36 Burst results for "Arthur"

Fresh update on "arthur" discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

Can I Pet Your Dog?

00:55 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "arthur" discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

"I or I think he maybe he does it on purpose because he wants to feel like somebody's like everything this house touches your. No there's a reason and what is this Simba? Name Leila. Yeah. Right, now Dr.. Actually because it really does not like the dog. So I feel like I always feel as twins, which is be like listen. You know. Very very kind very generous but now I wanNA custom made one for you I. Think. The Rights. To the point where could we? Could we try that? Well, because I want to do, it's time for name that. Wanted to do is what dog is John Travolta Cher and Jennifer Hudson. Okay he didn't know the breeds that they are and we will also do well, we'll give you the name that doc. So basically, you have to give us four. Okay. Great. All right. Well, definitely share is a labrador going with that. Right? Isn't that herm? Exactly Those ears back again. I kind of and I feel like I'm putting Jennifer Hudson, because she's she is I'm thinking I'm specifically thinking of her as an dreamgirls right so I'm GonNa put her as a poodle I. Love It. 'cause dream girl she's like ME. I'm. Does at John Travolta. Okay John Travolta's the tricky wide. Because, it needs like I'm trying to think. I think I. Can I give mine? Dark. 'cause he's he's got a lot of bark fighting. But he's not like Tahoe. That like a lapdog but. Right yeah, totally. Yeah, and just really struck me on the street so that that's what I was trying to think like who's got he's got to be able to Strut his core in worker. Oh Yeah. I kinda think thinking that because then I'm also thinking like when you put him in address, it just looks awkward like in harassed I you know and it would it'd be like Mrs Sally. What are we doing? Your? Pool. In that. CAST US at. That's right. I love it I. Love it so much. Okay. So now next time on this and your dream dogs. So we want a dog super friendly. OSCO or also can meet its name Osso that'd be. Down options. To. So obviously for friendly we got Golden Retriever, and then for our chill out, Alexis would you say my personal experience of a chill out documents nothing to do with me is a king. Charles Spaniel. Also could be a pug. Which? Is Our chill-out dog that we're. Together, Charles Spaniel just because. I love those little faces. Okay. So basically. Short. From Lady and the trim. Cocker Spaniels get of course. Also sidebar I don't know if you've seen the new live action lady and the tramp. Disney. Plus. It's shuttle good chefs. It's so good. So surprisingly good. Coming should have been released in theaters. Sorry, Dumbo. thinking it was so good aid. To the voice acting terrific like funny. I still finding out loud a few times absolutely because a lot of the usually the Disney remakes dislike. But why this one was perfectly on and also because originally the tramp has a very awkward song about me's and this. It we needed to Redo it hit the reset button CGI CAJAL Disney. Couldn't agree more when he got. A golden retriever and Cocker Spaniel mix right. Now Is. What it looks like a golden retriever with long curly ears. Retriever long, curly ears, it's a boy. What do we name in this dog? OSCO. I mean you already gave it away. Why are you asking a already told you? This IS I. Drank and say. Hey Miracles happen the. Appear Are we to question them you're. Right. It's amazing. And So it's great because it's just its own thing such an original Oscar. Yes, it's very raven claw its very raven claw goes to that's it. I'm circling back putting a pin in it Osco Guy, what are you gonna Put my vision board. Goes what does it look like on Your Vision Board Oh Yeah I could take it down. We can't take it down can. Take a picture and then take A. Listen. We're getting. It does seem like we said prove it. We believe you that there's just. GonNa get what else? Let's take. because. I see? White Dog. Really on I. L. Perfect Yeah I don't know what kind of dog it is but. It's a good on medium size. Oscar Oscar Wilde. Come home. With the. Get over there. Now that we could go another five more hours talking about vision boards, but again I did. You. Got Your actually now, he's like it's that time when the party or like Oh man gotta got up early. Like. He's To play apples apples. turned. Music off. Exactly, hosts have gotten into their pajamas. You've done all the dishes already. Figured out the Karaoke machine we. Just figured. You even pre major morning smoothie and. You're just literally like well, there's nothing I can do. A Vision Board Great. I've had the time of my life like this been a dream come. True. We love you so much I couldn't imagine that we've got a pretty big overlap that everybody is already so super fan of you but can you please tell everybody where they can find you? Oh, my goodness I'm well, if you go to and James Arthur dot com, it's a one stop shop for all the goodies. That is me I'm bites the biggest thing is Associated maximum fund listener..

John Travolta Herm Oscar Oscar Wilde Disney John Travolta Cher Jennifer Hudson Charles Spaniel Leila Mrs Sally Cocker Spaniels Osso Alexis James Arthur Tahoe
And They Will Inherit It

Latino USA

03:31 min | 4 d ago

And They Will Inherit It

"The film, salt of the Earth was made only a year or so after the strike and released in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, it tells the story of our group of Mexican American miners to Ghana. Powerful mining company to demand their rights their fifteen month long strike includes some unexpected heroes and we'll explain that soon. But I you need to understand how radical the film was for the Nineteen Fifties. Politicians at the time were determined to root out secret communists from Hollywood. There were even public interrogation of filmmakers. Are you now have you ever been a member of the? Communist Party, this is audio of the interrogation of filmmaker Herbert Bieber Bearman in front of the House UNAMERICAN activities committee. To use this to. The motion, picture industry and. The Right? Not only be be Berman ended up serving time in prison and was blacklisted in Hollywood because of his suspected communist sympathies, and then he made salt of the Earth along with two other men who also been blacklisted. It seems pretty clear that salt of the Earth was an act of defiance. The government had sanctioned the filmmakers for his sympathies. So they made a movie that was unapologetically leftist. In one thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, four, the film was so controversial, only a few theaters across the US would show it. Salt of the Earth was essentially buried from public sight for decades. But in one thousand, nine, hundred seventies, she gano and feminist movements embraced the Phil. They saw it as an example of what social justice movements could actually look like. In two, thousand, eighteen producer. Traveled to Grant County New Mexico to uncover the story of what would come to be called the Empire Zinc strike. He wanted to find out how is sleepy mining town erupted into protest, and if almost seventy years later, anyone still remembers Sayer give them is going to take it from here. Before I tell you about what things are like in county. Now, I'm GonNa, tell you the story about how things were and we're going to start with our to Florida's. He was an important figure in the empire's ING strikes. Please come in. Thank you. My Dad Arthur. Florida's one hundred years old. One of the first. President Sir Locally. Local. Late Ninety is the name of the miners union in Grant County. By the way, we're going to hear about it a lot and our to Florida's was a union leader there in the nineteen fifties. Here, it's OK. Okay. I ever I have no problem with talking. Hundred. Be. Dumb. You're doing just fine. Sits in a wheelchair. His thin silver hair is neatly combed. His son. Larry leaves out a set of old photographs on the table. Here's head. Here's some of the actors from the movie, Clint Man Walking Out of the Union Hall Women Flannels and big brimmed hats smiling triumphantly at the camera. There's two is a full head of thick black hair. The photo is labeled local eight, Ninety Activists Nineteen fifty-three.

Florida Hollywood Sayer Ghana Communist Party Herbert Bieber Bearman Grant County New Mexico Miners Union Berman Grant County Union Hall Women Flannels United States Gano Clint Man Larry Producer Arthur President Trump
Harry & Meghan Called Whiny Brats

Daily Pop

05:11 min | Last week

Harry & Meghan Called Whiny Brats

"Hey guys happy Monday and welcome to daily pop. I mean a- Parker joined by so my favorite. Silvester Aunt Victor Cruz A. You know we are going to go in this morning. Because someone is calling, Harry and Meghan tone death, whiny Brat S-. That person of course is Pierce Morgan who else pierce like the rest of US got a first look at the new book about the royals called finding freedom. It's a very personal and intimate look at their lives, and in today's Daily Mail Pierces the book. Confirms Up There Rawls, most that they are the world's most tone-deaf, hypocritical, narcissistic, deluded whiny Brat long to say. Do you guys agree with his assessment? Not even close not even close when you look at Harry and Meghan. You have to understand this okay. The royal family didn't work I. Think I think Harry First of all was just. He's a person that likes to spread his wings. He likes to do what he wants to do. And it just so happens that he found a partner that is rotten with him and wants to do the things he wants to do so look. They separated from the Royal Family I. Get it, but they still got to bring in the coin. So of course they're going to drop a book. Of course, it's going to be things about their their intimate parts of their life. That's going to be in the book. It has to sell copies, but do I think they're whining brats, because they're kind of letting people in into their loz little bit absolutely not coming from someone who has a New York Times bestselling book myself. You can go pick it up at Barnes and noble. You can. This is what you have to do to. You gotta give people a little bit of something personal so that they can go in and buy your book. That's what this is all about well I. I brought I bought. Cruise Control Victor and there was nothing personal in it, okay? We'll let me just. A REP from hearing. Megan told us that they did not contribute to the book. So this is not fair book. This is an author that claims that they spoke to over one hundred sources, which is how they got such personal information, so the book is about them, but they didn't write it. The sources gave them all the information from today's Arthur. First of all. Nina, you know as well as I. Know working in this business. We know that every celebrity has a few henchmen. You know my name on it I. Don't want to get my hands dirty, but wouldn't it be crazy if you're over? At TMZ found out about this personal detail. Look the thing is I do ride for Megan Harry? Understand everything that's going on with them, and I feel bad for them. However, the one thing that was missing in this book was them taking accountability for at least one thing. That's the only problem I have with. This I could see where they felt like they were trapped. I could see where they felt like they had been turned against, but they're just not taking accountability for anything at all. It's not their book. It's not their book. How do they take accountability for something? They didn't right. Come on, come on. Kirk five written. Book. Does like her five germ ability. If you decide to write something about my life, I don't have to take accountability for anything. It's not my book. You wrote it. But it's there. It's still going to come out and it's still going to be things in there that are probably true and depending on what those are. They should probably own up to a couple of those, and it's not anything wrong or anything bad about them. They're living their own lives right now. They're doing what they wanted to drink, so I wouldn't mind owning up to one. Maybe two of those things that are being said is. Is a lot because they don't want to go. This traditional route and I also think that there is a huge disconnect with how it relates to a lot of this because she's American because she's a celebrity from America and she had a different way of life, and also because she's a black woman, and I feel like there's been a lot of insensitivity to hurt that regard for how she's been treated in the press the way. Way that she's been treated compared to everybody else has been completely different because they didn't have to deal with a lot of the same type of headlines that she did. She felt very triggered by the way that she was treated by a lot of the press in Britain, because of the fact that a lot of it was race baiting a lot of it was. You know saying things that were really offensive to her, so of course. Course she's very defensive when she's dealing with that. And then also the fact that she was very popular coming over there, and so they were saying that she was kind of taking over for him, because she she was more popular than K., and that's to be expected so a lot of it, not that it's not her fault, but it's like look if my light is shining bright and this overshadowing. You said you'll came up, don't. Know Tena. Not that Nina I totally get it at the same time. If you're walking into institution that's been built for hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of years. Sometimes, you gotta learn the ropes before you start stepping out before you get crazy now. Not saying what she did was wrong I just would have played my game a little bit slower. I would follow. Call before jumping ship and surprising and enrolling up on the que-, being like hey, all we hear from Canada. Talked about Leonardo's. Popularity grew like that. It's not her fault that the attention came to her the way it did when she got there. It wasn't her fault, and it's not that she linked up with Harry who was riding with her, and it was like you know what we're doing this on our own less rocker

Megan Harry Silvester Aunt Victor Cruz A. Meghan Nina Pierce Morgan Harry First Rawls United States Parker Royal Family New York Times Bestselling Partner Canada Barnes Leonardo Kirk America Britain
How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | Last week

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC Radiation Effects Research Fou Technician United States Abc City Us Navy Yoshii Nagasaki Dennis Normal Dennis Arthur Hiroshima Nagasaki ARI Virginia Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese Rrf Inc Hauer Nargis
BadPower Vulnerability In Fast Chargers Might Make Phones Halt And Catch Fire

Daily Tech News Show

03:01 min | Last week

BadPower Vulnerability In Fast Chargers Might Make Phones Halt And Catch Fire

"Right. Let's talk a little bit more about that. Multi phone thing I would keep talking about. All right, let's security researchers at ten cents Genre lab publish published a vulnerability in the firmware for fast charges that could lead to melting components or fires or other damage, fast chargers detect how much voltage device can handle and deliver the maximum safe amount bad power as they call the exploit tricks. The firmware into delivering more volts than is safe, an attacker would need. Need physical access to the charger for a few seconds or infect a smartphone or laptop, then infects the Charger Sean Wu's team tested thirty-five chargers and found eighteen of them were indeed vulnerable John Woo. contacted all affected vendors, however, eighteen of thirty, four fast charging chips analyzed couldn't be flashed with new firmware. Yeah, this is this is only for messing with people. Could turn into a vulnerability that that gets data somehow I suppose, but for the moment it's just a way to break phones Amanda Suppose, there might be some spy tactic where you want to stop someone from from contacting someone so you hack charged to melt their phone or something. But but there are also people who like to cause grief and that's. You know probably were this would would come about Tricia D. do you think this is something you're worried about? I'm not personally worried about it, but I totally see like. If we're going to put the tin foil hat on for just a second, I can totally see a major corporation sending people out to try to exploited all the chargers of a competitor, so they can be like us. The note seven all over again to bed. Your phone stink at Arthur awesome, but it was really like the secret conspiracy. Just hack all of their charters. Some cut corporate espionage. That makes total sense. What else would it be used for besides just trying to be a jerk, and the fact that that this like or like injuring someone legitimately injuring? Yeah, because it could cause a fire so you could you know? You might plan to cause a fire and maybe burn down somebody's house with us and there's a bad stuff you could do. I was not too worried about it when it said it could only. have access to the charter that that's easier to keep control. Other people leave bags out and stuff so normal rules apply there, but when I when they said it could be. Done through a militias. Phone Then it became something that I think more people have to guard against again. Best practices a don't download things on your phone from sources. You're not absolutely sure of apply just like any other kind of Malware I. Don't think you would see people doing this too often. And hopefully the folks who make these chargers will mitigate them, but it is disconcerting that some of the chips can't even be patched. So, if you have a fast charger, you might want to look up that vendor list and maybe replace your charger. And Update firmware church, or in some cases as well.

Amanda Suppose Sean Wu Tricia D. Arthur John Woo.
Yannick Noah Interview

The Tennis Podcast

05:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Yannick Noah Interview

"We've had a week off and. Has Gone to get his haircuts. Catherine's been hanging out with Magnus. The dog I've been stressing about my football team west from job in as they try to throw promotion away. That may or may not mean something to you, and we will be back with tennis podcasts over the coming weeks and months altogether chat in as we normally do, but today we have a very very special interview with the French Open champion of nineteen eighty-three, the world's number three as his highest ranking, but that really doesn't tell the story of Yannick who is unquestionably the coolest man I have ever met Davis Cup winning captain. Three Times Fed Cup winning captain as well and had a hugely successful music career. Once his tennis stays had come to an end I had the chance to meet him just over twenty years ago when he joined the champions tour. Tour retired players who just traveled to will played matches against one another him and John McEnroe and beyond bog, and all these greats of the game, and just got to know him a little bit at that time. He was always suggest to me. I haven't seen him for about ten years, but I managed to get in contact with him through a couple of other people when we were researching and trying to set up interviews full at tennis, relived series, particularly the French Open, so that we could tell that story, and you'll have heard an excerpt perhaps of this interview when we covered his run to that nineteen, eighty three French Open title, but the entire interview. It's just joy, and it will improve your mood, and if you do enjoy the into you tell your friends family, let your social media, and what's that group's now about it because it will just leave them happier than when they started listening to. It has Yannick Noah. I'd like to go right back to the beginning of your of your career, and even before your career and the reason for your career and. I believe a meeting with Arthur Ashe. Yep Absolutely. Our used to leave the group in Cameroon, Africa and We were I was playing detail club tennis was. Not, very, big in Cameroon in the whole country, back nine court, so to play tennis was very privilege radio privilege so. so we used to go to the club at night, but at that time my parents couldn't afford a racket in one day. When I heard that? Some Americans were coming to the club saw. Americans you know so. So Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell, Tom, ochre, and Arthur Ashe where doing tour in Africa. And they happen to play one day my club. During the clinic they decide. They played with the kids. And I played with Sir and Liked what he saw. I was slim press. You know he was my heroes. At the end of the clinic gave me a racket is racket. Head competition that worth like. Probably Probably what my parents would making every month. and it was you know it was like a dream for me to meeting. Dr Racket Sonya poster. Saying To Yannick I hope I'll see one that. So that was very funny. But the next thing that happened is after this story went to the French Open and he talked to shut. It was the president of the Federation. I told him that he was a little kid was playing. Or was in French. Speaking. Country and And I I. The scholarship came to friends because of author I played in niece for few years. And? The first time I played in Wimbledon That was nine years after we met was in Wimbledon because as for wild card. That was accepted and we play doubles on center court. So that was a beautiful story, so yes, the so mean Africa. And he was a big part of my story. Because and after that you know. For some reason, he was always like you know. Not Too far helping me when I was younger growing up, and then you know played with him at Wimbledon, the first tournament. Back in the days. It was called Super Seris. I was playing Richmond Virginia where he was born. And that was the first tournament I one. Super Series and As I was you know going through the tournament semifinal quarterfinals? Semifinals Playing Roscoe Tanner and these gentlemen comes into locker room sold demand. It comes. It goes Yanic if you win. Arthur is coming tomorrow SEO really worrisome. Is Dad. So that was that was something I beat Roscoe and An author flew to Richmond I played Yvonne in the finals. Won The won. It and Arthur gave me the cup in his hometown, so that was really special.

Arthur Ashe Yannick Noah Tennis Africa Dr Racket Sonya John Mcenroe Cameroon Roscoe Tanner Catherine Football Richmond Davis Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell Richmond Virginia President Trump Yvonne TOM
The Dark Side of Enlightenment

Detective Trapp

03:51 min | Last month

The Dark Side of Enlightenment

"It was march. Two thousand nine, and in a big chain hotel in New Jersey a crowd milled around waiting. Once the doors opened everyone headed for the same place. It was launched auditory with a big stage in front. The event was called the harmonic wealth weekend, a rigorous two day seminar that promised to get participants on the fast track to personal and professional success. It wasn't the kind of thing ginny. Brown was normally into. A daughter Kirby had insisted that they go together. As they walked in, she had to admit the atmosphere was exciting. And we had to walk through a gauntlet I will say a cheerleaders who were jumping up and down reading up the energy in the room and. I remember saying to one woman man you. You girls really had your coffee this morning and she said to me Oh. We don't drink coffee like that's poison Oh. Okay well I do I love it. As everyone took their seats. The lights dimmed. James Arthur Ray stepped onto the stage and began a version of a speech. He often gave. Let's talk about what's changing right now? In your world, you see I firmly believe that you live in the most exciting time in our world history. Time where scientists spirituality are realizing that their sister studies. James was tanned with a bright white smile, wearing a bright white shirt. Pretty Trim Athletic Build. Daily good-looking just can't get going in the morning with on conflict. Give me a fricken break. Total Command of the audience people laughed. They nodded their heads. Like yeah, you know that higher energy kind of environment is just kind of fun you. You WanNa. Be Part of it. You WanNa belong. You don't WanNa. STAND DOWN AND BE! Kind of against what's going on? Because James Ray was a star. Law of attraction says like attracts like an as you lock your attention upon that then another particle, which is in harmony with is attracted and another attack. Another enough bang. You've got a Mercedes. onstage he talked about reflecting on yourself and your position in life. Then, he began to pull audience members onto the stage and ask them questions. And I'd like to have for two volunteers to help me out here. I need a couple of volunteers. Okay, come on, both come on up. Give him a hand. Give Up. First Jimmy was impressed I was fascinated by his ability to really read someone. Who Read people really well? But as she watched, something began to Nag at her. There are a couple of times where he brought people up on the stage, and had them reveal very deep, personal troubling. Things in their life. Ginny is a clinical social worker and I sat there thinking. was trained therapists. Those are the kinds of questions I would ask. If someone was sitting in my office, not in front of hundreds of people I was both fascinated and uncomfortable. She turned to her daughter, Kirby who was mesmerized. Just said you know that's you know that's. That's really not such. A great thing to do. But Kirby was focused on James, Kirby was in her late thirties and had bounced around careers and relationships. She wanted more success and stability in her life. Jennie knew that Kirby had been doing her own soul searching and the James Teachings had already helped, and she was going to stay there to get the most out of the experience whether she believed everything for not. But neither of US ever thought. He was dangerous.

James Arthur Ray Kirby Ginny New Jersey Wanna Brown Jennie United States Jimmy Mercedes.
New York City Opens Some Streets to Outdoor Dining on the Weekends

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | Last month

New York City Opens Some Streets to Outdoor Dining on the Weekends

"City streets will be turned over to restaurants on Friday nights and weekends Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. Fifth Avenue in in Park Park Slope, Slope, Little Little Italy. Italy. Mulberry Mulberry Street Street here here in in Manhattan. Manhattan. Think Think about about what what is is possible possible Dining Dining streets streets in in all all five five boroughs boroughs with with more more to to come, come, the the mayor mayor doubling doubling down on outdoor dining because for now, indoor dining just isn't possible. Al

Park Park Slope Little Little Italy Manhattan Italy
New York City Opens Some Streets to Outdoor Dining on the Weekends

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:06 min | Last month

New York City Opens Some Streets to Outdoor Dining on the Weekends

"To pandemic re opening, many parents think too much time has been spent on thinking through how to reopen restaurants and and bars bars will will not not enough enough effort effort has has been been spent spent on on getting getting school's school's open open again again in in the the fall. fall. Mayor Mayor DiBlasio, DiBlasio, who who hesitated hesitated to to close close the the schools schools when when the the pandemic pandemic hit, hit, says says they they will will re re open open in in the the fall. fall. With With mandatory mandatory face coverings and other precautions. Schools will be opening in September. Mayor De Blasio says face coverings will be required handwashing stations deep cleaning in schools and using every space inside for schools that cannot accommodate all their kids. By definition, some kind of staggered schedule. That piece will be determined with the school's that's ongoing conversation with the unions. The mayor, also announcing 22 city streets will be turned over to restaurants on Friday nights and weekends Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. Fifth Avenue in Park Slope, Little Italy, Mulberry Street here in Manhattan. Think about what is possible Dining streets in all five boroughs with more to come, the mayor doubling down on outdoor dining because for now, indoor dining just isn't possible. Al Jones 10 10 wins news.

Mayor Mayor Diblasio Mayor De Blasio Al Jones Park Slope Little Italy Manhattan
New York City Plans to Open Public Schools in September, Mayor Says

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:04 min | Last month

New York City Plans to Open Public Schools in September, Mayor Says

"Until further notice. You're fancy romantic dinner will have to remain outside. And as of this fall, your Children will be able to hold regular class inside. That's the word from Mayor de Blasio today at his news briefing, to bring everybody up to speed on what we're doing, as the city continues this reopening The biggest takeaway is that the so called three R's reading writing arithmetic will resume. Another are as safely as possible. Come September. Here's Al Jones School will start this fall, and the mayor says a Department of Education survey of nearly half a 1,000,000 families wants it in person. 75% of our New York City public school parents want to send their kids back to school in September. They feel ready now. The mayor says all students and staff will be wearing masks. There will be handwashing stations and deep cleaning of schools. Staggered schedules will be worked out on a school by school basis. The mayor's also doubling down on outdoor dining. Starting this weekend, 22 Open Street will also have open restaurants on the streets in all five boroughs like Arthur Avenue in the Bronx, Mulberry in Little Italy and Fifth Avenue in Park Slope, with many more to

Mayor De Blasio Al Jones School New York City Park Slope Bronx Little Italy Department Of Education
Washington DC - Fairfax, Pr. William county schools named for Confederate generals to be renamed

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | Last month

Washington DC - Fairfax, Pr. William county schools named for Confederate generals to be renamed

"Referencing Confederate General Stonewall Jackson will be removed from two local schools in Manassas before the start of this coming school year and replaced with new names approved just last night, But the Prince William County School board, Stonewall Middle School was renamed Unity. Braxton, Middle in honor of Celestine and Carol Braxton. Celestine was a longtime county teacher. Her husband, Carroll was one of the first black men to enlist in the Marine Corps. They made it their life's mission to serve and lift others as teachers and as defenders of those who needed defending. Their efforts made the world a better place board member Jennifer Wall. Also Stonewall Jackson High School will become unity. Reid hi to recognize much loved school security assistance. Arthur Reed board member Lisa's Argha Poor. I have a feeling with Mr Reed, his memory and his character going to live on in the students of this school. Both votes were unanimous.

Stonewall Jackson High School Stonewall Jackson Prince William County School Celestine Carol Braxton Mr Reed Manassas Arthur Reed Jennifer Wall Marine Corps Carroll Reid Lisa
Atheist Experience with Matt Dillahunty & Shannon Q: Nephilim

The Atheist Experience

09:07 min | Last month

Atheist Experience with Matt Dillahunty & Shannon Q: Nephilim

"Earl in New York. If you click a button is there early, new. York has proof of the Netflix Mural Shaniqua and matt. How're you? How are you doing well? Happy Father's Day to you that I'm not a father. I, am a mother or so. I've been told many many many many. Many Times. General but. Yeah so I believe I have information in popular evidence of Methuselah Aka giants as about in the Bible. Okay? What is your evidence now? Don't get triggered now. Don't get triggered that because it does have a lot of a fight, Bible references. that. Bible references don't trigger me, but I'm interested. If Bible references are so also earn evidence like a well I. mean that's sort of confusing me. Because like in my mind, the way I see it is no somebody wrote a letter back in the day and has the name. Well different from the Bible that has like no real Arthur's or you know energy. Don't know who will each book. We only know based on like sort of documentaries conspiracies in so on and so forth. That's confusing to me. Still getting to wear it might be evidence, or are you saying that if something was written down by someone at some point in time that it must be evidence well, not that it must be, but I'd say close to it in my in my perspective, but you know it doesn't work. Everybody understand that. It'd be a form of evidence, but it's not I suppose at anyway. Sorry, go ahead, man! In well to get to my evidence. I have actually photographed I'm looking at right now. I'm dying skills and giant gold flake. They're not like human proportions. They look like human skulls and human bones, and it's on, but right now based on the texts here based on information that explains certain things it says you know these are giants funds so IBM. And everything, but I have it all in front of me and I can okay. I'M GONNA. I'm GONNA interrupt you for one second because I think that we're going to go down a rabbit trail. All might come down to this. It sounds to me like you saw something on the Internet that looks like or is presenting you information that suggesting that these. Skulls and you just you believed it because it confirms something that's in the Bible, and you already want to believe what's in the Bible so that Dutt though that may qualify some form of evidence. That's certainly not enough evidence to convince anybody that's reasonable and confused as to. Why just looking at something that you saw on the Internet would be enough evidence to convince you read. So wondering which pictures you're actually looking at because some of the pictures that have reported been skeletons are known exposed hoaxes right so without knowing which one you're looking at question is then by any chance that could send you this information. You look over your so sure you can send email with links to TV at atheist. Hyphen community DOT ORG and I'll make sure that I forwarded to channel that. Once I can you repeat that again? TV TV at Atheist Hyphen Community Dot org, or you could google giant skeleton hoax and see if your picture appears amongst the ones that are known host hoaxes. Yeah, because if you don't have any other evidence to cooperate what you're looking at, it's it's. It's disheartening to me, dot. You would believe what you're looking at. When there's so much contrary evidence like if if that was really valid evidence and not one of these hoaxes that are used to convince impressionable people than you would see, it would be prominent like you would. You would see it would pervade archaeological an appeal to logical papers. There'd be papers written on it so. I would ask. This would be national geographic or Today Scholarly professors at university etc, and it wouldn't be just click bait photo on the Internet because this would fundamentally change. Huge things that we understand about our history, and so if if these were things were real, and the evidence was forum, it wouldn't just be on the conspiracy theorists, website or through some Google search this. Conspiracy Theorists website. To. See It on anywhere other than experience, conspiracy, websites or websites exposing those conspiracy theories. Because because was terribly. This is necessarily a conspiracy theory topic. Because if in fact, there were good photographic evidence to show that there were there used to be giants. Their entire scientific community is conspiring to keep that evidence from coming to light in any responsible fashion. That's why it fits into conspiracy. And, what? What did you do to validate it all? That would be my question aside from seeing it and being compelled by just onsite. What did you do to to confirm the validity of what you were looking at aside from believing it because it comports with a daddy much confirmative. Ability of it because I don't really know how. I don't want. So! You found something on the Internet you didn't do anything to come. I didn't actually find it. into me. You're set you something on the Internet. You didn't bother to do any research at all. You just call us to your homework for you. I guess yeah. You're on well. I can't give input on something I haven't seen. And while I'm happy to let you email us It would be nice and I'll say this to other people to measure beating you up. It'd be nice if some of you guys. Did your own homework just a little bit like spent four five seconds you because. If you have an image, you can do a Google image search and find out where else that's been reported. Maybe you find a news article about it because when you send it to me, that's what I'm GonNa. Do and my question is. Why should I spend all this time doing work that you could do just so you don't have to. Yeah and earl before we let you go I. Earl Earl. Interrupt, you for a second because I think this is an important port and I'm sorry to interrupt. You seem like you seem like a nice gentleman This is something that I say all the time I channel and it's something I wish people would do more often. It's advocate for your own and. People need to understand source methodologies significantly better. A lot of us are compelled to believe things that were exposed to because of confirmation bias, or or because of crowd conformity. There's a million reasons that we can be compelled and feel justified in believing things that don't actually make sense when you hold them up to scrutiny so I would encourage you before you call into another show before. Before you, start to report this or or put it out or spread it around. Do some advocating for your own understanding. Figure out how you would verify something like this. Go and find the sources do what Matt said and do a Google image search that like what you're doing now is a good step I. Suppose because you're actually seeking out people that are very likely to not. Not believe what you're saying just on face value, but there's a very good reason why ray earl is because we're not able to cooperate or validate what you're saying. Just you making a claim now? This happened to you I. Think what you need to do is learn how to source these things out so that they're not just surprisingly compelling to you and they become a little bit. Bit more novel, and that might be a journey towards uncovering more about what you believe in why I'm but a quick Google search will get you there where you want to go. I is a place called slopes, s., and E. ES DOT com, because if you go to slopes, dot com, there's a site there. That is fact Jack Giant human skeleton photographs that has went up January twenty, twenty, nineteen, covering a number different photographs, showing that this is false that these these are and so you'll be able to peruse through that link on smokes to see if the pictures that you got were amongst those that were hoaxes. A okay. To you know, gain some insight on how to get started on it of course image, Google, Google administered since on, and I thought I'd try. You would find other photos like this and it wouldn't really. Anything. There were there were number of like digital art. Contest sites ran these they were compiled together. Some of them as hoaxes. You know where to look at it in a voter shop perspective stuff all kinds of problems, none of it. is accepted as science or anything that is consistent with the known history of the world, but.

Google Matt Earl Earl Netflix New York DOT York Ray Earl Arthur Dutt IBM
A Pandemic Dahhhling, Do You Know What That Means?!

The Body Serve

05:01 min | Last month

A Pandemic Dahhhling, Do You Know What That Means?!

"Hello everybody welcome back to the body. Serve Jonathan and I'm James. His I told you had a bit of a surprise for you at the start. Those, Where we're watching the great, we've got one episode left and it's filled with Hazaras. That is the catchphrase. We are in the middle of pride month, and before we get into the show, a special shot and thanks to Tom Humber stone who has been or designer over the years for? Various artwork that you may see associated with the body serve, and he's given the body serve a pride makeover, so we've updated all of our various socials and websites, and you can have a look at what he did there. We think it's just swell, so thank you talk so there's been a lot of news this week. Tennis's not exactly back in full swing, but it is apparently coming soon. The plans are in place for the US Open Roland Garros and for the WPA of pretty full fall. Schedule this to happen in one day. Basically. You wake up before i. do so when I got up. We'll tell you when that was or when that typically is. Knows a lot for me to catch up on. It took a while took like full day very like I had a a grasp of what was going on, and what it felt like to me, was one domino started, and then everybody was like damn. Yes, so the USDA teased a little bit earlier in the week that they were primed to go ahead than a big announcement was coming pending government approval we had heard rumors about the zoom calls this huge. ATP Zoom Com that no Ruben was talking about on the behind the rocket podcast, criticizing Novak Djokovic for allegedly not being there, so we knew there were is nothing alleged about to. He was not okay. The whole point university I don't WanNa get spread cheated. You know everybody's got to be charted once in a while. The so there were there were murmurs throughout the week, but. Wednesday at ten am. The US Open holds a press conference in the empty and cavernous. Arthur ash stadium. Stacey Allaster is there? They have a few other folks on court physician. Mc I forgot who that was. Sorry. My reporting skills are just not up to snuff over the the tennis break, but it was very much a public relations event. There were a lot of sport reporters on zoom. So after the the press conference happened, or after the main presentation happened, there were individual questions by. Reporters who they showed on zoom, and when we found out that there wouldn't be media physically on site. We got the sense that this, too was a trial run for what the media access will be at the actual tournament where presumably players will be interviewed via zoom. Right, so the big announcement as I'm sure you've already heard that the US Open will go ahead. As planned in the the same part of the calendar in New, York City at Billie Jean, King National Tennis Centre with no spectators, and with a lot of health provision in place, but listen I'm still surprised that they're going full steam ahead. I'm still extremely skeptical and especially what we're seeing now in. Clemson University for example. was. At twenty three members of the football team tested positive for COVID. The exploding numbers and Florida Arizona California baseball has affected right now. Golf is affected right now pretty much every sport that you've seen. Attempts to restart has been affected in one way or another in tennis. Not going to be immune to that and we'll get to why. We think that that's the case based on what's been going on overseas. Break so I? Guess I'm getting ahead of myself. Let's just go through the actual news first, and then we can comment on it as part of this abbreviated summer schedule, or there will be the Washington D. C.. C. Tournament, the city open held in DC, starting August fourteenth for the men I. Don't think we have heard about the possibility of a winds tournament yet, but I believe it's being discussed because it's typically joint event, right, it's not currently in the WTO calendar, but apparently that is still open, then the western and southern open. That is normally in Cincinnati will be held in New York City the week before the US Open. And then the US Open and because Cincinnati is moving to new. York. That means that there will be no qualifying. For the US Open because typically the week leading into the Grand Slam in New, York, city. It's this. It's this week long. Qualifying Extravaganza pretty much and so with Cincinnati playing that there's no room for qualifying

United States Tennis New York City Cincinnati Novak Djokovic Tom Humber York Roland Garros Jonathan Usda Arthur Ash Stadium Clemson University Stacey Allaster King National Tennis Centre Ruben Golf MC WTO Florida Billie Jean
"White Lives Matter" spray-painted on Arthur Ashe statue

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | Last month

"White Lives Matter" spray-painted on Arthur Ashe statue

"Also on monument Avenue Richmond police say they have information on possible suspects after the statue of African American tennis legend Arthur Ashe was vandalized yesterday someone spray painted the words white lives matter and the initials the initials W. L. M. on that statute those initials were then painted over with BLM the Arthur Ashe monument was dedicated in nineteen ninety six to honor the Richmond

Arthur Ashe W. L. M. BLM Arthur Ashe Monument Richmond
"White Lives Matter" spray-painted on Arthur Ashe statue

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | Last month

"White Lives Matter" spray-painted on Arthur Ashe statue

"Someone spray painted white lives matter on a monument to tennis legend Arthur Ashe in Richmond Virginia the statues on monument Avenue a street that also houses a number of Confederate monuments the late Ashley was a Richmond native who became the first black man to win at Wimbledon the Australian Open and the U. S. open police have a description of the vandal but there is still no

Arthur Ashe Richmond Virginia Ashley
Statue of Arthur Ashe in Richmond, Virginia, defaced with 'White Lives Matter' spray paint

WBBM Evening News

00:34 sec | Last month

Statue of Arthur Ashe in Richmond, Virginia, defaced with 'White Lives Matter' spray paint

"Statue of an African American tennis legend as been vandalized in Virginia authorities in Richmond Virginia have surveillance video obtained using white spray paint to vandalize the statue of hometown tennis legend Arthur Ashe with the words white lives matter and the initials W. LM they were later painted over with BLM not far away on Richmond's famed abandonment Avenue city crews erected concrete barriers around a towering statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee Virginia's governor has called for its removal Jim chrysalis

Richmond Virginia Arthur Ashe BLM Richmond Robert E. Lee Virginia Jim Chrysalis Virginia
Miami - With storms in May, Florida lawmaker wants a longer hurricane season

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | Last month

Miami - With storms in May, Florida lawmaker wants a longer hurricane season

"One one Florida lawmaker wants a longer hurricane season since storms are beginning earlier in the year democratic U. S. representative Stephanie Murphy is asking the national oceanic and atmospheric organization to begin the hurricane season in mid may currently it runs from June through October but in each of the past six years there has been at least one named storm before June first this year to tropical storms Arthur and Bertha formed in the middle of may the third tropical storm so far Cristobal formed at the beginning of

Stephanie Murphy Arthur Florida U. S. Representative Bertha Cristobal
Grandmas House Visits

Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

04:34 min | 2 months ago

Grandmas House Visits

"As I've mentioned before grandmother's. This house was the biggest house in Whistler. My following description of the house is intended not to Brag or Put on as as they say down south. It stood high off the ground as many homes in the south dead, and had wide steps, leading up to middle of the front porch, and into the main hallway, the porch ran linked to the front of the House with a wooden swing on the far right. This weighing Hong by small change was at the very end of the porch. This wing was part of our playground. Front doors I mentioned was in the middle of the house, and only the screen door was locked to keep babies from going out and get an end of the street. Entering the front door you found yourself facing long hallway with ten foot ceilings, and on the left side, stood an old wardrobe. No such thing as walk in closets in those days. From? That long hallway doors left and right led into the various rooms I only remember there were. Two rooms on the right and left, but many told me that there were three on each side plus the kitchen at the far end of the hallway and to the right door. Let into the sparse kitchen. And dining table, saying an icebox. Mada refrigerator not those days and not those prices. News, an icebox where you would have the iceman bring a block of in from the horse drawn wagon and place it into the top. My job was empty. The pan of melted water from underneath before it ran over, my idea was to avoid having to stop my important playing outside didn't go across very well with my grandmother. I simply suggested that I drew a hole in the floor underneath a refrigerator for drainage and save all that walking. Let them snakes house. She said ain't no way. The kitchen, there was a door that led out onto small. Porch one of the bedrooms happened to the amount of. I would go there and wonder. You see he had a hobby that influenced me for life. He built model airplanes and to this day. I'm sure the stuck in my mind. That is why I later became a pilot. Thanks Uncle Arthur. Let's get back to the front porch. Now are fun days. Where when only cousins came to visit grandmother, and that was mostly on weekends. We would cram many cousins into the swing as possible. And fareless Fred Wynn. Mount the back of the swain with his toes in between the wooden slats and holding onto the change, he would swing out. Away from the porch and backed his is. He could never quite reach the ceiling. By, the squeals, the kids. How much fun we were having. That is until an aunt. Or an uncle or grandma would put a stop to it. That swing is GonNa Bright One day. And break you Jawans Nex. I remember once this Wayne did break as my corpulent and and a friend set in it. She never went out with him again. I guess that was a sign from somewhere above. The Yard in front consisted of various plants and bushes. Flower Bush was as my grandmother called it five o'clock. As? She showed me the first time at five o'clock. The, flowers would close up for the night. Fascinating I'll tell you the day we almost died. My two cousins and I were playing in the front yard near themselves in Bush's. My cousin Barbara asked us the WanNa pull only in Manet, Sandwich. On white bread well, who, in turn that down soon came the long awaited sandwiches presented on a plate.

Front Porch Hong Swain Bush Whistler Uncle Arthur Jawans Nex Yard Fred Wynn Wayne Barbara
Munazza

Tell Them, I Am

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Munazza

"My name is Vanessa all in the end. I am an astronomer. I think that is the primary way that identify myself when I, meet new people. Astronauts are on a lot of times ex military and engineers like they have survival skills versus strana mors are fabulous nerds. It's Uman to gaze up at the stars and contemplate the cosmos. There's a there's a Carl Sagan, quote, I'm probably paraphrasing at this point. It's not explaining science. Seems to me perverse, when you're in love, you want to tell the world. I grew up with my parents may data's from Pakistan. He moved to the US in the eighties. Horrible up getting. Okay. And my mom is from India, Mark from our message. Good. There. I have two sisters. We're very close knit family. We love hang out with each other like going home. It was always like the highlight of my day. My parents had this interesting parenting style, which I have started to now be more aware of I didn't have a bed time. I didn't have occurred few. I never had any like rules about how long it could stay on the computer or the or the TV or, or the phone, but it was kind of will lose things where if I wanted to do something by parents would be like that doesn't seem like such a good idea. And then I would kind of be like, oh, but I think it is. So they like, they'd say, well, go ahead, try it, and then I would try it, and it wouldn't be a good idea. And they come back like see. I feel like I'm humble Ryan about my parents really amazing people. When is engineers? I was a sophomore in college. My dad got extremely sick. So he was taking a medication for a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, the medicine was I N, H, I, E so Nisaan and it's known to be extremely toxic. We were not told that my dad was prescribed his medications, so he was told to take this six month course of I h and when he was done with the six months course than he could come back to start his Arthur treatment, well, five months in my dad's sorta getting extremely sick. I is getting very confused. And then one day he woke up and was just completely yellow like completely jaundiced. His is really his skin was yellow. And we took him to the to his primary didn't it turned out. He was having liver failure. Annan ver- when I heard that he was having liver failure. I didn't know what that meant, and I remember being scared, but not being sure why I was scared. A couple days after he started to get a lot worse. And there is one to remember it was the Saturday we were all home, and we had to do like basic errands, like grocery shopping. And we're all going to Costco, my favorite thing ever. And my dad was my dad was feed be used completely out of him. We started to get really concerned. So my mom colds, my dad's primary, who is also one of our good family friends. So he came by the evening, putting I remember who's putting on my dad's shoes for him. Like getting him ready to go to the hospital. And my dad was like kicking him in the face. And he eventually got my dad dressed enough to hospital. And like put him in the front seat of his car with a lot of struggle for my dad and drove him himself to to the hospital. NYU langone. Turned out that his liver was ninety eight percent necrosis, which means that ninety eight percent of his liver had died. It became very clear that he needed a new liver, and he needed a liver transplant. I just felt like as soon as, as soon as my dad was admitted hospital and this need for a transplant became a reality things kind of just felt completely different. And a couple of days into being in the hospital he fell into a coma. Apparently before my dad's slipped into the coma. He told the head transplant surgeon. Please help me get better because I have to take care of my family. I really was not processing like what was happening. Still going to all my classes I still hanging. All my problems, that's just kind of working on this autopilot mode, where I was going about my days, doing everything that I normally would going to my classes in the mornings, and they would take the six train down to NYU Langone and spend the rest of my day. There.

Nyu Langone Carl Sagan Coma Annan Vanessa Costco Pakistan India United States Nisaan Ryan Arthur Mark
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Tonight. I had an answer when I was listening to you. I decided to change it. Because you use the word existential threats and that a little flag went up for me. And one of the things that we were lucky we were lucky after World War Two during World War Two. We face an existential threat, right, which is what brought and together Stalin and the west, right? So shared assured threat, and then after the second World War, we saw the rise of the Soviet Union. And there was a competing ideologies to competing. Ideologies looking for customers and two largest economies in the world, two largest militaries in the world and these competing ideologies and. America's still had all the infighting and the intelligence services still fought with each other and the politicians still fought with each other. But when push came to Chauve, we could come together with competing politics because the existential threat was shared, and when the when the Berlin Wall came down we lost the perception of the existential threat of the external existential threat, and when we lost a reason to come together and come in 'cause we started to perceive each other as the enemies, by the way, this is how all empires full. Room flat in Carthage and then Rome ripped itself treads. And I for one thing that perhaps one of the most one of the best things that can happen to America is the rise of China the rewrite of Russia. Because I think it will force us to recognize that there are things way more threatening to us then each other. And by the way, those threats whether it's economic nuclear or or ideological used to be conveniently located in a single adversary called the Soviet Union. And now those threats are distributed. So we don't really fear nuclear war with China. But they've definitely challenge. Our and they're going to just get ready for it. The United States has been the number one economy in the world since the Foale since since the end of World War Two it's five years away. We're going to be number two. Just just get ready for it. Because it's happening. If you go look at the numbers the speed at which the Chinese economy is growing on believable. We have a four year plan thousand year plan, right? We don't the nuclear threat comes from another place that may not challenge us, economically righty logically. And the ideological threat. Now comes from the place. In other words, are Cold War two point? Oh as a distributed threat, and we haven't wised up to that yet that we cannot compete in the world today with outdated thinking from the Cold War, which is kind of what we're trying to do. We have a million. We did we only joined the world order after World War Two we were isolated as prior. So everything we know about competing on a world stage about being a superpower comes from one experience as focus group of one. Right. So I think that. And then what I said when I said, existential, what's better. No. I think you're right. I think that is the right term. And the problem is we perceive each other as the exit threat, we have no perception of an external existential threat, and the more that we perceive each other as the existential threat, we become our weaknesses become exploit -able to everyone who would do harm outside unity is what we need to provide for the United States for our society for our community for each other the production that we need to maintain the way of life of freedom opportunity enterprise, unity, solidarity and brotherhood, the things that we actually need the most I I'm fund of saying closed behind closed doors. It's fun to saying behind closed doors to folks in government, and sometimes the military that Osama bin Laden one we killed him. So what he made our entire country racist. You know, what you have to wait in long TSA line? You mean something a lot worse do that. No, no. And is forcing us to spend unbelievable amounts of money against a disproportionately small threat, but we have to because you have to not that's the point. And the way that you the way that you win and infinite game, but you exhaust your enemy of willin resources. We're spending tons of money. And we hate any other ready to others throats. And if we can't fix it ourselves, we'll be forced to fix it. If we face another existential. Superpower threat from outside. I think it's a sad. I don't like the fact that I have this opinion. Alas my last thought maybe Simon's to you. If you don't like that threat, and you want to turn it into an opportunity you need to love each other. And you need to love more people. Let's do that together. I love you. I love you too. And I love you. Thanks again to Simonsen it and the ninety second street y for facilitating conversation, I hope even joy this season. I love talking about love. And if you like the show, hey, if you love the show, please tell a friend about it a raid it and review it on apple podcasts or wherever you listening to this. Thanks for listening.

Soviet Union United States Osama bin Laden China America Stalin Berlin Wall Chauve Simonsen apple Rome Carthage Russia Simon ninety second thousand year five years
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"To hear things we don't like. You grew that I do. I think there's a difference between allowing speech and lifting speech up. We cannot suppress speech. We find apart that speech is not allowed to incite violence. That's against the law. There are standards, and those standards have been provided. We don't have to figure out what those standards are. But we have to allow speech, no matter. How contemptible we find it to exist? But we don't have to put it on national television. Like we have to allow for it. But we don't have to lift it up, and we don't have to give equal billing, but we do have to allow for it. So I don't think it's a chicken egg question. I don't think one has to come with the other. If you want to be a free speech warrior, by the way, the most important way to do it. It's a fight for free speech with people on your own side as to elicit a greater acceptance of free speech with people who agree with you who are trying to shut it down. That means conservatives need to start listening more free speech that speech this not conservative and liberals vice versa. And we all know the institutions for these are the greatest problems on both sides. Yeah. Where do we go next? We should we should do one more. And then we should we should go out in the lobby and meet you in person. Yeah. Whoever to remember who was to. Oh, you you you in the front your number two. Go and then. Sorry. Thank you. So I really is that you present. I think that. Acidly invention a story Tennessee rating on some things, but you connect with that. And you mentioned that wanted six people has popped off the phrase is out of mentions. How you're if you're beating this just everyday people aren't five. On what are something that we can seek out actions. Andrew will ales? They set ourselves up more amenable to have. Stieg work sessile for love art of things you see in American sign that we should be last to hate in that makes his arm stations. Great. But you gotta just have people in the room beginning if you don't have that next versus. I don't know how but it seems like free free whilst you defined spiracy theories and still love. Yeah. How do we do it? How do we tell? What do they're gonna make amenable to what's the book about bowling with bowling alone. Bob, Putnam book, bowling alone, bowling alone, by Bob Putnam is a professor at the Kennedy School at Harvard, and he talks about building civil society doing together doing things together. But the key point is going where you're not invited and saying what they don't expect and listening with love expanding the range of people that you talked to every pressure in America is the silo. Your news feeds to close down your friend groups to go to university where people are like you to go to a house of worship where people are like you. It's very easy to do. That is getting e. Yeah, it's just more comfortable just easier would between social media and the mobility of Americans in the way that were self sorting with respect to neighborhoods. It's easier to don't do it. Go be a personal entrepreneur. Go where people disagree with you where you're not necessarily even invited and say what they don't expect an listen with love and that's the goal, and if you can do that. And by the way is so interesting I've been I'm taking my own advice, and my life is getting richer by the day. And you know, where it is. Because each one of you knows how to expand the fear of ideological view points. Again, you might you might change your mind certain things, you might not. But it doesn't matter because your heart will if you do right. Totally on purpose and go with someone you'd have to go, and you can go someone. But but also, I think social social things we were less social if you go by when I play video games as a kid. We all showed up in the same house and played video games together. And now if you go by an XBox or PlayStation or something it comes with one controller, the doesn't even want you to play with a friend. And and I I have an XBox. And I was looking to play with a friend. And I was I went to buy games that I could play with somebody, and I have a nephew and he likes video games. And and they don't even they don't even sell them. You can up. It was bought a second controlling, and I struggle to find a video game they will allow me to play with a split screen with somebody in the same room. And this is a problem video games. But why can't we make them that we can play with people in the same room? When we go for dinner. I mean, I'm I'm pretty staunch about this put the phones away when you're with somebody at a dinner table. He put the phones away when you're in a meeting. I don't mean just. In your pocket. I mean, turn it off put an airplane mode. Leave it in the car. Don't need it at dinner. And I think we we are less, social and that breeds loneliness, and and then the echo chambers and all the rest of it, just just manifests and grows. Totally. Get out of your comfort zone with someone be alive. Be there. Go take you present. Let's say one more question. I think we're in the front row here. So. Yeah. If this. More on really be shame. Thanks. Is there is this very large motorized American. Statement who are not having their voice very because they don't go right speaks audience for it and say what to those who are in the sense that you are also complexity of national conversation. How do we then? How do we then? You know, it's true. And but thank you for the work more in common. I cited I started a lot in my book, and I signed it and every talk is super important what you guys are doing. I mean, you you might actually be the research organization that starts the new movement. And I appreciate it a lot. So a lot of people they feel devalued and they feel silent. And that by there's nothing new about that pre population groups at the margin of society have always been silenced and felt silenced. And the problem with being silent is that you don't sense of your own dignity, and we don't have a sense of your dignity. You're gonna fight back. If you want to know how populism works, particularly in the wake of a financial crisis where people felt economically and socially silenced. You're gonna see the bitterness that comes up the disdain and the and then here to the ideas of politicians were little more than walking middle fingers to the other side. It's unhelpful. Right. But that you get it you get it because they've been silent. So it's a. An answer to an existential threat to democracy, and civilized society that we don't listen to people that we don't give people a voice. So to me, it's a question of how do we how do people get voice when they don't have one on the contrary every single one of you in this room has power. You have disproportionate power and privilege. You're able to pay to come to see to aging hipsters. Give a lecture at the ninety second street, y sorry, you're not a hipster. And I'm not aging. So the. Your power. And that means you have this big opportunity to give somebody voice. It's amazing giving electrical buncha evangelical Christian kids big group. And I asked them we don't because the key thing to to dignity is being needed that actually enough feeling being needed. That's what gives you dignity, and when nobody needs what you think nobody needs economically. Nobody needs you socially. And nobody needs your opinion, you won't sense of dignity, and you will strike back. Okay. So I was asking this group of cushion kids think about a group that you that need something from you that you really don't need. Okay. Who is there is in New York City. They said homeless people homeless people that's completely wrong. Because if you're evangelical Christians, and you see a homeless person on the street, you need that person's prayers to keep you out of hell, that's Christian theology. You need something from every single person when you recognize your need of something from somebody at the periphery of our society to quote pope Francis. You will give personal voice and each one of us the power to do that starting maybe right outside the ninety second street, y when you live tonight.

Bob Putnam New York City Tennessee Stieg America Andrew pope Francis professor Kennedy School Harvard ninety second
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Action. Vigil due to start actually team responsibility extra. So the tricky thing in America that we do and we're so entrepeneurship, right? Which is we like to back plan everything. Right. We like to come up when with the result we want and then what's the back plan that I need to do and that works a little bit. But this is more what I'm asking recommending is more like a lifestyle, right? It's like somebody who says I want to get into shape. So you know, what that looks like he might have a weight goal or some sort of fitness goal and you'll start eating differently. And you'll you'll go to the gym you won't see anything. But you'll try again, and again, and you know, that it's a process, you know, that you know, that it's slow and it's not visible, right? But you there are certain metrics that you can measure the progress you can look in the mirror, which is sort of subjective. You can look at a scale, right? And the problem is when you hit your goal, you don't get to stop working out. You have to do it for the rest of your life. So what we're talking about though, there are goals that we could set what we're asking people to adopt an entirely different lifestyle a lifestyle in which when you start to feel yourself, seething and you want to react verbally or Twitter. Any other way, you you take that space and find the calm that when you want to label someone as evil or stupid or ignorant or a liar. We have learned the lifestyle of remembering that, it's an opinion or a point of view. And it's not who they are. It's just something they said, maybe they even said it to get a rise out of maybe they don't actually understand what they said they heard it. We don't know. And so what we're advocating is change of lifestyle that unfortunately, like exercise, some people will be quicker and some people will be slower and like. Secession of smoking. And like the fact that we're trying to eat healthy in time. It will become something American. There was a group of people said the smoking thing is bad for us. I'm not sure exactly when or how. But we we kind of the smoking numbers declined precipitously in this country, and that when they started passing legislation that you can't smoke in pub- in bars, which are private entities. Nobody was really up in arms. We're like. Okay. Right. And now we're doing with straws and plastic bags, and we're kind of okay with it. Right. In other words, it's become normalized, but it wasn't normalized and it wasn't normal. And we people aren't making economic arguments. Why we need to keep plastic bags? Yeah. And wouldn't let me put a put a quick point on that to violating the one and half answer rule. Neither of because because I've been struggling with this a lot what you're talking about. You know, I care about this a lot. I want to do what I can I have views, and I believe in certain public policy ideas, and I liked debate in the whole thing. But what I really care about is lifting people up and bring them together. And I've been thinking what can I do at scale? What can I do this moonshot because that's what you're asking? What can we do? This a societal thing as opposed to Diana one on one deal. And I've been struggling with this and struggling with us. And you know what I decided to do. I don't have to solve this. I just have to commit myself to doing this for the rest of my life because it makes my life better. And then I'm gonna see what the entrepeneurship venture actually is. So I quit my job. And I'm dedicating myself to this cause and I don't know where it's gonna take me. I don't know what this book is going to do. I don't know what my podcast is going to do my call them. I don't know. But I'm dedicating my work to this. And I'm gonna see where it's supposed to go because you know, what that's actually how all entrepreneurs endeavors work. I mean, we always talk about the business plan that says, and they were going to get to IPO in three years or something like that. That's almost never how they work in only. One third of entrepreneurial endeavors is there any recognizable business plan. So don't have a business plan have a lifestyle of love. That's truly entrepreneurial and daring and risky. And you're gonna start creating a movement and people are going to be attracted to you. And it's going to be magnetic, and we're gonna do together and pray for me. We're going to go one two three, and then we'll figure out some of the others go. Yup. In the back. Action. Oxygen. People. Two. It's a good one. I'm an academic. So this is really hitting home in and what am I going after? I'd leave the think tank that I'm running right now. I'm going to go teach at Harvard. Something about this a lot. And I think that there occasions in which it's appropriate to say that these ideas are beyond the pale. But we're way on the wrong side of that. And we should be a lot more accepting of different ideas than we are today. One on campuses today. We're trying to de platform people that it's wrong. It's like huge mistake. Because people can't be exposed of the competition of ideas. I think that a lot of ideas are wrong that I want to hear them. And I think students are going to think that a lot of ideas are wrong, but they should hear them because they're just they're going to be weak. They're going to be flaccid minds. They actually don't get that competition of ideas. So no doubt. There is a point at which the answer is. Yes. But I think that we're really far away from it. And we're making a mistake right now in America drastically direction like all of you to do is joined me in being more more in the in the in the business of free speech and more accepting of hearing things that we don't like because otherwise we become fearful, and we become resistant to the kind of. That requires to

America Twitter Harvard Diana three years
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Not. Truly for sure and you feel fear too. Because you being ganged up on totally. Yeah. As a beautiful question. Fears the ultimate negative emotion. Fear is the opposite of love. People think that hatred is the opposite of love not fear is the opposite of love hatred comes from fear. So if you wanna wipe out fear, you show love, even if you don't feel it and you'll start to feel love and you'll stop feeling fear. That's the secret too. By the way, there's a ton of social psychological and neurological research that backs this up and every major religion. But does them Christianity Islam. They all talked about fear is the ultimate negative emotion. Okay. So how do you do it? You see these interactions as profound opportunities for unit show love because your heart is overflowing with love, and you wanna go find these people disagree with you. Because when people treated with contempt trying to elicit fear, and you answer with warm heartedness and love you've changed your own heart. You've made yourself more effective. You made yourself happier. And you might just change their hearts too. So here's the thing. I want you to think about this. There's a metaphor that use in the book because they had a big impact on me. There's this. I was in this retreat center. And it was it was a Christian retreat center when my wife, and I we were doing, you know, training couples that were engaged to get married, and we were talking about what it's like to be married for twenty five or thirty years these young couples. But that's not the point what I noticed. I was going out. There's a sign over the door. Not when you come in. When you're going out for the people who are in the Christian retreat center before they go into the parking lot. You know, I said you are now entering mission territory myself. That's not just a religious message. See here's the deal every single one of you has fear in your hearts, but you want to dominate that fear with love if you want a better life, and you want to be more persuasive. So what I want you to do. What's your name? But I want you to do as I want you to want you to imagine a sign over the door of this auditorium before you go out that says you are now entering mission territory, and if you do that, and you keep that in your heart fear's got no chance. There's a technique for effective competition. I learned a long time ago the answer and a half three quarters of an answer is better than an answer and a half. I'm about to disobey that advice. There's a. There's a technique for effective confrontation. That is really fantastic perhaps you can use with them, right? Requires three things it does not matter the order, but you need to have all three we've game to that with one and two, and it doesn't work. You have to be able to talk to the person you're going to have to say exactly how you feel. You have to do better than happy sad angry, right? The specific action that they took that made you feel that way and the potential impact you have to do all three the order doesn't matter. So for example, you would say. When you got up and walked, and it has to be specific. You you always do this. Right. You're always late to meet it. It has to be specific. Specifically, how you feel Pacific actually took to make you feel that way and the potential impact. So you would say something to the effect of Wayne you got up and walked out of the room the Thursday night. You made me feel completely humiliated, and I fear that if I made to feel like that again, I won't I won't trust. You. I feel the love that. I have for you. We'll be shaking, and then you shut up. And then it doesn't matter if they get defensive. Well, you said this, and I was just being emotional. It's I'm sure I'm sorry. But you you you say I hear you. And then you repeat the whole statement again. And what it does it's designed to make people take accountability for their actions. And it's unbelievably effective. By the way, also works really really well for compliments, you do all three when you stayed and listened to me, you made me feel so hurt and so loved I know that if I made to feel like that again it'll make trust build for me. Like, you have no idea it works beautifully. But try that the order doesn't matter but have all three things. Let's come over here. Yes. David so much. Nineteen. More. Thank you. Thank you. These questions. What? Do you cheat her culture? And more on individual and group playing that gap to ten percent of this to that to getting. Are there? Points. Social action.

Wayne Christian retreat center David three quarters thirty years ten percent
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"The. The research that I've been doing about finite and infinite thinking. Kidding? I'm kidding. I don't have a call. I do. The research. We're doing is finite thinkers, which are which played a win all the time. They play the game only conceiving of winning and make all decisions with the goal of winning. Liked to control all the variables. Because surprises are scary because the prizes can subvert winning. Right. So we don't surprise if we want to control the variables the infinite thinker. The infinite minded sinker love surprises and sees opportunity in surprise and sees opportunity to grow into learn. And what we're proposing. What you're proposing is is to be open to surprise as opposed to wanting to control, and we want to control the other side, we want to control the other group who disagree with us. So that they will see the way we see it. So that we can build the world that we want and live in the country and get the politicians that we prefer and rather than being open to surprise and growth and extremely non entrepreneurial way to laugh. You know, the weirdest thing is these data that I see coming up all over the place and surveys that show that people in their twenties are much less entrepreneurial than we give them credit for and much less entrepreneurial than past generations. And the reason is because they're afraid it's because of fear fear is up part of the reason is because people my age have raised their kids to be to take less risk and to have more safety. It's funny. My buddy over intervene. You've totally. And so my buddy Jonathan height teaches at New York university's is social psychologist stern school business. And he does this thing gets out in front of audience says okay, everybody forty thinking your head count to three call out. How old you were the first time that you went out of the house by yourself on an errand you walk into school or one of the store for your mom or something like that one two three. Six seven. Everyone thirty how old were you under twenty five better one two three. Twelve thirteen my friends that is a big America's getting safer when I was walking around Seattle. And as I mentioned before in my neighborhood, literally Ted Bundy was running amok in my neighborhood. Right. And I had a paper route at four thirty in the morning. And she loved to strike, I know so so we were talking about around the dinner table my dad when a PHD in statistics. And he said, you know, the odds are very low that you're in his. You can keep it around. Right. I was in fifth grade, my friends, I mean, it was just, you know, the famous story of Richard Branson, right? So Richard Branson, one of the world's most successful entrepreneurs his mother when he was I think eight years old. They were I think three miles from home. They would driving home and she put him out of the car and make your way home and like five hours later, he finally came home. And she says I knew you take this long because you stop to smell stop to smell everything look at everything. But it was hours that it took this little kid to make his way home. But the kid learn not to be afraid that's not proposing. Let your eight year old you get to do this. I'm simply saying we overcome stop soup. It's an extreme example. It isn't extreme example behind of we are technically done, which means if you have babysitters, and you need to go by all means. But I don't know there's we're allowed to keep going. I don't know. Let's keep going if you want. Is. Oh, right. We also have a book signing. Yeah. So we either sacrifice the book signing that we come on man, or you just all we just did the book signing late. Okay. Let's do ten more minutes, and then we'll do anymore because there's a lot of hands up. This is the best. Yeah. Let's go to the back over there. We haven't had one from the back of their. Yes. It's daylight saving. I hear you. Yeah. Speaking of legislation policies we disagree with. Well. No, no. By the way, so bad member. When we're supposed to talk this morning on the phone. Yeah. We missed it. How come because? 'cause I called you at ten instead of nine. Daylight savings. It's funny. Libertarian. Concerned. Grounded by them. Question. There's a lot of here. And specifically like what? Because I. Right. Just right. Nine out of discussion around right? How try to come that. Yeah. Sphere. It's it's like feeling like, you can't sure you're not.

Richard Branson New York university Ted Bundy Seattle America eight years eight year five hours
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"People. I mean, I I have an opinion. I would love to hear it. Far out, man. I have an opinion too. And it's an interesting question, by the way, I'm not making light of it. Yeah. Sure. But that doesn't but it doesn't last. You know? So I would like a solution that is more infinite than the time that you're tripping. The, but the point is it ends the point is you do something to stimulate an experience. Even if that experience is love, and it may linger and it may linger for awhile, and then it'll stop and then you'll do it again. And it's this is the cycle that is the cycle of addiction. And though the impact and effect may be very affirmative. Is it you or is it the impact of the psychedelic? So sure it's not a judgment of the psychedelic whatsoever. Do it have fun love all the people around you. But I would say concurrently. Learn the skills of love that don't require the psychedelic. Because I need you in to be able to call upon it when you have no access to the psychedelic. There's a lot of emerging research that you're calling upon I can tell you're thinking about it. You're reading about it that you're really because because the emerging body of research suggests that their particular properties that are used for people who've experimented with Wasco in Peru, for example, or Vesco and under the watch of a physician or shaming. And it suggests that there's a way that you can you can trip some wires that can change some. We don't know. It's very early days of this research very early days. This possibly therapeutic uses of hallucinogens for anxiety and depression, we don't know a guy named Joe Greene who does work on this. He's in California, and he's doing early stage research on this. And so we don't know where it's going to go. I don't take drugs because I'm afraid I'm afraid, and I'm afraid of what it will do to my mental health because it's too early in the research. I also know, however, the based on this research that. Tation can get you to the same place. You can get it takes longer safer. And so one of the things that I recommend to all of us that you experiment with with discernment. What is the Cernan? It's it's sitting peacefully and looking for your own desire to Cernan is not what should I do? The sermon is what do I want? Most people. See this is science question. What's your why, you know, most people going through life with what's my what what's my what what do I do for a living? What am I going to do what am have for breakfast? How am I going to get to work? Right. They don't ask. What's my y? Which is a fundamental question of desire and desires about discernment discernment requires peace and peace requires calming your monkey mind, and maybe you can do that with L estate. Maybe you can do that with mescaline peyote in Moscow and fill in the blanks. But I know you can do that with meditation. I know that you can do that by bringing yourself piece. We'll go this way. And then we'll come back to you. Yes. Sure. You can change their mind. He shouldn't think this briny, but the same time our culture out is it. How changed I jerk any? Local to cheat. I mean, you'll rather I go back to the answer that we gave some women's ago, which is it starts with little America. You know, we cannot control the things we cannot control. And we keep talking about the things as if we can control them or that they need to change. And then we go about our day. And there's a there's something called the law of diffusion of innovations which basically all populations, regardless of their standard, regardless of their size, sift across the standard deviation the bell curve, right? If you have high performers, you have low performance, for example. And with the law division tells us guy by the name of Emmett Rogers who wrote about theorize about this in the nineteen sixties holds holds true that if you want to affect the bell, if you wanna fight the majority if you want to see an idea spread or see systemic change. You don't actually aim at the bell. You aim at the early adopters the early adopters more comfortable with risk. They're they're willing to sacrifice time energy or money to be a part of something that advances something. The majority is more cynical. What's in it? For me, what price quality service features. And what what he taught us is that the majority doesn't try something because they wanna see they want somebody else to try I and so you need fifteen to eighteen percent market penetration, which is called the tipping point. It's a sociological phenomenon that when you reach this level, it just goes ideas or anything else. Right. And so the problem is is we talk about how do we change the system? But we're talking about is the bell. We're talking about the majority, and we're talking about convincing people who have a very low risk tolerance to change the way. They see the world. The reality is there's about ten percent of us. That are practicing this really hard and Geoffrey Moore wrote many years ago crossing the chasm we have to go from the ten percent of eighteen fifteen to eighteen percent. In other words, we have to practice those values. And if you get enough of us to practice, those values those values become American values, and the problem is we're not practicing those. News, the value in this case of being willing to change your mind when the preponderance of I'm willing to change your mind on the against the prominence of evidence. The willingness to listen to a an opinion that you have visceral negative reaction to the the the willingness to be empathetic the willingness to be that wonderful young Muslim woman to go and spend time out of curiosity, and the empathy with those white supremacists before we label them evil, and what you're saying here is that to do that when you're early adopters subversive subversion of the conventions the culture, right? That's what that's what signs telling you. There's a whole chapter on this about this tipping point of the eighteen percent. And here's also what by the way, we got the way we are here because it went the tipping tipping point happened in the wrong. Exactly. Right. Exactly. Right. So here's the exciting part. If you're an entrepreneur, see real entrepreneurs are not this is what it's like in real life. When we say real real entrepreneurs swimmer on the phone. So real entrepreneurs don't starting companies. That's fine. You know, getting venture capital. That's real entrepreneurs do things like fall in love. Real entrepreneurs do things like change their mind why because those are subversive counter cultural acts that require putting capital at risk when you change your mind in American society today, it shows you're weak, and your wishy washy, and you don't believe anything really really strongly. Right. That is putting your capital at risk. But you know, what it's super satisfying because when you practice a little bit you start doing it a lot. I read a question that it kind of blew my mind a little bit because you help I'm doing this wrong, man. I'm on stage at the ninety second street, y and I- repudiated. The way I was talking tiny little bit because you were right. And I wasn't right in the way. I was thinking about it. You don't know this? You can do this. You could do this tomorrow. Sorry, simon. Go ahead. You you can I thought I know I know. I want you to put a point because I want to hear it. So. It's exactly like. Tomorrow. Somebody is going to say something you're gonna go good point. They're going to go a good point because nobody ever hears that and you'll be subversive element. And it's going to be just gonna love it's going to set your heart on fire. And then somebody else is gonna do it say. So in this in this new research that have been doing about finding your water. Yeah. Thanks. Did you finish yours have some left? Oh, sorry. The. Have a cold now. I'm kidding. The.

Cernan Emmett Rogers Geoffrey Moore Joe Greene mescaline Wasco Tation America California Peru anxiety Moscow simon depression eighteen percent ten percent ninety second
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Back. That saying goes. And I'm so sure. Wall. Just sort of adds on owed. Just sort of. Yeah. No. This gets back to the question that we have before you know, if you're treating somebody with contempt. You're you're part of the problem on the other hand, if your muting somebody who you don't know, but who's trying to fire you up and getting rich as a result of it. One of the things I talked about being manipulated. Yeah. The the point is in there are people, you know, and people you don't who are manipulating you. That's just a fact in America today. There are two different ways to deal with this for those you don't know it's simply the mute button or not reading the call him for the people. You do know if standing up for the people with whom you disagree or showing love to the person with whom you disagree. That's really what it is. In other words, if you're treated with contempt that's the moment because somebody who's in that seven percent who treats you with contempt who's trying to pull us apart. Whether it's the habit because they don't want to like us or whether they really do profit from it. There's never any reason for you to answer with that contempt zero percent reason for you to do it. So the only time talking about standing up to those were bullying, you and terrorize. You is when you have a one sided relationship their outbound and your inbound to stop making it inbound. Thank you for that clarification is really important. What do you think Simon anywhere you want? Okay. I want I want. I'm gonna woman. I mean, that's not a bad. Yes. Here's back. L feel the questions from now on. And this is by the way, the live taping of the Arthur Brooke show my podcast box. That's not going in. Yeah. Sexual violence. I'm visiting this is to your the little bits. Tweet teasing. Bryant's of more moral. We have to sew up of politics. Job because I wasn't. Conservative people. And he needs. Alone. Respect. Machines things right. I'm saying we even rights lawyer. Comes seems to be. Which? Multiple. Very gently practice. I appreciate this. Plummeted. But when it comes you ever going to age. Already for even on days and believe. I'm does this is somewhere where we're not being able to. Night. Some. Yup. This is. Right. Me say. To begin with. Thank you for your work, by the way. Thank you for making the world better. Thank you for coming to the United States, and please move here. So it's really hard when you're talking about Xs -sential issues like this to do what I'm about to say. So I'm gonna give you an aspirational goal. See when you're talking about political taxes, for example, and typical right left stuff that doesn't seem existential. Like this is easier. The advice, I'm giving you. But I'm gonna give you a hard advice. Now, I'm going to offer this to you in a spirit of love the person, you're talking to who doesn't share your values is not the same as those values. They hold those values. It's okay. If you feel contempt for their values, and you don't have to go out on a date or marry that person. But it's not okay to treat that person or even think about that person with contempt because it's a person, it's a human. It's another soul. And no other soul is worthy of contempt. Even if their ideas, are here's the I asked you to expand the space between stimulus from. I want you to expand the space between ideas and people, right? You can hate somebody's views if you want you can think they're noxious you can fight against them. That's the American way. And maybe they'll the Irish way too. But you can't hate another person. And what we're trying what we being fed constantly diet that somebody's ideas are the person that they're that. They're smashed together. This is what this is what this is what Simon was talking about where we mix up. Why? And what right. This is our moral goal is to remember that every human and every soul is just as valid as each one of us notwithstanding. The fact that we can't stand what we think is a new book that comes out and says, I love you. But I hate your politics about couples that actually do get married, but candies can't stand each other politics. But you can do that with somebody with whom he wouldn't even go out on a date in the first place that is my aspirational goal for my life. And I offer it with love to you. We hear it in the media you hear it with politicians. With the pundits where they say, you know, he's a liar versus he lied. There's a big difference. One is a criticism of the action. In the words spoken. The other one is criticism of the human being, and we should all watch ourselves accusing another person of being a liar versus saying he told a lie. Because we don't know most of us who have kids we've learned you never say, you know, you're a terrible student. You say you've got an F on your quiz. You don't say you're a terrible student precisely because we're trying to do that. We'll come down front in the Mogo in the back of their. So do you believe say? To play a role. The two and. People.

Simon Bryant United States America Arthur Brooke seven percent zero percent
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"But. Yeah. Yeah. Pretty shit that a lot, and you know. This is a real weakness for me. This is a real problem that I have because I'm don't have contempt have more love, and I've recognized. I've I've I've pointed out tonight, and I pointed on this book, and I've tried to point out with the witness that I'm trying to make for the rest of my life. I hope that we have to fight against this tendency to profit from setting person against person, but that shouldn't result in me, actually, having contempt for those people either because you love everybody or you don't that's binary, by the way, you stop talking to certain people these review one in six Americans has stopped talking to a family member or a close friend because of the twenty sixteen election that is a happiness crisis. That is a love crisis. That can't stand sad. One in six America higher than one in six almost one in five has stopped talking to a family member or close friend that is that's crazy that we're not as happy as we should be. We don't have as much love in our lives. Love is. A nuclear fuel of happiness if it's nuts that we actually will treat each other with contempt to get into the situation. So you know, what I'm working on this? I am working on not having contempt for the outrage industrial complex. But I think part of it part of it is also begrudgingly given credit credit is due. I think one of the things that hurt conservatives during the time of Obama was everything he did was wrong. Everything he did was wrong. One of the things that's hurting. Liberals, the time Trump is everything he does is wrong. Everything he does is wrong. And if you can give credit where credit is due where some of the things are actually correct the manner in which he goes about it might be wrong. But the underlying thinkings actually, correct. Or some of the things are actually good as a couple pieces of things that have actually passed that have actually if we can give credit where credit is due. It actually makes our disagreement stronger it's shock on a little bit that I it takes practice. It really does. But it, but but but. But it's true. But it's true. We're supposed to be the ones building bridges. Let's go over here. Yeah. Go ahead, ma'am. Saying I think it's more Austin's. See applying it in my jail. What happens when people told plant? Yeah. So so you can't guarantee that they're gonna play the great question. Thank you very much beautiful question. You can't guarantee it you can't guarantee by the way that even the person you're talking to at the bottom is going to play with you. But you know, what I can guarantee you that you're gonna change one heart. That's yours. This crazy experience when I just yeah. No, it's it's a beautiful thing, actually, a Catholic. But in every time, I spend time with the Dalai Lama. I've become a better Catholic. So I was the first time. The Dalai Lama. He gives advice how many people can say. So the Dalai Lama gave me this advice. Yeah. It's me shopping Harrison. I yeah. I didn't know Schopenhauer turns out in eighteen sixty. Ooh, I asked when he said when he said answer contempt warm heartedness next question was how I'm not strong enough. And he said remember a time when you did that by accident. Remember, how it set your heart on fire and recreate that feeling is a very robust, psychological technique of of remembering a feeling and having illicit the action because action follows attitude attitude falls action, and you got that. So so I remember a time years ago when accident did it I was still teaching at Syracuse. And I was just as I was beavering away Sewri obscurity with total happiness because it's the best live being active the best, and I had really good graduate students, and I wrote lots of books and nobody ever read the Riveria boring. And and I wrote this book about charity about charitable giving who gives conservatives or liberals religious, people are secular people poor people rich people and all the things that people think turns out a wrong, and it hit the news cycle is very boring. Book, but hit the news cycle and just the right way. And it started selling hundreds of copies of days. The weirdest feeling because your your life changes overnight and lots of presents on TV. And I was not ready for that. But the weirdest part was I started getting E mail from people had never met by the hundreds. My Email is very easy to get on the university website. I love your book. I read every word or a hated it. And here's why and I got this Email from guy. This is what I remembered Dalai Lama elicited this three except of the book came out to get an Email from guy in Texas said your professor Brooks, you are a fraud, which is bad way to start Email, but I kept reading and I noticed that this Email was going to be five thousand words long. It was gonna be twenty minutes to read it. But what I was reading. I noticed that. This guy was refuting every fact in my book, saying the data or wrong here. Your calculations are wrong here. Your interpretation Ron here. Like, the Collins table three point one or reversed you moron stuff like that. It was amazing. He read everywhere. And that's what I was saying to myself thinking haunch, so my emotions that's wonderful. And I said p right by buck. So and I was filled with gratitude I decided I decided to tell them just for sheer serendipity right in Jerusalem. So I know you hate them my book, and you think a stooge, but you read every word it took me two years to write that book, and my put my whole heart into it. I'm so grateful to you. Thank you send. And then I went back to work and fifteen minutes later, his response pops back up dating, and I'm like, oh, boy, he's going to buy those very apprehensive. He's gonna be really mad now. I thought an open it up, and he says professor Brooks next time here in Dallas. If you wanna get some dinner, give me a call. Do you know what your touch on? And this is what extending by the way, I didn't get dinner with him. Because right now, I'd be probably chained to a pipe in his basement. Or maybe he would just buy you dinner. I'm not willing to take that risk. My point the thing that the thing that I think what that highlights and the reason to extend love is everyone wants to feel heard which is different than listening to people right people want to feel heard. We don't want to have our words parroted back to us. And I think this is this is what makes people angry. There's a a documentary on Netflix. Right. Not wish. I could remember the name of it of of this wonderful. She's a an English Muslim woman who was attacked by white supremacists on Twitter viciously. And so she makes the decision instead of reacting with anger, and contempt to try and understand where they're coming from. And you can go watch it. It's amazing. And she goes and spends times spends time with white supremacists in the United States, and she was actually in Charlottesville wasn't marching with them. But she was walking with them when the violence exploded in Charlottesville, and what she does she doesn't. She doesn't tell them if they're stupid. She doesn't tell them that they're ignorant. She doesn't tell them that they're racist. She tells them how she feels how how their words necessarily make her feel and she listens to them. And she makes them feel hurt. And she asks them good questions, and you. Watch you watch. And what you start to see these diehard white supremacists. Now confused because she's supposed to be evil an anti-american and anti everything and for the first time in their lives. They actually feel heard and some of them drop out of the organization because they reconcile what their beliefs are with how they feel towards what they consider their friend who they consider their friend. And it basically is everything that Arthur is talking about what he's written about. You can see it happen live, which is when we extend love and truly try to understand what is underneath someone not to see them as contemptible. But to try and understand with love it forces us it forces those people to to question themselves because we yell and scream at them. They hunker down. If somebody calls unity it and says all your political views of the stupidest thing I've ever heard. You're not gonna question your own beliefs. You're going to hunker down. This is what when I say, we're partially to blame. So I think to do it in your. In your little America. I think if you again, you may not change that person's heart. She might not have changed. Correct. But you can change your heart wrecked. And you'll be happier. And you'll be more persuasive, and you'll be more successful. And you deserve that. Let's go to the back.

America professor Brooks Obama Charlottesville Syracuse Trump Netflix Twitter United States Sewri Schopenhauer Austin Harrison Texas Ron Jerusalem professor fraud Arthur
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Stage. On this very stage. Yeah. The ninety second street, y and it got a good review in the New York Times. I just went back and found from twenty June June to January twenty nineteen Eighty-four. And it was great. And I really I was I was nineteen years old. I had just dropped out of college dropped out kicked out. Splitting hairs. And I went on the road as a classical musician playing the French horn was my my dream. I did it that was the beginning of a twelve year career as a French horn player in New York store right here on the stage. What a thrill it is back with my friend, Simon cynic from my friends in New York on this very stage doing something that I love even more which talking about ideas with you. My first time on the stage was last year with you. How about that? Is that true? Well, the last time we were here is that was my that is true. If you have any questions raise your hand shout out. Yes. In the back. Thank you. Your. And. Just say. Four. After. Said. How? Eaters using double Ursus. It was really what's the question. So. That you're that. But is being. One strategies. Strategy. What would you like Arthur to comment on? Okay. So that's appreciate it a lot. And thank you, by the way, over the course of your work and think tanks and in media to try to bring people together people. There was progress, by the way, there is progress why because when society is not made up of groups talking to each other societies made up of individuals loving each other. That's the strength of a society, and what can happen would each one of us like you need to hold your views. Anybody who says we need more agreement in America? Instead of three times, I think that's wrong, but we can love each other in spite of that. And we can create a movement that we were starting the ninety second street y in March of twenty nine hundred if we can start to make love cool across disagreement that's really super dangerous for the outrage industrial complex, and it's really good for dirty word. Well, it's flexibility is what we do. I mean, anybody who has. Gotten married and stayed married understands that that it's a it's a it's a competition of ideas. The thing that you said that I think is is very interesting, particularly just think to me is you talk about that these highest levels, these Republicans and Democrats are coming together at CF are. And and yet it didn't matter because at some district when it got out to the to the elected member sort of fell apart. And I think that's exactly what they're saying. Which is somebody who's profiting from the contempt and in this case, it's it didn't matter the level disagreement. Once it got out to to somebody who's running for office. The contempt was to their benefit to throw meat into the into the audience because it profited my election rather than it was the right thing to do. I agree with you entirely. And I think that's one of the challenges. Yes. In the middle. Thank you. My is. Just on the other side. Yeah. Why not? Four hours. So. House. Sean, Hannity, you know. It's all about money. Sure. And the president supposedly brand. Do anything about that? Again. Maybe that's not true. But.

New York New York Times Simon cynic Arthur elected member president America Sean Hannity ninety second nineteen years twelve year Four hours
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Night. I love your mother forget that. By the time. You get through the five you don't remember the one that's your rule for social media. That's your rule for your all your interactions with other people. You can't do anything critical or negative even remotely until you said five beautiful, and affirming things and I've committed myself to this. I've lashed myself to the mask because. Public job our books. Yeah. And so when I say something if it's hypocritical or wrong or go against it. I'm gonna hear about it. Someone will let you know somebody will let me know my teenage kids will let me know, which is not that fun. So I've committed myself to the five to one rule, and you know, what happened if it's wind up being the fine two zero rule, and that's what we can do. This is a practical way for us to actually become warriors in the fight against contempt and four more love. And what you do is. You say, okay, I got it five five that's expanding the range between stimulus and response. Changed my life. I think the I think we'll switch to questions in now. Making a call them. The I'll share a story that really helped me which is I have a friend who lives in a small town in Tennessee near nothing an hour and a half from the nearest small city, rural Tennessee, she holds very very different political views to me. And she says things that are absolutely based on conspiracy theory. You know, some of the -rageous things that's what they want you to think. You know, the, but I'm not a conspiracy theorist. No, no, no. I am not a theorist either. But she she believes in a lot of these things like to the core of her being absolutely believes, the government is listening to all our phone calls and reading all our emails, and the government doesn't care what she's doing, you know. And I got her an Amazon Alexa for for Christmas. And she returned it. Because she thought the government would listen to everything. And it's been such. It's been it's so good for me. Because if we talk about political things or she says one of her theories, I I have I've become incensed and started screaming logic. You know? And it's been so good to me because I know her core. She such a good human being who cares about me with all her heart. And it's been so good to me to learn that her opinions are not her, and I can I can I can love somebody not love, their political points of view or views world, everyone of you has this. It's your it's your nephew. I think I think the spend time with those people are the most important thing right now. And it's not a criticism of her criticism of me that I would get angry. Sometimes. Yeah. No. It's amazing. The extent that we will also see eight look, it's very irritating. When people continuously say things that we think are wrong. And by the way, that are harmful and they're really hurtful to the country. But that's all. Always the way it's been there's always been bitter disagreement. And that's actually as much as it's hard to absorb in. The current moment you go back throughout history. And you see these big disagreements that were considered to be just existential disagreements in the vast majority of the -cations the United States. These were the source of strength. Ideological diversity without violence was the source of strength. Even when one side was was vindicated by the facts, the fact that we could adjudicate and aggressive way are disputes without violence that exercise is really important to the polity it's really important to American civic life. And so what I recommend people all the time is to say, but who you're talking to somebody that you think is just hopeless unreasonable is actually state to that person. And this is again, this is a this is something psychologists recommend, but Bush masters and Catholic priests and everybody tend to recommend is when you're listening to somebody really listen, you know, when they listen to understand. Yeah. When they. Talk about active listening, these classes and active listening. It's actually usually they're trying to help you fake listening. Here's how to act like you're listening waiting for your turn to right? That's not. That's not what we want to really listen to say, what is the person this person's moral objective? Yeah. No, what policy do they want? What party? They want their moral objective, and then to start by stating or asking is this what you really deeply want the following. And if you get that right in virtually every case, that's what you want to. And that is deeply satisfying that is deeply connecting between people because most people want the same thing, and they have I mean, look, they have different views, and they have different facts and sometimes they're woefully misinformed. And by the way, sometimes I am woefully. And this is one of the things I learned which is usually when we use the term conspiracy theory as a criticism of the way, the other person sees the world and there are liberal conspiracy theories. They're conservative spiracy theories. And what I learned was that. My conspiracy theories are just different from hers and some of hers actually have some credence. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's right insurance that Alexa, really is listening. Yeah. Except for the government. It's Amazon, you know, somebody in the in the heart of the State Department or the department offenses Simon bought more socks, right? I keep telling I keep telling people that that. To punish people in the government. They would make them listen to my phone. Let's do some questions. We we can we bring the house lights up is that possible as we can emission one thing. So one thing I had this little thrill being in here, and the reason. Yeah. Five years ago, thirty five thirty five forty five years ago on January twenty first I made my New York concert debut. Here's a chamber musician on this stage.

Amazon Tennessee Alexa United States State Department New York Bush Simon thirty five thirty five forty Five years
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Know. I think I think there's a number of reasons I think one of the big reasons is that. More and more and more would disconnected from the people with whom we're disagreeing with we we get angry on Twitter, we get angry on Facebook you, and I both know this which is. We can say something publicly and people will Ripa shreds. Online. But everybody's really polite when they come into the audience, you know. Because there's a respect when when you're when you're with someone plus the count to ten rule, I think is has been invalidated with the instantaneous nature of social media. Which is you read something, you're incensed you react, which is usually a reaction in your mind. But except you type it, and you had send I personally believe Twitter should have a twenty second delay. And then it says, you really sure you want to send this. Twenty hour. And and and I would I would I would I would put money down that most of the stuff that gets posted wouldn't get post the Roseanne bars and things like things that are done in poor taste or poor humor or the Adler is off or and I mean, I think I think there are people just didn't have a second to think through even I intended this to be funny. Should I really post this Trevor Noah, you know, even if I I'm being angry, should I believe post this? And I think the ten second rules a big a big thing this so smart, but I think the disconnected nece is is the thing. Dehumanisation dehumanisation individuals is the way you produce pieces as you meet your enemy, right? You shake. You have peace talks. Have you have you shake hands? It has to be done in person. William Yuri the guy who wrote getting to. Yes, who am I shoo fan up? He laments. The fact that we have peace talks. We don't have peace listens. And he was actually at the Camp David accords, which is when Yasser Arafat was offered. Ninety eight percent of everything he was asking for and couldn't make the deal. And Bill was there to help broker the peace that ended up collapsing? And I and I asked him. This is peace negotiators V highest level in the world. Arab-israelis at camp. David the world's best peace negotiators at the table. I said do they start with why they showed up? And he said, nah, they start with what they want and one side lays out what they want. And the other side lays out what they want and the negotiation begins of giving and taking but neither party says neither party asked. Why did you come here today? You're a busy person you got spending a lot of political capital to be here. The risk of failure will will will damage your reputation or maybe failing will enhance reputation what is the point of all of this nonsense. What is the point of all the stress, and it doesn't matter who goes first the party will say, it's simple. What I'm looking for is that our people want to feel safe that they go to work every day and come home and feel safe and send their kids to school every day. And that they feel safe coming home. We all want to be able to provide for ourselves and feel a part of something bigger than ourselves. Call it a nation state, call it and ideology right to which the other side can respond funny. That's what we want right now. Negotiate. And you can't do that. Very well when you're on Twitter you at all when you're on Twitter. No, we don't talk with people. We talk at people in social media. This is why by the way, Simon is not very much social media. I mean, you're living out your biggest bestselling book is start with y. Yeah. So you the principal here is by the way, this is operatives and all of our lives when you're in New York or Washington D C where I live is the most professionalized ambitious places in the world. You know, the question is everybody asks you to party? What do you do nobody ever asked? Why do you do what you do ever? You have an answer you need an answer. Read the book. No, no. I. I think I think that I think that what we have in America today is a mirror. I think we get the politicians we deserve. And I think we sit in our armchairs and say look at them. We hate the Republicans are at Democrats throws. We hate the Democrats or Republicans roads war we endorse our own contempt. The the other have contempt for the other. And I don't think enough of us have looked in the mirror and said shit. That's me. Because these are my friends to hear it as well. I hear my friends who have actual contempt for somebody who would say, I'm I'm a Republican or democrat or especially in New York City, if somebody says I voted for Trump there are people who voted for Trump who keep their mouth shut in parties. Not because they're embarrassed. But because they will be berated and humiliated and criticized in the most horrible way. So it's just you just keep it to yourself. And I think what's more interesting is to is for us to learn curiosity, which is if somebody voted for Trump to try and understand what motivated that decision rather than judging the person, I think is more interesting. And I think I think the Y question as opposed to the why I think I think yeah. Exactly, the why question, and I think we we cannot control the things that we cannot control. You can't control the Republican party of the Democratic Party. Neither can I we can't control the president or any of the secretary's. And the cabinet like we have no control of the thing. We can control ourselves and our environment. It's not big America. That's the problem. It's little merica. That's the problem. And I think the solution. We're looking for silver bullets. We're looking for to elect somebody who's gonna fix everything. And I wish it could be done that quickly and that easily, but it continent won't. And I think the our politicians will reflect us you meant why was living here in the eighties. When Ed Koch finally lost there and on the night when you find. Finally, lost you know, and he'd run run run says politicians sooner or later, your gonna lose sure he lost. And he said the people have made their decision. And now they're going to have to pay. We we want that we believe that the mere deserted. It's really deserve. It's really that was point. And that's really clear for sure, but we can fight back. We have. But what should we not love back and said, oh, we can't well fighting back with love is the ultimate is the ultimate of the moist. I'm trying to make okay. So let's get to some practical solutions about this. Right. We were talking about social media. So this is d individual people. You have a bigger problem. The biggest problem you're going to have is when you're not an actual person talking to somebody in person, you get an Email from Simon. It says if you're if you're with somebody and you're looking at your phone, please put down your phone and pay attention to that person before you read this Email because the people you with a more important than anything in this Email. That's yeah. Yeah. I almost got it. Right. Because I've seen it a bunch of times. I usually read that it's own back. What do you call it my signature, but it's actually comes. Before the message. Yeah. Yeah. It comes before the message. So okay. We need to Rian divis-. Wait ourselves any occasion in which you are not you. And what you're anonymous should be repudiated. And so one of the go through these rules, particularly young people who wanna be happier. There's a lot of new research that shows that every hour you spend on social media. You will be unhappier every hour will be an unhappier hours. A lot of good experimentation. Good. Stay in Michigan. Good study from Israel that with natural. Spend more time on Facebook unhappy with people who been let exactly right and Twitter, which is a contempt machine is worst. And according to a lot of these data that were currently starting to see. Okay. So what do you do re individual? It yourself starting with a few rules number one never ever interact with an anonymous entity. I mean, you can't tell, but you really know when somebody's, you know, Trump lover twenty twenty Bernie Brodie twenty twenty that's not actual. That might be a Russian Twitter bot for all, you know. But at very least somebody not taking responsibility for what he or she says second never be anonymous never say anything anonymously commit to a lack of anonymity. We don't live in Burma. This is not a dictatorial regime, where if you actually say what you think politically is going to be you know, a knock at midnight. You know, we're living in the one of the freest countries in the history of the world we can afford not to be anonymous. That's number two number three. This comes from John Godman, the marriage counselor. When he's got a he's got people that are on the rocks couples on the rocks. He makes them carry notebooks around and write down what they're thinking. And they want to say something critical to their partner. He makes them safe five loving things before they can get to the criticism because they have to remember how to not be critical when you're first in love, you can't think of anything critical. And then when you're about to get divorced. You can't think of anything criticism. So what does he make them? Do. He makes them go back to the early days. Manual. It's great. So it's like, you know, I can't believe you picked me up. I can't believe all alright you'll beautiful night.

Twitter Trump Facebook America Simon Ripa shreds Trevor Noah Yasser Arafat Ed Koch William Yuri Republican party Bill New York City David John Godman Burma partner Rian divis
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

12:39 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"But it's time for us to take the wheel. Do we we take the wheel by recognizing that it's a big problem for us recognizing that we're being torn apart, and we cannot reconcile and we can't make progress as long as they are in charge. And the first thing that you do is you deprive oxygen to those who need it who need the attention who need the clicks who need the money who need the the views, and so one of the things except there the car accidents that were turning we're slowing down to watch. So we simply speed up. No. And one of the knowledge how is my view knowledge is power on this. We have to make a moral choice about what we want to give our attention to and most people again they're scratching each. There's a habit of contempt. We if we don't like the habit, we have to be conscious of it and break the habit. So you have to substitute something for and you will find that. If. Expand the the space. I talked about in great in great detail in this book between civilised response, and you put warm heartedness in it. You will not be interested in outrage industrial complex anymore. So does that mean FOX Jewish turnoff, FOX MSNBC view as you turn on him? ABC? It is whatever is scratching your issue. Your favorite columnist your favorite news network. Your whatever if something is really ideologically biased, and it's firing you up, and it's telling you anybody who's saying, you're right. And they're stupid. Newt do you know what this is analogous, the Nagas analogous to is an app a game on your phone that you're dictate to whatever. And. Spend money. So you can keep playing and then one day, you realize you're not talking to your friends, and you're sitting there, and you're just delete it and you never miss it. It's amazing or you do miss it for day or two the habit. It's funny. There are these four profit or profitable companies and people throughout history that make people miserable, and they work on dopamine dopamine, the neurotransmitter of concentration and focus and. It's what gets you addicted almost everything that's addictive and not just drugs and alcohol, but gambling and cell phones, cell phones and social media. And and what the problem is. You hate it. But you keep doing it. Back in the day. It was RJ Reynolds. And Philip Morris Companies that you gave all your money to that. We're really working on dopamine and people have largely walked away in this country from those addictive products. Now, it's social media social media absolutely is working on the dopamine circuits in our brains, and it stimulates the most dopamine when it tells us what we want to hear. And that the people that we don't like our stupid Nevil. It's amazing when you look at the apps on your favorite newspaper, and you read your favorite columnist who's firing you up and telling you the other side is dumb. You get to the bottom. And it's monitoring your viewing habits to give you the next article that you get you a little bit more fired up. This is on purpose. We're being used. It's not right. And it's time for us to take our take it back. So one of the things I'd love to get your opinion on is. I'm fascinated by the difference in the way conservatives are able to support other conservatives even when they viscerally disagree with them. And behind the scenes, maybe even have contempt for them. And yet publicly they will fall in luck Staten and liberals will eat their own the middle's liberals with somebody just you might have had years of agreement and something happened and they'll eat their own spit them out like nobody's business. Talk. Just I'd love to get your opinion of why that happened. Well, it's funny because conservatives say the same thing, but in reverse they think that liberals go in lockstep and the conservatives eat their own and are not loyal to each other. That's true. Well, it's. Objectively what's happening is whatever side you're on. You actually see the civil war going on on the other side you see solitaire. But we know that's not true. I mean, just look at what happens in congress. I mean. I mean, I'll Franken's a great example. I mean without any kind of investigation or anything with you or l Franken did the thing that he did or not the party reacted and pushed him destroyed his career, pushed them out entirely. Whereas. If you wanna take the Cavanaugh hearings, whether you agree with Kevin did it or not. It was just remarkable to see that the conservatives just fell into lockstep. The example that a lot of people are talking about on the and those similar accusation. Yeah. A lot of people are talking on the political, right? These days about what's going on with charges of anti-semitism in the Democratic Party. And why why is there not a full throated denunciation of anti-semitism? And again, only Democrats can as an independent. I can't answer that only Democrats can answer. Whether the political calculation is such that, it's not either not meritorious or not warranted. So this is a problem and increasingly answer problem where tribalism takes precedence over over principal. And you know, it's easy for all of us to do that. It's really really easy to to see the sins of the other side in greater focus and with greater gravity than sins on your own side. But that's exactly the opposite of what we should be doing. We should be more. Moral armed when people who agree with us transgress on our own values that should really make us angrier. And we should hold them to hire a count. You think about it? And yet we don't because power is attractive, and it seems everybody's telling us in the seven percent outrage industrial complex that this is the election that matters more than any time in our lifetime that this is the moment in which we have to come together, and we lower standards what I find. So interesting. And and you know, I preached by partisanship actually work with both parties quite openly as do I because we both have. And the point is Arthur I've made the decision, which is we preach bipartisanship. And then pick aside. And what I find so astonishing is sort of New Hampshire, which is when one one group of people in one political spectrum, and it's just politics, actually view the other side is evil evil evil. There was an amazing interview. With Kristof volts and David Letterman winning glorious bastards was in the movies. I don't know if you've seen the moving glorious bastards gray movie and Chris Volz plays this the Nazi. In chilling, an effective portrayal. And in this interview with crystal volts, David Letterman asked him, what did you have to do as an actor to be able to portray evil so effectively and Christopher looks at him. Absolutely confused. You see him trying to understand the question you, see the wheels turning and he's any any kind of doesn't understand the question that he says to let them in. He wasn't evil. And then let him ask the question again is what did you have to do to playboy in Kearney? Like where did you have to go inside yourself to to muster that up? And again, Chris Volz doesn't understand the question. And he says something completely unrelated. And eventually they move on. You can see it's going to go nowhere. And what you realize what make what made Kristof volts such an effective actor is no one thinks they're on the side of evil. Everyone thinks they're on the side of good. And the way he was able to play the character. So effectively is he as an actor said this guy absolutely believes in the goodness of what he's doing. Yes. And I think this is our problem in politics today, which is only we can label the other side evil. They're isis. They're on the side of good. You know? And the idea of empathy. Which is to to absolately believe that the other side, though, we may disagree with them. Absolutely believes they're on the side of goodness. And the opportunities to try and understand what is driving that. With an open heart of athlete. Right. And it's something that that ninety three percent of us who think that our country's divided are not doing because we're the ones calling the other side evil, and they're the ones that have to s into when somebody's calls the other side or acquiescing. We're falling in line with our favorite columnist. We're not needing them or better yet repudiating. So there's this great research by gyna- Madame weights who teaches at Northwestern University on something called motive attribution a symmetry. You like. Sort of complicated in any way. It's simple idea. But you have to say it in a complicated way to get tenure. Which is why I've never been given tenure. I've had it's not it's not really that. Great. You quoted shopping Hauer when we started and and the date. That's why you got tenure. I was at a communist that gave me nothing. So so motive attribution they symmetry is this incredibly interesting phenomenon in which you have two sides in a conflict where both sides are convinced that they're motivated by love and the other side is motivated by hate. Now. Both sides think I'm motivated by love Arthur thinks that he's motivated by love and Simon's one of it by hatred and Simon thinks Simon is one of my love and Arthur's motivated by hatred Simon. And Arthur can't both be right Arthur might be wrong. But we can't both be right. When does this occurred generally in periods of confrontation, military, confrontation, you see a ton of it and the Israeli Palestinian conflict both sides uniformly that they are motivated by love for humanity and for their country, and what's right and good and the other side thinks, and they think that the other side motivate hatred for them. Okay. Now, why is this? An interesting piece of research is published in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences in two thousand fourteen that today in America, liberals and conservatives have the same. Level of motive attribution as symmetry as the Israelis and Palestinians big problem because that's the ultimate kind of tribalism was basically than people can get you to almost anything. If you basically in the weirdest thing is that when I had that experience in New Hampshire said, how can I do kind of a little quasi experiments on the road a lot? I'm talking a lot of different audiences left right and center. So I started asking this question. I'm gonna ask you now. I can't see very well. But I I'm gonna look out, and I'm gonna ask you just for a quick show hands. How many of you love somebody with whom you disagree politically? Kinda around that two hundred percent Simon. It's it's probably eighty five percents. Okay. Ninety percent see side. It's ninety three percents ninety three percent. Okay. All of you at your hands up. Ask yourself those people that you love who disagree with political. You disagree with you politically are they on those people motivated by hatred to you almost none of you would say, yes, you would say they're misguided say that they're wrong. It says that they have that information. You say they've been brainwashed by some Cable News Network, or by a bunch of politicians or the entertainment industry or something outrage industrial complex. So the problem is that attribution motive attribution as symmetry is based on an error by a cognitive functioning error that and we've been convinced of that because it gives people power we have to recognize that people who disagree with us, usually virtually none of the cases except for the crowning heights when people who are profiting from it. They don't hate us. They might be wrong. And again, none of this. Is to say that we need to agree more because I believe in the competition of ideas and soda you. I've even disagreement vigorous disagreements something's wrong, you should go after it hammer and tongs, but their ideas are not the person, and separating the person from the ideas means that you can treat bad ideas with the stain and still love a person and not treat the person this happened, isn't it right inches. We've personalized light. Right. We don't think their ideas are bad. We they're about layer bad. Why do we do that? I. Are you asking me? No, no, no. I'm asking you because you know.

dopamine Arthur Simon New Hampshire Kristof Chris Volz FOX MSNBC l Franken David Letterman RJ Reynolds Philip Morris Companies ABC Staten Newt principal Democratic Party congress Cavanaugh
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Love you never have been at an interaction with somebody. With whom you disagree, and you show contempt and create an enemy, and then and then say that was great when I did never. And when you when you fail to do that. And you actually show kindness and respect and love you never say later. I wish I'd been more of a jerk. This is just not how we're wired and yet we racked this way. So here's the problem. We have a culture of contempt as the subtitle in this book is the culture how a decent people can save America from the culture of canton, and it starts with each one of us. Here's the good news. You can break the cycle each one of us can break the cycle by by recogni-. Ising? There's a habit. I don't wanna be a bad person. Ninety three percent of Americans hate how divided we become a country. But yet we're the ones contribute because we have a habit. So one of the things I talk a lot about in. This book is how habits reformed how has can be broken. Because each one of us is going to have a mission having a pasta it against this then went into break her own habits, and it goes to this Buddhist masters. They talk about stimulus and response and maximizing the space between that so you're stimulated treats you with contempt. Have all the time. If you're on social media it'll happen within twenty four seconds. Okay. So civilly, treat contempt, and if you have no space between your stimulus and response, you'll rack with contempt Buddhist masters talk about maximizing the space between stimulus response into wish you choose your own reaction, which makes you the master. So give a practical example, your mother who is a Buddhist master. Your mother's here. But I mean, all messed and all of your mother's were Buddhist masters why because your mother's told you to count to ten before when you're angry for your act. That's what you should do you count to ten why? Because your mother is saying choose your response. So here's how I it was working on this research, and I understand this because I've been a meditators and understands stimulus response cadence. But I what do I put in there? So I was doing a documentary film. It's actually coming out this spring called the pursuit, and in it, we're in Dharamsala with his holiness, the Dalai Lama, and we were working together like six or seven years, and we were shooting these scenes and between takes having a conversation with them. I said this is on my mind, my heart your holiness. What should I do when I feel contempt and he said, he said show, warm heartedness? And I said or thought you got anything else? Because that's weak thought about it. A lot of you here. You know, the story of his holiness, the Dalai Lama, the leader that Tabet and Buddhist people he's super famous, but when he was leading to exile after the communist Chinese rolled through Tabet six million people vast land mass people who had no military capability doing what tyrants always do by the way, which is a role militarily through population for resources to bet holds the headwaters of all the major Chinese rivers. He was lead. He was he led his people in exile at age twenty four. Now, he could have responded with contempt and anger and tried to get put out a press release or something. But he didn't he was poor. And he was to be disappeared in forgotten. And he's for the next sixty years has started every told me he started every day praying for the Chinese leaders not that they'll give them back as homeland, but they'll live good and happy lives, and he's become the most respected religious leader in the world and the cause of Tibet. Is an international cause which I promote. And I believe in. There's zero percent chance that the guy who's the president of the American Enterprise Institute is going to be an advocate for the Tabet in Buddhist. People have the Dalai Lama responded to his situation with contempt. That's power man that is strength answering contempt with contempt for weak people answering content with warm heartedness is for true masters. You have a wonderful phrase that that in this book that I love the outrage industrial complex. Which is this business of contempt to sell advertising, and contempt breeds contempt. And there are a few people who profiting from our contempt both financially but for to benefit their elections as well. Yeah, tell tell us more about contempt outrage industrial complex. So there's a group nonprofit group called more in common that does outstanding original surveys polling of people's attitudes. And they they want to bring the country in the world together, which is the ultimate meritorious. 'cause in my view, they find that ninety three percent mention this minute. Ninety three percent of Americans hate how divided we become a country and nothing pulls at ninety three percent. Moms popularity is not even a ninety three percent is incredible. It's just like here's the problem. That means seven percent like how polarized we've become country. That's because they're profiting from it might not be. Profiting in money. They might lucrative television contracts, and money and fame and power and influence, and prestige and cliques and popularity attention. You know that Semper sent but we hear virtually all of you. I hope all of you. Join me and Simon in the ninety three percent. So we gotta fight back. The outrage industrial complex is using us. They're bullying us their terrorizing the country by driving us to be against each other. We have differences politically. So actually, it was great. I mean, that's the fruit of democracy. That's the promise of this country. That's the reason that the cynics and the brooks' one of the reasons as ambitious riffraff they made their way to America. So they could work hard and rice, the top disagree and not have a knock in the night and the jack-booted thug the door we have to protect that. And we have the the world on our side or at least ninety three percent. Percent of the country on our side. That's a really great thing. The outrage industrial complex right now is sort of driving the bus. But

America Dharamsala canton American Enterprise Institute president brooks Simon ninety three percent Ninety three percent twenty four seconds seven percent zero percent seven years sixty years
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Hi, everybody. Here's a bonus episode of the Arthur Brooke show in your feet. This is a conversation that I had with Simon cynic about the idea of loving, your enemies. Actually, it's a conversation that Simon had with me. Now, if you're not familiar with Simon Senate, he's the New York Times bestselling author of start with why leaders eat last and we've been friends for a long time. This was recorded in front of a live audience at the ninety second street y in Newark city a couple of weeks ago. It was really a great conversation. We talked about contempt, and our modern society. And now, it's it's wrecking our relationships and even hurting our happiness, we talked about the fact that you can't be persuasive. When you're insulting other people that treating other people with love and respect is the only way you're gonna have a chance of convincing. Anybody of anything we go through step by step? How loving your enemies is an incredibly practical and happiness inducing strategy for each one of us to adopt in our lives. So I hope you enjoy your. Evening. I am Mark Schultz that chairman emeritus of the board of the ninety second street, y and it's my privilege tonight. To welcome you to this very special event. Love your enemies, Arthur Brooks in conversation with Simon cynic. Let me just quickly note this is being recorded for Arthur Brooks podcast series. So when we come to Q, a just keep in mind, we're going to be recording the program. Let me tell you a little bit about each of the two gentlemen, who were very lucky to have here tonight. Simon cynic trained ethnographer has devoted his life to share in his thinking in order to help leaders and organizations. Inspire action from American Airlines Disney from big business entrepreneurs to police forces Simon has had the honor of sharing his ideas with an array of leaders and organizations in nearly every industry. He's also the author of multiple bestselling books including start with UAE leaders eat last together as better and find your own y find your wife's us me. And that's not this why. Although we do hope you'll find that. So his new book the infinite game will be released in June two thousand nineteen so please be on the lookout for that. We can get him back here to talk about his book, but simul wonderful tonight's program speaking with some with Arthur Brooks who is a columnist for the Washington Post host of the podcast, the Arthur Brooke show, as I mentioned, the we'll be recording for tonight and president of the American Enterprise Institute, a public policy think tank in Washington DC, I also have the great personal privilege of content him, very, dear and longtime friend previously. He was the Louis Banta professor of business and government at Syracuse university. His latest book that will be focusing on tonight. Love your enemies outlines a series of practical strategies for leaders in all areas of life who wished to subvert the culture of contempt and usher in new era of American progress. Something I'm quite sure we all are very sympathetic to love your enemies will be on sale in the lobby afterward. And a book signing will take place encourage you all to pick up a copy and read it it is terrific. So without further ado, please join me with the ninety second street y in welcoming, Arthur and Simon. I'm gonna put your book like that. All right. That's good. Thanks everyone for coming. It's a particular thrill for me. I'm a huge fan of Arthur's and of the way he thinks. And when I heard that he was he knew that he was writing the book when he was writing it. And it was one of those things where you think why hasn't this been written yet? Why why has no one else in this book before? So so glad you did. Write it. Thank you a relief to me that. No that nobody had written it by the time. It isn't it? Yeah. That's always a plus definitely a plus. So what we thought we would do tonight is have Arthur share a little bit about. How he came about the idea, and what his what his thoughts are and how to cure some of the challenges we have in our country today. And then we'll feel some of your questions afterwards. If you could can you share the story of New Hampshire, which I think is so good that really sets the stage for for this idea. Thank you, Simon. And then the admiration that I have for years, you know, is analogous. We've been friends for a number of years now, and we met at a kind of a political event that we're a lot of protesters outside and we felt mutually under siege. And is one of these bunker things where we bonded over an event where there were people picketing outside. It's great. And and your your books have had a huge impact on me. So thank you. Thanks very much. And thanks to all of you, by the way. So what signs referring to is an incident stimulated this book, love, your enemies. And most of you know, that idea love your enemies as ancient and subversive concept that comes from almost every major religious tradition yet either. It's not good enough to love your friends because that's easy in the love people who don't love you. And that civility intolerance are not high enough standards are actually garbage Sanders. You know, it's one of the things that I plan on the book is if I said, Simon my wife Esther, and I we were civil to each other. It's a dude you need counseling. Or my employee's that they tolerate me say, that's. Big problem, we need a higher standard. And that's what I'm seeking this. And I got started thinking about this in two thousand fourteen when I started to recognize that there was a political train coming down the tracks. That was not good for America. Or ended the world. I was doing a speech in New Hampshire a conservative event. I do a lot of the hundred and fifty or so speeches year, and sometimes they're very progressive audiences at universities, and sometimes they're non-political sometimes they're conservative. It was the latter group and seven hundred conservative activists in the audience, and it was talking about politics and economics and foreign policy and stopped in the middle. Because I was actually the only non candidate on the schedule. Everybody else's running for president. I mean in twenty fourteen half of America was running for president and or was going to. And I thought it was sitting backstage listening to the speeches and they were doing politicians always do throwing red meat at the audience and. Saying you're right

Simon Simon cynic Arthur Brooks Arthur Brooke Arthur Simon Senate New Hampshire president New York Times UAE Newark America American Airlines Mark Schultz chairman emeritus American Enterprise Institute Syracuse university Louis Banta Washington Post
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Our shared humanity can help us create a better world. Welcome to the Arthur, Brooke show, Adam thank you so much for having me the research that you have been engaged in over the past few years that's been blowing my mind a little bit. Frankly is about what you call motive attribution, a symmetry or political motive a symmetry, the basic finding is that when you're on one side of conflict. You think your group is motive motivated by love more than hate and more often than not you believe the people on the other side of the contra. Conflict are motivated by hatred of you more than love of their own. So that's the basic a symmetry, and we found that in a in a few studies, we feel like other people have found bits and pieces of that tendency, and we just kind of put it all together. It's a super interesting hypothesis and the and the findings are really compelling to. But here's the mind-blowing part. You find equal levels of political motivation Matry today in the way that Democrats and Republicans each other in America, right? Yeah. So our studies of Israel as impel stinian were what we call nationally Representative which means were taking a broad swath of as ralian Palestinians, Israel society. And we're showing how this phenomenon manifests are. Studies death Democrats and Republicans used a convenience sample, which was heavier on Democrats Republic. Kins-? We would love to get a more Representative sample, basically what we're dealing with as a minority of Republicans yet nonetheless when we look at the data, we've collected. Yes, we show a similar pattern across across the board..

Adam Representative Israel Israel society Arthur Kins Brooke America
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

11:21 min | 2 years ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Now worth pointing out that not everybody thinks this problem. We've just heard from prominent authors who've written a book on this, and they clearly think this is something we should be concerned about, but we need all different points of view on this after all this show by disagreement. So let's bring in somebody now who thinks that this isn't something we should be so worried about on delighted. Now, to welcome to the show. Zach Beecham's Zach is a senior reporter for vox media. So he's in the vox media family just like me, Zach is the host of worldly, which is one of oxes other podcasts. That's that's a podcast that covers foreign policy international relations, and I'd strongly recommend it to listeners the book show. Now Zak is a journalist, but he also has a bit of an academic background. He has a masters in science international relations from the London School of economics and political science, and he's been giving thought to the tenor of discussions on college campuses on ideological diversity and on what's going on the subject of this show. Zach, welcome to the. Arthur show, hey Arthur to be here, and thanks for the super nice shoutout to worldly. We like to think that your listeners would like us to people in our world who are interested in foreign policy, find it really enriching and something that has to the debates regulations of the success of that show. And thanks for coming on the Arthur Burke show to help us sort out a little bit. This idea of disagreement on campuses. You pay attention a lot to politics and you know that the hot topic right now on college campuses for a lot of people's free speech. College campuses where the epicenter for free speech in the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. I have so many friends that came up through Berkeley and and I've talked to a lot of them since then and many of the people who are really old line progressives, they'll say today, it feels like something different than free speech because we're trying to preclude certain arguments, not just conservative arguments, but all kinds of arguments. How do you see it? Well, my basic view is that it's important to look at the denominator on these issues. And by that, I mean, let's take a look at the number of incidents that one could define as being troubling for free speech on the college campus. And then let's take a look at how many college campus there are. You know, there's some researchers at Georgetown doing that right now. The Georgetown center for free speech, I believe is the actual name of the institute and their data found roughly sixty incidents in the past two years that have occurred on college campuses that might be deemed as threatening to free speech, which include everything ranging from university administrator announcing a student for their speech in then. To faculty being fired for their views. So that sixty incidents over the course of two years, and there are well over four thousand four year and two year colleges in the United States. So the dominator is really huge in the numerous really spoil. Right? So that's just to me right off the bat, that there isn't a lot of evidence that there really is a major challenge being mounted to free speech on college campuses today. So you're looking at this from the point of view as skeptic, of course this, that's an appropriate thing to do. Of course, because when there's a conventional viewpoint, that's being propagated, it's always good to push back on the bed. But why do you suppose that is that so many people are so worried about it? You think it's just a fad, do you think it's unfounded? What do you think is behind the fretting about this particular topic? So I think that there are two things, one of which is not quite a fat and the way that you put it, but a recurring fad or recurring. Moral panic. People always think that there's something wrong with the youth. It doesn't matter which generation it is. There are always covers of magazines, feature stories in newspapers, articles and books being written about how the new generation is going to poison our society and how they're lazy or insert vice here and it. You know, I, it comes every time and it's an different fashion based on what those people think at that time. So now you have people who are really energized by anti-racist activity and really upset by racist speech, and that is being spun as they hate for speech. And I think the second part of it is people are disconnected from the politics on college campuses. I think it really is the case that universities are not only much more liberal but much more radical than mainstream society as a whole, where you know, you have debates between liberals and Marxist or philosophical liberals and philosophical post-structuralist. And those are the center of gravity, the arguments between faculty, whereas in the United States as a whole, there's a vanishingly small Marxist movement. Post structuralism is not a political force and you have debates between liberals and conservatives in the poll in the center of the conversations very different. So if you're looking at this from the outside, you're like, wow, this is really a crazy place where typical debate in the United States is not being tolerated. It's really divorced from our normal conversation and that that makes people wonder what's going on there and why there aren't more standard ranges of us being expressed on American college campuses. So you get a sense that free speech is being squelched. Okay. So you're saying that it's true what a lot of conservatives regret about college campuses is that they're, they're way way the left. They are in point of fact way more radical. And so when you listen in on the debates, you think holy cow, this is this is just way outside the mainstream, so that that seems to you to be. Kind of uncontroversial to say right Zak. Yeah, I think that that's indisputable. Read a their various different surveys. I one number that I saw bandied about was about one tenth of faculty members are conservative. Yeah, on a campuses is probably more like one in twenty five. What that means is that the center of gravity is so different than American society that a guy like me. I'm an old academic, I mean, once and future guy on college campuses, but I'm sort of center, right? My political views. You wouldn't think me radical by American standards, believe in free enterprise. I think it's a source of good in the world. I think that American leadership militarily has been net net very good for the world, but that in of itself, given the way college campuses or working is kind of radically right wing, right? Yeah, I would say I mean, certainly the institutions that I've studied at our worked at not the second view interestingly or the first one actually, and it depends on the department. So in the economics field, for instance. I would find it shocking if anyone descended from the here that free enterprise has been good for the world. And I think the majority based on recent polling I saw would say that American hegemony or the American liberal or however you wanted to find it has been probably net good for the world. That's why you've seen such backlash to the Trump administration's foreign policy from from professional scholars for the most part now is a robust abate over international relations scholars as to whether or not that's true. You know the case that you just made that US military dominance is good for the world. Isn't that right? But that's a, that's a real meaningful debate. Right? And I think it's an important conversation to be having when I wish honestly, we had more in the American mainstream, but I, it would not be controversial to say what you just said in either of the fields that specialize in the two areas you write about this. In my view, there's been nothing better for bringing progressives into the fold for American internationalism than the Trump foreign policy in a very wise brought. It's brought a lot of people in the left around. My basic point of view as a matter of fact, and his claw, those things work. But that's just, I guess that's just the way it goes. Now. I wanna I wanna make sure that I'm characterizing your views of and your views are not just your opinion. This is based on your reading the date. I should add that because because you've done work on this, you're not saying that the sixty or so cases of the infringement of free speech on college campuses that that it's okay. You're not saying that you're in favor of it. You might very well be against it. You're saying this not as frequent as people think. Is that correct? That's right. I don't have a blanket opinion on every single one of the cases catalogued in that thing. Some of them when I was looking over the examples seemed troubling and there are really -xample 's of college students going too far of university administrators, reacting in nature kind of way. I also think there are instances in which you really can justify disinvite somebody in the case of a provocateur. Milo Yiannopoulos who never should have been invite. In the first place. And I've, I've interviewed Milo I, I know him as well as one can. No a very alien subject of your of your reporting, and he is a troll. He's not someone who you would engage with on an intellectual level, and so bring him to a college campus is a form provocation rather than an attempt of a serious intellectual conversation. So I, I don't think that disputation of someone like him is necessarily might be, but not necessarily a bad idea. It really just depends on the case. So as a fair to say that what troubles you is the cases of what is often called these days? D platforming taking away people's abilities become campuses. What troubles used deep platforming people who are conflicted with somebody like Miley Annapolis somebody who is a provocateur who's a controversial list, but who's actually a scholar in other words to not be able to tell the difference between a controversial than a scholar who just doesn't happen to be to have conventional academic views. Is that more troubling to that would bother me more. We might disagree on who constitutes that kind of person who fits that profile. There are some high-profile examples of people that I might take less seriously than you or vice versa perhaps. But yeah, I think that there can be incidents that are worth being concerned about. I do not think those incidents are concerning enough, and here's where the absolute numbers. The denominator question is really important, right? I do not think that those numbers are concerning enough that we should say that this is a serious problem for university campuses that deep latte forming is an existential threat to open discourse on campus. I hear ya, but there's this one thing that's kind of bugging me still, which is the chilling effect. And you know, as an academic, I have to say there really is a chilling effect. When you see real scholars who who are disinvited from giving a commencement addresses. People like Robert zelik who is an honest to goodness, PHD economist academic head of the World Bank. He just happens to be a relatively moderate Republican who was disinvited from college campuses. You see things like that, and it has a chilling effect for even for for people like me. It makes me worry and are my worries. Overblown just being kind of paranoid. I don't know about paranoid can't presume to speak about your mental state, but I could say, I think that the risks of writing for a conservative magazine or publishing journal articles that support some relatively right leaning

United States Zach Beecham Arthur Burke Zak vox media administrator London School of economics Georgetown center Georgetown reporter World Bank Berkeley Milo I Trump administration Milo Yiannopoulos Robert zelik Miley Annapolis two years four thousand four year
"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

The Arthur Brooks Show

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"arthur" Discussed on The Arthur Brooks Show

"Our team at CC galaxy Nathan Thompson and Spencer more at vox media. Our producer is gal streakish who also composed our theme music. Gold Arthur is senior producer and Nishat coup was executive producer audio, please rate and review the podcast and subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening to this next week. We're gonna talk about contempt with a psychologist, John Gottmann. It's a fascinating conversation. You're gonna wanna hear it. And here's the thing I need you to write to me and tell me a story about contempt in your life and we might play it on the next episode. The Email address is Arthur Brooke show at FOX media dot com. You can get in touch on Twitter too. I'm at Arthur Brooks. Thanks for listening. For seventy years. The nonpartisan pew charitable trusts has researched the data and the facts that promote civil conversation and lead to innovative policy solutions. Now is providing some of that civil dialogue and a podcast called after the fact in each episode Pugh shares a surprising stat in a story that help illuminate the issues that matter. Listen at pewtrust dot org slash after the fact or subscribe at apple podcasts or wherever you stream your favorite programs.

producer apple John Gottmann Arthur Brooke Arthur Brooks vox media FOX media dot Arthur executive producer Nathan Thompson Twitter Pugh Spencer seventy years