14 Burst results for "Arthur Machen"

"arthur machen" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

07:36 min | Last month

"arthur machen" Discussed on Thoth-Hermes Podcast

"Comes from a an unwavering conviction that i had really really on my cell to try and become a published writer which was many years ago and that was i was going to try and convey my own vision and and and really were to select words that conveyed a poetic sense that really that were evocative of these these environments these places these impressions an convey them as concretely an end as as in a. It's it's sort of like the way. Many of the surrealists attempted to believe the term was. They tried to convey the doreen with architectural clarity. I think that that was you. Know a a nice summation I suppose i remember the you know the idea of being an old soul but will say that he also was from me to short veteran singles from so thankful for myself. I think it really comes down more to the fact that many of those nineteenth century ghost story ryan supernatural writers for instance and early twentieth century. Were immensely important to me because again they weren't trying to create a whole fit in asia. I think that they were really trying to white sincere literature What was algernon blackwood. Who is is an immense power arthur. Machen these these were individuals who were definitely conveying. The world view. I their experience of the world which often included ghosts gods spirits. The you know the the trial mystery and fats has has definitely been bad as certainly a lineage. That i- i fancied myself in my early days to to want to be a part of. And i'm very gratified that as years have gone on in the more look produced. There are many critics and readers. Who who see my work as a sort of contemporary extension of that lineage. Which which against extremely humbling and rewarding as classical german romanticism. Romantic literature romantic movement influence absolutely yet hugely hugely important to me many as the from as well as a lot of the the writers and philosophers that came later outlive the carcasses of immense importance to me. Absolutely the best. That was definitely a lot of the Germanic full tales and stories. Storytelling in the romanticism. Definitely i was a huge impact on the end. I think continues to this day. I mean many of those touchstones. I can go back to heart rhythm several times over many years and still see you know new and powerful aspects of their work and i think that's the sign of of masterpieces when you can go back and revisit them and regardless of winning were written or what culture. They emanated from. They have that intensity words taking place in the now you know you are. You're experiencing them in the moment. That's that his problem though. The the greatest Nicole that that that our can reach. And also i don't know about you but maybe you're still too young for that but How often happens to me. That when i re read those works twenty years later they have a complete different different sentence. That would be wrong but they they mean something else to me and they are another for said which is just as strong as it was before but in another level a relaunched apiece at indeed and i know for myself as my younger and was reading was blackwood or mr james or whomever to me. It was the effect and the image was so central. That when i go back and revisit them i actually see how also they on all his other themes that i didn't get as a youth but as an adult i can appreciate you know the the character development or the way that they're describing nature is another massively important aspects on any taliban the other thing that i love about this many of the the better writers in the steel you can also tell i believe when these works are written out of direct experience and when they were written out of just imaginative. Fancy not suggesting that the true. I'm not trying to say that. But i am saying is that you can tell when you read blackwood that he was a man who who hiked. Who travels who canoed new already. As well as you know the author lifestyles us knew that he was a man who had If not a belief. Because i don't have best again one of those terms of remoted but i think he definitely has a sensitivity or respect for the notion of spirits beyond literary device. You can tell that this was a man who essentially conveyed you know. These were aspects of the world in which we live. And that's i think that has been so tragically lost again going back to what we discussed earlier that i believe that these are things that were not necessarily working towards those things that we had in sort of sold or gave up and i think that that that aspect of of supernatural literature is is tragically rare. I don't think it's not altogether. You know there. There are still offers in the field who explore waiting philosophical Again exploring the these kinds of aspects as more than just tropes or literary devices. But i don't believe that it is as common or as as Accepted perhaps as as it was in the past guy see few. We'll read richard gavin next week. Keeping book can be read it twenty two complete different experience once again. You mentioned david bethel. Early of course is well known to our listeners. Here because he was a guest on this show and we had a human even within later on and i don't know if everyone knows here that you have done not only fiction writing but there is i i think that's the only fixed at least only nonfiction book that i know alphabet. You correct me. If i'm wrong but you published with the on publishing's The benighted pass about three years ago. I believe yet what. Actually i've written a few couples book length. Works of us occurs in. There was an her work that i did. There was actually a shorter work. But cova moruban oracle nam and but the the benighted half yet that was that was a wonderful project that came about through my celebration with receiver. Beth ends yet really. He was wonderfully supportive. He and jessica both the running incredibly supportive and it really giving me this forum to explore some of the themes that were of great import to me that i haven't really seen conveyed or given the context of that i tried to give them in the benighted path.

richard gavin jessica david bethel algernon blackwood next week asia early twentieth century twenty years later nineteenth century Nicole Beth twenty two The benighted pass both blackwood three years ago cova moruban german many years ago james
"arthur machen" Discussed on Lore

Lore

04:45 min | 3 months ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on Lore

"Just five days after the battle and a full month before arthur machen published his legendary tale august twenty eighth.

"arthur machen" Discussed on Lore

Lore

02:26 min | 3 months ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on Lore

"The way whether it was american soldiers in world war one clipping pages from the powwow in grim warr the long lost friend into their clothing or spartan soldiers making sacrifices to ares before battle. Every soldier seems to have leaned on superstition at some point in their life. What we see in the story of the angel of monsters is the power of hope and belief and not just in the notion that accompany of doomed. Soldiers were somehow given protection by a supernatural force. You see the rumors of what happened. In months seemed so connected to arthur. Machen story that the public began to refuse to believe that the latter wasn't inspired by the former people from all across the uk wrote to mock and asking him to reveal his sources for his historical accounts. Ministers read his work from the pulpit people everywhere clung to it as a sign that some other worldly power was on their side belief had become more powerful than truth and no matter how many times machen told his growing fan base that the parallels between the two stories was nothing more than coincidence. They refused to hear him for one man. Though that coincident seemed just a bit too strong in nineteen fifteen at the height of the rumour mill journalist. Harold begbie set about researching the events at monse and the stories that followed them hoping to nail down. A definitive. timeline did the events in months somehow without his knowing influence machen work or did his short story give life to a belief that the public was primed and ready to believe. It seems that there was one report that stood out from the rest. A lance corporal. With the british expeditionary force had reported seeing something unusual during the battle and while there were some differences in his telling key details. Were still there during the fighting win. All hope seemed to be lost. This soldier looked up toward the german line moving toward them and saw as he watched. This light began to take on shape three shapes. Actually although to never fully materialized the third however did and this soldier described what he witnessed with eerie language the figure he claimed shone brightly. It had wide outstretched wings and most significantly of all was adorned in golden armor significance. Because of win the report was made.

machen Harold begbie Machen monse arthur uk british expeditionary force
"arthur machen" Discussed on Lore

Lore

07:18 min | 3 months ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on Lore

"It had been a full century. Since the boots of their soldiers had tread on european soil. In the early days of the first world war britain had stayed outside the fray watching from the sidelines and planning for an unpredictable future. But of course that's the way of war. Isn't it coping with things. We cannot control with human lives hanging in the balance and august of nineteen fourteen. All of that changed one hundred. Thousand troops from the british expeditionary force landed in france to help hold back the oncoming wave of german invasion. If you read about them you'll hear them described as professional soldiers and some people assume that means battle-hardened then experienced but it just means that they weren't enlisted men called up weeks before most of them had never seen combat in their lives however green they might have been. They were still a welcome sight. They were cheered by fishermen when they landed and praised as they pass through the countryside on their way to the front their help was badly needed and so were their guns. Their destination was an old mining town called months which sat alongside a canal. From what i can tell. Monse was chosen because the canal had to make a few sharp bends around the town creating a little peninsula that gave the french and british strong tactical view of the oncoming germans but the british failed to use that position to their advantage. They made a few mistakes in setting up. I even though a number of bridges connected monster. The german side of a canal. No-one destroyed them and second. That wide view of the other side turned out to have a number of blind spots where hills of mining debris blocked their view and lastly yes that peninsula of land offered them a great position but if the germans managed to sneak around behind them they'd be trapped. Details of the battle itself depends solely on the soldiers who survived when the germans finally showed up said that they marched toward the canal in parade formation like one massive sea of bodies the british had set up heavy machine guns and made quick work of that initial wave mowing them down like a field at harvest time after that though things became much less controllable up and down the canal that stretched out from their flanks. The french troops collapsed quickly and began to retreat deeper into the countryside behind months the british held on his best. They could though but that's when their failure to destroy. The bridges came back to haunt them as the germans advanced. They took bridge after bridge surging into months. The battle was over and the british made a hasty retreat following after their french allies. That's the battle of mons as we know. But there's more because as those soldiers began to return to the safety of french territory. Stories began to leak out. Not just one or two mind you but a whole chorus of whispers all describing the same thing. It seems that the reason the british were able to hold on for so long was that they had been protected by an angel. Most of the stories contained the same details to all throughout the afternoon and evening of the battle of figure could be seen amongst the british troops. It was described as glowing brightly with a golden light and seated upon a white horse. One later description by a soldier who is there says it best. We all saw i. There was a sort of yellow missed sort of rising before the germans as they come to the top of the hill. The next minute comes this funny cloud of light and when it clears off. There's a tall man with yellow hair and golden armor on a white horse holding his sword up and his mouth open as if he were saying. Come on boys. I'll put the kibosh on the devils. How figure was interpreted varied from soldier to soldier. Some assumed it was angel while others were convinced it was saint george. The french soldiers who witnessed it believe the ghostly figure was none other than joan of arc. But what was agreed. Upon was that something was seen and its presence gave them hope and this is what we talked about a little while ago in war with so much fear and anxiety wayne down upon them. It has always been easy for soldiers to grasp for anything that might give them. Hope rabbit's foot a stylized doll or an odd shape in the clouds. I've even read stories of soldiers hiding little scraps of paper in their uniforms papers. That contain significant quotes holy scripture or notes from loved ones but most of the time folklore turns out to be a lot like the wizard of oz. You can see him standing there. But he's really just an illusion controlled by someone else behind the curtain and when it comes to the story of the angel of monse that analogy holds true because it seems something else was going on behind the scenes it turns out that almost all of the reports of ghostly golden figure seemed to arrive in the summer of nineteen fifteen nearly a year after the battle itself now granted the war was still going on and a lot of those soldiers were too busy fighting elsewhere to tell their stories right away but it creates an interesting time line interesting because of what had happened back in england months earlier in september of nineteen fourteen. The london evening times published a short story by a man named arthur machen. He was a well known author whose book the great god pan has been cited as deeply influential to writers like brom stoker and hp lovecraft as well as modern storytellers. Like guillermo del toro and stephen king but this new short story called the bowman at an altogether different sort of influence in it's a group of english soldiers are taking intense artillery fire from german troops and just at the moment when they believe all hope is lost. An electric shock seemed to flow through the english troops. At that moment they looked up to see a line of ghostly figures on their side each with shimmering bow in hand at once. The boman released their arrows into the germans. Helping the english win the day. That story was published just when news reports of the battle of months were sweeping into england. And because so much of machen story sounded similar to the real life events to seem to have become confused in the minds of the general public and well. I think we can see the results. A century later. Historians and experts in folklore moore. What happened to create the legend of the angel of months. But it's clear that machen story and the news reports eventually blended. It was a tale that the english wanted to believe was true and much like a fake. Social media post rides to viral status on the wave of gullibility. Most people swallowed it as fact true or not. The results of the stories impact are clearly documented. It went on to become a major piece of british propaganda during the first world war and assign to the english at least that their cause was the just one at unified people whether they were on the battlefield or not and it gave them.

Monse british expeditionary force britain monse france saint george The london evening times arthur machen brom stoker devils joan wayne boman guillermo del toro england machen stephen king bowman hp moore
"arthur machen" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

Classic Ghost Stories

07:48 min | 6 months ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on Classic Ghost Stories

"Swallowed it with a little shiver. He's only an idea now is to get out of the month before her collapse became inevitable, but this could not safely be done by turning tail and running from the enemy in action was no longer possible every minute. He was growing less Master himself off and desperate aggressive measures were imperative without further delay more over the action must be taken towards the enemy not away from it the climax if necessary a month would have to be faced boldly. He can do it now, but in ten minutes, you might not have a force left to act for himself much less for both. Upstairs the sounds of meanwhile becoming louder and closer accompanied by occasional creaking of the board's someone was moving stealthily about stumbling now and then all quickly against the furniture waiting a few moments to allow the tremendous dose of spirits to produce its effect and knowing this would last but a short time under circumstances short house, then quietly got to his feet saying in a determined voice now, I'm Julia will go upstairs and find out what all these noises you must come to wage. We agreed. It picked up his stick and went to the cupboard for the candle a limp form Rose shakily beside him breathing hard and he heard a voice say very faintly something about being able to come the woman's courage amazed him. It was so much greater than his own and as the advanced holding Aloft the dripping candle some subtle Force exhale from this trembling Whiteface Club. Woman at his side. That was the true source of his inspiration. It held something really great that shamed him and gave him the support without which it would have proved far less equal to the occasion the across the dark Landing avoiding with our office is the Deep black space over the banisters, then they began to mount the narrow staircase to meet the sounds which minute-by-minute grew louder and nearer about halfway passed off as Julia stumbled and short house turned to catch her by the arm and just at that moment there came a terrific crash in a service Corridor overhead. It was instantly followed by a shrill Edge Ice Cream. That was a cry of Terror and a cry for help melted into one. Before they can move aside all go down a single stab someone came rushing along the passage overhead blundering horribly racing madly at full speed three-step wage the time down the very staircase where they stood the steps were lightened and certain but close behind them sounded the heavier tread of another person and the staircase home seem to shake short house and His companion just had time to flatten themselves against the wall when the jumble of flying steps as upon them until persons with the slightest possible between them dashed past at full speed. It was a perfect Whirlwind of sound breaking in upon the midnight Silence of the empty building. The two Runners pursuer and pursued it passed clean through them where they stood and already with a thunder boards below. I'd received first one then the other yet. I had seen absolutely nothing not a hand or arm or face or even a shred of flying clothing. That came a second sport then the first one the lighter of the two, obviously the pursued one ran with uncertain footsteps into the little room where short hairs and his Anta just left the hell alone followed. There was a sound of scuffling gasping and smothered screaming and then out onto the landing came to step of a single person thread wait till 8. A dead silence followed to the space of half a minute and then was heard a rushing sound through the air. It was followed by a dull crashing thud in the depths of the house below Palm on the stone floor of the hall. Not to silence reigned after nothing moved. The flame of the candle is steady. It had been steady the whole time and the air had been undisturbed by any movement whatsoever of palsied with Terror aren't Julia without waiting for her companion began fumbling her way downstairs. She was crying gently to herself and went short has put his arm around her and half carried her. She felt that she was trembling like a leaf. You went into the little room and picked up the cloak from the floor and arm-in-arm walking very slowly without speaking a word. I'm looking once behind them. They marched down the three flights into the Hall in the hall Sr. Nothing but the whole way down the stairs, they were conscious at someone followed them step by step. When they went faster it was left behind and when they went more slowly it caught them up. But never once they look behind to say and at each turning staircase, they lowered their eyes for fear of the following horror. They might see upon the stairs above Earth Trembling Hands short house opened the front door and they walked out into the Moonlight and drew a deep breath of the cool night air blowing in from the sea. Everybody dies dancing and there's nuts are you trying to get into the store today? Didn't you talk to the Dead come back on? What's the secret think so that was Elgin in Blackwood the empty house. That's the second story. We've done by Blackwood. We did on just before Christmas break and 2019 and there that was episode twenty which was the Kit which was set on Christmas Eve, which is where we did for Christmas and I said then just to remind you wage Algernon Blackwood was an English writer born in 1869 who by the end of his long life became a broadcaster on radio and TV critics loved him at the time. He was very well received and even HP Lovecraft excited Blackwood is one of the Masters of The Craft he came from it was quite an interesting man. He came from a well-to-do family and was privately educated wage. A bit but was rather adventurous. He was interested in Hinduism and he had a very varied career wandering all over the world who ran a dairy farm in Canada and also a hotel in the country. It was a newspaper reporter in New York City was a bartender a model and also a violin teacher. So he was a polymath and he was always writing like being outdoors and many of his stories featured the outdoors. Obviously. This story has a very English feeling English Seaside town. He was a member of the society for psychical research found. It said that this story is based on one of the haunted houses or one of the cases in he investigated it certainly feels very similar to that kind of hairy prices investigations a bully rectory. He was also a magician he was a member and I don't mean a stage conjuror. I mean a a sorcerer, he was a member of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn and other writers. Just Arthur machen and WB Yeats with members. And of course Aleister Crowley who would have liked to seen himself as a and he was I mean, I've read a lot of Crowley's books. If you want to.

Julia Algernon Blackwood Aleister Crowley Blackwood Whiteface Club Arthur machen Golden Dawn Rose WB Yeats English Seaside Canada HP New York City reporter writer Masters of The Craft
"arthur machen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 8 months ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Him behind completely. Literature is a conversation between authors and between books. And there's just some people that keep getting our attention for some reason or another. There's something that they said there that still speaks to us, and I think left craft. Unlike other writers, we have been for gotten of the time period. Really does say things that jive with her modern experience, not only, you know the questions about living in AA. In a world that is Phantom Listen, unforgiving and where your life might have no meaning but also the fact that some of his stories are peppered with issues of race. I think is why we keep looking at him because he is one of the writers that actually has that baked into the story and we can actually Use those blocks to build something new. You can't do that with other writers so easily. Victor. What about you? Why even bother using Lovecraft as a starting point or an inspiration? Why not just, you know, create things without having to refer back to him. I guess I would think of you often Think of literature as a kind of an enormous family. Write the books you read. When you're young. The books that influenced you, the artists that influence you. They get into your DNA. They become a part of your sort of lay of thinking and seen the world. And as a result, they influence who you are, in the same way that they were influenced. I would echo Sylvia that Ah Lovecraft didn't invent the genre of cosmic Harbor. They're artists that were inspiring him like Algernon Blackwood, Arthur Machen, whose work is still red. But he added to that genre, and to my mind, the worst thing would be to say. That kind of writing or that genre. It's on ly for white dudes, because when I was growing up, I said, I love this. I knew lots of writers of color lots of women who also loved this and so the idea that we would have to Give up the whole sort of Geography simply because someone who was a big part of it was a problem. I mean, I feel like then you'd have to talk about realism and Herman Melville. You have to talk about almost every single genre, some of the writers who are foundational We're also awful people. And so the question is, Do we give up everything or do we find a way to revitalize it? Regenerated and perhaps making make something good out of some land That was At times a little bit poisoned. A little bit fallow. Let's say it that way. Sylvia wanted to ask you about this summer's Hugo Awards, which honor science fiction and fantasy writing Where Lovecraft got a retroactive award. What? What did you make of the decision to do that? I think all the retro awards are ridiculous..

Sylvia Arthur Machen Lovecraft Algernon Blackwood Hugo Awards Herman Melville Victor
"arthur machen" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

08:18 min | 8 months ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on The Takeaway

"That and then most people or I think everybody actually said Yeah I would I would like to do that and they went in wildly different directions somewhere using queer characters. We're using cactus of colors were doing things that were finding comedic which lovecraft have done, and some were going in berry bleak places and very serious explorations. Of Race and history and and womanhood, and sexism, and all these kinds of things. So it was just this lovecraft. The good thing about lovecraft mythos lovecraft fiction is that it has been for many many decades. It's like a Lego Kit. You know you can grab the Lego blocks and you can build a spaceship, but else can build a castle. L. Question for both of you why even bother trying to find inspiration from lovecraft today rather than just leaving him behind. Entirely and allowing people you know and just creating your own stories without any contact with lovecraft I mean is it is he that critical to the genre or? Just curious Sylvia. Literature is a conversation between us and between books, and there's just some people that keep getting our attention for some reason or another. There's something that they said there that still speaks to us and I think lovecraft unlike other writers who have been forgotten of the time period. Really, say things that Jive were there modern experience only you know the questions about living in. A world that is a phantom list and unforgiving and were your life might have no meaning. But also the fact that some of history's are peppered with issues of race I think is why we keep looking at him because he is one of the writers that actually has dad baked into the story and we can actually. Use, those blocks to build something new. You can't do that with other writers so easily. Victor, what about you? Why even bother using lovecraft as a starting point or an inspiration? Why not? Just you know create things without having to refer back the him. I guess I would think of I often think of literature as a kind of an enormous family write the books you read when you're young the books that influenced you the artists that influence you they get into your DNA they become a part of your sort of way of thinking seemed world, and as a result they influence who you are in the same way that they were influenced. The I would echo Sylvia that lovecraft didn't invent the genre of. Cosmic horror, their artists that were inspiring him like Algernon, Blackwood, Arthur, machen, whose work still red, but he added to that Chandra and to my mind the worst thing would be say that kind of writing or that genre it's only for white dudes because when I was growing up I, said I love this I knew lots of writers of color lots of women who also loved this, and so the idea that we would have to give up a whole sort of. Geography simply because someone who was a big part of it was a problem I mean I feel like then you'd have to talk about realism and Herman Melville. You'd have to talk about almost every single genre, some of the writers who are foundational. Were also people, and so the question is, do we give up everything or do we find a way to revitalize it regenerated and perhaps making make something good out of some land that was at times a little bit poisoned. Or a little bit fallow let's say it that way. Sylvia, wanted to ask you about this summer's Hugo awards which honor science fiction and fantasy writing where lovecraft got a retroactive award. What what did you make of the decision to do that? I think all the retro awards are ridiculous. Why do we care what somebody did you know eighty years ago when they were extremely famous as in the case of HP lovecraft, it's not adding anything to recognize him at this point I mean he is dead Shouldn't we be looking at other people who are alive and well, and maybe didn't get as much attention I mean I remember when Charles Saunders wrote, what is a rip roaring African sword and sorcery in the nineteen seventies and eighties and it Kinda was not very well known that those are the kind of people that I would like to see and getting a worth. I mean there's like four games inspired by lovecraft. Work, there's a film festival. Why does he need that award and of course you know this coming after they changed the world fantasy award from being a love crap had a how we to to something else. It's it. Just it just feels really quite pointless, and if we are going to be doing that kind of looking into the past. And awards that we should be doing it. You know two more interesting people that were forgotten. Wondering Victor View couldn't recommend any SCI FI or fantasy writers today who are tackling things like racism and sexism in their work is there anyone you would recommend? Yeah for sure, there's a few there's a writer named grew Sana emory's has an a series of books that starts with a novel called winter tied. That took talks about lovecraft stuff particularly from the point of view of women in the lovecraft. In sort of fictional world, there's writing Cassandra car who has a novel called Hammers on bone, and then a writing in Caitlin Kiernan who has a novel called agents of Dreamland. All three of them are excellent writers and Rhode Excellent Books In this sort of thing Sylvia, are there any sci fi or fantasy writers today that you would want to recommend? Stephen Graham Jones just released the only good Indians I. think it is an excellent novel that has all the flavor of giving king. It or Peters tribes go story, but it feels fresh and exciting. I also read a Book and Translation. Recently, that is called tender is the flesh. It's a dystopia in which human beings are being farmed for meat consumption. So. Those are just too. Har- books that are that are coming out that have come out recently that I think are very exciting and there's always interesting work going on in the magazines and small presses. Nadia Balkans collection, she said destroy. Is just amazing and there's all kinds of stuff that is happening that I think if you like horror we are I hope kind of entering a sort of renaissance after it'd being. Kind of dry out there where we are wasn't getting much attention in the military sphere and you would be told, well, don't right her it'll never sell think we're finally heading into `fine era in which that might not be true anymore. Don't write her. It'll never sell if you're not Stephen King or don't right Har-, it'll never sell because people are interested. Well. I. Was told don't writes anything said in Mexico because nobody will read anything in Mexico. So if you want to get more specific about my situation that was mine but in general I was also told that horror is not something that agents or editors would like and it is true. It's one of those things that you don't see age kind of running out and begging you for for horror books. There were other things that they might want like epic fantasy was kind of the big things patented after. George Martin and and game of thrones. That's kind that was kind of like hot stuff that that people were were kind of asking and if you said well, I've got a her book is like. Okay and then if I said, it said in Mexico than they were just like well no, that's definitely no. I suspect that might be starting to change Sylvia. Well I wrote a book called Mexican Gothic an Kansas other. So I just thought that will show them. Victor, Lavalle is the author of the Changeling and Sylvia Boediono Garcia is the author of Mexican gothic thanks to you both. Thank.

lovecraft Sylvia Boediono Garcia writer Victor View world fantasy award Mexico Herman Melville Stephen Graham Jones Hugo awards Jive Stephen King Caitlin Kiernan Kansas HP George Martin Peters Hammers Sana emory Charles Saunders Algernon
"arthur machen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh AIR let's get back to my interview with Stephen King he has a new collection of novellas called if it bleeds I want to read something that you recently wrote and I'm I'm I think I sent a tweet if I remember correctly people reading novels including me said and the president are going to have to rethink a great deal of their works in progress to quote Bob Dylan things have changed so are you in the middle of something and are you rethinking it because you know the world is changing around you and there are changes that are going to be the long term or permanent I am in the middle or something I've been working on a book since our last April I think since yeah since about the spring of two thousand and nineteen there been a lot of things that are sort of interfered with the progress of this book but his marching down it's largely marching because I'm stuck in the house and I have no excuse to procrastinate I have to do this but my idea originally was the book if it bleeds is out this year in twenty twenty so I set this book in the year twenty twenty because I thought okay when I publish it if it's in twenty twenty one it will be like in the past safely in the past and then this thing came along and I immediately looked back to the copy that I've written and I saw that one of the things that was going on was that two of my characters have gone on a cruise on a cruise ship hello and I thought well no I don't think anybody's going on cruise ships this year and so I looked at everything and I immediately set the book in two thousand and nineteen where people could congregate and be together and the story would work because of that a lot of interesting ramifications that word again think of with this well I can remember when the when the Cold War more or less ended and people said well I don't know what spy novelist you're going to have to right about now well of course they found things to write about in writers will find things to write about with this I don't know what there will be love in the time of corona virus or exactly what it will be but there will be novels but for people who are writing books current right now I would just say take a look at the TV ads that run on the news the news is running all coronavirus all the time everything else has been pushed to the sidelines all of this but when you see the ads they still show people congregating together there in car dealerships there shaking hands the grandfather is still with these kids and he's saying the big bad wolf huffed and puffed and the kid says sort of like you grandpa right for those people those people are not together anymore the ads are basically obsolete totally obsolete you know I I have to say I don't know how closely you worked on the HBO series it was so good and I want to recommend it to anybody who has access to HBO who's looking for something to to stream and although it has it's evil and it's scary moments it's not related to the kind of thing we're going through right now exactly so what do you think Stephen well I love this series and love what they did to it the guy who developed it Richard price is a fantastic novelist and I'm a long time fan of his work need to doesn't she does a lot of police procedural stuff very tough very greedy I'm not seen balls he knows a lot about that sort of thing and I was stunned to learn during my relationship with them and the emails that we had back and forth he's also a huge horror fan and he's read a lot of my stuff he knows all the classic writers like Arthur Machen in H. P. Lovecraft and so he was eager to try and combine the two which was one of the interesting things one of the things that I really loved about writing the outsider was I was able to take police work and a very rational who done it how does this story about a man who could be in two places at the same time there were witnesses that said yeah he was there and he must have killed this child but there are other credible witnesses who say he was ninety miles away at a conference so I had a chance to use the all the bells and whistles of police procedurals which I also love and combine them with the the horror story well let's take another short break here and then we'll talk some more if you're just joining us my guest is Stephen King his new collection of novellas.

Stephen King
"arthur machen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh AIR let's get back to my interview with Stephen King he has a new collection of novellas called if it bleeds I want to read something that you recently wrote and I'm I'm I think I sent a tweet if I remember correctly people reading novels including me said and the president are going to have to rethink a great deal of their works in progress to quote Bob Dylan things have changed so are you in the middle of something and are you rethinking it because you know the world is changing around you and there are changes that are going to be long term or permanent I am in the middle of something I've been working on a book exchange so last April I think since yeah since about the spring of two thousand and nineteen that a lot of things that are sort of interfered with the progress of this book but his marching down it's largely marching because I'm stuck in the house and I have no excuse to procrastinate I have to do this but my idea originally was the book if it bleeds is out this year in twenty twenty so I set this book in the year twenty twenty because I thought okay when I publish it if it's in twenty twenty one it will be like in the past safely in the past and then this thing came along and I immediately went back to the copy that I've written and I saw that one of the things that was going on was that two of my characters he got on a cruise on a cruise ship hello and I thought well no I don't think anybody's going on cruise ships this year and so I looked at everything and I immediately set the book in two thousand and nineteen where people could congregate and be together and the story would work because of that there are a lot of interesting ramifications that word again did you think of with this well I can remember when the when the Cold War more or less ended and people said well I don't know what spy novelists are going to have to write about now owns course they found things to write about in writers will find things to write about with this I don't know what there will be love in the time of corona virus or exactly what it will be but there will be novels but for people who are writing books current right now I would just say take a look at the TV ads that run on the news the news is running all coronavirus all the time everything else has been pushed to the sidelines all of this but when you see the ads they still show people congregating together there in car dealerships there shaking hands the grandfather is still with these kids and he's saying the big bad wolf huffed and puffed and the kids says sort of like you grandpa right for those people those people are not together anymore the ads are basically obsolete totally obsolete you know I I have to say I don't know how closely you worked on the HBO series it was so good and I want to recommend it to anybody who has access to HBO who's looking for something to to stream and although it has it's evil and it's scary moments it's not related to the kind of thing we're going through right now exactly so what do you think Stephen well I love this series and love what they did to it the guy who developed it Richard price is a fantastic novelist and I'm a long time fan of his work need to doesn't she does a lot of police procedural staff very tough very greedy I'm not seen balls he knows a lot about that sort of thing and I was stunned to learn during my relationship with them and the emails that we had back and forth he's also a huge horror fan and he's read a lot of my stuff he knows all the classic writers like Arthur Machen in H. P. Lovecraft and so he was eager to try and combine the two which was one of the interesting things one of the things that I really loved about writing the outsider was I was able to take police work and a very rational who done it how done it story about a man who could be in two places at the same time there were witnesses to Chad yeah he was there and he must have killed this child but there are other credible witnesses say he was ninety miles away at a conference so I had a chance to use the all the bells and whistles of police procedurals which I also love and combine them with the the horror story well let's take another short break here and then we'll talk some more if you're just joining us my guest is Stephen King his new collection of novellas is called if it.

Stephen King
"arthur machen" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Your hands waiting to get inside the warmth of your body where they can multiply and spread and once you start thinking about that. It's very hard to unthinking again. So it's it's easy to start to be paranoid about it but on the other hand. What's the alternative? I'm glad you mentioned Howard used because I keep thinking about the scene in Martin Scorsese's film the aviator. We're Leon Leonardo DiCaprio as how his in the bathroom exactly and he's trying to get out of the bathroom because he's compulsive about washing his hands and cleaning his hands every time he washes his hands he has. He can't reach the door with with the paper and so he can't get out because everytime we touch US something has to go back and wash his hands again and it seemed keeps going on. And that's the world I feel like I'm living in right now. I'm not really have any skin left on my hands from washing so much. Do you like that scene. I know you yeah I was I was thinking about that scene just as you were and as I'm I'm sure a lot of people who've seen that movie can relate to that immediately you know to the idea of these. Things are all over our hands where making complexes in our children that are going to last a generation. You know for me as a guy who is in his seventies now. I can remember my mother talking about the Great Depression. It made a scar. It left trauma behind and I think for our children when they grow up. Or let's put it this way my grandchildren when they grow up my granddaughter. Who can't see your friends can only skype them. Once in a while she stuck in the house she could go out in the yard when her children say all my God i? I'm so bored. I can't go out that little girl who's becomes a woman is going to say. Well you should have been around in two thousand twenty because we were stuck in the house for months at a time. We couldn't go out. We were scared of germs. You see what I'm saying. I think you're absolutely right. I completely I feel exactly the same way. I WanNa read something that you recently wrote. And I'm I think it was an tweet. If I remember correctly people writing novels including me set in the present are going to have to rethink a great deal of their works in progress to quote. Bob Dylan things have changed. So are you in the middle of something and are rethinking because to know the world is changing around you and there are changes that are going to be Long-term or permanent. I am in the middle of something I've been working on a book Since last April I think since since about the spring of two thousand and nine thousand nine hundred been a lot of things that have sort of interfering with the progress of this book. But it's marching now it's largely marching. Because I'm stuck in the house and I have no excuse to procrastinate. I have to do this but my idea originally was the book if it breeds is out this year in twenty twenty so I set this book in the year. Twenty twenty because I thought okay when I publish it in twenty twenty one it will be like in the past safely in the past and then this thing came along and I immediately look back through the copy that I've written and I saw that one of the things that was going on. Was that two of my characters. Had Gone on a cruise on a cruise ship. And I thought well No. I don't think anybody's going on cruise ships this year and so I looked at everything and I immediately set the book. In two thousand and nineteen where people could congregate and be together and the story would work because of that. There are a lot of interesting ramifications. That word again to think of with this. I can remember when the when the Cold War more or less ended and people said well. I don't know what spy novelist you're going to have to write about now. Of course they found thanks to write about and writers will find things to write about with this. I don't know whether we'll be love in the time of Corona virus or exactly what it will be but the will be novels but for people who were writing books. Oh current right now I would just say take a look at TV ads. That run on the news. The news is running all corona virus. All the time everything else has been pushed to the sidelines of this. But when you see the ads they still show people congregating together they are in car dealerships. They're shaking hands The grandfather is still with his kids and he saying the big bad wolf often puffed and the kid says. Sorta like you GRANDPA right. Those people those people are not together anymore. The ads are basically obsolete. Totally obsolete I have to say. I don't know how closely you worked on the HBO series. It was so good and I want to recommend it to anybody who has access to HBO. Who's looking for something to To Stream and although it has it's evil and it's scary moments it's not related to the kind of thing we're going through right now exactly. So what do you think Stephen? Well I love the series. I loved what they did to it. The Guy who developed it. Richard price is a fantastic novelist. And I'm a long time fan of his work knee. Does she does a lot of police procedural stuff very tough very gritty. Nuts and bolts. He knows a lot about that sort of thing and I was stunned to learn During my relationship with him and the emails that we had back and forth that he's also a huge horror fan and he's read a lot of my stuff out he knows all the classic writers Mike Arthur Machen and HP lovecraft and so he was eager to try and combine the two which was one of the interesting things One of the things that I really loved about writing the was I was able to take. Police work in a very rational. Who done it or how done it story about a man who could be in two places at the same time there were witnesses that said yeah he was there and he must have killed this child but there are other credible witnesses say he was ninety miles away at a conference so I had a chance to use the all. The Bells and whistles of police procedural also love and combine them with a horror story. Well let's take another short break here and then we'll talk some more if you're just joining us. My guest is Stephen King. His new of.

Leon Leonardo DiCaprio US Martin Scorsese Mike Arthur Machen Howard Bob Dylan Stephen King HBO Stephen HP Richard price
"arthur machen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In recovery from substance use disorders co with nineteen poses a major challenge the entire concept of recovery it's built on the sense of community the sense of belonging this sense of doing anything other than isolating voices of recovery and surprising ways the corona virus is also bringing them together I'm with you Larry and that's next time on the takeaway weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM this is fresh AIR let's get back to my interview with Stephen King he has a new collection of novellas called if it bleeds I want to read something that you recently wrote and I'm I'm I think I sent a tweet if I remember correctly people reading novels including me said and the president are going to have to rethink a great deal of their works in progress to quote Bob Dylan things have changed so are you in the middle of something and are you rethinking it because to know the world is changing around you and there are changes that are going to be the long term or permanent I am in the middle of something I've been working on a book since last April I think since yeah since about the spring of two thousand and nineteen there been a lot of things that are sort of interfered with the progress of this book but his marching down it's largely marching because I'm stuck in the house and I have no excuse to procrastinate I have to do this but my idea originally was the book if it bleeds is out this year in twenty twenty so I set this book in the year twenty twenty because I thought okay when I publish it if it's in twenty twenty one it will be like in the past safely in the past and then this thing came along and I immediately looked back to the copy that I've written and I saw that one of the things that was going on was that two of my characters have gone on a cruise on a cruise ship hello and I thought well no I don't think anybody's going on cruise ships this year and so I looked at everything and I immediately set the book in two thousand and nineteen where people could congregate and be together and the story would work because of that there are a lot of interesting ramifications that word again teachers think up with this L. E. I can remember when the when the Cold War more or less ended and people said well I don't know what spy novelists are going to have to right about now well of course they found things to write about in writers will find things to write about with this I don't know what there will be love in the time of corona virus or exactly what it will be but there will be novels but for people who are writing books current right now I would just say take a look at the TV ads that run on the news the news is running all coronavirus all the time everything else has been pushed to the sidelines all of this but when you see the ads they still show people congregating together there in car dealerships there shaking hands on the grandfather is still with these kids and he's saying the big bad wolf huffed and puffed in the kids says sort of like you grandpa right for those people those people are not together anymore the ads are basically obsolete totally obsolete you know I I have to say I don't know how closely you worked on the HBO series it was so good and I want to recommend it to anybody who has access to HBO who's looking for something to to stream and although it has it's evil and it's scary moments it's not related to the kind of thing we're going through right now exactly so what do you think Stephen well I love the series I love what they did to it the guy who developed it Richard price is a fantastic novelist and I'm a long time fan of his work me too doesn't she does a lot of police procedural stuff very tough very greedy I'm not seen balls he knows a lot about that sort of thing and I was stunned to learn during my relationship with them and the emails that we had back and forth he's also a huge horror fan and he's read a lot of my stuff he knows all the classic writers like Arthur Machen in H. P. Lovecraft and so he was eager to try and combine the two which was one of the interesting things up one of the things that I really loved about writing the outsider was I was able to take police work and a very rational who done it how does this story about a man who could be in two places at the same time the witnesses that said yeah he was there and he must've killed this child but there are other credible witnesses who say he was ninety miles away at a conference so I had a chance to use the all the bells and whistles of police procedurals which I also love and combine them with the the horror story well let's take another short break here and then we'll talk some more if you're just joining us my guest is Stephen King his new collection of.

"arthur machen" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

12:18 min | 1 year ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"I guess that's an American thing it is it is we have a lot of Am radio bleed over from Benesch speaking stations at night? I Dunno style Blondeau Sobre Senor George Noory. Well they use this method for the season to kind of get information about what they they think. They're investigating whether they should go on. One of the things that comes out. This is this. Tin Can disintegrate. You want to write. Consider how you make a show like this like like any reality. Tv show is is a basis of you film. Everything and then you structure narrative in the editing room right so the emergent narrative in season one of Hellier is that there is a ten cannon cave and it's significant. I was unable to call it I don't know what you want to call you. People that the suspension of disbelief. I don't know what the right term is for this but I was unable to find it within my heart to accept the that the Tim Caine was important but I think that was supposed to happen. I'll I will say this so we've talked about there. Being two two seasons. There's a season one of five episodes and a season two of ten and they actually re number them as so season or episode seven of season. Two is chapter twelve. So it's it's a little bit of a George Lucas thing. But where the season one I found. I'm just gonNA say the strata. I found it maddening because it was very interested in the beginning and then it just became this almost meditative something that ended with their encountering spirits. In a once it becomes season two it becomes this very different thing but the point I'm making here is the Tin Cam is a thing for a while. And then there's another thing and they follow that and then there's another thing and there's a balloon and then there's amy and then there's Somerset and then there's in other words it's just thing after thing after thing after thing that continues a stain what's going on. It's like it's almost like a mess. That just swallowed up. Things free suggestions. Something is suggested to be connected to the case and rather than analyzing it critically that just like yet. That's another indication that we're on the right path and Adam Greenford. She saw encourages them when they into him in the season two. He encourages them to keep following these signs and so they start finding. I think they found liked to deflate two balloons in different places on then but one of those places was coordinates that they got from the decipher from Terry wrist. Rice stay then suggest they kind of forget that but the balloons does significantly deflated. They find though that title finds there is still significant because they then find a billion elsewhere and then like this is a sign that we need to just keep following the pathway. Going on a can't quite do verner Hertzog but the balloon reflects my own sense of deflation balloons society. I can't be but you know what I mean. It's it's okay. Look here's a piece of evidence for you. They found this can at the end of season one. The can in the cave is a significant part of the narrative goes ahead been seen earlier in. Connor's estes method imagery right right now seeing a ten cam while they went to. Hell your God like BNB or wherever they were cabin and and and did this century deprivation thing. He's like there's an image of a tin can then go to a tunnel where there may be goblins but but season to season to where is the can they left it in the cave and the reason they left in the cave they're like I don't know why we left. I know why it's because the narrative was constructed in the editing booth and the can was not significant to them as much as it seemed to be when they actually filmed it. That's my belief as a field archaeologist. Who's done a lot of work in parts of the eastern U. S? You find a lot of random shit everywhere. They also left it because this is what you find in frigging a former tunnels in mining places. You find crap. Yeah Right Right. I know I know obviously real life. It's crab just saying within the context of the story. Why why did they say it was important but leded behind I'm saying is because the importance of arose later? I have to go back. They needed to be able to go back and refined it and then do they did this. Oh what actually this comes onto the next bit. I watch talk. They do this session where they use a helmet so Dana is holding data. New York's holding the tin can in her hand. You've got Is it Connor? Doing the ESTES methods. So he's got. He's got the noise cancelling headphones on his blindfolded. Can't hear anything that's being said. She accepted provides. And the other one's not but in an altered state because of electro magnets. That's the thing so she's using God. Helmet has been made apparently with permission in the help of Michael passing for those who don't know God helmet is a device that was created basically study religious experiences and the effects of stimulation of the temporal Lopes and it goes over the head and it uses weak magnetic fields which are to the head to save if religious experiences of what you flora and visions and so be stimulated in crated. And they've got this helmet which is being apparently created with the help with the permission of Michael Passing. Who did that research? And they use it to try and amplify Dana newkirk psychic abilities so that she can kind of guess bring in whatever that communicating with and then the entity. The whatever is communicating through the ghost box which is being fed into corners airs. And he's trying out onces or statements in response to the questions that dinner is asking. And what's really crazy about? That is the God helmet. There is no evidence that it can amplify likeability and in the actual segment. We're talking about this and about doing it. Dana says the one when she used the God Helmet. They only use it for fifty minutes. Sorry and up to ten days afterwards. She feels completely out of sync. And so on and I've got a friend WHO's neurologist. As contacted him I was. Hey if someone was using these weak magnetic fields on their brain would it make them feel wit up to ten days will soon afterwards and I? He was at the idea that people would be applying electric fields that are in temporal lobes it. Non Clinical Setting. He was not yet. Don't don't do that. He was pointed out that Trans Cranial magnetic stimulation or tms which is used in a clinical situation. It has some therapy to benefits. It can be used in the treatment of mental health. There is still research on. Go into its effectiveness but it is used to treat people that uses frustrating electric fields which are fed for coiled credit magnetic field and is used on talk to regions of the brain depending on which part of the Brain. They're trying to stimulate uncosted. Change in it has some rest effects including seizures and fainting. And if people have like a pacemaker. It can screw that up. But the God helmet uses really weak magnetic fields which are applied just to the temporal lobes and the fields in those are one million times weaker than those using tear mass. So if Dana New car is having an adverse side effect of wearing their version of the God helmet which isn't like the official was be made. I guess in line with the blueprints then either something wrong with it and it it could potentially be causing damage or I mean skeptic and maybe I'm just closed minded but maybe we're dealing with people who have a tendency to see connections went on exist. I just throwing out look. That's interesting idea. No I would agree that the I will say that. The I've heard Greg and others from the hell. Your project talk about their protocols and how their people have jury rigged God helmets that sound a lot stronger and a lot scarier to your your neurons. So there's that I wanna point out two things so first off and they do discuss this in the show. Michael Persinger was attempting to amplify psychic abilities. As you said Haley he was trying to study religious experiences. And I think a lot of paranormal ISTS learned about this because he expanded that to alien abduction and I think it's a lot of paranormal S. Learn about it so they do say in the show. Oh this was not the initial intention but it got used for that but I want to say something else. So Pan is a significant part of season two hellier and yet the primary part of season one is about little goblins under the earth. This all starts to bring the mind. Arthur machen Arthur. Machen was a Welsh author in the late nineteenth early twentieth century. Incredibly important for it gets called weird fiction. He wrote other sorts of things. A number of his stories. Were about the idea that was actually a quasi-legitimate notion in folklore and anthropology. At the time that fairy lore stories of ferry people were actually remembrances of ancient prehistoric races. This is back when anthropologists and anatomist were just beginning to figure out human evolution and archaeology. So there was the idea that. Oh well maybe there were other people in the past and like neanderthals and whatnot. That were an and I can't remember Homo Sony. Basically the piltdown man that were The or a therapist thus owning don man that were the inspiration for fairy stories. And so- machen wrote a series of fictional tales but heavily based on those ideas that there were these ancient people that were still living in caves and that we're responsible for ferries which sounds a lot like some of the more material aspects of Hellier it also inspires. We mentioned earlier. Lovecraft the whisper in darkness which is a direct lift from that but the other story that Machen is very famous for is a story. He writes in the early twentieth century. I'd have to make sure that's the date not late. Nineteenth twentieth either way you had wordy period the great God Pan Pan In the early twentieth century in the period and the British empire sort of stood in like it does in Hell. You're for nature. So they mix the green man and pan and Kerr new nose and all these other things which you do see some of that in the western culture tradition. But they're mixing a lot in the story. The Great God Pan. Eight eight thousand nine hundred eighty four because very late nineteenth century. Thank you tell me if this sounds familiar. In the Great God Pan a series of investigators interested in the cycle realm. They want to pierce the veil of reality to go to the other world to understand it so they do a medical technological procedure on a young woman. There's a lot of cringe things. Some Aachen's writing so just be aware of that k where she is allowed to see the great God pan the essence of nature that we cannot see and they do this experiment on her.

Arthur machen Arthur Dana newkirk Hellier Connor Senor George Noory Tim Caine Benesch verner Hertzog Pan Michael Persinger George Lucas Adam Greenford Michael Passing Somerset Terry Rice Kerr Aachen Michael New York
"arthur machen" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"Again this concept of scripted you know the idea that that the pop culture that influences can actually cause us to see things that sounds wackadoo because most people walk around and say oh i don't see things because i watched the movie yeah but but just because you don't doesn't mean that other people don't well first of all there's that second i think there's a rephrasing that might help here yeah it's not that you see things it's that you percy thing yeah and remember and that's a big difference yeah yeah and you know and so many of the things that you do talk about on the show and and some of this makes it in the book i talk about some of this you know you've done your slender man episode well you don't get slender man without lovecraft that is clearly an inspiration on on the creation of slender man honestly a lot of things we talk about kinda come through that lens and a lot of our pop culture i mean how much of our superhero stuff comes from jack kirby and jack kirby is very much playing with ancient alien stuff and not just when he reads von daniken all the he's clearly doing that as well yeah yeah and you know so now starting the seventies you have the i love kraft renaissance and the revival and kind of the creation of you know i mean arguably you could argue that modern geek culture isn't essence a great pulp revival so lovecraft gets mentioned but a lot of the seeds of this stuff planted in the fifties and sixties is all of these the these these folks reading stuff and like oh well i want an evil ancient book i want an elder god and they put them in their comics and they put them in their science fiction but since there was no geek reference culture there's no point in saying oh and of course lovecraft they play around with it and you know make up names but there's there's obvious influence but then that inspires also paranormal stuff i mean i've talked about on this show the paranormal unified field theory concept i've been working with that again i didn't invent i just gave a catchy acronym the puffed too right but it's got real elements of this you know a john keel we know gray barker he's working allah bender on his men in black and you read that stuff and there's a rainbow city in artika where they need aliens that are too horrible to describe okay if you're talking about an ancient alien city and article where this aliens to horrible describe your knocking on lovecraft store i'm reading the bender book right now yes so yeah so that that's that's that's something by the way are it's one of those things whereas benders one of those people who oh i would've loved to admit him i mean he seems like bright at my alley you know what are the guys i would love to go have a drink with just hang out with but he's like he's decorated his whole upstairs attic room with movie stuff macab yeah yeah yeah he had his his his his aver or right yeah but but she's also he's experiencing the weirdest things which if you read it it sounds like he's having some kind of psychotic episode it doesn't sound like a real experience it's become accepted as he was legitimately influenced by real experiences and i'm not sure how people were able to read his his account and turn them into yahoo by that yeah i mean well because you get these intermediaries what you know you get gray barker just like you get rape palmer to richard shaver ju they there helping helping as you say shave off the rough edges yeah we're not we're nice yeah no foliage do but yeah so lovecraft becomes i think one of these again not alone though i mean he is part of you know we mentioned robbie howard he's partially responsible for the whole reptilian alien thing and lovecraft is taking some of his stuff from arthur machen i mean it has been argued and i would argue that there's a there's a good argument and frankly if you go back and read things communion virga that the whispering darkness about oh and author goes to a lonely cabin in the mountains of vermont and horrible things happen yeah is is is is one of the origins of what becomes alien abduction well.

"arthur machen" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"arthur machen" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"People call it forty and phenomena is a blanket statement exactly yeah so that is a huge influence on the call khufu we know he read it and we read four and secondly mentioned it and some later stories and secondly called the call of through that story the clear difference in my mind and maybe i'm biased from stuffy done before is it is it is an archaeological science fiction story it is a story that if you did science fiction through archaeology you get the call through he's not the only one who did that but he arguably creates the most important story that influences many others that come afterwards it becomes the archetype of the logical horror right i think it does there are things before including the fact that he is a fan of arthur machen who is doing some of the same things but he goes much further and i think one of the reasons why this hasn't been talked about as i mean on the one hand i mean philo in lovecraft become these pop culture icons today in no small part because of stuff like sandy petersen game the call khufu and if you think if your stereotypical character in that game who are they archaeology professor so i mean it's not that far but i possibly because of the people that have done academic work on lovecraft before they have focused on his atheism they're focused on his racism for good reason because he's super aces they have focused in particular on his interest in cosmology and astronomy and this been very little interest in archaeology this story is very difficult to understand without archaeology it starts with an artist taking a ball relief in an ancient style they ask carved recently to and archaeologist that archaeologists then like four collects strange clippings and then he tells the story in his notes about when he was an archaeology conference and somebody brought him bits from an ancient cult that's an artifact that he then studies with hieroglyphs all over it which then leads to his nephew who still alive was an anthropologist with archaeological interests finding notes from us iem about another artifact ticket from a cult that then takes all of this to a ruined city which is described very much like cities like macho peachy or kish in which this ancient alien lives or dies or does both yeah really hard to understand this story as not archaeological story i would agree one hundred percent about i just read it like two weeks ago by coincidence i wasn't really planning it for this but it's it's very fresh in my mind and then of course many of his stories he does later including most famously mountains of madness is straight up archaeology is sean is it's like oh look we're going to explore ancient ruins city and find the history of earth that's a story yeah in the idea that some of the ideas here the within the story it's not so much in this story but the idea that the the human race arises from the the work of these aliens in in some of the stories it's almost like the mountains of madness in particular it's not just that humans come from these aliens it's like we're an accident like hello if you've got any pride in being the human drop it you know well what's what's interesting is so this this so the at the mountains of madness lovecraft kind of magnum opus of ancient alien stuff has ancient aliens come to earth and create us as an accident the call thue actually is much closer to what you'll hear on like the history channel where aliens come here and maybe they mess with us but they become our gods.

one hundred percent two weeks one hand