stories. Beautifully told by my friend and six time emmy winner. John hoffman the kindness. M- may be thought of as something gentle but it has real strength. John says that kindness is a weapon for change. One of the heroes. He's spotlights in the film. Says quote kindness is a practice. Kindness is a stance end quote. And so today. I want you to meet my friend and john. He and i both know this to be true. Kindness may not be the ultimate antidote. And it's not actually something special you can drop into any community at any time and find it blossoming and you'll find those leaders who are practicing it every day. John's journey developing idea and bringing it to life is as instructive and as inspiring is the film. What's up. I feel lucky. Indeed to be able to introduce you to my friend. John and grateful that he's game to share his story with you. Greetings welcome to nonprofits her messy. I'm your host joan. Gary founder the nonprofit leadership lab where we help smaller nonprofits thrive. I'm also a strategic advisor for executive directors and boards of larger nonprofits. I'm a frequent keynote. Speaker blogger an author on all things leadership and management learn. More at joan gary dot com. I'm a one with a mission to fuel. The leadership of the nonprofit sector my goal with each episode is to dig deep into an issue. I know the nonprofit leaders are grappling with finding just the right person to offer you advice and insights. Today is no exception. John hoffman is a six time emmy award winning filmmaker whose most recent films include rancher farmer fisherman which premiered at the sundance film festival in january twenty seventeen and out of many one which premiered at the new york film festival followed by net flex in two thousand eighteen much. John's work as a filmmaker has focused on the key. Health issues of our time including the weight of the nation addiction and the alzheimer's project all on. Hbo and i in human on discovery. A six hour series set in the world's largest research hospital. The nih is building ten. In addition to making films. John has also been a network executive. He was the adp of docs specials for discovery. From twenty fifteen to two thousand eighteen and After nearly two decades as vp of documentary programming at hbo not in john's by is that he was instrumental. In persuading me that i needed to leave corporate america and become a nonprofit executive director. He may take some degree of pride in that. But it is far exceeded by the gratitude. I feel for what became a complete personal and professional transformation for me so john welcome and i am just not sure i can ever repay you for the art of press. Suasion was on display during a lovely brunch at our home so many years ago. Hi john john really wonderful to be with you. I am so out of you and all that you have accomplished in the time that we've known each other But the the tremendous evolution of your sort of career. You're you're on understanding end leadership in the not so My hat to you for all. You're doing that seems. Seems like you go have a piece of my hat. So so let's pick up your story about the making of this film from the point at which you and your team became kind of hyper focused on this world kindness and how you might explore it in a documentary. I guess you kinda define it. I why don't you tell us about the process. Well in in the two thousand sixteen two thousand seventeen but bearing much In i was Very disturbed as so. Many people were by the growing distance in the country. An outright hatred that was expressed in so many ways in the country and i had the incredible good fortune of having a relationship with A nonprofit health system called dignity health. They had funded in a very generous way some public health that i was doing when i left. Hvo when i created a nonprofit media company called the topic good projects and i was with the ceo of dignity house and their model is hello human kindness and i was having a very interesting conversation with him and senior leadership about the strong commitment as a nonprofit helped brighter kindness and our authentic was and i said would you ever consider doing the documentary becomes and lighting and that led to were conversation and eventually led just on that word to them giving principal funding for what became the antidote total editorial control. It was literally confidence in me to make a film on that. Were not a big risk now. Really not big risks. And so i put together a small team. I found a remarkable co director cooperman. Who was nominated for the kennedy award for short film. She did hojo's violin. Beautiful beautiful short documentary and we started on jer. We read everything we could about compassionate empathy decency putt from art and poetry in economics and political theory and evolution. We found absorbs so much and we quickly came to the realization that the world does not need any more exploration random next is that there's so many media platforms that on. Social media is love stories of random acts. We

John Hoffman John Joan Gary Emmy Emmy Award Amazon Joan Gary NIH John John HBO Alzheimer Dignity House New York America Cooperman Kennedy Award Hojo
Traditional vs. Contemporary Classical Music

Rescot Creative

02:16 min | Last month

Traditional vs. Contemporary Classical Music

"Today we are talking about the somewhat controversial topic of traditional versus contemporary. And this is a debate in pretty much all areas of life or art forms, whether you are thinking literary. So where you have a more traditional or even historical type fiction versus contemporary fiction or in music, if you like the traditional sounding songs, very classical, or a more contemporary pop genre, and obviously to apologize to everything else, like politics, if you have your more traditional people and your more contemporary progressive people anyway, I personally believe that it's important that we can appreciate things on both sides. Of the line. So when it comes to more traditional sounding violin music, you're going to think, especially a lot about Bach baro, classical era, music like Mozart, so here's a little box. Okay, so this very ornate decorative sounding music or you might have something even from the romantic time period, which was 19th century. Right? Now, if you are actually trying to do something more contemporary, you might do a little bit more with improvisation, although actually in the baroque era Bach did improvise a lot. But for example, if this was like twinkle little star. You know, Abu Dhabi in French Mozart did a ton of variations on that. But a contemporary version of that could be.

Bach Baro Mozart Abu Dhabi
Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | Last month

Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

"One of your interviewee is mentions that everyone's going through something. And I think people need to understand if you're meeting people on the street. We're talking with some of they've gone through stuff. Like I've gone through things. I'm sure lose Tristan you mentioned you've got through your own grief as well. And with American society, I think American society in general, I think there is there needs to be more conversation about going to therapy, talking about things that are not very comfortable and what are things that society should be saying. What should we be talking about and should be made more aware? Society. Yeah. You know, you know, we live in a culture where everything is so fast paced and we're so, you know, what are you feeling? You know what I mean? You got to get money. You know what I mean? Next thing, you know what I mean? It's so it's so bad because when we see some of our favorites, you know what I mean fall down and we say, wow, they were so kids saying signs of this early on, but we chose not to see that. You know what I mean? I see that person. And I always say, like you said earlier, we meet people. Everyone's gonna be dealing with something. And I think that in this world, everybody, you need to be kind. Point blank period. You have to leave the kindness and all that. So you know, I know it's a hard thing to do to do in the world, but you need to kind of, you know, you'll be on the right path and all that. And as far as the world of itself, then what conversations that we have the better. What I'm wearing this in front of the audience. Everybody stood up at the end. It just started hunting on one another. Why? Because it's that common thing that we go through as people. You know what I mean? You still be able to really talk about okay, yes, I want to do that challenge a theme. I'm like, how did I overcome that by doing XYZ? You know what I mean? And I didn't think I was like, you know, as a self that's crazy or, you know, like, you know, you're crazy if you ask for help. Everybody needs to help. Yeah, and it's definitely a very important, especially disorder. We're all going through something. So now, but as far as the artist's part, right? You are, we're dealing with our own issues. And then we put on top of that, our creativity. How do you do that? Specifically, this documentary, you said, okay, so I was asking other questions and then he led to something else. That has creativity sparking, right? And you're saying, okay, maybe I have something bigger than I thought. How do you deal with that in the sense because it is at the very difficult theme to talk about with people and you're not sure if they're going to be open to share. So how do you deal with that in your creative approach? Well, it's so interesting that you say that because while I was interviewing them, you know, my grief was still fresh in my own. Correct. So while I was interviewing them, I'm like, geez, I'm still unpacking myself and here I am receiving things from other people. And I'm like, I have to take a couple I have to take about a week or so apart from each interview because I'm like, you know, all I talk about some heavy stuff and then now I gotta edit it while I'm editing my short film and it was like, it was filled with stuff made emotional roller coaster for me, but it was that theme to what I knew single handedly that it was in divine order that I was doing the right thing with this project. You know what I mean? And I think for me, the biggest thing was just like sitting back and knowing that Michael okay. This is bigger than me. You know what I mean? My project is bigger than me. It's documentary is bigger than me. And to be able to teach with it in people to see it and feel something, that's what it is. That's what it's about. Right. And it's not something that you're doing. Do you have to sort of detach yourself from your own feelings or maybe you got more into that in order to be able to finish this documentary? I'm curious, I'm a curious person. So I definitely leaned into myself a little bit more about why does the person feel that way or can we go back, you know, the technology and see what happened to our specific time and all that. Yeah, it's just intuitive and me to just like, you know, lead with my body and the heart. Definitely. And I think that's what we have, right? I left at the end. So creativity is our voices just making stuff that it's important to us and that we want to share. So as far as that, we got to bring back something a little lighter. So you said you were doing your film and the documentary at the same time. A lot of filmmakers out there are season filmmakers but there are others that are starting out like I mentioned. So in that sense, tell us more about the process with that. You're doing two projects at the same time, but one of them came out before. And now you have something that you're working. What is the process as far as the production part of it? About at least what you encounter. Yeah, you know, so I'm very grateful for my short film team because when I sat down with each and every one of them, you know, they, you know, what my vision was, single handedly, you know what I mean? So grateful for that. Now, when I was in the editing room by myself for my documentary, it was just me, I didn't have anyone to turn to our go to look too. So it was kind of like it was kind of like a home therapy session in itself. And, you know, you walk through this project and I know that I've mentioned that, you know, we did with the 5 stages of three, you know, bargaining and like acceptance and the value that depression and all those other ones. And the people were talking, but I didn't set up the questions. Like, okay, let's talk about arguing, you know what I mean? Those things just like naturally just like the conversation. And as I was piecing together, this documentary, I was like, huh. Here we are. Talking about the acceptance of something, or the denial of something. And so, you know, my process was very, you know, blindness on and, you know, just getting very articulate about what it is that we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries

Scranton Tristan Chicago Pennsylvania Filmmaking Independent Film American Society Michael Okay Stony Island Depression
George W Bush Reveals Himself as He Equates Jan 6 With 9/11

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:31 min | Last month

George W Bush Reveals Himself as He Equates Jan 6 With 9/11

"I really knew. Extreme w we hardly knew because so many of us really know what we're getting when we voted for and supported george w bush revealed his true self to listen and for that. We need to be grateful. We needed to be thankful that the picture of dorian gray has come out of the closet with the separating pus and the dripping is and the fangs when george w bush are you body are you body shaming dorian gray no your character shaming george bush. That's right of course that's a few ask. It's like trying to get a chimpanzee embarrassed. But i i am attempting to shame if there is if there is a human art left inside the shell. That is george w bush. There's a single flicker of humanity. I would like to summit so that i can shame it into repentance. We'll look for first of all john. We always were. Both of us are too clever by half. You're too clever by three quarters. What we need to do is very clearly. Lay out what he said the other day so the audience because a lot of people will not have heard this ladies and gentlemen. I tweeted about this. This is shocking. This is disturbing. It's actually sickening and john. Tell my audience What they've won at the service in pennsylvania for the flight ninety three passengers who took down a plane that was headed for the us capitol or the white house. These ordinary americans knew there were throwing their lives away. They charge the cockpit and brought that plane down they brought down the terrorists. George bush's administration officials had led into this country. And george bush. An fbi had failed to stop at a service for these brave american shanksville pennsylvania. That's right george. Bush gets up there and condemns the january six protesters who who were pit protesting peacefully ninety nine point nine nine percent of them protesting peacefully to make sure they're american votes. Were counted in american election. He condemned them. He equated them to the hijackers who brought down the planes on nine eleven and flew them into buildings trying to murder. Tens of thousands of americans. George w bush equated them as extremists who were intolerant and not supportive of

George Bush Dorian Gray John Pennsylvania White House FBI Bush George United States
#1 Book 'American Marxism' to Be Published Internationally

Mark Levin

00:56 sec | Last month

#1 Book 'American Marxism' to Be Published Internationally

"Devi art. Also, I wanted to tell you that American Marxism is now going to be published. Listen to this. We have requests from all over the In Brazil. In Greece in Taiwan in Albania like that, Mr Producer And we have inquiries from Hungary, Poland, Portugal and Japan. So Spreading the word against Marxism. We get very little write up on this, but it's very, very important. Also, we not only been number 19 weeks around and around the New York Times bestseller list that you wouldn't know it, would you We're at 965,000 copies and all formats sold. So I'll be at a million very, very shortly. That's you. The Patriots

Mr Producer Albania Taiwan Brazil Greece Hungary Portugal Poland Japan New York Times Patriots
John Zmirak: 'Dubya, We Hardly Knew Ye'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:25 min | Last month

John Zmirak: 'Dubya, We Hardly Knew Ye'

"Written some articles at the stream. Which one shall we discuss. I shall we discuss. Yeah there's an article. W we hardly knew he'd take on a john kennedy book. There was a book by about john. F. kennedy johnny. We hardly knew. Is that bunch of his advisors after he was shot is that true. And it's based on an old irish song about soldier who dies prematurely right. I really knew. Extreme w we hardly knew because so many of us really know what we're getting when we voted for and supported george w bush revealed his true self to listen and for that. We need to be grateful. We needed to be thankful that the picture of dorian gray has come out of the closet with the separating pus and the dripping is and the fangs when george w bush are you body are you body shaming dorian gray no your character shaming george bush. That's right of course that's a few ask. It's like trying to get a chimpanzee embarrassed. But i i am attempting to shame if there is if there is a human art left inside the shell. That is george w bush. There's a single flicker of humanity. I would like to summit so that i can shame it into

F. Kennedy Johnny George Bush John Kennedy Dorian Gray John
Body Composition Tracking: Why It's Important & What Metrics To Track

20 Minute Fitness

02:53 min | Last month

Body Composition Tracking: Why It's Important & What Metrics To Track

"I think a good starting point years to really i decided. Okay what is it that you actually want to achieve right. I looking to become bigger looking to become slimmer or do wanna be more toned where he can really see the muscle definition clear separation of all muscle groups or even some daska. Laryea around your your arms beds even your apps and maybe of a specific shape goal even like around some body parts. I mean most people were of course lew stabia belly bird others have other issues. Maybe they wanna Wind their shoulders or the one a shape their butts in in a certain way and aesthetic society. They're also health among chevy goals. Right in deir. Daphne limits off. How can push yourself definitely getting slim For the most part also allows you to live longer but there are limits. You know like where you really got into bodybuilding territory which is no longer necessarily something that's going to increase your overall health long-term yeah because the metrics and methods that you use are basically dependent on by your goal is at the end of the bay right. That's right because you know like wait may may be less useful to somebody who has a specific shape goal for example. Because maybe they don't want to change the size change. Know that one body part where it says like incredibly more important for somebody trying to become slimmer right and i think that's why it's really important to figure out okay where he wannabe for most people. That is really like to become slimmer. And that's also what my own case had been. I want to become slimmer. Plus and that was more like the bonus i wanted to be more tones and i wanted to retain as much muscle mass as possible while they the metrics for you that that you were tracking yes so a bunch of different things and definitely not something that would recommend. Everybody should be trekking. And i'm going to outline which. I like the most important ones but i was first and foremost measuring my weight and that was something i was doing and still doing almost every day. Striking my body fat water levels bone mass my lean body mass and actually includes my bone mass and my circumference measurements and that was really all the measurements from my waist circumference to my chest to my shoulders to my upper arms laura arms thighs hips coughs and to some extent even neck but to a lesser extent. Because there was really not that important. I mean i haven't really seen laura people that care about the neck but i heard it's kind of important for some martial arts because it can kinda healthy to not get knocked out and fight for for instance but yeah i mean i wasn't really concerned for me and using shapes trekking my volume compartmentalized through different body parts. So i could kinda see where exactly my my size was changing. So where i was gaining size or losing inside the goal was re to lose mostly incised across the board

Laryea Lew Stabia Deir Daphne Laura
"arts" Discussed on Strength To Be Human --Global Arts & Affairs Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

Strength To Be Human --Global Arts & Affairs Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

03:37 min | 3 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Strength To Be Human --Global Arts & Affairs Podcast, Hosted by Mark Antony Rossi

"You know it happens you now. I know so many that they stop running for a couple of months because their pet who they had true all kinds of things thick and thin died. So it's not like these things don't happen to us on a regular basis would right as we have a lot more to worry about because we are so active in online because we are so vocal in our voices when we tried to write. And because in many instances we're more out there socially then then a lot of people. Are i know the Writer is here in the dark closet somewhere with a with a candle. And you know the spirit of notre dom on one on there and lincoln. Abraham lincoln is on the other. Hand you over there right in something. That's silly stereotype. Most people are pretty outgoing actually They might be all spoken to and even be a little annoying. I know i've heard that about myself some time so i don't mind call myself out there that way but when that so when that's close to we're not so cliquish and we're and we're not so You know antisocial that we're not gonna have some of these things happen to us and these are some of the ways that i want to bring out on this particular show. That's just so acknowledged that it's out there so acknowledged that you don't have to have some specific form of depression that also have some of the same situations half of your life doesn't have to be formal diagnosis okay. You don't have to have some big latin name and take some drug that has seventeen letters in it or something okay. Sometimes it's just a matter of working it out in yourself and you can be done so check out Many shows talking about this. You can listen to this again. I wrote a book about it Writing his therapy tools to treat trauma. You can pick that up and check it out and it gives you some some lesson plans and some of the things. I do with with veterans. Just stephanie can apply to to other people as well but jolt ignored. Don't tonight please don't make fun of it. All right accept it and work with. You'll have a better life. You know have a happy life more importantly though you get to be who is supposed to be rather than just another victim out there. I'm telling you right now. We don't need anymore. Greg gyms right we we. We need more people like they're saying. Hey i'm beating this in the. But because i'm not gonna take life i'm not gonna let feel my happiness. I'm not gonna have my joy ransom by by some traumatic events from three years ago so with stopping victims and stopping. Victor's right. all right folks. God bless until next time this is mark antony rossi be human. That was episode. Two hundred and ten post traumatic stress disorder in the arts until next time Thank you for listening. Follow the show and support our efforts by visiting our sponsors at www dot strength to be human dot com or purchasing an e book at www dot so my publishing dot com..

Abraham lincoln lincoln depression trauma stephanie mark antony rossi Greg traumatic stress disorder Victor
"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

01:59 min | 4 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"Like that. And i was like yeah. That's right that's it and so i think that that's been the silver lining in that. I think there's finally broad recognition that we need the arts. Secondly i think there was also a reckoning inside of the arts sector both racial reckoning in terms of seeing where's the disproportionate impact happening who has not been traditionally getting the resources getting the leadership positions. And i think that reckoning is about time and is happening and we have to really make those systemic changes happen now so at the end. There's a great opportunity. We had to pause in a sense and really take a look internally at ourselves on a final peace to is i think that there has become a recognition again internally that artists are seeing themselves as laborers an essential workers and that it is okay to proclaim that that doesn't take away the integrity of your work and your creation but that it is really helpful for those of us who are on the front end of trying to get policy to support the sector for them to come with us in raising their voices as their own advocates. And i guess that's the other pieces. I feel like we've had more people engage in advocacy than ever before and hopefully recognizing that it makes a difference if we actually work together. Raise our voices talk about the problems and then offer solutions. We will find those champions. And we can affec- significant change. That was really great. So thank you for sharing the wonderful insights from your work at california's for the arts and your work with the arts and cultural sector will make sure that listeners have your contact information website and social media while with all the links for your advocacy accessorised sign up and all the wonderful resources to california for the arts has out there so please stay safe and healthy as we work our way through what is become a very strange new normal thanks jerked. That's it for this episode voices of the community. You've been listening to the voice of the executive director of california's for the arts..

both Secondly california
"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

05:57 min | 4 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"As our website and there you can see on the front page on the bottom. Right you'll see a way to sign up for email list and then you'll start to get our emails which will alert you to. What are the actions that you can take and that will be in a form of signing onto letters for example are billion dollar budget ask has over five hundred arts organizations businesses mayors mayor. Eric garcetti from los angeles disappointed. The billion dollar asked mayor libby from oakland. Mayors todd gloria from san diego and supportive at the california travel association understanding the relationship of the recovery of tourism. The arts and culture has signed onto our billion dollar ask so as an organization you can sign on an individual you can send a ladder through our template system to your own elected officials saying this is a priority for me to make sure that this industry recovers and even if you're not someone who in it if you're someone who can't wait to get back to a live performance whether it's senior independent. Venue your small theater. You're performing arts center. Whatever it may be you want to support this budget. Ask so that they can come back. They can recover. And it can build sustainability over the next two to four years and then california for the arts is a membership based organization as well right we are. We're actually. We are one of the small budget nonprofit arts organizations ourselves we are hopefully growing. I was the first full time. Staffers hired in this organization in the last two years. We've only recently become a staff organization and we are growing and we're growing because of membership and foundation support and grants and commitment is to keep our programs free because we.

Eric garcetti san diego los angeles todd gloria billion dollar first four years oakland one over five hundred arts last two years california for the arts two california travel association
"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

05:45 min | 4 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"And so we're really working hard to make that case and we've joined in coalition with neva california. Which is a national independent venues association. That is a new organization that kind of came together in this last year of independent venues both for profit and non profits mom and pop shops. Who have been shut down for fourteen months without an ability to earn revenue and the california association of museums and the three of our organizations with california arts advocates have been promoting a billion dollar budget. Ask and within that. There's money for all three aspects of the organizations and people that we represent and we're now real excited because we have five legislative champions pushing this through and bringing this to the attention of leadership we've directly met with the governor's office and we're talking about why this is so critical and we're getting really great. Response june fifteenth when the budget has to be passed here in the state of california. The governor announced it in his may revise some specific things for the arts. He talked about the arts in his budget. Speech which was fantastic to be heard and recognized in that way but we still feel like there's more that needs to be addressed in terms of what was not in that budget so we continue to push for that more hopeful and we ask people who are supportive of the investment to recover the sector and to bill back sustainability and to build equity into this sector to support us in our billion dollar ass. So that's the budget as you mentioned in the end if you want me to quickly talk about a couple pieces of specific legislation and policy that we're working on please do. I mean i noticed. for example on newsome's bump up in may he bumped up the artis core for example the california creative core pilot program was something that the governor introduced in his january budget and it was about fifteen million dollars now in his may revise he has bumped that up to sixty million an expanded the scope of the services that artists would be hired to do so it would be arts in utilizing artists.

fourteen months january last year five legislative champions both sixty million about fifteen million dollars june neva billion dollar three aspects california three of our organizations newsome fifteenth
"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

04:13 min | 4 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"Folks in the arts and creative sector to become advocates for our industry and for our workforce and then just to follow up. Could you share some of the main topics that california's for the arts working. I knew a big piece. Most recently has been the budget because now california has massive amounts of windfall between taxes in its usual form as well as the feds so california's for the arts has been really pushing to lobby the state legislature for more funds for arts and then the other piece of pieces that were really great. Was your policy work around. California artists core the whole idea of artists core or like to call back to the future which is our national theatre effort from the great depression. The new deal right. Well let me also clarify. I'm the executive director of two organizations californians yards through the public awareness side. The education the building of the tool kits in the resources media campaigns. All of those things and then cal. Arts advocates is our direct lobbying organization and that is actually a c. Four where we have a lobbyists and we work to influence legislation and budgets. And so on. So on the korean for the arts side but we do is really to like. I said we built a media campaign around this. We built toolkits advocacy resources and do a lot of programs like regional conversations. We gathered people across nine different regions in california to really understand water. The fields priorities because our policy development. It should only be in Response recognition of what the fields needs. Are we have an amazing board of twenty six people across california who also informed that those regional conversations are really critical to that as you can imagine cove in nineteen has been severely impactful for our sector as you said at the top of the hour. You know it's been fourteen months of being shutdown. Had incredible people doing work to pivot and to do everything to continue to provide the benefits that arts and culture brain into our lives. And i'm so grateful for all of those content creators out there that have been providing that mental health benefits that we've all been needing during this time period but we also know that's near impossible to earn revenue. So essentially for fourteen months. our sector's been without revenue. And what has also happened as you are quite aware that the individual arts workers are unemployed the institutions the organizations. The buildings may still be there but the people who make it work are hanging on and barely hanging on and so our work as advocates and in direct lobbying work is to say this is a sector that had been disproportionately impacted by the effects of the shutdown due to covid nineteen. This is a sector that brings a huge economic benefits to the state of california close to eight percent of the gross state product of california's a creative industries were head of agriculture and transportation or two hundred thirty billion dollar industry in the state of california and we employ over seven hundred fifty thousand workers and so our job is to continually say this is something that needs to be taken seriously and every aspect of the ecosystem needs to be supported. An ecosystem is everything from the individual artists and the arts teachers and the directors and the lighting people in all the aspects of what are the ancillary businesses that supported the caterers the porta potties..

two hundred thirty billion dol fourteen months twenty six people nineteen California eight percent over seven hundred fifty thous two organizations california nine different regions cal c. Four korean californians
"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

03:18 min | 4 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"Your host. This episode is part of our series exploring covid nineteen impact on nonprofits and small businesses in the san francisco bay area back in april of twenty twenty when we decided to create this ongoing series on covid nineteen impact i or nonprofits and then on small businesses in the san francisco bay area. We like you had no idea how long the pandemic would go on. And what. The health and economic impact would be in our community with vaccinations increasing in nineteen cases and deaths decreasing. We're now moving into the summer of twenty twenty one with the reopening of the economy and all of the uncertainty of ever changing indoor and outdoor vaccinated and unvaccinated protocols and politics. That will drive how we all come back together as a unified or fractured community. We will continue to shine a spotlight on the nonprofits and small businesses that make up the fabric of our community along with the founders and staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on their operations services is sustainability until we can all get to the other side of the pandemic along the way we will also share with you all the amazing solutions that are nonprofits. Small businesses foundations and government leaders are working on to help us all get to the other side of the pandemic and come together to rebuild our communities with more economic social and environmental quality. Get some surveys. That really helped to build our case making the impact of what kobe did. We release that with otis report that they do annually on that creative economy and one of the things that showed was that many people were considering leaving the industry and we ended up getting quoted in the new york times. About how if we do not address this potential deficit in this pipeline of creation of new workers. We could be facing a cultural depression in california. And that's part of where i think. Things like the california creative workforce act and this level of investment is so critical for us to really emerge and be that state of creativity. This is the executive director of californians for the arts. Julie baker julia shirts with us. How the covid. Nineteen pandemic is impacting our creative economy and its workforce as well as how californians for the arts is working with arts organizations and the state government to support the recovery of the creative konami. I'm joined remotely by the executive director of californians for the arts julie baker. Thanks for being here julie. Thanks george it's a pleasure to be here. So i think it would be really helpful for the audience if you could provide an overview of what is californians for the arts. And what are your programs my pleasure. So californians through the arts is the statewide our culture and creative industries advocacy organization. And so we worked to increase awareness of the impact of this industry. This workforce on california's economic recovery. In this case since covid nineteen as well social impact our impact on every community in california and really not only engaging and educating policymakers in.

julie california april of twenty twenty nineteen cases george new york julie baker Julie baker san francisco bay californians for the arts one summer of twenty twenty one nineteen pandemic californians impact nineteen nineteen impact konami Nineteen pandemic
"arts" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

Course and Career Chat

04:22 min | 5 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

"It was hot though is very hot. I still have the poterie stuff. Because i handed in. I just had to take orders and send through. Yeah now difficult part of online learning the theory. It was all easy because it was just on my computer but the practical is a little bit more difficult yet. i was still just making. don't love. it helped fill up some time during quarantine sir. That was good as well yeah. It's actually really good. That they persisted. Because i could understand from the taif perspective that potentially could get particularly because during the year we never knew when when things are going to open and all of that could have just sorta parse then united states Sorry guys you're gonna have to do it next year instead kind of thing but i love that they did come up with a different way to go about that and make sure that you could get you certificate by the end of the that was talk about like stopping the caution like finishing it win. Carver was vomit them when they realize that carbon was gonna lost a little bit longer than what we had expected. We just decided to do online. A lot of people did dropping off the Like knowledge is too much work. But i i wanted to get my certificate so i i did it during online learning. Yeah that's awesome. Congratulations for assisting emmanuel. Doing a diploma of visual arts are can you tell us. Firstly the difference between the certificate that you did last year and the deployment and yet what you classes. A lot can have that old wax. Well i'd say the biggest difference between the two is that the diploma offs like a lot. More fear you get a lot more work a lot more stuff to finish in like one term. I'm working on quite a few drawings at the moment for one single assignment like this a lot. More workers into each class. This also most theory. I haven't entitling it dedicated to just the theory side which is good..

next year last year emmanuel two one single assignment one term each class united states Firstly
"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

02:32 min | 10 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"Performing arts organizations independent movie theaters the attribute producers talent representatives and nonprofit museums. It provides grants that could reimburse venues for forty five percent of their losses or ten million. Whichever is less. So where do we go from here. Americans for the arts has been advising joe biden and camera harris on the best way to forge a new partnership between the arts and government and early september. Twenty twenty yards. We least putting creative workers to work a template for arts and government cooperation the template included input from cultural nonprofits and government agencies creative gig workers and independent artist who helped to identify specific goals. At the biden administration can put into effect. Proposed actions include an expansion of existing workforce hiring programs to include artists and creative workers launching a program of federal arts commissions developing an artist core within the americorps continuing cares act policies that extended benefits to the self employed and the creation of a new leadership position to coordinate federal arts policy. The americans for the arts action fund and american for the arts are lobbying the biden harris administration to create a cultural adviser to the president. Who would work to integrate arts into every new policy developed along with working with the private sector to infuse creative workers into their business models if we wonder performing arts to be there on the other side of the pandemic we could go back to the future back in nineteen thirty five. The us had a national commitment to the performing arts and the form of the federal theatre project which was part of the new deal wpa program. The purpose of the federal theatre project was to reemploy theater workers to provide theater to the public for free and to establish theater as a vital asset in the community that would be on the federal program during its short four years of existence. Thirty million people watch twelve hundred productions in two hundred venues from closed-off streets in hospitals to parks and shuddered theaters. The challenge for the incoming administration is to all the players government private industry and the creative community working together to advance their mutual interest and to embrace artists as valuable contributing members of our communities and society. A new year's resolution for the arts would be for the.

biden administration biden harris administration joe biden harris us
"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

04:15 min | 10 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"My next question is really for both of you. Go back to randy in this one to start with so with you. Know the economic and the pandemic and again the five component of what do you feel will be the largest impact on not only artists organizations but also the community itself and then our local. I think that terms of the community itself as they've felt the absence of the things they've come to count on from the arts community that ability to just go out and see a shower or go to gallery so there may be a new appreciation once we reopen and are able to convene again in person for what that meant and the beauty of that. But we know that you don't terms of the people who are working in the cultural sector and everything it's exposed. Even further our vulnerabilities the fact that we're all was working in the margins and then when something like this hits it's catastrophic in so many cases but we're resilient and adaptable bunch and i think it's showing in the way people are responding to this. How will we are. yeah i would. Second third and one positive impact is knowing that we can be inventive and come up with ways to be creative and come to terms with this new reality. Essentially and finding ways to connect and express ourselves in new ways oftentimes from home and still staying active and connected with our arts communities. Thank you so you've both been at this for a while. What are some of the strategies that you've identified in android that you have been working with through foundations and other nonprofits in our local city county of san francisco that we could execute to address the covid nineteen impact on non-profits..

randy san francisco
"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

03:05 min | 10 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"So we were just starting to grapple with that and then cove it hit and i can only describe it as as kind of like a body blow to the sector. You had a number of different things happen immediately. Like performance cancelled. A you know and folks were reeling from the realities of that. They'd already invested a lot in the shows and then Ticket sales were going to materialize and it started playing out in little ways like that but it was also a blow to the community that is used to gathering in person and what was the new reality but and simultaneously everybody was grappling with an on a personal level. So you've got your arts enterprise that you're working on and everything suddenly there's this enormous evil but you've got your personal thing. I'm stuck in my home. And i don't know but this is there was remember those first few weeks for just like i fully don't understand this and then if you're trying to keep things going like we were with intersection because we needed to make sure that the artists and everything we're gonna you know we could get the checks out the door you know. I think we came up with like three different operating scenarios over the weekend before the shelter in place order happened. How are we going to keep things going and everybody experienced that. So it's too profound things happening simultaneously and everybody kinda put away five for a little while. While we grappled with the the larger reality of cova. But it's now coming back into play so it's two viruses at once basically and that's a really good description. So alison since. You're working every day with all of the various individual artists organizations. What are some of the needs that you're seeing that the arts and cultural community can use during the pandemic and economic impact though as randi mentioned the arts sector relies heavily on coming together as a community and being person whether the before performances or workshops or whatever it is not being able to gathering person is a huge shock and you know that oftentimes can reflect their revenue streams as well if they're not selling tickets to performances and whatnot so really just learning new ways to pivot and come up with virtual programming or outdoor programming and finding new ways to stay connected to their constituents and to stay motivated and to stay sane through all of this in state creative and inspired and also financially having to dig into their organizational budgets. And figure out how to make things work during this time. So what we've done to kind of address this and recognize the need for information and resources so we try to keep our products.

cova alison randi
"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

04:34 min | 10 months ago

"arts" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"Gallery program and then the organization had to reinvent in two thousand fourteen and what we did was decide to focus on one of the key things. That had been a through line for intersection. Which is its support of artists in their work. So intersection news dab like a radio show back in the sixties and seventies about opportunities through the bay area and then we were one of the first adopters fiscal sponsorship which is the ability to use an organizations five three extend that used to others who are working for the saint charitable purpose and so that has an a very robust program all through the decades and so when we reinvented we really changed the focus solely to providing artists and cultural workers with resources in order to thrive so we do that through fiscal sponsorship. But we take a more holistic approach. We work with artists who are creating these amazing organizations and they're accidental administrators. And so we really want to help them develop their professional capacities and their ability to raise money right. A compelling pitch for support what is the business model underneath their organization or their individual artist practice so we provide a lot of workshops mentorship coaching technical assistance and really like i said take a holistic approach because it could be pretty lonely when you start out one of these enterprises and then we want to let them know that you there within a community and there's a support system for them thinking. That was great. Allison could you walk us through the artist in organising missions that you work with at intersection for the arts. So we currently have about one hundred fifty seven members who are under frisco sponsor ship. That number is constantly growing and fluctuating and working with artists and arts organizations that use their work in the arts and cultural sector to make a positive impact within their communities so most of them are working with historically underserved populations and then creating and providing access to the arts most are in the bay area. Some projects have a broader reach..

Allison bay area
"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Maybe in the shower in the so. Maybe yes quiet monologues in my office. That's real. I don't know man And i guess i stopped. I stopped a long time ago. Trying to be good at things and just trying to accomplish things as effectively comprehensively possibly. Could i know for myself. I feel i feel most comfortable one. I'm in a space of facilitating something for other people in that. Directing is a former that for me right sort of creating creating a space in a world in pathway in which actors feel confident in telling a very clear store because at the end of the day it is them up there it's not up there on stage welcomes all story. It's their story. It's their care there. Are there at iraq tres. So it's just there to kind of help help them see what they can't see. Yeah and this on the outside. I feel best about my work as a director when people actually don't say anything about my work it's and that it is all it is all about the actors or the story or the integration of the production elements or something right all stuff that definitely. I played a leading role in but nobody is saying. You directed that. So well. Because i feel like they're seeing the quote unquote good direction. And that's not the point of the exercise. I've been in productions as an actor where the director had a very heavy hand a very heavy vision. Yes that perhaps became more production became more about the director's vision story and to me that it tips that balance you know yeah and so as a director i always try very very hard not to go in that direction and again as you said make it about the actors simply being what they need to be in trouble and safe space so i think that's the best approach. I'd much rather do the play than do something to fly at excellent an excellent way to look out yeah. I don't usually find those experiences. So satisfied has often as an audience. Yeah yeah i was gonna say the same thing that it becomes like well. Technical thing is really really cool. But if i'm if i'm left walking out of the theater wondering how they made this particular thing happen they've lost me complete right. I mean if you're gonna if you're gonna go see king kong you know you're going to go for the guerrilla right. And that's that's the point going will be. I will say. I really sad. I missed that one. Because i wanted to see the the guerilla was supposed to be pretty rad. But so you know yeah you shouldn't you shouldn't be walking out of glass menagerie talking about the guerrilla rights. What was it miss saigon and you leave the theater humming the helicopter. I i hadn't heard. W poor leo great so good so as you kind of look back over the last twenty something years. Yeah what surprises have you found. Oh gosh surprises i that i'm that i'm still doing this. Twenty years later. That's that's the biggest. Because i never really i didn't i didn't set out with a master plan really other than to tell some stories and was fortunate enough to have to have the space in the court to figure out what that really meant to me in how i really wanted to do it. A huge thing so surprised. I don't know maybe surprised that were that. Were still having exactly the same conversations now that we were twenty years ago about how we make the community a better place how we make the theater a better place itself you know. Maybe that's a negative surprise. That's that's legitimate. I mean. I think that there are but i think you know. I do think. Set kind of looking back over the history of theater. At least when. I went through undergrad in my history classes. Those have been the conversation surrounding the theater for centuries and that's part of the reason. The theater is here part of the reason. The arts are here on to kind of engage the community as they say. Hold that mirror up to society and kind of show what we see at. The conversation will always be there about how we how we use art to maximize the festive human potential. I don't think that's ever going away because that is the point of art right if we ever. If that conversation never goes away art goes away about know in what way that happens but yeah i guess the the negative surprises that were still soon as like retreading the same ground over and over and over and over yes but but also that there are so many people who want to continue to tread in an industry that is challenging and exclusionary an unforgiving of there are enough people who still want to still look at it and go. You know what. I can fix that. And that's worth me putting myself into that for the most inspirational. I think in the most in the words of that that famous philosopher just keep swimming keeps you just keep swimming license. That's about all we have time for a. Yeah i got two minutes. You gotta go still. Yeah i i really appreciate you sitting down with me. glad fantastic. We have really enjoyed kind of learning about you. And what you do. And how you approach That's been really enlightening. And i really thank you so very much for for being my guinea pig in this first episode. Absolute pleasure anytime brice. Thank you according to americans for the arts so national arts advocacy organization arts nonprofits in wisconsin alone are estimated to have lost over thirty eight million dollars in revenue so far this year related to coronavirus and while the impact on the wisconsin creative economy has been devastating the ripple effect on the surrounding communities that support and are supported by these organizations has yet to be seen in full as brenton. I discussed during our conversation. The more that we as a community can view these organizations not just as entertainment but as community builders and economic drivers. The more will be able to understand their true value. So that's a wrap on season one episode one of nonprofits in java. Thank you again. Brent hazelton for joining me on this test run. You made it incredibly easy. Nonprofits java can be found wherever most podcasts can be found. You can look for new episodes every other monday fingers crossed if you enjoy this conversation. Feel free to subscribe download light comment. Whatever podcast listeners are supposed to do and let me know what you thought. I have a pretty thick skin. You can also me on facebook. Twitter and instagram just search for nonprofits java. And so with that. Thanks for listening. I'm outta here..

iraq swimming wisconsin brice guinea Brent hazelton brenton instagram facebook Twitter
"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"We cannot provide that support to our local. Yeah i mean. I think you're certainly not alone. Oh no the arts. Are i would. I've argued for a while now. The the hardest hit of all of the different kind of nonprofit organizations out there because of the nature of the work they do it all revolves around gatherings of people that we just can't do in the same way so s A lot of other organizations whether it's human services or education you know the zoom call is is certainly much more viable for telehealth or education. And it's not like we said it's it's kind of run its course as a novelty in the The arts community. I think what's what's disturbing to is. It's not just about the arts aren't just about entertainment. They are in many cases as economic dry. I is the community. You know you've got you know people go out to dinner beforehand or they drive into town in park in a parking ramp. I mean there's all of these additional expenses second allowed go along with it evening to the theater or if you go to summer fest store. Any of the cultural festivals. There's so much other income that comes from the arts and arts and humanities organizations that people don't really think about how much Of you know you you mentioned earlier and you know the city of spring green for example. What is the community. Overall gonna do economically without crush of people coming. Every brian got there. You know annual dose of shakespeare in the park. And i think so. It's on an organizational level. It's early huge concern. But i think too that what we need to try and do is shift the mindset that these organizations are in it alone that this is actually a community driving the necessary. It's it's the need for the community to help drive the response to help drive the assistance in the aid to get these. Bring the community back around in terms of infection rates. Interns this all that. We're just not seeing that. Which is very frustrating. Just from a personal level let alone a professional level and so maybe winter is is. Maybe the fact that winter is coming as our savior. Everybody's gonna wanna stay indoors for a change and when they go out. They'll have their scarves over their face any way. Or whatever unfortunately rece- we'll have a crystal ball and could navigate through that true. That friend hewlett splits end on a brighter note. So i mean you had a wealth of experience i mean. I think that's safe to say in terms of arts administration and sort of the the kind of programming you've looked at new play development directing writing so many different things. What are you best out. Oh lord i knew that was coming. And i don't like it for me. I think the job. The job of an assistant director is to create an old space for other artists. And that's i don't know if that's what i'm best apple. That's what i'm trying to be very good at Because that is dead to me is the most important part of the job. All the other stuff sort of boils down in some way to to task But creating in holding space for artists is that that feels like the core of it in that involves everything from defining defining the vision around which that space coalesce right not necessarily just. Hey here's the money to pay for the rehearsal hall like a physical space. But what is the. what is the mission space occupying. What is the The emotional space rocky a company. What conversations re trying to have and crew. Who do we wish to have them with two. We wish to create the about all that all matters should express mission. Yeah i i don't know in terms of individual disciplines. You mentioned if i would pick one. That i feel like is the thing that i'd go to because for me. I learned them all in relation to one another. So it's very hard for me to even view them as separate things i've been. I've been told that. I direct like an actor that i direct like a playwright direct dramaturge. I've been told that. I write like a director that i write like an actor or that. I direct like an administrator. I think that was probably probably a little right there. Yeah but but i. I feel that to me right. That all of the all of the skill sets are related. Insertive interlocking with one another and that it is all about what tools sort of take primacy in terms of storytelling. When i'm i'm reading play. Or conceiving an idea or something like that it's it's it's all of those different perspectives. Come to bear on it simultaneously and sometimes some celebs. It'll it'll be. Oh yes very clearly. I have a super clear vision redirecting. Let's play on. That feels like that just feels like the right fit or sometimes it's you know i really. I understand how this fits into the overall picture of the theater. I think it's a good thing for us to do. And i understand how to facilitate the process but artistically. My voice is nowhere in here which is definitely more of the producing size of sometimes. It's a writing impulse every once in a while. There's still an acting impulse in there. Which i hope never gets realized.

fest store rece hewlett brian apple
"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Stay on your course until it changes in half an hour Sort of laughed about that. Whatever and then sure enough and literally forty forty minutes later we were visited with a very significant change in terms of just information from Our our union producing parker's But sort of made us has to take a step back in reinvasion. A whole lot of things so you know usually are are obstacles in the theater our time and money talk and now it's very interesting to be in a place where those are the obstacles secondary to whatever the current infection rate is and that is really the governing force right now that determines what we are not able to do because that is the governing metric that Most of our labor union partners are using to say. Well not most all are using to say yes you can or no. You may not proceed so it is this. It is very much a limbo state where we're trying to figure out how to generate content how to fulfill our how to advance our mission how to develop our is how to expand in a way that we don't have control over the core elements enough because even if i mean given given where the infection rate is right now. We can't get union members together in the same space to create a planet record it which means that we have to use this soom format or some version of this zoom format which everyone is already done seeing theater. Yes i mean it. The kind of novel thing over the summer to kind of see some of these sort of staged readings more or laos It will call them. Zoom zoom rita ratings rather than the stage necessarily. But yeah and it was kind of an interesting thing. It does only go so far in terms of an audience's attention span the novelty of it and so what is next. I mean how do you how even kind of flow through that we have to we. We have to get artists together in a space somewhere or we have to start learning and purchasing some very expensive virtual production techniques where we are able to create things where it looks like people are in the same space together that that outstrips the capacity of of really any theater. It's just not our thing. It stops being cedar than to becoming television or film or something different right and i think what we're all trying to do right now. Is embraced that different space. We know it's not theater. We know it's definitely not tv. We're not trying to make it film because we're gonna lose that battle every time So what is it. what are we calling it. what is it feel like. what can it be. What is the delivery mechanism and as a way to as a way to tell stories. We've what i'm finding. Is the the more we try to replicate the theatrical experience via zoom. The more points up the fact that has just not so. So what is that other thing. And i think that's everybody's open question right now. So there is a middle ground between zoom and getting actors together on sets in recording them with three cameras. But nobody's found it yet and we need to find it particularly as what winter is coming is a phrase exactly where we lose the ability to even potentially gather people outside but but it really is all right now in many ways it is all moot until we get the pandemic under control because we were at the end of last week in a very very nice position to start gathering people together. The infection rate had been trending downward in milwaukee county. I believe for twenty days. We were at sort of right right around a five or six percent infection rate of which is that five percent market sorta bend the threshold for most of the unions to allow people to come back safely together and the percent of positive tests was also decreasing great. You know the the our numbers under one all these things are really really good this week. Day all this week happened. Yeah the numbers from labor day and the numbers from schools. Being back in session started to hit. And we're just. I mean we. I haven't looked at them yet today. But but everything was trending towards us having the worst infection rates in the country by the end of the week which is wisconsin is is asked right up at the top so communities. Yeah yeah so until we get that under control. We don't have a hope of getting actors together in space together unless we are creating non-equity productions which is you know for those. It was equity contracts signatories. Just not an option unless we break faith with that arrangement which is interested in doing an equity themselves is in a very hard position because they're trying to protect their members to the best of their ability at the same time they're trying to create pathways for their members to get back to work in health insurance weeks because you their own viability is called deeply into question. The longer and longer that actors are out of work just in terms of their ability to sustain their own organization which comes from the dues of working actors. Exactly so yeah. It's a very Very tenuous intentive time for the industry right now. In a way that i think is a little deeper than than runs the current narratives of. Just hey we don't have audiences we're not producing we're hemorrhaging money. So somebody please help us. With contributed support there are many larger Larger and deeper systemic challenges and risks in play particularly given the dissolution of all these governing bodies. If people aren't getting back to work possible which is you know especially for a company like who's who's has had a forty five year mission of supporting local artists. That tells me is we need to be employing as many people as we can right now and making sure they're getting health insurance weeks because that is what that is of the greatest support to local artists. Right now it is. What is providing the most important to our local community because the infection rate is so high right now. We don't have a pathway to do that. So you can directly say that the pandemic is cutting off our ability to advance our mission fed that as a as a producer right as someone who is charged with fulfilling a mission because we are a nonprofit. Non profits are all service. Organizations theaters are no different than service. We provide is based on our state admission supporting local artists. We are we are currently failing our mission because.

"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Now. Structurally and so. I'm kind of curious than so you know we talk about artistic directors kind of in some ways bringing their own stamp tour but also staying the course of the existing organization. So where do you see yourself in her balance. Yeah no it is it is definitely about. It's not about you know sinking the ship and finding another one but just about sort of turning it into different direction and figuring out how to get more people on board I think the the templates in the core program. The company certainly align well with with live professional experienced. You know in terms of a focus as somebody who is from whitewater originally went to school for four years in iowa then promptly came right back to milwaukee and never left My dad's dallas my mom's from kiosk like the is how people and never really as a theater maker for me. The point of the exercise is to is to have an ongoing conversation about the nature of a community with that community. I've never really because of that. Had much of an impulse to freelance. Because i don't know how to have that conversation or even what that conversation is with people who aren't in wisconsin. I'm sure i could figure it out but it's not It's not where. I respond most immediately. it's not where my my heart lives. Certainly i'm sure the people of cincinnati are delightful. I am much less interested in helping them. Build their community than i have milwaukee but it's specifically for me as well about a conversation about this place in this space and wanting it to be it's absolute best self for everybody who lives in it and not not necessarily having that same level of passion for other places right again. I'm sure you know development over time home is where you find it but for me it has always been about about this place at about these people and i've never really been interested in in looking further afield for opportunities because the the need for those sorts of conversations. Here is so great there are. There are so many wonderful things about this city. This is community in this space we share and they're also so many things that are reprehensibly bad and ourself our past the time for them to change that You know it's always talk a lot about about going of where the work is needed. And there's they're looking at america. Now as opposed to four years ago and i think you could make the argument that the work is needed everywhere in terms of developing greater depth of empathy among your average american or your average american community but particularly here where we are so we are so divided and the divides are so deep and they are so long held that that they're almost that they're accepted casually as a part of everyday life in the city. And that's that's the thing that that i think. Our role is artists. Strike is to you know we are the conscience of our communities and it is our role to either say. Hey look over here that thing you see every day let's look at it differently or shine a little more light on. Its you actually see how not okay. It is or to say. Hey look at this picture of what we could be those. Those for me seem to be the two roles particularly of theater artists in the theater is the most. The most democratic of a whole art forms and promise is nothing more than just as space to listen. That brings me to. And i think it brings the conversation naturally to the milwaukee black theatre festival all chamber sponsored. I sent i guess. Is the cup the appropriate word over the summer and just personally as an audience member as a community member was absolutely thrilled to see that develop. I think you know as we talk about a need particularly this year in with a lot of the a lot of that sort of spotlight shining. That's been going on. I applaud chamber for ta- kind of taking the lead in bringing that to our real visible place in the theater community and really look forward to seeing that grow. yes thanks it was It was quick. You know. I think it was from the first conversation i had with and demonte about it. You know from that to actually getting something on the website was three months at the most so it was it was crazy crazy fast and the the chamber staff did an amazing herculean job of course that altogether logistically on the production side but the coolest thing about it for me the thing that we really wanted to make sure we were doing what we set out on. It was to have all the content curated through a black lens right so so there is no because so often particularly well in milwaukee or any theater really since most of them are still white lead even the perspectives of tyler. That wind up on stage are still curated and produced and programmed and marketed. Through very very white went so we wanted to make sure that we didn't ask this time. You and that we as the producing entity said. Hey this is the money we have This is what feels like mission fit for chamber this sort of thing because it's still our first production season but beyond that go to town. What's what's on your mind. What are the stories that you feel like need to be heard right now. Who are the other artists. We need to include and to just begin to. I mean we had. I think forty forty three individual black contributors to that were wonderful farm. Which is i mean. Certainly i think the largest the largest collection of professional black theatre talent that's ever happened in the And we probably could have programmed. Did three or four times over not using any of these same people twice in had it been justin solid. I mean the the depth in the city is incredible and the fact that we only were sort of beginning to scratch the surface without. I think he's really excited or rations gonna take me too me too. I'm really look forward to kind of seeing where vowed trajectory goes and howard influences other companies and opportunities. So i i think it's an important step forward that It'll be really fascinating to kind of watch and see how that progresses hopefully the next time we do it we can get off a screen right. Actually get real human beings together in the same space even if it is just outside. Yeah that's that's certainly the real hope for the next one around and saudi this and so how is chambered dealing with all of this just in the planning in value Kind of organizational structure Yes every day is a A replan or a re-budget or a new version of the season. I mean that's partially true. But it does feel like the The planning and the crisis response and the response to changes into conditions around us are very much ongoing and that there is. There is a new thing to deal with every day. As having a conversation with jim pickering Yesterday afternoon you know about a project were hoping to be able to accomplish in virtual space this year and we we just started talking about all the in flow and changes. You know As he was departing said something like soon..

milwaukee whitewater demonte iowa cincinnati dallas wisconsin america tyler justin howard saudi jim pickering
"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Journey as a coach. Just tell them they're getting something. Well i mean we've certainly had experience in a community with artistic directors. Come and want wanna put their own individual stamp on things without necessarily picking into the audience and their goals and kind of what they want out of the performance decisi and they don't tend to last too long. No it's not. it's not necessarily a bad thing. And that is something that i that i see as a negative sometimes about our arts culture milwaukee is that it is it is a bit less open to a bit less open to change in a bit less difference in a bit less open to experiencing something in a new way. I don't exclusive to milwaukee. I know i personally think that's kind of a midwest thing that we're very very comfortable with what we know and what we want and And that's not necessarily bad but it does also limit limit exposure to new ideas and new experiences. So is trying to find that balances. I think the big challenge in the arts overall from an artistic perspective is how do you. How do you nudge the needle ever so slightly in the direction that you is in our district director would like to see it go and still engaging the audience enough to comfortably come along with you and you know lest we forget that. These are actually nonprofit businesses as opposed to entities that function on the whim of artistic leader. The the board must be factored in as well exact right and what are their expectations. And certainly i was. I think audience members forget this. Sometimes that went artistic. Directors are hired. It's not necessarily well. Not exclusively leave about the strength of artistic programming. It's because there's a fit between that artistic leaders vision and the direction which the board would like the company to go right so so many of those new talk about those artistic leaders who come in and in any community right. This is not limited to milwaukee does not even limited to america. Bud come in and mitch change for the audience too abrupt or too sudden Most of the time. That is a change that has been sanctioned ended courage by board of directors through that hiring process so i always sort of feel in in many of those occasions that the artistic director started getting hung out to dry a little bit particularly if it's someone who's new to the community particularly if it's someone who's new to the company Because there are those expectations to as you say. Put your staff off it right out of the gate and in many ways the only way the contextual lens through which that stamp is measured is whatever the boards instruction has and if if the board gets instruction wrong. The boards not gonna suffer. They're just gonna hire somebody else. It's going to be artistic leader. Who suffers because that face of the organization the kind of feel the brunt of it. All right so yeah. It isn't very. It is very very careful thing to be negotiated. And i will say it's in some ways easy for me to say because i'm i'm holding this position right now but i do think chambers negotiated it carefully and thoughtfully and slowly and with the the right asking the right sort of questions as it went and making sure that they they found someone that they felt matched where they wanted to see the company. Go which is it. We forget that. So much boards are the caretakers in the stewards of these things. And the company's old the company will only go as far as the board wishes really glad to hear all of this because i think there there are some really truly amazing boards out there and anybody that works in the sector concern leave has their opinions on kind of where they may might be but to hear this kind of confidence and home in in the board and its actions and the process of their is really really glad to hear. It's really reaffirming. Because i think that there are there are so many boards Don't quite understand the Exactly what you were talking about. The the kind of control and oversight we get a lot of you know we see a lot of board members who are there as a result of sort of their job for profit businesses community engagement requirements. We need you to sit on so many boards or the subsidy or that committee and they are there as a responsibility to somebody else not to the organization and so the investment is a strong or takes a while to build and we see that far too often so to hear that chamber theatre is Kind of moving in that correct path of engagement underinvestment in the organization is just really really reassuring and it is. I can't stress enough. It's all it's lead from the board and the board is great. I mean to say it sounds like a speaking in my own professional self interest here. But it's true i mean they. They approach questions thoughtfully There is very little individual ego in the room. Right like we. We don't really have these conversations where there are two or three trustees who are sort of sticking their foot in the ground. Because i wanted this way The conversations are always very much about what is what is in the best interest of longevity of the company. How how can we live our mission as fully as possible and the thing is artistic leader that i always find most inspiring is whenever i venture an idea. They're almost invariably the question. Someone in the room asks right out of the gate is that sounds great. Is that as far as you want to go with that. That's such a great position to be in as you know as opposed to continually venturing ideas in having the least interesting twenty five percent of them be the parts latched onto or forward it to be space of of really frankly a brave and courageous open-minded philanthropists is is really tremendous as say philanthropist is not necessarily a financial right because there is there are certainly the philanthropy of advocacy which is more important in many ways now wrote so it's yeah it's a really a Very fortunate to be to be in the situation right.

milwaukee midwest mitch Bud chambers america
"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

Nonprofits & Java

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"arts" Discussed on Nonprofits & Java

"Hello this is bryce lord. Welcome to the very first episode of nonprofits java before we begin. I'd like to take a moment and thank you for joining me as i step outside my comfort zone into this world of podcasting. So he's nice to have a few friends along. As you explore the changing world around you nonprofits and java evolved from an idea i had while working from home in this covid nineteen quarantine to socially distance madness. Were living at right now. I realized very quickly that there were many aspects of my day to day that i could very easily accomplished from home. I didn't need to be in my office to get most everything done however what was missing turned out to be a very important part of my day is a big part of my work involves connecting to the community and learning more about. What's on in the nonprofit community organizing sort of grassroots movement world. Not just in my home of milwaukee but around the state of wisconsin my colleagues or my friends and i would sit down in a coffee shop somewhere and compare notes on what was going on in their world. What was going on in mind and learn more about the community around us. The really rewarding part of the whole thing to see the spark in their eyes and hear the lift their voices as the passion behind what they do. Start to kick in. So i've invited a number of my friends. From all different walks of the social world the arts public health social justice philanthropy and more to sit down for now in a virtual coffee shop and reconnect and find out what we can learn what you can learn as we explore the passion behind the communities. We live at so without further delay. Let's get the show on the road. Being the leader of performing arts organization during the ongoing pandemic is not for the faint of heart the inability to engage in audience in ways that they're used to or in the ways that the actors are used to is a challenge that affects every performing arts community around the state. My guest today has been active in the milwaukee theatre seeing for over twenty years in a variety of different capacities. Starting out as a fledgling professional actor to his relatively new position as the artistic director of an organization that is considered by many to be a cornerstone of the milwaukee theatre community. Brent hazelton joins me to talk about his career moving into his new role hot on the heels of the international pandemic and how he is maneuvering within this new environment. At milwaukee chamber theatre so hey brent hiroo great our you. i'm all right. I'm all right. It's good to good to talk with you all. It's been a long time so we first met. Could god almost twenty years ago. I think that has to be right back in the boulevard theatre day. Yeah back when. I was trying to be an actor which thankfully only like seven people in the world. Still remember right now. You know what i have to say. I don't i remember that good. That's great darn it. Why bring it up man. Now now everybody in the world is going to want to see you on stage again but jen no. There's there's some vhs recordings the world probably never needs to see betamax and all that all i am hot as you pretty quickly switched directing not not all that quickly really. I mean i started as an actor Had the really really good fortune to do the acting internship at milwaukee rep right out of undergrad and sort of realized that that taught me How far. I had to go in order to do that. Work as well as i wanted to do it right. I mean you know. Being spending time around those masters of their craft just sort of realizing like oh yeah way far away from that and just thinking about the the amount of work that i had to put in relative to what the emotional pay off of that was going to be Did not releasing to add up for me. So i you know i tried for a couple years because that's what i was supposed to do when we're figuring things out and i remember Jane clear at in tandem. offered me Role in play apartment. Three jeff daniels. The norman moses was directing with a bush and tom bruno day ferry internet out to be really really great experience. The last play. That all the second to last that admit being in. But i remember when when chris offered me the role hang up the phone and being like yes they offered humane than like. Oh but now. I have to do it and then just sort of realizing like a moral obligation than like a passionate or a love at this point. This is the thing that everybody thinks. I'm supposed to be doing but it's is not what i wanna do anymore. And had at the time the luxury of having an administrative assistant job at the rap corrigan with johannes had morgan and sandy ernst's succeeded. A van van grid in that position is now managing director Clearly a good gig in ameri camero cammarata was in before kerry But you know that that really helped. Keep me in the theater. It kept me engaged. Very high level of theater While being able to use his skills that it really nicely and in theater admin was an immediate like. Oh this is where the fit is And it was did that for a few years and it was only after maybe three or four years of doing that that there was sort of an artistic that came up again started directing started writing a little bit started. Traumatized game Exploring the literary management side and. That's that i guess that exploration is still ongoing in one way or another. I'm curious when you. I've kind of been through degrees of that. But when you you start out with your mindset that you're going to be one thing that actor you come out of school prepared for this pass and then you realize that that's not the right pass i mean. How do you cope with that kind of change or was it just really something that you immediately came to terms. Where so or was there. Was there a disappointment or no. It was pretty easy for me absolutely. i felt. I felt grateful to have Another vehicle that. I could channel a love connection and a passion for the theatre into You know if i had a i don't know move to chicago or something right after. The internship tried to be enactor down there and not had any opportunities for a couple years while working a job that i did not really like to try to support that. I honestly i think about i think about where i and my life might be now. Had that been the path and it really frankly scares me Can i don't know where i'd be. But i had a really like i said before a really good graceful opportunity to transition away from acting While still remaining deeply connected to the theater so it was. It was a tremendous gift of and Of berry very smooth transition. I had i had four years to kind of figure out where the artistic impulse lived to. No one is afforded that kind of opportunity while actually having a career in the theater. So i feel remarkably fortunate to have had that opportunity to.

bryce lord milwaukee theatre community Brent hazelton milwaukee milwaukee chamber theatre brent hiroo boulevard theatre milwaukee rep norman moses tom bruno sandy ernst wisconsin ameri camero cammarata jeff daniels jen van van johannes Jane bush chris