18 Burst results for "Arthur Shahani"

French Wine Gets Caught Up In France's New Tax On Big Tech

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:50 min | 3 years ago

French Wine Gets Caught Up In France's New Tax On Big Tech

"At the g. seven summit president trump wouldn't say if he backed down from his threat to go after francis most beloved export wine in retaliation for france's dances new digital tax on big tech companies n._p._r.'s arthur shahani has the story earlier this summer france passed a new three percent tax on the revenues of big. Mostly american tech companies trump shot back with a tweet quote if anybody taxes them. It should be their home country the u._s._a. We will announce a substantial santeuil reciprocal action on macron's foolishness shortly. I've always said american wine is better than french wine. He reportedly toyed with the idea of a one hundred percent tariff on french wine. Yesterday trump ben french president emmanuel macron had to face each other at a g seven press conference difference would he had the nervousness because of misunderstanding macron with a voiceover striking a conciliatory town twelve hundred. They have reached a very good agreement the u._s. Government has criticized france for acting alone instead of reaching a multilateral accord after all digital trade trade is a global issue. Many companies sell services across borders but headquartered themselves in low. Tax countries like ireland mccrum appraised u._s. in french negotiators for reaching the very good agreements and he elaborated on one detail. If in one the global community of nations can strike a deal france will toss out there law and give refunds. He's not done this and everything that has already been paid under the french. Tax system would be reimbursed. Amazon has called francis law discriminatory for targeting american giants and leaving most french companies which which are much smaller out of the crosshairs google says unilateral action is a race to the bottom the purported new agreement to refund down the line gives little comfort to the big tech lobby that doesn't provide the kind of tax certainty that we're looking for jason oxman chief of i t i attack lobbying indian group whose members include amazon google facebook microsoft and apple. It certainly doesn't provide a reason for countries not to move forward with unilateral digital digital taxes as france has done in fact provides the opposite and incentive for them to do so lobbyist oxman. Fear is a domino effect the u._k. In italy are looking to pass <unk> similar digital tax bills. He says the world is at risk of a patchwork that is irreversible. Even more tightly knit because money has traded hands from tech coffers. There's two government treasuries that said his group is not asking for retaliation against bordeaux's or lows or pinos or even chardonnays we would rather have the underlying tax issues resolved. That's the gold were pursuing. France like china is now in the u._s. Crosshairs the trump administration has moved to investigate the french law for potential violation of international covenants and treaties but the first lady has undermined her husband's hardline hardline stance while he doesn't drink she was spotted at the g seven sipping french. Not american wine at the g seven presser at journalists asked president trump pointblank if he'd drop the one hundred percent tariff threat or can confirm that the first lady loved you a french french wine okay all right. You loved you french wine so thank you very much u._s. Officials have yet to confirm the agreement that francis president discussed meanwhile american tech companies have not yet paved the new tax and are awaiting guidance r._t. Shahani n._p._r. News.

France Trump Pointblank Emmanuel Macron President Trump Francis Ben French Arthur Shahani Google Amazon Jason Oxman Italy Ireland Bordeaux Apple Microsoft China One Hundred Percent Three Percent
"arthur shahani" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Noel king. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Facebook says it is creating its own digital currency. The company says that by next year people on Facebook apps such as WhatsApp and messenger will be able to essentially text payments to other people using this currency, which is to be called libra. This comes as regulators Raskin if the tech giant has already too powerful and doing too many things. NPR's Arthur Shahani is covering the story. She's on the line morning, mourning. So what is libra exactly well besides being the very best sign in the horse cope. It is Facebook's big, bold move to reinvent money. Libra is the best signed, because it's your signed gotta took me a minute. Please. You got it libra is a form of crypto currency here in the US. The most popular cryptocurrency is bitcoin, right? Use bitcoin to pay for flights, but a hotel, but they're real reason, bitcoin so well known is because it's value fluctuates wildly and people. Buy like stock libra is meant to be far more stable at it's tied to real world assets. Facebook is marketing this new digital currency as a service, especially for people who do not have Bank accounts. They estimate one point seven billion people around the world once it's ready, you can buy Lieber, coins and suddenly breads, almost anyone with a smartphone. They're aiming to offer it next year. Facebook plans to expand the uses over time so you can eventually pay your bills say your phone or electric Bill or even buy a Cup of coffee like you can with Apple Pay now. I want to understand this without getting too far in the weeds. I mean, the value of a dollar is what people will pay for it in terms of goods or other currency, the value of bitcoin is what people will pay for it. Now. You mentioned that went up and down. What do you mean? That libra would be. Tied to real world assets. Yeah. So it actually has to be insured with actual goods, whether it's backed with dollars or gold. They're working out the details of that. But the real message Facebook is trying to put out to the world along with its partners. It's enlisted other companies in this is hey, this is not supposed to be some crazy speculative instrument. This is meant to be a stable currency to buy. It's by thing Facebook is going back to the gold standard of maybe something like that. Okay. So is Facebook doing this all by itself now not at all. It's got partners, involved Uber and lift to companies like Facebook, half popular apps and users on smartphones. These and MasterCard have decided to join it. And they're also mobile carriers like Vodafone Facebook set up an entity in Switzerland. Okay. Not a Swiss Bank account, but a nonprofit, where each of these companies has vote on how the technology is going to work, what the rules are what's backing the currency notably other major tech giants like apple and Google are not on the team. We mentioned that Facebook is already under scrutiny for being so very. Powerful does having its own currency, assuming it succeeds. Make Facebook more powerful still it. Absolutely does. And, you know, the thing is I'm a one hand it makes sense that Facebook is making this move because globally. It's comparables and competitors are already doing this over in Chinese. Got we chat the giant social network that already has a digital payment system in India. You've got paid TM in Kenya. You've got him Pessa so all over the so-called emerging markets. This technology large scale has been implemented because citizens don't have Bank accounts, but they have mobile phones. So Facebook wants to get in on this action. But it does raise the question of are they going to stop out the competition in ways that enhances, their power in ways that make regulator scared? I'm just trying to think this through if it is not a currency that floats on the open market, if it's tied to dollar's tied to gold or something like that. Isn't it just like making payment in dollars, but by another proprietary Facebook name on Facebook platforms? Yeah. I mean. Facebook wants to get in on digital payments. And so they want to engineer a way to do that. And you know, you're raising this question of is this, too much power yet again, for a company that's already largest social network out, our that's already largest, publish Radyr. That's one of the largest companies on earth with the most in revenue and that remains to be seen. Okay. Arthur, thanks so much. Thank you. NPR's Arthur Shahani on news that Facebook plans to launch its own currency called libra..

Facebook Vodafone Facebook NPR Arthur Shahani Raskin Steve Inskeep Noel king apple Uber US MasterCard Lieber engineer Kenya Swiss Bank Switzerland India
"arthur shahani" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Hold a series of hearings on big tech and the threat of monopoly power. Meanwhile, regulators plan to probe four tech giants in particular the drumbeat to crack down on Facebook Amazon, Google and apple is growing louder here in the US NPR's Shahani has been following the latest developments in Arthur to begin. It's been a long time, right? Where the American political establishment has been criticized for basically giving tech giants pass that doesn't seem to be the case. Now. What's going on? Yeah. That's right. The House Judiciary committee announced yesterday. They're going to hold multiple hearings on antitrust issues. So much like we saw lots of investigation and testimony on Russian interference in US elections, and the role of Facebook and that lawmakers are turning to look at the economics of Silicon Valley and equity fairness, I'd say the shift got a real jump start with the presidential candidate thoroughly this year, especially Elizabeth Warren calling for the break up of the largest companies. What's interesting with the house move is that it is BI partisan. In a statement, congressman Doug Collins Republican from Georgia, he said, lawmakers have got have got to take a look at whether the market remains competitive, I don't think that means he's going to echo warrants. Call anytime soon though, and it's not just congress, according to multiple news reports. The Justice department and Federal Trade Commission going to probe specific companies, and they struck a deal to divide up the work Justice may take apple and also bet. That's the parent company of Google and the FTC Facebook, Amazon. What's the thinking behind that division of labor so antitrust if? Quickly label for a long list of conferrence one concern. His merger that make the company way too big the FTC formed a task force a few months back to look at that. Thank Facebook, acquiring WhatsApp, Instagram. Amazon buying whole foods and audible. So that could be why the FTC is focusing on those two companies. Meanwhile critics have raised questions about what's happening inside the big app stores are developers of apps getting a fair deal our consumers so it could be that's why Justice would take Google apple are the how does this compared to the developments in the European Union? They've been at the forefront of the so-called tech lash, it is absolutely the case that Europe has acted quicker. They've drafted and pass laws on hate speech. They've leveled multibillion dollar fines against Google and apple, but whether or not their model of action will you know that depends on who you ask I spoke with two lawyers. Both antitrust experts one from Paris. The other Chicago, the Paris lawyer says, listen you Americans fell asleep at the wheel back in the nineteen eighties. You let your antitrust approach focus way too narrowly on. One issue. If consumers are getting a bum deal because Facebook is free, according to the American approach can't be bad, but he said, European regulators understand the real problem is competition when companies get way too big. There's no space for startups. Now ready picker, he's at the university of Chicago law school, he thinks the US needs to take a hard look at big tech, but he does not want Americans following the European approach, even if they been far more aggressive, I do not think they've accomplish very much Dave extracted a bunch of money. But have they actually changed competition on the ground in these areas? I don't think so he says, what might really matter is looking at specific. Well defined ways companies have gotten too much power say over data over industries, and then make them share. So what can we expect to see in the coming months? Well, I'd say years, not months. A text the egos are going to be sitting in hearings answering hours of questions much we saw Mark Zuckerberg do last year. Investors are going to keep an eye on this. So stocks will go up and down a lot. And this question of other tech companies are too big the outside role. They play in everything we do the fact that one platform can reach, you know, more than two billion people that's becoming a mainstream political issue. That's NPR's Arthur Shahani, Arthur..

Facebook Google apple Arthur Shahani Federal Trade Commission US NPR Amazon congressman Doug Collins House Judiciary committee Mark Zuckerberg Europe Elizabeth Warren Paris European Union Justice department Dave university of Chicago law scho congress Chicago
"arthur shahani" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"And from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro Audie. Cornish, the house plans to hold a series of hearings on big tech and the threat of monopoly power. Meanwhile, regulators plan to probe four tech giants in particular the drumbeat to crack down on Facebook Amazon, Google and apple is growing louder here in the US NPR's Arthur Shahani has been following the latest developments and Arthur to begin. It's been a long time. Right. Where the American political establishment has been criticized for basically giving tech giants pass that doesn't seem to be the case. Now. What's going on? That's right. The House Judiciary committee announced yesterday. They're going to hold multiple hearings on antitrust issues. So much like we saw lots of investigation and testimony on Russian interference in US elections, and the role of Facebook and that lawmakers are turning to look at the economics of Silicon Valley and equity fairness, I'd say the shift got a real jump start with the presidential candidates earlier this year, especially Elizabeth Warren calling for the break-up of the largest companies. What's interesting with the house move is that it is bipartisan in a statement, congressman Doug Collins Republican from Georgia, he said lawmakers have got have got to take a look at whether the market remains competitive, I don't think that means he's going to echo warrants. Call anytime soon though, and it's not just congress, according to multiple news reports. The Justice department and Federal Trade Commission are going to probe specific companies, and they struck a deal to divide up the work Justice may take apple and alphabet. That's the parent company of Google and the FTC Facebook at Amazon. What's the thinking behind that division of labor so antitrust if? Quickly label for a long list of conferrence. One concern is merger that make the company way too big the FTC formed a task force a few months back to look at that. Thank Facebook, acquiring what's happened Instagram? Amazon buying whole foods and audible. So that could be why the FTC is focusing on those two companies. Meanwhile critics have raised questions about what's happening inside the big app stores are developers of apps getting a fair deal our consumers so it could be that's why Justice would take Google apple arthy. How does this compared to the developments in the European Union? They've been at the forefront of the so-called tech lash, it is absolutely the case that Europe has acted quicker. They've drafted and pass laws on hate speech. They've leveled multibillion dollar fines against Google and apple, but whether or not their model of action will you know that depends on who you ask I spoke with two lawyers. Both antitrust experts one from Paris. The other Chicago, the Paris lawyer says, listen you Americans fell asleep at the wheel back in the nineteen eighties. You let your anti-trust approach focus way too narrowly on one. Issue. If consumers are getting a bum deal because Facebook is free. According to the American approach, it can't be bad, but he said, European regulators understand the real problem is competition when companies get way too big. There's no space for startups now. Randy picker, he's at the university of Chicago law school, he thinks the US needs to take a hard look at big tech, but he does not want Americans following the European approach, even if they've been far more aggressive, I do not think they've accomplished very much. I do not Dave extracted a bunch of money. But have they actually changed competition on the ground in these areas? I don't think so he says, what might really matter is looking at specific. Well defined ways companies have gotten too much power fail over data over industries, and then make them share. So what can we expect to see in the coming months? Well, I'd say years not months, a tech CEO's are going to be sitting in hearings answering hours of questions much like we saw Mark Zuckerberg do last year. Investors are going to keep an eye on this. So stocks will go up and down a lot. And this question of other tech companies are too big the outside role. They play in everything we do the fact that one platform can reach more than two billion people that's becoming a mainstream political issue. That's NPR's are the Shahani Arthur..

Facebook Google Federal Trade Commission US apple Arthur Shahani NPR Amazon Ari Shapiro Audie House Judiciary committee Cornish European Union congressman Doug Collins congress Europe Elizabeth Warren Mark Zuckerberg Dave
"arthur shahani" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Shapiro Cornish, the house plans to hold a series of hearings on big tech and the threat of monopoly power. Meanwhile, regulators plan to probe four tech giants in particular the drumbeat to crack down on Facebook Amazon, Google and apple is growing louder here in the US NPR's Shahani has been following the latest developments in Arthur to begin. It's been a long time. Right. Where the American political establishment has been criticized for basically giving tech giants pass that doesn't seem to be the case. Now, let's going on. Yeah, that's right. The House Judiciary committee announced yesterday. They're going to hold multiple hearings on antitrust issues. So much like we saw lots of investigation and testimony on Russian interference in US elections in the role of Facebook and that lawmakers are turning to look at the economics of Silicon Valley and equity fairness, I'd say the shift got a real jump start with the presidential candidates earlier this year, especially Elizabeth Warren, calling for the break-up. The largest companies. What's interesting with the house move is that it is by partisan. In a statement, congressman Doug Collins Republican from Georgia, he said, lawmakers have have got to take a look at whether the market remains competitive. I don't think that means he's going to echo warrants. Call anytime soon though, and it's not just congress, according to multiple news reports. The Justice department and Federal Trade Commission are going to probe specific companies, and they struck a deal to divide up the work Justice may take apple and alpha bet. That's the parent company of Google and the FTC Facebook and Amazon, what's the thinking behind that division of labor. So antitrust quickly label for a long list of conferrence. One concern is merger that make the company way too big the FTC formed a taskforce few months back to look at that. Thank Facebook, acquiring, what's happened Instagram, Amazon buying whole foods audible so that could be why the FTC is focusing on those two companies. Meanwhile critics have raised questions about what's happening inside the big app stores are developers of apps. Getting a fair deal are consumers so it could be. Why Justice would take Google apple or the how does this compared to the developments in the European Union? They've been at the forefront of the so-called tech lash, it is absolutely the case that Europe has acted quicker. They've drafted and pass laws on hate speech. They've leveled multibillion dollar fines against Google and apple, but whether or not their model of action will you know that depends on who you ask I spoke with two lawyers. Both antitrust experts one from Paris. The other Chicago, the Paris lawyer says, listen you Americans fell asleep at the wheel back in the nineteen eighties. You let your antitrust approach focus way too narrowly on one issue. If consumers are getting a bum deal because Facebook is free, according to the American approach can't be bad, but he said, European regulators understand the real problem is competition when companies get way too big. There's no space for startups. Now ready picker, he's at the university of Chicago law school, he thinks the US needs to take a hard look at big tech, but he does not want Americans following the European approach, even if they've been far. For more aggressive, I do not think they've accomplished very much. I do not Dave extracted a bunch of money. But have they actually changed competition on the ground in these areas? I don't think so he says, what might really matter is looking at specific. Well defined ways companies have gotten too much power say over data over industries, and then make them share. So what can we expect to see in the coming months? Well, I'd say years not months, a tech CEO's are going to be sitting in hearings answering hours of questions much we saw Mark Zuckerberg do last year. Investors are going to keep an eye on this. So stocks will go up and down a lot. And this question of other tech companies are too big the outside role. They play in everything we do the fact that one platform can reach more than two billion people that's becoming a mainstream political issue. That's NPR's Arthur Shahani, Arthur..

Facebook Google Arthur Shahani US apple Federal Trade Commission NPR Justice Shapiro Cornish congressman Doug Collins House Judiciary committee Amazon Europe Elizabeth Warren Mark Zuckerberg Paris Dave European Union CEO
"arthur shahani" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Noel king. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, just how far can the United States go and targeting Weiwei President Trump's administration told American firms to stop doing business with the Chinese company that move prompted Google to block some software applications on wall way phones that are sold around the world. But then yesterday, the administration gave you as firms an extra ninety days to do some kinds of business with wa wa, which underlines, just how tricky it is to isolate a giant global player that the US regards is an information security threat, NPR's Arthur Shahani is on the line. Hi there. Hi, what did the administration do I? Right. Okay. So it started last week, the Trump administration added while eight to a shortlist that American companies cannot buy from or sell to the ban affects very big players and also some pretty small ones, take small mobile carriers. Okay. Not your horizons and T Mobile's, but say. Hey, you're rural carrier. They buy while way Clinton because it's cheap NAT will have to change suppliers on the big end. Let's say Google, Google, and wow. We have licensing agreements, that's put apps like g mail, maps and YouTube on why phones, so now with the new band for any future phones. New licensing agreements are not allowed the Google apps can't be included. So that'll curtail Google's presence in Europe, where alway phones are sold. Now, everything I've just said, has a caveat. Okay. As you've mentioned yesterday, the administration lightened their touch instead, American tech firms could keep engaging in existing business with wa until mid August, that's presumably, to give some transition are prep time. Is it really possible that the administration could raise these alarms of Chinese spying through Weiwei equipment? That's the scenario, they put out. And then just let the business go on shit. That's totally possible, and there would be a precedent for that last year. President Trump ban sales to another Chinese filmmakers, E T E also, citing national security concerns that. Basically brought China's president to the bargaining table, and then Trump announced the he would pay a billion dollar fine to do business with America again. So, you know, maybe maybe the Walli van is a move to create leverage in the last couple of weeks. The Trump administration has increased tariffs on sixty sixty billion dollars worth of Chinese goods to China's responded in tensions were growing. You have underlined for us, how deeply engaged US companies are already with, wow way, whether it's a small rural phone provider here in the United States are service provider in the United States or whether it's Google operating in Europe, how tech companies responding, so you know, we're seeing a very restrained response from other American tech giants and Intel spokesperson said the chip maker would comply with the law, of course. But refused to explain what exactly that net? Microsoft and apple do business with Weiwei each declined to explain how they would implement the ban. Let's take apple for moment. It's delicate position all of this. China is a really important market for iphones. So when the US targets while way, either with this man. Or other actions that actually helps always popularity in China. Okay. So while as in some circles, considered a martyr in the countryside against US imperialism, that is not helpful to apple which has been going through a sales slump in China. Also apple could become the target of Chinese government backlash. You know, we just had a team doing reporting in China. We were in the city of Shenzhen, and there was an apple store on the street. And there was a Weiwei store on either side of it. So you have a sense of how fierce the competition surrounding it. Arthur, thanks. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's. Arthur, john. Wyoming, Republican congresswoman, Liz Cheney has a decision to make she's deciding whether to run for the Senate in twenty twenty or stay put in the house. She is the third highest ranking Republican, and she has a path to climb even higher NPR's congressional correspondent Susan Davis has the story. Liz Cheney does not mince words. But when it comes to our own political ambitions. She's got nothing to say right now I don't have any announcements to make about that. That is the question of Cheney's political future prompted by Wyoming Republican Senator Mike Enzi decision to retire in twenty twenty Cini wanted that seat bad, so bad. She tried to primary Enzi in two thousand fourteen in a short-lived bid that ended bitterly, but she rebounded and won the states only how seat in two thousand sixteen just two years later House, Republicans elevated her to the party's leadership table as the chair of the Republican conference here, she is just after her leadership election last November. Work, and we're gonna take back this majority. It's the same leadership job, once held by her father, former vice president and Wyoming congressman Dick Cheney. It's also the highest position any Republican woman has ever reached in the house, and she'll walk away from a history making chance to climb even higher on the leadership ladder to whip leader or even speaker if she runs for the Senate that is exactly what Oklahoma congressman. Tom Cole wants her.

Weiwei President Trump Google United States China Trump administration Arthur Shahani apple Liz Cheney NPR president Steve Inskeep Noel king Wyoming Europe Dick Cheney wa YouTube T Mobile Senate
"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Noel king. And I've seen Inskeep. Good morning. Just how far can the United States go and targeting Weiwei President Trump's administration told American firms to stop doing business with the Chinese company that move prompted Google to block some software applications on wall way phones that are sold around the world. But then yesterday, the administration gave you as firms an extra ninety days to do some kinds of business with wa which underlines, just how tricky it is to isolate a giant global player that the US regard is an information security threat. And peers Arthur Shahani is on the line. Hi there. Hi. What did the administration do I? Right. Okay. So it started last week, the Trump administration added while way to a shortlist that American companies cannot buy from or sell to the ban affects very big players and also some pretty small ones, take small mobile carriers. Okay. Not your varieties, and T Mobile's. But. Hey, you're rural carrier. They buy wa equipment because it's cheap. Nat will have to change suppliers on the big end. Let's say Google, Google, and while we have licensing agreements, that's to put apps like g mail maps and YouTube on why phones, so now with the new band for any future phones. New licensing agreements are not allowed to Google apps. Can't be included. So that'll curtail Google's presence in Europe where why phones are sold now. Everything I've just said has a caveat. Okay, as you've mentioned yesterday, the administration lightened their touch instead, American tech firms could keep engaging in existing business with wa wa until mid August, that's presumably, to give some transition are prep time. Is it really possible that the administration could raise these alarms of Chinese spying through Weiwei equipment? That's the scenario, they put out. And then just let the business go on shit. That's totally possible, and there would be a precedent for that last year. President Trump ban sales to and other Chinese filmmakers, E T also, citing national security concerns that. Basically brought China's president to the bargaining table, and then Trump announced he would pay a billion dollar fine to do business with America again. So, you know, maybe maybe the white van is a move to create leverage in the last couple of weeks. The Trump administration has increased tariffs on sixty sixty billion dollars worth of Chinese goods to China's responded, and, you know, tensions are growing. You have underlined for us, how deeply engaged US companies are already with, wow way, whether it's a small rural phone provider here in the United States are service provider in the United States or whether it's Google operating in Europe, how tech companies responding, so you know, we're seeing a very restrained response from other American tech giants and Intel spokesperson said the chipmaker would comply with the law, of course. But refused to explain what exactly that net? Microsoft and apple both do business with Weiwei h declined to explain how they would implement the ban. Let's take apple for moment, notice delicate position all of this. China is a really important market for iphones. So when the US targets while way, either with this man. Or other actions that actually helps always popularity in China. Okay. So while as in some circles considered a martyr in the country's fight against US imperialism, that is not helpful to apple which has been going through a sales slump in China. Also apple could become the target of Chinese government backlash. You know, we just had a team doing reporting in China. We were in the city of Shenzhen, and there was an apple store on the street. And there was a Weiwei store on either side of it. So you have sense of how fierce the competition surrounding it. Arthur, thanks. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's. Arthur, john. Wyoming, Republican congresswoman, Liz Cheney has a decision to make she's deciding whether to run for the Senate in twenty twenty or stay put in the house. She is the third highest ranking Republican, and she has a path to climb even higher NPR's congressional correspondent Susan Davis has the story. Liz Cheney does not mince words. But when it comes to her own political ambitions. She's got nothing to say right now. I don't have any announcements to make about that. That is the question of Cheney's political future prompted by Wyoming Republican Senator Mike Enzi decision to retire in twenty twenty genie wanted that seat bad, so bad. She tried to primary Enzi in twenty fourteen in a short-lived bid that ended bitterly, but she rebounded and won the states only how seat in two thousand sixteen just two years later House, Republicans elevated her to the party's leadership table as the chair of the Republican conference here, she is just after her leadership election last November. I look forward again. The work and we're going to take back this majority. It's the same leadership job, once held by her father, former vice president in Wyoming. Congressman Dick Cheney. It's also the highest position any Republican woman has ever reached in the house, and she'll walk away from a history making chance to climb even higher on the leadership ladder to whip leader or even speaker if she runs for the Senate that is exactly what Oklahoma congressman. Tom Cole wants.

Weiwei President Trump Google United States China Trump administration apple Arthur Shahani Liz Cheney NPR wa Wyoming Congressman Dick Cheney president Senate Noel king Europe Inskeep T Mobile
"arthur shahani" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm too will king. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, just how far can the United States go and targeting way, President Trump's administration told American firms to stop doing business with the Chinese company that move prompted Google to block some software applications on wall way phones that are sold around the world. But then yesterday, the administration gave you as firms an extra ninety days to do some kinds of business with wa which underlines, just how tricky it is to isolate a giant global player that the US regards is an information security threat. And Arthur Shahani is on the line. Hi there. Hi. What did the administration do I? Right. Okay. So it started last week. The Trump administration added way to a shortlist that American companies cannot buy from or sell to of the benefits very big players, and also some pretty small ones, take small mobile carriers. Okay. Not your varieties and T Mobile's, but say you're rural carrier. Her. They buy while way because it's cheap now we'll have to change supplier on the big end. Let's say Google, Google while we have licensing agreements, that's to put apps like, g mail maps and YouTube on why phones, so now with the new band for any future phones. New licensing agreements are not allowed to Google apps. Can't be included so that occur tail Google's presence in Europe where why phones are sold now. See everything. I've just has a caveat. Okay, as you've mentioned yesterday, the administration lightened their touch instead, American tech firms could keep engaging in existing business with wa until mid August, that's presumably, to give some transition are prep time. Is it really possible that the administration could raise these alarms of Chinese spying through way Queant? That's the scenario, they put out. And then just let the business go on. Sure that's totally possible. And there would be a precedent for that last year. President Trump ban sales to another Chinese makers ET also citing national security concerns that basically brought China's. President to the bargaining table. And then Trump now V t would pay a billion dollar fine to do business with America again. So, you know, maybe, maybe the why ban is a move to create leverage. In the last couple of weeks. Trump administration has increased tariffs sixty sixty billion dollars worth of Chinese goods to China's responded in tensions growing. You have underlined for us, how deeply engaged US companies are already with, wow way, whether it's a small rural phone provider here in the United States are service provider in the United States, whether it's Google operating in Europe how tech companies responding. So we're seeing a very restrained response from other American tech giants and Intel spokesperson said the chipmaker would comply with the law, of course. But refused to explain what exactly that net? Microsoft, apple do business with Weiwei each declined to explain how they would implement the ban. Let's take apple for moment note. It's delicate position all of this. China is a really important market for iphones. So when the US targets while way, either with this band, or other actions. That actually helps while always popularity in China. Okay. So while ways in some circles considered a martyr in the country's fight against us imperialism, that is not helpful to apple which has been going through a sales slump in China. Also apple could become the target of Chinese government backlash. We just had a team doing reporting in China. We were in the city of Shenzhen, and there was an apple store on the street. And there was a Weiwei store on either side of it. So you haven't sense of how fierce the competition surrounding it. Thanks. Thanks so much. Thank you. That's NPR's. Arthur, john. Wyoming, Republican congresswoman, Liz Cheney has a decision to make she's deciding whether to run for the Senate in twenty twenty or stay put in the house. She is the third highest ranking Republican, and she has a path to climb even higher NPR's congressional correspondent Susan Davis has the story. Liz Cheney does not mince words. But when it comes to her own political ambitions. She's got nothing to say right now. I don't have any announcements to make about that. That is the question of Cheney's political future prompted by Wyoming Republican Senator Mike Enzi decision to retire twenty twenty Cheney wanted that seat bad, so bad. She tried to primary Enzi in twenty fourteen in a short-lived bid that ended bitterly, but she rebounded and won the states only how seat in twenty sixteen just two years later House, Republicans elevated her to the party's leadership table as the chair of the Republican conference here, she is just after her leadership election last November. I look forward again the work. And we're gonna take this majority. It's the same leadership job, once held by her father, former vice president and Wyoming congressman Dick Cheney. It's also the highest position any Republican woman has ever reached in the house, and she'll walk away from a history making chance to climb even higher on the leadership ladder to whip leader or even speaker if she runs for the Senate that is exactly what Oklahoma congressman. Tom Cole wants her to do. I personally believe you ought to go to the Senate Republicans like coal. See Cini as a possible national contender. One day and the house isn't a great launch pad for that she'd.

Google United States China President Trump apple Liz Cheney Arthur Shahani wa Weiwei Steve Inskeep Dick Cheney Europe Wyoming President Senate Republicans Senate T Mobile Tom Cole vice president
"arthur shahani" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:26 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Such a thing as happiness in the context of dementia. We'll talk about caring for people with dementia, and how the medical system can improve how it treats people with dementia. In spite of the lack of medications to affectively slow progress. My guess will be psychiatrist and bioethicists Tia pow author of the new book dementia. Reimagined join us. Weekdays at two on ninety three point nine. FM. WNYC. Following the money behind our museums were actually feeding the monsters that we apparently care about dismantling. It just doesn't make sense, one Arte talks about why he pulled out of the Whitney biennial in protest. I'm tansy Vega. And that's next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm no well, king, a teenage boy was found dead yesterday at a border patrol station in south Texas. He's the fifth migrant child to die after being apprehended the US Mexico border since December. He was sixteen years old. He was from Guatemala, and immigration. Authorities say only that he was diagnosed with the flu over the weekend is death comes amid growing concern about the conditions at border patrol facilities on Sunday, Kevin McLean. And the acting secretary of homeland security's spoke of US detention centers on CBS. I'm very concerned about the conditions are not appropriate facilities for families and children, particularly police stations built for single adults now. That's why vast cars for more resources to address, NPR's Joel rose covers immigration. He's in studio with us this morning, high Joel Hainault Noel. So what more do we know about this? Boy, who tied his name was Carlos Gregorio. Hernandez Vasquez, as you say, sixteen years old from Guatemala, US customs and border protection says he was taken into custody after crossing the border in Hidalgo Texas, which is near mcallen he entered the US according to see with a group of about seventy migrants from there. He was moved to a border patrol processing center in mcallen, according to see he received a medical screening when he arrived, and another one on Sunday when he reported feeling sick, a nurse practitioner diagnosed him with the flu, and then he was transferred to another border patrol facility to isolate him from the other migrants and given medicine for the flu. But he was never taken to a hospital. See says he was discovered unresponsive during a welfare check on Monday morning. And his death is under investigation by the FBI by CB by other agencies as we said, he's the fifth migrants today after being apprehended by the difference here is that he wasn't taken to a hospital. Right. Well, exactly. I mean five migrants have died after crossing the border in just the last six months, but. They were all either rushed to the hospital or had been in the hospital for some time when they died, Hernandez Vasquez died in the border patrol facility. So there are still a lot of questions here why he wasn't taken to the hospital. It's also not clear why he was still in border patrol custody for almost a week by law. The border patrol is not supposed to hold children. For more than seventy two hours, we know in practice that they've been holding them for a lot longer recently in this case, Hernandez, Vasquez was supposed to be sent to a migrant child shelter, that's overseeing by US health and human services. It's not really clear why that was not done. CPI HHS seemed to be sort of pointing fingers at each other. But immigrant rights advocates say the bottom line is he should not have been a border patrol facility for that long. Wendy young is the president of kids in need of defense. It's a nonprofit that advocates for migrant children kids, we're talking about are typically arriving at the border exhausted. You know they had a very difficult journey. They've had experience in their home country. They very often. Are in poor health. So providing them with the right care from the moment that they take into custody is really critical. Right. And you heard that clip Joel from Kevin michelina in just a few minutes ago talking about these conditions being inappropriate. What does he mean? What are the conditions? Like, why think everyone agrees that these facilities are just not equipped for the current situation, which is that thous of migrants, arriving at the US Mexico border every day. And immigrant rights advocates say that conditions in these facilities are only getting worse. The ACLU of Texas, sent a formal complaint on Friday to the internal government watchdogs, at both d H SNCB that, that paints a pretty ugly picture. The ACLU says thousands of migrants have been detained outside because there's just no more room inside the holding cells. Migrants report, not having access to showers or medical attention forced to sleep outside. The did not respond for our request for comment on that complaint. NPR's Joel rose covers immigration. Thanks so much. You're welcome. All right. How exactly does the Trump administration plan to pressure giant Chinese tech company? The administration has made some dramatic moves in recent days. I it told US tech companies to stop dealing with, wow, way, the US allege that this maker smartphones and cell phone networks is an information security risk. The US move prompted Google to block walkways access to software that is used in many, many, many phones. And then yesterday, the US abruptly gave Weiwei a ninety day reprieve NPR's arthy Shahani has been following all of this morning are in morning. So are they what kicked this off? And what's actually being banned here short? So it started last week. The Trump administration added while way to shortlist that American companies can't buy from or sell to the benefits affects very big players, and also some pretty small ones, take the small ones small mobile carrier is not. Derived T Mobile's but say you're rural carriers. They buy wa equipment because it's cheap now will have to change suppliers on the big end. Let's say Google, Google, and we have licensing agreements and that's to put g mail maps and the YouTube app on why phones now with the new band for any future phones, you licensing agreements are not allowed to Google apps. Can't be included in that occur tale Google's presence in Europe where the phones are sold. All right. That is the context, but the US has actually taken a step back and said, while wait now has ninety days to operate in the United States. What is that about what they do that? Yeah. So everything I just said, has a caveat. The administration that shouldn't update saying American firms could keep engaging in certain existing business with w-way and till mid August, and that's presumably to give some transition or prep time, and could the ban possibly get dropped entirely during that period. Sure that's possible, too. And there would be a precedent for that last year. President Trump band and other Chinese phone makers E T E for national security concerns, and that basically brought China's president Xi Jinping to the parking table that ended in Trump outings, E, T would pay a billion dollar fine. So, you know, maybe, maybe the why ban is just a move to create leverage for the US, and what is Wally saying about all this? So according to Reuters while as president told China state TV, that America is underestimating his company's capabilities. And meanwhile we're seeing a very restrained response from other American tech giant's an Intel spokesperson said the chipmaker would comply with the law, of course but wouldn't explain without net. Microsoft, and apple both. Do business with Weiwei and each declined to explain how they would implement the ban. It is worth noting, Apple's delicate position. And all of this China is a really important market for phones, one, the US targets way, either with the span, or other actions that helps Weiwei's popularity in China. Okay. While as in some circles seen as a martyr on country's fight against US imperialism that namic is not at all helpful to apple, which has been going through a sales slump in China. And also, you know, apple could become the target of Chinese government backlash. So as this is proceeding, there's a real need to be cautious about the signals that the companies are sending to the government overseas. And of course, all of this happening in the context of a trade war between the United States in China. Correct escalating one NPR's Arthur Shahani. Thanks. Thank you..

US NPR Hernandez Vasquez Google Joel rose Texas dementia Weiwei president CBS Guatemala China flu apple Steve Inskeep Mexico Joel Hainault Noel Arthur Shahani Arte
"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The only solution is to change. The regime itself. And that's why before twenty nine teen. We hear will celebrate interrogation. Thank you. They have these two world views in the west wing. There's John Bolton who talks about regime change in preemptive strikes. And there's President Trump, who talks about pulling US troops out of Iraq and Syria, and putting America first, how are those different worldviews playing out right now? Well, in some ways, they're, they're similar, when you think about, you know, volt in putting America's security, I not being very concerned with US allies, working multi-laterally when possible, but there is kind of that America first in him. Although he's much more ambitious I would say in his worldview, it's interesting because I want heard that in a meeting with a foreign leader that President Trump introduced Bolton and said John here wants to get me into a war, but he's not going to get that under me. And I'm never sure if I should believe this kind of cocktail conversation. But, but then President Trump basically said that just last week. Judge very good. John. His strong views and things. But that's okay. I actually temper John, which is pretty amazing. So he tempers him at least for now and diplomat. Correspondent Michelle Kellerman? Thanks, michelle. Thank you. President Trump has a new website up and it's asking Americans to report when a big tech company sensors them, it's the latest move in his campaign against big tech, which is accused of anti conservative bias and compared to other global leaders, he's taking a distinctly epithelial outside or approach NPR's. Arthur Shahani reports the world over people are worried that America's social media giants have too much power free speech. Steinhardt Jillian York share that concern. She goes online, the check out a survey. The White House put up this week. So this tool says that social media platforms advance freedom of speech. I definitely agree with that York is with the electric frontier foundation, which advocates for internet civil liberties years ago. She created a similar survey, Trump's asks about immigration status. You must say you're a US citizen or permanent resident to proceed, it asks which companies have taken action against the respondent. Oh, so this is interesting. It's focused, only on four platforms. Facebook, Instagram Twitter. Her and YouTube hers did, too also like hers Trump's asks for screen shots of what notification or pop up the tech platform sent when they took censorship action though. One glaring difference between hers and the president's his final question to verify. You are not a robot. The declaration of independence was signed in what year. That is quite the verification question this, Gino her American history. Well, you know, I think I do it seven I put in seventeen seventy six York and other say it's hard to know if the White House site is for real or farcical. It has some basic coding errors, it could be designed for data collection or a ploy to collect voter. Contact say either way, the Trump moved a protest in shame the social media giant's stands in stark contrast to the approach by another head of state, French. President Emmanuel Macron person. Access to come to of a racist nature Macron with an English voiceover. Speaking at a press conference on Wednesday we have to progress in that area to achieve smart regulation. Trump launch to fight three weeks after he fat down one on one with Twitter. Theo, Jack Dorsey a couple of weeks after Facebook band far-right leaders, like Alex Jones and the same day other heads of state gathered in Paris to commemorate, the massacre of Muslims in Christchurch, New Zealand, which was live. Streamed on Facebook Macron has been working inside or outside or strategy Francis developing new laws to combat cyber hate this week. He helps fear headed gathering governments in big tech signed a pledge to work together. He also brokered an exclusive deal with Facebook to give French regulators unprecedented insider access to the company to see how censorship decisions are made. We must ensure that the platforms Joel, the content and enable us to. Identify who is disseminating the hate speech and the negative edges. Kate clinic, a law professor at Saint John's university, says Macron and Trump have a lot in common. They both see big tech as a powerful fourth. They are both threatened by that Hauer, but only one truly gets this fact, you can't think of these platforms as representing anyone particular nation, their transnational platforms. They represent a global audience. White House spokesman John Deere says the administration created the online form because they want to hear from all Americans, regardless of their political leanings. Our facial Honey NPR news..

President Trump President Emmanuel Macron Michelle Kellerman America Facebook US John Bolton White House York Twitter Steinhardt Jillian York president John Deere John NPR YouTube electric frontier foundation
"arthur shahani" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From NPR news. It's all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. Social media giants say they will work with heads of state to regulate extremist content that spreads online. One key player has refused to endorse the plan the United States NPR's. Arthur Shahani reports there is a growing rift between the US government and well the world that rift was on full display at the Elysee palace. In paris. Fifty one woman and children from the New Zealand Muslim community were killed and were killed online. New Zealand Prime Minister just send a ardor and helped convene the summit today is the two month anniversary of the Christ Church shooting were a gunman used Facebook live to broadcast his massacre n- the social media dimension to the attack was unprecedented. Endow response today with the adoption of the Christ cold is equally unprecedented. It's been. Long road for tech leaders who once fancied themselves protectors of speech who feared looking to chummy with governments. Now in Paris, Facebook, Google YouTube, Amazon, Twitter and Microsoft are entering a voluntary. Compact. It's called the Christ Church. Call basically, they're agreeing to beef up their efforts to catch terrorists content as it spreads across platforms. And they say they'll share more data with each other to make their algorithms smarter better at identifying video by ISIS or a white nationalist Neva before have countries and companies come together in the white kevon horrific attack to commit to an action plan. The social media giant's agreed to work with governments to redirect users away from extremism and let investigators in French president Emmanuel Macron hurt here with an English. Voiceover says. He and Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg have come to a unique agreement has authorized the regulator teams the teams of French regulators true. Join. His machine to share confidential information to fight against treasuries coat it but also hatred contents harassment methods. More than a dozen countries have signed today's packed including France, Germany United Kingdom, India Australia. New Zealand the US is staying out of the deal, the White House a tech policy advisor to observe in show support. But in a statement, the Trump administration said the best tool to defeat terrorists speech is productive speech. And thus we emphasize the importance of promoting credible alternative narratives this stance puts the US increasingly at odds with other countries as well as with American tech giant's. Art facial Honey NPR news one of the biggest hits and TV history signs off tomorrow after a twelve season run..

Facebook US NPR New Zealand paris Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro New Zealand Muslim Emmanuel Macron Elysee palace Christ Church ISIS Arthur Shahani White House Mark Zuckerberg harassment Prime Minister
"arthur shahani" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news. It's all things considered by Mati Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. Social media giants say they will work with heads of state to regulate extremist content that spreads online. One key player has refused to endorse the plan the United States NPR's, Arthur. Shahani reports there is a growing rift between the US government and well the world that rift was on full display at the Elysee palace. In paris. Fifty one men women and children from the New Zealand Muslim community would killed and we killed online. New Zealand Prime Minister just send ardor and helped convene the summit today is the two month anniversary of the Christ Church shooting where a gunman used Facebook live to broadcast his massacre artery the social media dimension to the attack was unprecedented. Endow response today with the adoption of the church coal is equally unprecedented. It's been a long road for tech leaders who once fancied themselves protectors of speech who feared looking to chummy with governments. Now in Paris, Facebook, Google YouTube, Amazon, Twitter and Microsoft are entering a voluntary. Compact. It's called the Christ Church. Call basically, they're agree. Eating the beef up their efforts to catch terrorists content as it spreads across platforms. And they say they'll share more data with each other to make their algorithms smarter better at identifying video by ISIS or a white nationalist Neva before have countries and companies come together in the white Kevin horrific attack to commit to an action plan. The social media giant's agreed to work with governments to redirect users away from extremism and let investigators in French president Emmanuel Macron hurt here with an English. Voiceover says. He and Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg have come to a unique agreement has authorized the regulator teams the teams of French regulators. Join his machine to share confidential information to fight against terrorists it but also hatred. Harassment methods. More than a dozen countries have signed today's packed including France, Germany United Kingdom, India Australia. New Zealand the US is staying out of the deal the White House at tech policy advisor to observe in show support. But in a statement, the Trump administration said the best tool to defeat terrorists speech is productive speech. And thus we emphasize the importance of promoting credible alternative narratives this stance puts the US increasingly at odds with other countries as well as with American tech giant's artificial Honey, NPR news one of the biggest hits and TV history signs off tomorrow after a twelve season run. Density. The nearly fourteen billion years ago expansion started waiting. The big bang theory on CBS wraps up its story about a group of Caltech scientists and their friends and peers mandalit del Barco.

Facebook US NPR New Zealand paris Emmanuel Macron Ari Shapiro Mati Cornish New Zealand Muslim Elysee palace Christ Church ISIS CBS Shahani Mark Zuckerberg Harassment Prime Minister
"arthur shahani" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:00 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"News. It's all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. Social media giants say they will work with heads of state to regulate extremist content that spreads online. One key player has refused to endorse the plan the United States NPR's. Arthur Shahani reports there is a growing rift between the US government and well the world that rift was on full display at the palace in Paris. Fifty one woman and children from the New Zealand Muslim community would killed and were killed online. New Zealand Prime Minister just send a ardor helped convene the summit today is the two month anniversary of the Christ Church shooting were a gunman used Facebook live to broadcast his massacre n- the social media dimension to the attack was unprecedented. Endow response today with the adoption of the Christ cold is equally unprecedented. It's been a long. Long road for tech leaders who once fancied themselves protectors of speech who feared looking to chummy with governments. Now in Paris, Facebook, Google YouTube, Amazon, Twitter and Microsoft are entering a voluntary. Compact. It's called the Christ Church. Call basically, they're agreeing to beef up their efforts to catch terrorists content as it spreads across platforms. And they say they'll share more data with each other to make their algorithms smarter better at identifying video by ISIS or a white nationalist Neva before have countries and companies come together in the white coat and horrific take to commit to an action plan. The social media giant's agreed to work with governments to redirect users away from extremism and let investigators in French president Emmanuel Macron hurt here with an English. Voiceover says. He and Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg have come to a unique agreement has authorized the regulator teams the teams of French regulators. Join his machine to share confidential information to fight against terrorists. Coated also hatred harassment methods. More than a dozen countries have signed today's packed including France, Germany United Kingdom, India Australia. New Zealand the US is staying out of the deal. The White House says its policy advisor to observe in show support. But in a statement, the Trump administration said the best tool to defeat terrorists speech is productive speech. And thus we emphasize the importance of promoting credible alternative narratives this stance puts the US increasingly at odds with other countries as well as with American tech giant's artificial Honey, NPR news one of the biggest hits and TV history signs off tomorrow after a twelve season run. Danced the nearly thirteen billion years ago expansion started wait. The big bang theory on CBS wraps up its story about a group of Caltech scientists and their friends and bureau's mandalit del.

Facebook US New Zealand Emmanuel Macron Paris Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro Christ Church New Zealand Muslim NPR ISIS Arthur Shahani CBS Mark Zuckerberg White House harassment Prime Minister
"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:37 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. It's all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro as free Lanka investigates who was behind yesterday's terrorist attacks on churches and hotels. The government continues to block access to social media, their Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp all owned by Facebook are among the services under a blackout this. Once again brings into focus the fear that Facebook cannot rain in disinformation and calls to finance and pears. Arthur Shahani is following the situation hierarchy high. What explanation did tree long has government give for shutting down these social media apps? So in a nutshell, the government doesn't trust Facebook to yank down fake news and call to miles before they go viral keep in mind. Sri Lanka is only a decade out of civil war. That's not a long time people. Remember it peace feels tenuous to them just a year ago last March Buddhist extremists torched, Muslim homes and businesses and used Facebook to incite violence in response to that the government had had. Had announced a seventy two hour block on social media in this time around the government is not putting a time limit on it. It's unclear when the band will come to an end. Of course, there are lots of examples of hoaxes going rampant on on Facebook from Myanmar to the United States. We have to note, they aren't NPR sponsor. How is the company responded to what's happening? Sri Lanka responses. Me company leaders are not defending themselves. They issued a statement and a pretty conciliatory tone saying, hey, we're working to support first responders and law enforcement and to identify and remove harmful content. Facebook had so many screw ups executive can't give themselves up Pat on the back or claim. Hey, we have a handle on calls to violence as recently as the New Zealand massacre Facebook failed to remove twenty percents of the video footage of the mass shooting, even though in that instance, people in the company knew what to look out for tell us how people in Sri Lanka are responding to the Senate you've been reaching out to people affected by the blackout. What are you hearing? I have you know, social media has been used time and again to help in crises right people turn to. Facebook to check in and broadcast that their faith to get updates from local officials and hospitals, and especially in Asia where WhatsApp is replaced regular phone calls for much of the population. The ban really threw people off. I spoke to one woman in American named Rena Aurora who is in Sri Lanka on vacation her family. Didn't know she was in Colombo near a bomb target. And this is her they tried to call me several times. I believe what's happened. They weren't able to get in contact with me. And so they were very concerned for my safety because all of them that I was traveling enchilada the time she had to worry about her parents worrying that she was injured or even worse than that. And she had no idea what was down when she tried to reach driver to get to the airport. He didn't respond and she figured, okay. He's blowing me off. And you know, he wasn't. He just didn't get the messages. So the both of them were operating in an information. Vacuum feeling totally isolated when what they really needed was to connect in a moments of panic. Can we say whether the blackout has actually worked at prevent. Eating the spread of hoaxes and conspiracy theories. Yeah. You know, I actually spoke to a man who lives in Colombo. And he told me that even though Facebook was banned some people use the back door tool. It's called a VPN to get on. Anyway. And lo and behold there ripostes online designed to so fear one one post claims a bomb went off in a nearby local park that was not true and other post claim that terrorists had poisoned the water supply. That was also ally TV and radio journalists had to jump in on that. And report that hey, you can trust the water you can drink at faith. That was extra work for them. It could have been worse with more people on the platform. Wow. So just briefly how does what's happened in Sri Lanka compared to what you've seen in other parts of the world. You know, what we've just seen in Sri Lanka is very swift unilateral action. Other countries like France and Germany have gone. The regulatory route, right. Germany path laws to find Facebook severely for its failure to pull down white supremacists. Content. Either approach quick or regulatory methodic the illustrate that because Facebook has. Been able to take control governments have decided that they're going to have to act. It's NPR's Arthur Shahani, thanks so much. Thank you now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups who keep attacking health workers in just the last few days. They were two assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's and read is in and welcome to the studio. Hi outy. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Mutombo. That's one of the current epicenters of the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having a meeting in witnesses say two gunmen Burstein, they took everyone's cell phones and other they started shooting injured two people and they killed the team leader. His name was. Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He was an epidemiologist from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Ebola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center, this one was at a hospital in a nearby. Suburb called Koch wa it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant, and they captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the response for the World Health Organization, and he says witnesses in that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting Ebola doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in the local population. There have been years of armed. Conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr Masuku the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to give you an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new cases a week. And then this month, we're already up. To seventy new cases every week even as high as one hundred new cases every week. If this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences, first of all the WHO and the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is highly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest violence, that's NPR's Eisenman. Thank you for explaining.

Facebook Sri Lanka NPR Colombo Arthur Shahani Lanka Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro Democratic Republic of Congo World Health Organization Asia Ebola Instagram Congo Germany Rena Aurora
"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:11 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Arthur Shahani is following the situation hierarchy what explanation Detroit has government give for shutting down the social media apps. So in a nutshell, the government doesn't trust Facebook to yank down fake news and calls to violence before they go viral keep in mind. Sri Lanka is only a decade of civil war. That's not a long time people. Remember it peace feels tenuous to them just a year ago last March Buddhist extremists torched, Muslim homes and businesses and used Facebook to incite violence in response to that the government had. Had announced a seventy two hour block on social media in this time around the government is not in a time. Limit on it. It's unclear when the band will come to an end. Of course, there are lots of examples of hoaxes going rampant on on Facebook from Myanmar to the United States. We have to note, they aren't NPR sponsor. How is the company responded to what's happening? Sri lanka. Responses. Me company leaders are not defending themselves. They issued a statement in a pretty conciliatory tone, saying, hey, were working to support first responders and law enforcement and to identify and remove harmful content. Facebook had so many screw apps. Executive can't give themselves Pat on the back or claim. Hey, we have a handle on call violence as recently as the New Zealand massacre Facebook failed to remove twenty percents of the video footage of the mass shooting, even though in that instance, people in the company knew what to look out for until us how people in Sri Lanka are responding to the Senate you've been reaching out to people affected by the blackout. What are you hearing social media has been used time and again to help in crises right people turn to. Facebook to check in and broadcast that their faith to get updates from local officials in hospitals, and especially in Asia where what has replaced regular phone calls for much of the population. The ban really threw people off. I spoke to one woman in America named Rena Aurora who is in Sri Lanka on vacation her family. Didn't know if she was in Colombo near Niro bomb target, and this is her they tried to call me several times believe what happened. They weren't able to get in contact with me, and they were very concerned for my safety because all of them knew that I was traveling insure Lanka time, she had to worry about her parents worrying that she was injured or even worse than that. And she had no idea what was down when she tried to reach driver to get to the airport. He didn't respond and she figured, okay. He's blowing me off. And you know, he wasn't. He just didn't get the messages. So the both of them were operating in an information. Vacuum feeling totally isolated when what they really needed was to connect moments of panic. Can we say whether the blackout has actually worked at? Preventing the spread of hoaxes and conspiracy theories. Yeah, I actually spoke to a man who lives in Colombo. And he told me that even though Facebook was banned some people use the back door tool. It's called VPN to get on. Anyway. And lo and behold there ripostes online designed to fear one one post claims bomb went off in a nearby local park that was not true in other post claim that terrorists had poisoned the water supply. That was also ally TV and radio. Journalists have to jump on that and report that hey, you can trust the water you can drink at faith. That was extra work for them. It could have been worse with more people on the platform. Wow. So just briefly how does what happened in Sri Lanka compared to what you see another parts of the world know what we've just seen in. Sri Lanka is very swift unilateral action. Other countries like France and Germany have gone to regulatory route. Right. Germany pass laws to find Facebook severely for its failure to pull down white supremacists. Content. Either quick or regulatory methodic. They illustrate because Facebook hasn't been able to take control governments have decided that they're going to have to act ten pairs arthy Shahani. Thanks so much. Thank you now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups keep attacking health workers in just the last few days, they were to assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's read is and welcome to the studio. Hi ati. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Mutombo. That's one of the current epicenter of the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having meeting in witnesses say two gunmen Burstein. They took everyone cell phones and other. They started shooting injured two people. And they killed the team leader. His name was Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He wasn't ebony Miala just from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Mola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center, this one was at a hospital in nearby suburb called Kotla it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant and the captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the response for the World Health Organization, and he says witnesses in that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting evil. It doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in. The local population. There've been years of armed conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr MS Oku, the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to get an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new. Cases a week. And then this month, we're already up to seventy new cases every week even as high as a hundred new cases every week. If this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences, first of all the television show and the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is highly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest violence, that's NPR's Eisenman. Thank you for.

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"arthur shahani" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:48 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KCRW

"Well, it looks like on the northbound five at seventh street, we have a crash involving a semi that's on the right shoulder, but that's causing a little bit of backup. There. Also, northbound four five at the ten connector vehicle with the flat tire in the center divider. Much west LA, sixty four degrees from NPR news. It's all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro as Sri Lanka investigates who was behind yesterday's terrorist attacks on churches and hotels. The government continues to block access to social media, their Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp all owned by Facebook are among the services under a blackout this. Once again brings into focus the fear that Facebook cannot rain in disinformation and calls to finance and pears. Arthur Shahani is following the situation hierarchy what explication did Sri Lanka's government give for shutting down these social media apps in a nutshell. The government doesn't trust Facebook to yank down fake news and calls two months before they go viral keep in mind. Sri Lanka is only a decade out of civil war. That's not a long time. People. Remember it peace feels tenuous to them just a year ago last March Buddhist extremists torched, Muslim homes and businesses and used Facebook to incite violence in response to that the government had had announced a seventy two hour block on social media. And this time around the government is not in a time. Limit on it. It's unclear when the band will come to an end. Of course, there are lots of examples of hoaxes going rampant on on Facebook from me and mar to the United States. We have to note, they aren't NPR sponsor, how is the company responded to what's happening. Sri Lanka responses. Me company leaders are not defending themselves. They issued a statement in a pretty conciliatory tone saying, hey, we're working to support first responders and law enforcement and to identify and remove harmful content. Facebook had so many screw ups executives can't give themselves Pat on the back or claim. Hey, we have a handle on costs violence as recently as the New Zealand massacre Facebook failed to remove twenty percents of video footage of the mass shooting, even though in that instance. People in the company knew what to look out for us. How people in Sri Lanka are responding to the center you've been reaching out to people affected by the blackout. What are you hearing social media has been used time and again to help in crises right, people turn to Facebook to check in and broadcast that their faith to get updates from local officials in hospitals, and especially in Asia where WhatsApp is replaced regular phone calls for much of the population. The ban really threw people off. I spoke to one woman in American named Rena Aurora who is in Sri Lanka on vacation her family. Didn't know if she was in Colombo near bomb target, and this is her they tried to call me several times believed. What's happened? They weren't able to get in contact with me. And so they were very concerned for my safety because all of them knew that I was traveling enchila- uncut the time she had to worry about her parents worrying that she was injured or even worse than that. And she had no idea what was down when she tried to reach driver to get to the airport. He didn't respond and she figured, okay. He's blowing me off and. You know, he wasn't. He just didn't get the messages. So the both of them were operating in an information. Vacuum feeling totally isolated when they really needed was to connect moments of panic. Can we say whether the blackout has actually worked at preventing the spread of hoaxes and conspiracy theories. Yeah, you know, I actually spoke to a man who lives in Colombo, and he told me that even though Facebook was banned some people use the back door tool. It's called VPN to get on. Anyway. And lo and behold, there were posts online designed to so fear one one post claims bomb went off in a nearby local park that was not true and other posts claim that terrorists had poisoned the water supply. That was also ally TV and radio journalists had to jump in on that. And report that hey, you can trust the water you can drink at faith. That was extra work for them. It could have been worse with more people on the platform. So just briefly how does what's happened in Sri Lanka compared to what you see another parts of the world. What we've just seen in Sri Lanka is very swift unilateral action. Other countries. Like, France and Germany have gone. The regulatory route. Right. Germany pass laws to find Facebook severely for its failure to pull down white supremacists. Content. Either approach quick or regulatory methodic the illustrate that because Facebook hasn't been able to take control governments have decided that they're going to have to act. It's NPR's Arthur Shahani, thanks so much. Thank you now to the Democratic Republic of Congo where for months health workers have been struggling to contain any bull outbreak. Despite the fact that more than one hundred thousand people have been vaccinated. There's been a surge of new cases and more than thirteen hundred people have been infected so far the biggest obstacle to stopping the outbreak armed groups keep attacking health workers in just the last few days, they were to assaults here to tell us. More is NPR's read is and welcome to the studio. Hi ati. Give us the latest on these attacks. I well the first one was on Friday afternoon. It was at a local hospital in a city called Mutombo. That's one of the current F. Centers on the outbreak and about twenty members of one of the local Ebola response teams were having meeting and witnesses say two gunmen Burstein. They took everyone's cell phones and other quick -ment. They started shooting injured two people and they killed the team leader. His name was Dr Richard Valerie was Oko. He wasn't Eddie meteorologist from Cameron had been deployed by the World Health Organization to help fight Ebola. And then just a few hours later there was an attack on another local command center this was at a hospital in a nearby. Suburb called Koch wa it's one of the worst hot spots in the outbreak zone. And this one was around three AM Saturday morning. Four people tried to set fire to that command center. Police fought them off they killed one assailant and the captured the rest are these centers being targeted on purpose in if so how come it seems so yes, and it's not clear exactly who was behind each of these attacks. But I spoke with Dr Michel Yow who is leading the polar response for the World Health Organization. And he says witnesses in that first attack told him that the gunmen were shouting Ebola doesn't exist. You're just here to make money off of us and it fits into a larger problem of mistrust in the local population. There've been years of armed conflict in this part of Congo and people feel victimized by the government. So they don't trust authorities and by extension health workers. What does this mean for the effort to try and contain the outbreak? Well, there's a lot of concern because this is just the latest in a series of violent incidents that directly target health workers since February two Ebola treatment centers have been attacked Dr MS Oku, the doctor who was killed on Friday. He had only arrived four weeks ago. And he apparently told colleagues that he was really worried he's left behind a wife and four children in Cameroon. And so each time there's been an attack the health workers need to regroup. They slow down their efforts to vaccinate people who've been exposed, and then you see the effect in the outbreak. It gets worse. Basically more people start to get sick. And you know to give you an example in February just before these attacks on the bullet treatment centers started. They were saying about thirty new cases a week. And then this month, we're already up to seventy new cases every week even as high as one hundred new cases every week if this violence continues is there a chance at the outbreak could grow into a catastrophe similar to what we saw in twenty fourteen in some west African countries there are some really important differences. First of all the W H O in the government have been on this from the beginning. There's also a vaccine now which has been a game changer as you noted they've managed to get more than one hundred thousand people to take it and the evidence is a tightly effective. So there are still reasons to be hopeful despite this latest violence, that's NPR's Eisenman. Thank you for explaining it to us. Glad to do it. Tomorrow on morning edition, New York City has just passed legislation requiring large buildings to dramatically cut their carbon emissions. The retrofits could cost property owners. Billions of dollars will other cities follow suit that story and the latest news from around the world tomorrow on morning edition. Esther smart speaker to play NPR or your station by name. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This is Anthony burns opening the curtain on LA theater for KCRW in the playhouse latest production. You're going to office.

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"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:46 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Subaru dot com and from the listeners of member supported cake FM eighty eight point five San Francisco and kqei Kiwi FM eighty nine point three north highlands, Sacramento. The time is five twenty one. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm also Chang, and Mary Louise Kelley one week after the terror attack that killed fifty people at two mosques in the city of Christchurch the government of New Zealand broadcast, the Muslim call to prayer from one of those mosques. Thousands of people attended today's service, including prime minister, just send a n- in a statement. She quoted the prophet Muhammed believe is in the mutual kindness. Compassion and sympathy just like one body when any part of the body surface, the whole Audie feels pain. Mourns with you. We are one among those their analysts Ning NPR's, rob Schmitz. He has been a New Zealand all week. He joins me now. Hey, rob Lewis sounds like this was incredibly emotional yet again today. What was it like to be at this prayer service? Yeah. I think the service helped the country in the community. He'll after the prayer ran into someone named Akmal Ali who just arrived from Auckland family member of his was shot. But his okay and his best friend shot in the lower back he survived, but he's never going to walk properly. Again, Ali talk to me about the shooter. And here's what he said. I don't have any. Because I forgive him. I don't know other people. But today what I'm seeing here? I see I see love online. It's a lovely cinema. What's it for you, Robin? Like just tracking the stages of grief that you have been watching people go through as you've interviewed them this week. This is a country. That's in many ways lost its innocence. I feel like I'm leaving a different country than what I arrived to a week ago. When I flew in last Saturday, everyone I met was in a state of shock. I spent my first day at the family crisis center as a journalist I wasn't supposed to be there. But a member of the mosque I met that day snuck me in I sat at a table. And just watched everything that was unfolding around me. And it was pretty heartbreaking one, man. Tell me about cradling his his three year old who had died. Another told me about an uncle he had lost two. When he was two years old had smuggled him out of Afganistan to flee, the Taliban, and they both made it here and thought they were safe, but as the week went on, and we learn more about the nature of what happened from the police and the government grief. Gave way to this big call for change right, which was expressed itself. Most tangible if you're changing the gun laws when you arrived it was regal in New Zealand to own an assault rifle. Now, it is not owners are handing their guns in could you track the conversation shifting in the days, you've been there, you could you know, by by Monday or Tuesday, you can sort of feel things changing of people actually didn't even know that semi automatic weapons where legal here, and when they found out they wanted them banned in less than a week later an entire class of weapons was suddenly band. I mean, that's pretty incredible change in the course of a week. It is remarkable. So I wonder if you have a parting thought you're flying out today back to Shanghai in a parting thought on just covering a transformative tragedy for New Zealand. Yes. Something happened today that I'd like to share my first morning. I went to the only mosque in Christ Church. That was not attacked. I wasn't sure how they'd received me when a knock on the door man named Abdul answered. He's a short guys from Fiji. He has a long beard, and he. Immediately took my hand. And he said, Hello, brother. Come in sit down eat breakfast with us. It was just automatic. And suddenly I was on this carpet with him and imam and three others. And later that day Abdul smuggled me into the family crisis centers. So that he was the one who got you down as he was the guy and then leader in the week. I didn't think I'd see him again later in the week. When I attended the first burial. I wasn't sure if I'd be able to get in. But when I entered the cemetery I saw dual he was there because many of his friends had been killed, and he was helping to bury one of them. And he rushed over to me any put his arm around my shoulder. And again, he got me inside is sorta felt like all week this one incredibly friendly man, sort of magically appeared whatever I needed access so today after the national prayer I wanted to see the mosque one last time. So I'm waiting through thousands of people, and I go to the police perimeter, and I was taking pictures, and then someone taps me on the shoulder. And sure enough. The first person that I met on my trip and as fate would have it. He was last person he was on his way to help bury twenty-six people from his community, but he stopped and he gave me a very big hug to say goodbye, and he began to cry. And he said, I love you rather. And all week I've been pretty successful at keeping my emotions in check. But at that moment, I failed to do that. An emotional and to what has been an emotional week reporting on this tragedy in New Zealand. That's NPR's rob Schmitz signing off from Christchurch. Thank you for your reporting. Rob thanks for having me a leading expert in anti-terror technology is calling on Facebook to suspend live video in the wake of the New Zealand massacre. He says the company's failure to pull down footage of the tragedy is absolutely inexcusable. The suspect had streamed the shooting live on Facebook. And from there, it was shared hundreds of thousands of times, even after New Zealand police alerted the company, here's NPR's Arthur Shahani, Astor Facebook, removed the video users attempted to upload it again in various forums about one point five million times of those attempts three hundred thousand slipped through the cracks. That's a one in five failure rate. The repeated uploading as an absolute failure. And it is inexcusable because we have the technology to stop. Honey, Farid leading architect of that technology. And if your technology isn't working, well, then you haven't innovated enough you can't claim this is a hard problem. It's the same video. It's the same video. How can this be this hard of a problem? I simply don't buy that argument for read an incoming professor at the university of California Berkeley works with Microsoft ten years ago to create photo DNA, a tool the tech giant's rely on to fingerprint digital content, the algorithms have evolved. So a photo video or audio clip can be fingerprinted and automatically blocked, even when it's been modified Facebook says they used automated technology, but the video was re cut and re recorded into formats that made it harder to match copies for it says this excuse rings hollow. It's a common problem and tech giants have had a decade to solve it haven't figured out that problem. I think says a lot about your priorities at these companies. It's simply not your. Priority the US, congress and European regulators have relied on free to fact, check the tech giant's. He says political leader should launch an inquiry and insist on honest answer is in this recent Facebook failure, which he compares to another public safety debacle. Boeing seven thirty-seven started falling out of the skies. There was a global outcry grounded planes, we stopped until we got answers to secure that with investors. Facebook leaders talk off their ability to solve the hardest technical problems like getting livestream videos to work for millions of people on smartphones at the same time. That's a really hard problem. CEO Mark Zuckerberg, November two thousand sixteen. So there aren't that many companies that can do this at the scale that we're talking about. And this has been a big advantage for us when it comes to security building. The guardrails company leaders are much quieter Facebook declined to say how many of us massacre footage got in total from the three hundred thousand to recap loads. The company also. Declined to respond to for its comments which NPR shared in an Email. Arthur Shahani, NPR news, Berkeley. This is NPR news. This is K Q public radio. Stay with us for a newscast from Tara Siler after traffic.

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"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"arthur shahani" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Back to our program now at seven twenty two it's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. President Trump's social media director wants to know why did a social media giant silence him Facebook temporarily blocked Dansk Gavino from making public comments Monday. The administration said it was politically motivated Facebook says this is more a matter of what's Gavino. Did we should note that Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters? Here's NPR's, Arthur Shahani. Here's the play by play scurvy. No was not blocked for making new posts on Facebook. A company spokesperson says Scooby note was blocked from tagging specific people in the comet thread what's called mentions. He'd been tagging so much engaging with users automated bats thought he was a spam. Or Facebook software took away his ability to do mentions for an hour or two act most and the spokesperson says the company apologizes ska vino posted a screen shot of the pop of notice he got. His boss. President Trump tweeted I will be looking into this hashtag stopped the bias. And so the incident powered by a bat. Not a human has become an example of tech giant's liberal bias, a growing concern among conservatives. They're pushing a left wing agenda. We know that which makes them even more dangerous. We need to do some about that was Missouri. Senator Josh Holly, speaking to the daily caller Republican politicians are raising red flags around what they call anti conservative bias, according to leading scholars who track online speech and censorship. There isn't dated back. It up though, one study from two thousand eighteen indicates conservatives are not the only ones with this fear across the political spectrum people who've been silenced by big tech platforms. Believe the censorship. They've experienced is politically motivated Sarah Roberts, professor at university of California, Los Angeles. They construing that add social media is by. Against me, a conservative person or social media is unfairly taking me down, you know, radical socialist or anywhere in between. While the president tweets about liberal bias. He's a strong believer in Facebook. According to the political marketing firm bully pulpit, interactive Trump has poured three point five million dollars this year into Facebook advertising more than the entire crowded field of democratic contenders combined. Artificial Honey, NPR news. Let's go now to Kashmir Valley High in the Himalayas that's been the subject of conflict for generations. Just as it is. Now the region is split between India and Pakistan separatists are fighting for independence, hundreds of thousands of soldiers are stationed there. But most winters when the valley fills with snow the fighting subsides in the area becomes a winter playground. Here's NPR's Laura unfair. A helicopter takes off near military barracks. In one of the world's longest running conflict. Artillery often rings out across these peaks seven big last..

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