21 Burst results for "Arthur Brooks"

"arthur brooks" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

03:53 min | 1 d ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"And tell my 24 year old, my son, he's getting married this summer. And I was telling him about this. I said, it's basically you're inadvertently with a dating app, but she never used, but all his friends did. You're inadvertently trying to date your sibling. Oh. And my son says, not hot. Agreed, yeah, that's not ideal. Yeah. So all of this adds up. Social fear, safetyism and the way you were raised, and too much compatibility. One, two, three, 30 points down. Wow. That's crazy. Yeah, man, I love modernity. I love it, but I, in the same way that I'm skeptical about myself and the ways that I think I am skeptical about modernity and some of the things that it's introduced, it's very interesting because I am a gen xer. So for me, it was like, I didn't get, I was married before dating apps came about. Thank God, right? Thank God. I am a me too waiting to happen because my wife, it was a school for adults, but I was the teacher and she was the student. But when you really say that, more or less. I'm three years older. Yeah, same age more or less. So it was me at my best and there's this whole thing around whoever is the center of attention women tend to find more attractive. Yeah. And so I was the center of attention because I'm literally at the front of the class teaching. And there was like a power imbalance. She found attractive. Yeah. It's like, maybe she shouldn't. Maybe that's bad. Like maybe now this was social construction that says that this shouldn't happen. But I understand that because there is plenty of abuse. But you can't rule out an entire class of behavior because of cases because of some cases of abuse. Look, 17 this year, 17% of people have met their spouse at work. Bad enough that everybody's on Zoom. You're not going to find your spouse on a Zoom screen. Very, very unlikely. But on top of that, if you're making roles saying no love, no love at work. Then you've over corrected. As a company owner, though, I am super paranoid. I got it. It's like, oh, I got it, yeah. But I'm the same, right? I want people to be able to find each other. And so we've always made it in every company I've had, a policy that as long as you tell HR or whatever, it's all good, 'cause damn, how was you meeting people? That was awesome. Yes. 70% of people who have a best friend at work, love their jobs. 58% of people who have a best friend at work wouldn't leave for more pay. This is the life in life at the friendship level. And now you add now on the other hand, 25% of romantic relationships at work have involved one person who was married and that's bad. Oh, that's me, right? And so but nobody thinks that there's no balance in here. Nobody thinks that there's not going to be abuses when there's something good. But to rule it out because of the liability, this is an overcorrection that is, I think that's indicative of the way that we see love in our society that leads to these patterns that are lowering our happiness. We need love, love is happiness is love, full stop. Arthur Brooks, that feels like the right place to stop. That was fucking on the money man. Where can people find you? Arthur Brooks dot com or at the Greyhound station. I don't know. I do my research at Harvard University and I write for the Atlantic. And I write a column on the science of happiness every Thursday morning called how to build a life and all this stuff and the podcast in the books and anybody anything anybody wants. I offer up with love and you can find it on my website or Arthur Royce dot com. I love it. Guys, the book is strength, the strength, buy it, read it, it made me emotional. It was that good. I don't care what age you are. This is information that you want to have at your fingertips and speaking of something that you want to have at your fingertips. If you haven't already, be sure to subscribe and until next time my Friends, be legendary take care, peace..

Arthur Brooks Greyhound station Arthur Royce Harvard University Atlantic
"arthur brooks" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:54 min | 3 months ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And actually quite a long list here of intriguing notions from your book. So in no particular order here, there is a phrase you use satisfaction is what you have divided by what you want and it raises the question that I have wrestled with a lot and continue to wrestle with, which is what is enough. Say more, please. Yeah, and the world's formula for satisfaction. And satisfaction is the joy you get for attaining a reward. So that's what satisfaction works. And I want to get that job. I get that job I get joy. I want to make some more money. It makes some more money. It gives me some joy. I want to get an a on the exam. I get an and the exam that gives me joy. That satisfaction. The problem is not as Mick Jagger articulated that I can't get no satisfaction. Yes, you can. The problem is you can't keep no satisfaction. And there's a biological basis for that. The biological basis for that is a complicated concept with a simple meaning, by the way, this is how we academics get ten years by taking a simple idea and putting a complicated word around it. It's called homeostasis. Homeostasis is the biological inability to stay out of equilibrium. So your heart, you get off the treadmill in the morning after doing your cardiovascular exercise. And within a few minutes, your heart goes back to his baseline. If it didn't, you'd be dead in a week. The same thing is true with your emotions. When you feel something, some elation or for that matter, you're really bummed out. You don't maintain that because you need to go back to a baseline, so you're ready for the next set of circumstances. Your biology is wired for dissatisfaction. And life is kind of a, if you let it can be a process of dissatisfaction, punctuated by this particular satisfaction. And if somebody is listening and saying, how is it possible that the state of nature is something as dissatisfying or even unhappy? And the answer to that is that mother nature does not care for happy. Mother nature wants you to propagate the species by being as successful as possible by running running running from one thing to another. Having more Flint arrowheads and animal skins in your cave so you can have more kids. That's what mother nature wants. She doesn't care if you're happy. That's your business, basically. Your brain tells you your mind tells you that you will be satisfied. Long term, you'll finally be happy and stay happy if you get what you want. So if you have more. This is the idea of this harebrained idea called a bucket list where people on their birthday will write out their list of cravings and desires, sticky cravings. Duqqa in Sanskrit, which is suffering, which really means sticky cravings of dissatisfaction. That's what you're doing with your bucket list. And the result is that you're satisfaction is actually falling when you're looking at those cravings. So how do you defeat that? And the answer is by remembering that satisfaction is not a function of what you have. It's a function of what you have, divided by what you want. The want is in the denominator of the satisfaction equation. And what that means is that having more will give you brief satisfaction is true. But wanting less will also bring you more satisfaction and in a more in a more enduring way at that. If you don't have a wants management strategy, your wants will sprawl like the suburbs of Atlanta. You know, I have this friend who said private equity pioneering is super successful. And he said when he was in his 20s, that he was going to know he was successfully doing go into a Mercedes dealership and buy a car in cash. And he was able to do that at 32. He goes, it was a super successful. He goes in he plunks down his cash. And he says, I want my Mercedes and they give it to him. As he's driving it off a lot, he said, I should have waited a couple more months and got in the Ferrari. Okay, so that's his wants are sprawling. It's a disaster. He had a haves management strategy and not I want management strategy. So the way to deal with this for everybody listening to us is on your birthday, write out your bucket list. And then throw stuff out of your bucket. That's your reverse bucket list. Now, there's good stuff in there, like your faith and family and friendship and work. Make the bucket list of the fame and the power and the pleasure and the money and that stuff. The worldly satisfactions. And then just stick your hand in there and say I detach myself from this. If I get it fine, but I detach myself from emotionally craving this particular thing. And you will guarantee it. You will see your satisfaction rise. I'm just trying to figure out how to make to operationalize that advice in my life. I have seen in my own mind recently and it's very, I mean, it better to see it than not to see it, but it's disturbing to see it that I am incredibly as the college kids would say privileged, just in every possible way, except for I'm not very tall. But everything else. I mean, look at you. If I had your hair, I could be president of the United States. So that's a desire I don't have to be president of the United States. But I have watched, for example, we went through the process of buying our first House. And I ain't that process, which was quite torturous. I kept telling myself, if we could just get this done, I'm done. I'm good. That's all I want. And now it's like, I don't know, do it, baby. Maybe nice to have a place in the city too. Or maybe we should get a second car 'cause my wife leaves. I've got a stranded. And it just that can metastasize indefinitely beyond the suburbs of Atlanta. Maybe I need to own the suburbs of Atlanta. Yeah, then you'd be sprawling out into the three states around Georgia. It's a real rat race. And again, the reason is because human evolution has actually conspired to put you on that treadmill. We even have a word for it. It's called the hedonic treadmill. Hedonic means feeling to get the feeling. And this gets back to success addiction. And dopamine. And you got to run, run, run, run, run, you're never really moving forward. You're hitting the lever and you immediately go back and have to hit it again. Pretty soon you realize that you're actually running out of fear, too, because if you stop on a treadmill, you become a hilarious Instagram meme. And faceplant on the back of the treadmill,.

Mick Jagger Atlanta Mercedes Ferrari United States Georgia
"arthur brooks" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:30 min | 3 months ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

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"arthur brooks" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

06:01 min | 3 months ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Alaska airlines, where every customer is a guest in every guest is a priority. Book online now at Alaska air dot com and earn one mile for every mile you fly on the most caring airline in the sky. Arthur Brooks, welcome back to the show. Thank you, Dan. What a delight to be with you now fully in 10% happier world. Are you happier now that you're 100% 10% as the best maths joke? I get a lot of math jokes, and that's among, if not the very best. Yes, I am happier. I do really miss my colleagues and the rubbing elbows with said colleagues. I had so many deep, deep relationships at ABC News for 21 years. So that is hard for me, but really focusing on what it is I want to do with my life or what remains of my life. It's a powerful happiness producer. Does that make sense? It sure does. It's a matter of fact. That's exactly what I'm thinking and writing about these days is how people can do what you've done. And I think a wonderful case study and how to design your own life on purpose is to do it exactly as you have done it. It doesn't meet everybody needs to start a podcast and company and becoming happier, exactly like you did in terms of a product, but the idea of designing your life such that the back half is dedicated toward propagating ideas that lift other people up. Boy oh boy. That couldn't be a better example of what I've been writing about these days. Well, I appreciate that. The only words I take objection to are on purpose because much of what I've done feels like just a glorious messy mistake. Yeah, well, presumably leaving ABC News formally to focus entirely on 10% happier. Is an entirely conscious decision in what we in my business call crystallized intelligence, which is to say, dedicating yourself to sharing ideas and instructing others on how they can live their own best lives. Well, let's explore that. And since you've made mention of your recent writings and you dropped one of your terms of art that show up in the book, let's talk about your new book, which I loved, and I found bracing and challenging and scary in all the right ways. I should also add inspiring. So let's start there. And maybe if you're comfortable perhaps a good way to begin would be to hear you talk about your personal story, why did this subject become so urgent for you? Well, did bring the audience more or less up to speed. I'm a professor at Harvard, where I teach classes on happiness. But I haven't been doing that for the past several decades. There's only a few years old. I'm 57 years old. I retired from a CEO job when I was 55. It was a CEO of a big nonprofit, a think tank in Washington, D.C.. That's been around for many years since 1938. So it's not unlike the founder or anything, but it's a big organization in the heart of D.C.. And I ran it for a decade, and in the middle of my time as a nonprofit executive. In the heart of D.C. and these battles and it was a very public job as a very exciting job. I realized that what I was doing was kind of running on this treadmill going from big accomplishment to big accomplishment. And I was starting to have this creeping feeling. And again, I didn't feel unlucky. I was not resentful of anything. I felt super fortunate for having this privileged existence to be sure, but I started having this creeping fear that sooner or later, this was going to have to stop and then what? What is it going to mean when I have to stop this or when it stops for me or whatever? And as I was going through this, I had this experience, this and I tell this story in the beginning of the book where I was on a plane from LA to Washington, which is my lifestyle. I was doing a hundred trips a year, raising money, giving a 175 speeches a year. It's a great life, but it was constantly on the road. And it was nighttime on this flight, and I couldn't see because it was dark. People were watching the movies or sleeping or whatever. And there's a couple behind me on the plane. And I could tell whether voices that it was a man or a woman and that they were elderly. I could tell by this under their voice. So I just assumed filling in their biography in my imagination that they were a married couple. And I couldn't quite make out the husband's words, but the wife's words were clear as a bell. He would kind of mumble and she would say, oh, don't say it would be better if you were dead. Like, wow. They had my full attention, right? You know, I was, I didn't mean to eavesdrop, but what are you going to do? And then he goes on mobile, and I hear her say, it's not true that nobody cares about you and that you're just a has been your washed up. And she was consoling him like this for 20 minutes. I'm thinking, who is this guy? He's the guy who's disappointed, you know, he's a guy who's never been able to accomplish very much, because if you accomplish a lot, the world tells you, you should be able to dine out on that, even when it finishes. So just get the buried treasure, retire and enjoy it for the rest of your life, but even I was worried about when the party stops. So something's not quite right about that. Anyway, we land in Washington. The lights go on. I turn around just to get a look. What kind of curious? And it turns out to be one of the most famous men in the world. This is somebody who's universally admired. He's not controversial because of politics or even in business. This is somebody who's done amazing things with his life and his loved by millions and admired by millions and millions of people and I thought to myself, if I had done what this man is done, which I won't incapable of. I would be incredibly satisfied with my life and yet I heard what he was confessing to his wife. And as we were leaving the plane, the pilot stops him and said, recognizes him and said, sir, you've been my hero since I was a little boy. And he was beaming with pride and I thought which is the real hero. This one or the one 20 minutes ago. And I thought, this is not right. Because increasingly, I'm finding that people are afraid. As their life changes, they're afraid as their skills and their abilities change that they're not in charge of what they're going to do with latter parts of their.

Arthur Brooks ABC News Alaska Washington, D.C. D.C. Dan Harvard Washington LA
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

04:23 min | 5 months ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The One You Feed

"And these are the antidotes to the bad fear for. I mean, the bad wolf, the fear wolf is just chowing down on money and power and pleasure and fame and all the stuff that scarce and your worry is going to go away. And if you want to feed the other wolf, you need to put a deposit in each one of the four divine accounts every day. What are you doing to cultivate your faith? What are you doing to develop your family and maintain and protect your family relationships? Thanksgiving's coming, man. What are you doing with your friendships? And what are you doing such that your work truly is lifting other people up? Those are the questions that ask. And I try to ask myself every day. So faith, family, friendships, and work that matters. Yeah, that's a meaningful work, meaningful work only has two characteristics. They are not prestige and position and money, none of that stuff unless. The two things that matter to make your work meaningful are the answers to the questions. Am I earning my success and am I serving others? Am I earning my success in my serving others? There's a lot of things that people would say are parts of the good life that maybe aren't clearly delineated in these. Where does pleasure fit in this? Some degree of enjoyment. Because I think you also mentioned that if we talk about happiness, you talk about it having three sort of macronutrients. Which are enjoyment satisfaction and purpose. There's some crossover here. And then there's a little perhaps some slight differences. I'm curious how those tie together for you. Sure. So happiness is like a meal. And there's lots of ways if I said, what's dinner? Well, what kind of question is that? There's a bunch of ways that I can answer the question what's dinner. I can answer in terms of dinner's macronutrients, which are protein carbohydrates. And fat. I get answer dinner is the dishes that I had. I had a salad and I had an entree and I had some dessert. I had my vegetables, or you could answer it in terms of the micro nutrients that was in it. You know, all the different parts, the vitamins and minerals that actually go into it. There's lots and lots of ways to answer the question. Or the ingredients, you know, the spices and the actual foods that you cooked. So the way to think about it is this way. When I said faith family friends and meaningful work, those are the dishes in your happiness. Those are the things you actually need to consume every day. Well, let's dig a little further into the purpose or meaning side of things. You recently talked about different ways or the different parts of meaning. Should we go into that for a second? Yeah, sure. So meaning and purpose more purpose is another way of talking about it, although purpose is actually an aspect of meaning, meaning is definitely one of the macronutrients of happiness..

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

04:43 min | 5 months ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The One You Feed

"Broadway's Tony winning feel good again, musical is welcoming audiences back into the heart of the remarkable true story. In the middle of nowhere, one small town showed the world that the kindness of strangers could bring us closer. Come back together at come from away. Thanks for joining us. Our guest on this episode is Arthur Brooks, a bestselling author, social scientist, and the president of the American enterprise institute. He teaches leadership in a happiness at the Harvard school of business, and today Arthur and Eric discuss one of his many books. Love your enemies, how decent people can save America from the culture of contempt. Hi Arthur, welcome to the show. Thanks. It's great to be with you. I'm happy to have you on. We're going to be discussing your latest book, love your enemies, how decent people can save America from the culture of contempt, and we're also going to be talking about happiness, which is a topic you have written in a lot about. But before we get into either of those things, we'll start like we always do with the parable. In the parable, there's a grandfather who's talking with his grandson, he says, in life, there are two wolves inside of us that are always at battle. One is a good wolf, which represents things like kindness and bravery and love. And the other is a bad wolf which represents things like greed and hatred and fear. And the grandson stops, he thinks about it for a second. He looks up at his grandfather and he says, well, grandfather, which one wins? And the grandfather says the one you feed. So I'd like to start off by asking you what that pair will means to you in your life and in the work that you do. Well, I appreciate that. And I've heard you talk about this in the past and talk about it with your guests. And so I've given it a little bit of thought, because this is actually what I teach at the Harvard Business school. I have a class called leadership and happiness. And this is almost exactly what I ask my students to do. What are they feeding? Which will for their feeding. And for me, it comes down to literally one of the choices that you gave. It's lover fear. This is what we've got. Love or fear. And on my worst days, I realized that I am feeling fair. I am afraid of what people will think about me. I'm afraid of what's going to happen to me. And fear is sort of the shadow of the dark one over what we're doing in our lives. And there's an antidote to it, which of course, as you'd say, feeding the other world. But there's a way to do it too. In the Bible, St. John, the apostle says that perfect love drives that fear..

Arthur Brooks Hi Arthur Harvard Business school American enterprise institute America Tony Arthur Eric St. John
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Sooner or later this is not going to be the thing that you have right now and you're going to actually suffer more from the lost. This is i eat as prospect theory. And then there's the writ large phenomenon where all the stuff that you can do. Are you still successful right down. The answer is that you're you're you're cranking on your fluid intelligence. Which is your analytic capacity your ability to solve problems. You're going down the hill. That's going down the hill here. It goes in your forty s. You're not forty yet. I am i am. You'll go to that hair. I could be present united states so that here. But you know in your forties declines in your fifties. It's like really getting low but there's another curve behind it call your crystallized intelligence which is based on the stock stuff you know and your ability to use it not solving new problems but assembling information by yourself and others from earlier in life that's wisdom which is actually a virtue and so one of the things that i talked about is when people feel like. They're in decline in the very depressed those who get worse and worse and worse off after eight seventy. It's because they regret what they think is their only success curve. So the key thing is jumping off scot very kaufman. Success curve under arthur. Brooks's success you know. One of the greatest things in my life was i mean. I read my early academic papers for right when i finished my phd. And i literally candidate in the math anymore of what i was doing. I mean he left me behind. I've left myself in dust. But now i'm teaching. I'm writing speaking. I'm doing what i'm doing with you trying to explain things clearly in in a way that people find inspirational and i'm better at way better at it. You know that at columbia. Were you teacher. Harvard by teach the best valuations are uniformly for professors over seventy is. You're not pity evaluations. Because they're the best teachers because that relies on crystallized intelligence. So i talk in the book about how you can jump from your understand your fluid procedure crystallized intelligence curve get into limited space between them to get on your crystallized intelligence her techniques for doing it one of the joys of doing it. How do you do it. Well i mean. Frankly i think i think i actually cracked the code getting olden in loving it a while. I can't wait to read this. You know Especially manager says the same thing. Yeah yeah. I mean. I especially as my food. Reasoning is notably declining by the second I can't wait to read it by the way you said. My podcast is inevitably not going to be the most important psychology pockets dino. Something i don't know we talk about arthur brooks. He's coming for no he's just the sense of arthur's like it's a matter of time. You're no longer a top But no i'm joking. Look i love talking to you today. You are such a breath of fresh air in our society that has such portion but also such extreme views on things. That doesn't incorporate spirituality into the discussions doesn't treat people sacred. I've i've been arguing. We need to start treating people sacred. I feel you would agree with that. Yeah i really. I really appreciate you arthur. And was she was she. Well thank you scott. Congratulations again on the podcast. And thanks to all the listeners. Who are making this a most popular thing because it should be the quality. And you're doing grace..

arthur brooks Harvard scott today Brooks forty One fifties over seventy one scot forties arthur forty s. columbia after eight seventy kaufman united states things
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:12 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Yes there's a lot of we call them spiritual practices and the research is so exciting in that area showing how these practices if we can somehow reduce that separation between cellphone world neurologically thrill nego practice various practices it all rise to the same conclusion this oneness an and it. It's all it. It goes up so age-old mysteries you know. We always say you know. There's that zen question that paradox. That the question that the the master will ask the novice monk. What is the sound of one hand clapping and and that you know like one of these. It's almost a joke right. It's like one of these unanswerable. Buddhists questions it turns out is not a question the answer to a question. You know the sound of one hand clapping is your individuality and your separation as an entity from the whole it isn't illusion. It's a pantomime. It doesn't actually exist so the buddhist masters Allama explain this to me that this concept that that when you feel that you're isolated that you're an isolated individual that your consciousness is nothing more than a vestige of your physical brain and the you exist out there as a unitary entity that is an illusion and any lujan is the this radical. Individuality can be resolved by by seeing yourself as using a different metaphor. You know the individual tree for example. An aspen tree is just one shoot off the same root system it's one entity but it looks like an individual so to say what is the. What is my individual nature. What is what is scott's individual nature. It is the same thing as the sound of one hand clapping. It looks like excuse me. Excuse me speak for your damn self. I'm joking i'm joking. No you're saying some really Really cool things and you know we talk about self transcend experiences that we call rally around you see I think art and creativity has a lot of potential to unify the species. You know lots of ways. Can you share your thoughts on how creativity art and music can contribute to our sense of wellbeing and happiness. Yeah i think that a lot because of my obviously because my background in the arts my mother was a painter and we have were all basically artists in academics. And my family and almost everything that i study now is a social scientists stems from observations questions that i had when i was in the arts and one of the things that i find. Is that when when i have an. I come to conclusion on the basis of data analysis in research that i can find these fundamental truths embedded in the work of the greatest artists in the world. Actually have a series of videos. That i i've done call. The art of happiness looks at these really big ideas in in the search for happiness and and finds their their their metaphors in the work and lives of of artists and in point of fact actually became a social scientist because of the world's greatest composer. When i was a kid my when i was working as a professional musician my favorite composer johann sebastian bach and extraordinarily about that. I mean everybody knows who almost everybody knows who baucus baucus half of the world favorite composer but the interesting thing about bach is not the fact that he was just great and and fertile and productive composer and productive person by the way he had twenty kids. It's pretty productive The interesting thing about bach was his philosophy of his work. And i remember reading this quote near the end of his life and surrounded by his kids and grandkids surrounded by love and he was very religious guy and and there's a deep deep deep christian and jews asked by biographer herrbach. Why do you write music. And it's weird because all of us who've been able to do something with our lives and achieve some things and some success he was asked you scott. What do you do when they meet you but they never ask you why you do what you do at end. You need an answer you morally answer. Box answer was immediate. Apparently he said immediately to the person who's interviewing him in about the about the seventeen forty nine or something when when this when this happened. He said the aim final end of all music is nothing less than a glorification of god and the refreshment of the soul dow yano and so for people who are not religious. Don't be distracted by that. He said the point of your work is sanctified service. That's the point of your work. And i heard that of selling music business. Unlike can i say that you know mount every night on stage. I don't feel like a refreshing souls and feel like glorifying. God and i literally went inquest in a vision. Quest to find out what. I could do what i can do professionally so i did the i. It wasn't actually okay so it wasn't of using the hallucinogens. But i didn't have an wasco experience but through my meditation and my prayer through the search burkhas mc truth. Has i could find my answer to box questions. So i actually find what i became literally. I mean talk about the the the sublime to the dismal. I became a social scientist. Because i felt like i could refresh souls and glorify gone and scott. I feel like i'm doing it right now. I mean it's unbelievable to me. I mean. I'm just i'm so happy. Not all the time on that particularly happy. I'm so happy to be able to do something if somebody's listening to us right now. Like those are good ideas. Those are things. I want to take on board. Those are life enriching ideas. These are ways that i can actually lower little bit more than than some weird little way. I have composed the kind of a little bot cantata and got it because of box. Why not because a box. W-what that's an answer. A question about how creativity informs the science i love. Is i feel like that. You just explain why. I do everything i do. Well nine nine ninety percent ninety percent of everything i do. There's always that ten percent like what the fuck was i think and paint red. Yeah we're still human at the end of the day but no i. I love that you know my intentional purpose. That explains why do that walk love. It love it. Can you kind of ending this interview today. Can you tell me about your upcoming book on strategy strategies for getting happier as we age. Because you make a very interesting point you say that as we get older. Our sense of attachment toward chievements makes us more susceptible to noticing a long term decline. Wow that's profound. What happened was i. I started a personal research project. Understand how i wanted to design the second half of my life. Because i realize there's not very much stuff out there for that. I teach leadership unhappiness at at our business school to talk about people who are launching their careers on how they can use the signs of happiness. But there's very little and you're you're twenty years younger than i am. But you're going to get where i am and you're going to need your age is going to need something. That's based on the science. Based on truth and based on philosophy and based on wisdom said talk about how after you're fifty years old you can design your life for the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune or not deciding whether or not you're gonna retire happy in and go to go to the grave a happier man than than than when you were younger and you shouldn't have to leave it up to chance has got to be. Some signposts. has some very profound experiences with older people. When i was about the age of fifty. That suggested that if you leave it up to chance some really bad things can happen. You find that. There's certain dynamics that are really solid earlier. In life you find that people generally speaking from the early s until the early fifties. They gradually decline in happiness not profoundly and then in the early fifties to about seventy. Most people increased dramatically in their happiness. And those are those are strong and gurgle tendencies but after seventy or so people break up into two big groups have get happier and half get sadder as they get older now. The group that gets sadder. Here's the weird thing they have in common they tend to be the strivers the high achievers. That's the paradox of it. And that's the thing i kept finding it so you know the work of charles carroll han at university of texas in austin who do work on the burden of high achievement and basically if you read their work when it comes down to at least my aim reading of their work is this like law psycho professional gravitation the more you do with your life. The more you know in in decline. If you don't do anything you know live up to your potential. You don't have the slightest idea you're in declined because there's no bump that you're coming down from on the other hand if you do a lot i mean if you're you know scott perry kaufman you've got the most important psychology pont apple. Sooner or later this is not going to be the most important podcast..

johann sebastian bach nine twenty kids ten percent twenty years scott perry kaufman Allama herrbach charles carroll han ninety percent austin today bach scott jews two big groups nine ninety percent fifty years old second half early fifties
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Data thin to get started today. I hear you. There are a lot of people in this in this country. now that don't glove america. I mean i. I hear the conversations on clubhouse and things they they wouldn't say god bless america they say what does america done for me. You know but you're certainly saying that the you want us to move in the direction where everyone will say. God bless america. Yeah i want everybody to to say they. America don't necessarily want properly dictator not a dictator. I know you know what i mean. Nobody board the point to be quite literal about it. I literally believe in god. I'm i'm i'm i'm a traditionally religious person but i'm so happy to live in a country where not everybody is. I want everybody to share faith. Because it's such a source of joy and i think that my faith is correct so i would recommend it to anybody for sure but i wanna live in a country where we all. Don't think light. That's why i want to live in a family. Where we all like in the proverbs. They say that iron sharpens iron. That's such a source of joy and this gets back to you the original premise of your question. Which is that we don't get. We're not getting happiness from that and we really should. We should be down on our knees with gratitude that we live in a country where you can disagree politically where you can write something on the internet saying that the president united states is a criminal. And a jerk. And there's no knock in the night. And no jack booted thugs but instead we're so we're so such ingrates that were saying all the time that this is a terrible terrible country isn't it. Oracle were as bad as nazi germany. Just as stalinist russia. It's it's nuts. It's nuts what we're doing. It's basically it's ingratitude. Ingratitude is a product of lack of love and that comes down to too much fear. And that's where we started. Yeah there are multiple things that i want to zoom in on so is such an interesting conversation so i'm really curious to hear more. Haulier religion and spirituality packs your approach to human happiness in contrast to like the rationalist humanist approach for instance while it is we talked a little bit ago about the fact that there are two basic strands of happiness researchers one that's on the rationalist humanist psychoanalytic approach that's on the spiritualist philosophical love based approach. And there's some people who are in the middle of we actually don't come down in either. I mean i don't mean to. It's kind of an artificial distinction but if there is a distinction i'm early in the second camp and part of this is just because i've made a made a decision in my life like every love based decision like the decision to be a husband to my wife and with the m my my ambition is that she is the last person i see. Is i take my dying breath. That's my ambition. That's a decision right. That's not it's has feelings attached to it but but those are adjunct feelings and the same thing is true with the decision that i've made about what i think is the right approach to my life which is to embrace tenants of spirituality to to put them within a framework as well established by people who are more sophisticated smarter than the editions that have gone back thousands of years and that i understand that there are certain things that i can't know huracan social scientists and these are the mystery of faith which is taking things were on other non testable hypotheses on the basis of that faith but understanding that. Doing so is actually a very rational thing to do. And it makes my life that much better and sharing it with others can make their life that much better as well and also it illuminates numerous sources of of mysteries in life it resolves. All kinds of gordian knots that are both cognitive and philosophical. There things that also that. I realize. I don't have to solve all the time at our. Have to be tortured by austin and he gives me a tremendous constellation. So i love it. It's it just the the happiest adventure in my life is virtually. I really appreciate you sharing that viewpoint. I consider myself more spiritual than religious. But i match we both Are united in seeking very similar. Self transcendent experiences. That's right than some people. Believe people i've heard on your show. As a matter of fact believe that stat transcended experiences or nothing more than kind of synoptic signals in the brain that everything is encompassed by the by the radical immaterial. Really listen to my podcast. I'm impressed actually do great podcasts. Learn a lot from it and that's important because you know that materialistic view is early with utterly at odds with this concept that that they're they're very well might be a cosmic consciousness that exists before us and after us and that we're part of which is i think i think it's the most the most plausible view i mean we don't know but you know and i know that you share the view that that free well can exist. Approval can only exist when there's an exemption consciousness i mean it really can't existed if if consciousness is nothing more than part of brain right. Yeah i'm not i'm not quite a dualist. But i think. There's you know all the evidence and my own intuitions or point to this idea that we're all part of one whole of some like you said cosmic consciousness are called. There's something there that That people can witness conditions such as lsd but but the certain conditions were patient medicare..

today two basic strands both thousands of years America second camp one stalinist Oracle nazi germany God united states america russia
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Yeah he makes the distinction between compassion empathy and what you find is people were excessively empathetic. They tend to be insufficiently compassionate. Why because empathy is easy anytime. There's any conflict if you say you need more love. You're twisting the concept of love away from doing hard things. What is love. Economy saint thomas acquaintance. The love is to will the good of the other. There's nothing about about about feelings and love. Love is commitment. Law isn't is a is a commitment to act in a particular way notwithstanding your feelings if you truly love somebody you know. This is the secret to a happy man. I've been married for thirty years. wow happy. Marriage congrats feelings feelings commitment. It's action it's work love. His work love is the greatest the most satisfying work but the the problem that we have in our society among others is that we've reduced love to a feeling and that's the reason that that marriages don't laugh because we have unrealistic expectations. It's the reason that we have a public policy system. This excessively empathetic in insufficiently compassionate with people that treats adults like children that reduces them to liabilities in our society because empathy is easy. And anytime there's any conflict you say. Well we just need more love. That's exactly the problem that we're talking about is anybody who says that has reduced to feeling thus devalued it by understanding you correctly call. Thank you so much for getting my question. I feel like you immediately. Got what i was what i was getting at and a great questions. Important question is something we all need to grapple with because we all have a tendency to do just that. Yeah when when we fear. Yeah yeah. Sometimes we won't even speak our mind because we're so afraid of not being loved by the person you know. We know everybody does that. And it's easy to do Given the current cultural currents that we see in society today where people wield power by willfully misinterpreting or taking the the worst possible spin on on in the bullying tactics of the current moment of extremism our size that everybody right and left is trying to cancel everybody else and so everybody's walking on eggshells all the time. You can't say what you think because people who bear you ill-will are looking for an opportunity to not give you the benefit of the doubt. Now everybody's listening to this this thinking about either one side or the other way to combat that is the look on your own side so if you're a conservative don't talk. Don't don't only be worried about cancel culture on campus. He worried about the extent to which you actually get no quarter. You give no quarter on your own political side when somebody doesn't tell the line well well let's talk about conservatives. Can we talk about service. Can we can't because you have a very interesting take because some people will you know you have like Was a bleeding. Heart liberals is that is that they. Can't you have bleeding-heart conservatives. Yes i am one. I suppose you are. It's fair to say. I mean if i believe that that happiness is love full stop and furthermore the public policy issue literally than i care about the most is poverty traditionally thought of his conservative approaches. Doesn't really matter if they are. I mean i believe the free enterprise system is great assistant in the history of humanity for pulling people out of poverty. I don't believe that. Because i wanted to be true. I believe that. I've been looking at the data. And we have pulled two billion people at a poverty through largely through globalization and free trade property rights. The rule of law in a culture of entrepreneurship since nineteen seventy. You know that has changed. The world's changed my life. Actually that that basic truth in on these are my sisters and brothers. And i want the next two billion to be pulled out of poverty so that kinda defines the contours traditionally. What you'd be thought of as politically now. It's like oh that's a conservative guy. But now the reason. I think those things. It's not because i care. Capitalism actually care about money is because. I believe that people should be able to build their lives. Like i've been able to build my life. Because i'm i wanna be a warrior for human dignity so it's complicated. It's complicated but i be. You're adding that level nuance that that. I don't see that prevalent in these kinds of discussions. It turns out the political discussions in america not very nuanced if the left and the right cancel each other will there be a center that they'll just they'll just be a center that exists. Yeah that's called ordinary everyday life. And and that's where most people exist in the better part of their lives. People have political opinions but for most sentient humans. The politics are not the most important part lies. The problem is that that politics has taken on an outsized role. In the american discourse and has been contemporaneous with the retreat of traditional religion will need moral camps than need tribes that they can belong to and you know as the percentage of americans under thirty who say they have. No religious affiliation has gone from three percents to thirty percent over the last two generations. You're going to see more and more young people who affiliate and who ex- who expressively us a framework of more ideas to say to say i attach themselves to. It's not going to be necessarily united methodist church. It might be the you know the american democratic party instead. People need that fundamentally but then there's also been this political entertainment complex largely perpetrated by social media and the cable news networks. And and what they have done is they've made it really really easy for people to exist in filter bubbles and caricature the other side when they get out of those. You know when they're actually trying to deal with their neighbors and friends at thanksgiving dinner in and at the soccer games in the choir practices if they could acquire practices. They you know. Politics for most americans is not the salient feature of their lives. And i think that's really really good. You know i i. I'll read these surveys. That no written by guys like you and me. That are extremely sad of the fact that the average american can't name both senators. And i'm like man that's exactly the country i wanna live in is not that i want. People are apathetic. But i want people who are able to live their lives and live in such a stable strong upwardly mobile charitable rich country. They don't have to be thinking all the time of is senator. Who's gonna come and get my stuff. Great god bless america. it's all i can say.

thirty percent thirty years america thomas two billion people three percents today nineteen seventy one side both senators american democratic party two billion under thirty two one each thanksgiving american americans
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"So fear is in an appropriate humility with a guy with a union card in in social psychology in emotion specialties. Don't be insecure communist. So we're the most imperialist evolve social scientists too but it doesn't mean we know the most and and fear as a philosophical matter but if you go back to allow sue or the apostle john or any of the aristotle for that matter fears the ultimate network of emotion and that's actually a physiological truth as well so the amiga law governs fear makes us gives us the responses to fight flight or freeze is more potent than any other part of the limbic system. It will crowd. Fear will crowd out. All emotions were negative so the native emotions are generally classified as sadness. Fear anger or disgust and the positive emotions joy love and some people opening interest. Which i think is great because you know the interested is so intensely sat satisfied but all of those seven emotions. The most powerful is fear because as an evolutionary matter. Fear will have to be able to crowded. You got to clear the decks. Were fear visit sabertooth tiger around. You need to not be enjoying the smell of those beautiful flowers or those tasty berries or anything else and so the the the migdal say ding ding ding ding. Dings like a fire alarm. It will send off a signal through your hypothalamus to signal to your patisserie gland. Dust year adrenal glands to to to to send out adrenaline cortisol and put your your pulse system on high alert. Now that's an important thing. Because what that means is that it's the predominant emotion and it's and you can easily see why philosophers and later psychologists would say it's the ultimate negative emotion. It's good for you but a negative emotion not nonetheless and so therefore it's opposite has to be the ultimate positive emotion which is love now. that's actually coherent philosophically. Because you find that people typically will say which is hate. The opposite of love hate is downstream fear and almost every case. Pride is downstream from fear. Envy is downstream from fear. All of these things are fundamentally fear based emotions. Kate something really really hate something. That's not a threat. If it's not a threat to your is actually not worth hating in. A threat is stimulating. The amid it's stimulating the fear response. It's you're getting the stress hormones so both physiologically and psychologically and philosophically we find the ultimate eggert of emotions fear that puts at one hundred eighty degrees away from. Yeah i'm amazed how so many things. So many phenomena can can be reduced to the avoidance approach distinction in psychology. Oh yeah oh yeah no. It's amazing it's actually one of those one of those fundamental ideas that winds up organizing most of the rest. I mean yeah like everything like ultimately reduced to like. Are you avoiding it. You go you engaging in it. You know and love isn't engaging emotion waiting emotion so in another way of organizing this whole set of ideas but but you know and then they're actually applications of this for all of our lives and again because psychology podcast which is understand the science than work on the applications and the application of this. Is you know when you're suffering from something. Negative one of the best ways to deal with it is not taking it on on. Its face but looking for its opposite and cultivating that right and so in basically if you're engaged. All kinds of avoidance behavior one of the best ways of coping with this in therapy is to actually find something which you can engage because that induces this cognitive dissonance. That you don't away everything and then you it changes. Your life is behavioral matter. Well the same thing is true with fear when people come to me my students for example. They'll say they're really afraid of something. And what i'll look for is ways that they can love more than they can surround their lives more in love which thus utilizes feeder. Perfect love drives out. Fear apostle john in philosophers have said this in nonreligious context forever at the same time. People will say to me. I don't have enough love in my life. i'll say let's examine your fear because you know the the fact that they have a lack of love probably means they have an excess of fear. So let's not look at the love directly. Let's look at the fear and find out if there's something that we can do to treat the level of fear in their lives in so doing they can create more space for buff. I love that. Ca- can i ask cheeky. Follow up question. My favorite kind. Can't you have too much love which is really fear. Tell me give me an example. You know other people that like that's all they ever every third world like we need we love. We love lovable. And they won't shut up about loving and they're obsessed with it. They're obsessed with the word like it's like the only thing they ever think or talk about and it's like that's the only thing we ever should have in the world and at the slightest sense that like something like a conversation makes on uncomfortable. They're like we just need more love. Stop the conversation we need love. Isn't there a point at which that's actually because the person has fear like they they're using love as a way to like cover up for sure it's nice to not love to pablo right fair enough. He has this great book. Called against malaya is fantastic. Well he's my homeboy homeboy. He's great he's screaming he. I mean it's a it's a fabulous book because it's on the cover is great coverer to it's a picture of a heart frozen inside an ice cube against the but it's actually the wrong image because when he argues for his compassion and irrational compassion..

pablo Kate both seven emotions one hundred eighty degrees third world Envy john ideas case
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"On The extent to which you perceive that you matter in the world there should be some sort of internal stable acceptance of well. I have dignity just by my you know being a human you know So how do you sort of it. You see what i'm saying like. How do you manage that. Yeah totally and so. I think that that actually gets into a slightly different dimension on one thing is to be needed by other people. The other thing is to objectify yourself such that your unrepeatable now. This is really different right. I mean you can have. You can imagine that you're running. A company of the ceo of the company has each one is the ceo of our lives. Right hand me sean. Saluting the start apply and okay so and then you have employees in your company. You have somebody who is really going to help you. That person can be organically really really really needed right. And so you want to develop that person because they're so necessary or that person can be so kind of devious and mouth season they can make themselves unrepeatable to you. And we see this in companies all the time. This sort of sycophants and yes men that are following the ceo around creating problems in being mysteriously the only person who can clean them up. That's a very different kind of phenomenon. Now so the balance. That's actually really important. I think for achieving dignity and insurance happiness is to be at once necessary needed therefore an asset in other people's lives but at the same time profoundly useless and this is a different and competing concept that actually comes from aristotle's of complete and incomplete activities or can eight heloc experience so he talks an awful lot about what it means to be a perfect friend. S not somebody that that. You're going to objectify. You'll have a friendship with them because you to buy something or sell something to them and it's not just because you admire the person is because you should have shared love you have a shared set of values and is inherently as a completely satisfying experience. Just to hang out with somebody it's useless and and so that's really really important. One of the things i often write about is the importance of having useless friends and having people who consider utah useless. Do you know it sounds one. I actually because. I know exactly what you're what you mean by that. Can i link it to my favorite psychologist. Abraham maslow's notion of be love be dash love for the being of others. I'm i'm a huge promoter of this. You know you're exactly right. Maslow's has exactly this perfect balance between at once being needed and being useless he yes he calls it. A needing love distinguish that from needing love. Yeah you don't know exactly right so so this is it takes a whole lot of sort of thought and contemplation to net this out to say at once. I need to be needed and at the same time. I need to be useless because those two ideas are actually profoundly compatible with never elliott so so easy to misunderstand so easy to misuse is so easy to become neurotic about it such that. We become an replaceable. Such that we become artificially useful in that way. We can experience the love that comes from complete friendships and at the same time. We don't get the dignity of feeling like like we're needed cosmetically in you know in some really important way in. We need useless things. I couldn't agree more. I want more useless friends. Will you be my useless friend. Arthur i would be delighted. Because i can use all right now on your podcast. But you're yes but we share values and that's actually the the baseless useless friendship exactly but exactly like a useless conjures up a friend that we can just like watch a sunset together like you know like do some edibles like chill on the beach like you know like discuss philosophy discuss free will and and and there's no it's just it's just there's nothing we're trying to get out of each other. Yeah that's right and that's one of the reasons is actually pretty interesting. You know this literature. Better than i do. But about about mature friendships. So people in their fifties and sixties and seventies that men tend to have useless friendships on the basis of a shared useless activity. So it's like we're super into baseball baseball all the most useless than ever. And that's the reason it creates so much. Joy lives because it's a complete activity and incomplete activities this instrumental to some greater end. A complete activity is basically you consume it and it is the meal and the nutrition in itself. That's that's useless in this in this really profound and wonderful way and so men tend to consume useless things together as the basis of the useless french whereas women especially in their fifties and sixties they tend to have relationships that are useless but based on a common understanding of feelings they discuss intimate things. Now this is important as an important distinction because the friendship between women under the circumstances tend to be more enduring. Tends to be stronger than it is. You know it's like if all i involved. Scott and i have in common is like love for the red sox. That's it might endure on the other hand. You know. it might only endure as long as the sox have a good season which you never know. Yeah it's a good point. It's a good point Keeping on the notion of love. I'm really curious why you Precisely defined fears the opposite of.

Abraham maslow fifties Scott Arthur two ideas seventies One sixties one of the reasons one thing each one heloc baseball french Maslow things one
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Your approach to the squad. Science of happiness is different from others. Who are studying happiness. Because i feel you have some unique spins on this on this topic. A couple of ways. That the that that my christopher's from from many others in one of the great things about the science of happiness and the ultimate experts that are out there is a multiplicity of approaches. All of which all the good ones of which actually rely on empirical social sciences in other words we're looking for data that are collected appropriately. Were looking at statistical methods experimental approaches. That are good and we're actually trying to get as close as we can do. The truth is as far as we so everybody believes that but they're one of the biggest differences the in the schools that are there for me is that there's a school that basically has has as its as route The world is psychotherapy finalists. Actually and those that actually think of happiness is coming out of the cycle psychoanalytic approach of freud in young and the different schools their basic raison d'etre their their basic objective is to make pain go away is to make suffering going to make unhappiness. Go away and so why would you study happiness because you because life is hard and because people are suffering in happiness needs means crowding out the unhappiness that people feel as approach another approach is not actually starting from the rationalist humanist psychoanalysis world it actually starts from the world of philosophy of theology of spirituality. And that's an approach that basically says guess what unhappiness is part of happiness because the macro nutrients of the subjective wellbeing meal kind of like the protein fat in high rates are actually enjoyment satisfaction and purpose. Those are the three macronutrients of happiness. And guess what purpose meaning in life requires pain requires suffering requires challenges requires unhappiness. One of my purpose in life is d- chocolate. That can't be your person like that's an mint. Okay for now. You're your thinking your carbohydrates rashly proteins and bravo. Were you to tell me what my purpose in life is and so so. That's i i would say those are really the two big schools and then the psychoanalytic approach basically says that they're all different ways that people can you find the source of suffering and try to eliminate it the let's let's find out the nature of what it means to be alive approaches. That second approach was the nature of human life experience of human life. That basically comes down to what you might think of as as the other pillars of happiness which are experiential pillars of happiness and. They're really only four literature. Faith family friendship and work that has meaning this genitive which is to say where you earn your success and were you serve other people and you know so. I really subscribed to the second school. The school of the nature of human life. I don't. I don't want to suffer needlessly but i have to suffer and every single one of us has to understand that you're suffering is really a sacred thing. It makes you who you are. It makes you fully alive now. It could be too much can be too much. It can be overwhelming. It could be post. Traumatic stress can overtake post. Traumatic growth is all kinds of cases. Low as the case but if we actually want anesthetize ourselves from suffering per se we're gonna have big problems in the business of being fully alive and that's the adventure is really where it comes from so it comes down to that approach. Mice the school that i subscribe to is is kinda summed up by george valiant. Yeah famous psychiatrist here at harvard. Who wrote the or who who wrote many bestselling books but also. He ran a harvard study of adult development. An eighty year longitudinal study of people's lives and he's basically the whole study can be boiled down to five words. Happiness is love full stop and and so that's it there's one is broad and the other. Is you know love well. We're done today. Nice to have you on the psychology podcast. Now it's done no i. I just adore your conversation with your most recent conversation with dialogue. I know you've had multiple conversations. But i love how you talk about. How happiness connection and the fear of being a needed wise so the fear of being a needed is behind much of our feelings of anxiety and existential wellness I don't it's an interesting kind of inversion. You know the opposite end of what we often about the need to matter. People really want to feel like they they matter but i think it's interesting spin on it where you talk about kind of the fear of being unneeded kind of like it's kind of it's kind of like it's opposite pole. Yeah so and there's actually a couple of different things nested in that. I'm that with so we think about what is what is dignity and you know. Almost everybody in the west would agree with the following statement. And there's a reason it's in the west. I'll say in a second. I'm not being xenophobic here. That they that that people is a radical equality of human dignity. People are radically equal is just as human beings on the planet. Most everybody listening to us especially from the west would agree with that. But it's actually really important because that actually comes from from ancient concept a judeo christian concept from a the the jewish notion that that people are descended in the likeness of god and that god is worthy of respect and so therefore people are inherently. Were the respect. Dignity is to be worthy of respect. Now that's not true. In every culture in every tradition that is certainly not true in the cultures that say that that that people are not made in god's image that has it doesn't necessarily descend is not sort of a an opinion on the genome. Necessarily you know different. People disagree with that and you find different people around the world. It's like no people don't have inherent human dignity you gotta earn it and like you don't have to earn it. The problem is depending on no matter which school you're from east or west. We can all agree that not. Everybody has nickel sense of their dignity. The not sense. Your dignity is the essence of despair and despair comes. Our dignity is absent when you are a liability when you're not when you're not you're not an asset to be needed is to be an asset to develop to be unneeded to be unnecessary Expendable is to is to be a liability to manage within the case of our children. Now i got three kids. As i have three adult kids and i would never have brought my kids dealing like there to feel like they're liabilities that i'm managing you get liabilities off. The bottom line of your balance sheet is a company managed them away. As soon as you can't assets can be tremendously expensive but you develop them even if you're losing money on them that's my kids are assets. I mean they were like they were resource eaters. Man i mean you should have seen what college bills looked like. It was insanity but that's because they were huge. They were moral. They were psychological emotional assets. They were assets to the world assets to my family and they knew it and that was the empowerment of the dignity actually came. That's super important for everybody and one of the big things we get wrong in our society. Today i believe is that we treat some people like assets to develop Certain people like liabilities to manage we treat poor people in this country like liabilities to manage the way that we run our welfare system the way that we met many times that we run our schools. And that's discrimination against or people. I wanna think it's really morally impermissible. Why agree. I'm trying to think of it within the framework of some personality research. I've done because people differ in their need to matter. And i've i've studied the concept pathological where people have an extreme need to matter and i'm wondering to what extent should we. There's there's two sides of this coin so there's absolutely. I agree with you that we should be treating people as assets between each individual dignity. That's part of my light triad concept but from within teams. The most psychologically healthy thing is not to require your self esteem to be.

Today eighty year three kids two sides christopher five words today jewish two big schools One three adult kids george valiant three macronutrients second approach one each individual second school harvard four literature one of the
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Unhappiness it lies within each of us hence the importance of the psychology podcast. Well thank you and your podcast. If i dare say on happiness everyone. I'm excited to announce that the eight week online transcend courses back this iteration of the chorus. Which will run from september fifth october. Twenty four th of this year. Will you science to help you. Live a more fulfilling meaningful creative and self actualized life there will be limited slots available so save your spot as soon as possible in addition to the regular class pricing. We're also offering limited slots for personal self actualization coaching. Save your spot today. Going to transcend course dot com. That's transcend course. Dot com the transcend courses. Just one of the offerings of the brand new center for the science of human potential. The center for the science of human potentials mission is to use science to help each person fulfill their highest potential and contribute to the good of society. Toward that goal. We offer classes coaching and consulting opportunities to help. People apply the latest science to help themselves their organizations their schools their families and their communities to be more creative loving and full transcendent possibilities for more on the center. You can go to science of human potential dot com here. Everyone doing this podcast for y'all one of my greatest privileges for the cost of maintaining a professional production. Like this one really adds up. I'm grateful to today sponsors. You helped fund the show. But if he prefer completely ad free experience you can join us at p. Tryon dot com slash podcast. You'll get completely ad free episodes all while directly supporting the show for as little as five dollars a month. That's patriot dot com slash. Podcast would like to ask you how.

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I love the skepticism. Until it's directed at me. And then i don. I don't love it and it's funny. I want people to respect me. It's it's it's yeah. Yeah it's funny because on one side of my family practically. Nobody went to college on the other side. I'm a third generation college professor. The everybody harvard harvard. No less come on come on air. I know it's actually pretty interesting. Scott because i remember. I teach happiness at harvard business school. Yes the first thing that. I tell them when i get in there. Is the paradox. The harvard business school is that if you're not happy if you do get it and you're not happy so and i know that because i didn't get it when i was actually trying to get into graduate school. I got my bachelor's degree by by by correspondents because of those on the road is musician and it turns out that. Harvard is not looking for graduate students who are thirty year old french horn plane. Dropouts correspondence degrees weird. Right mean that s other cordova graphics. I got rejected like two weeks. I remember feeling just rushed like i have. No future is not going to be any good. And then i get to the weird things you know. Life you never know is going to have the store for you. I wind up as professor at harvard. And i'm looking at the data on people who graduated with their mba's ten years ago and then really sat a lot of them. Not all of them. Many of them are very happy. But many of them are dissatisfied with the world rewards. They were promised at an alive. Basically shows that getting into not getting into harvard is not secret happiness or unhappiness it lies within each of us hence the importance of the psychology podcast. Well thank you and your podcast. If i dare say.

Scott Harvard harvard thirty year two weeks harvard harvard ten years ago third generation harvard business school first thing each one side
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"You know. There's this whole literature that the litter on the ten thousand hours etcetera etcetera one of the things. That's actually true. And i'm not. I don't believe that we should specialize too much. I believe we should be able to do lots of things in life. But i do believe you have to do something. Get a lot of reps to get good at it and that also includes thinking. Most people don't actually have time to think they they don't think during much they kind of do go go go all day and when you do a phd and everything from literary criticism to military operations research. Whatever you're studying you're going to have years to just smash your brain against the wall over and over and over again and the most important intellectual thing that ever happened to me. It was having all those years to learn how to think and learn how to learn. I'm just a much linear thinker than it was. When i was in the music business and i'm persuaded. I could have a phd in almost any topic and it would have largely benefit because the time yeah and a lot of journalists. Say they feel like they got a lot of mini. Phd's in doing doing the work. There's no such thing as a problem because you basically small periods of time. Don't you know they're isolated. Don't add up to one. Long period is the same thing that people who were meditators. Understand that i've been somebody who's been deeply involved in contemporary practices for most of my adult life and one of the every day for example. Everyday for you know twenty five or thirty minutes today. My wife we pray and meditate together and yeah and it's super important for my equilibrium for relationships and everything else but it's nothing compared to the large scale long-term A multi day silent retreats and is because the twenty five minutes doesn't doesn't scale when you summit actually have to. You have to sit in silent meditation. You have to be quiet for day after day after day and if you want to think a lot thinking in many. Phd's is not the same thing as as as working for several years. That's like multiyear cognitive retreat. Are you concerned about the The cynicism towards experts that that i mean that seems to be Really accelerating To the extent to which people think they have they have the truth in that if someone comes into maybe he did a whole. Pd and the topic. I feel like people are not just taking those individuals seriously as much as they used to. Yeah i my view is that they actually never took them seriously point. I think just a lot of i think a lot. Two two reasons one is that one of the great charms. The united states is that we don't trust experts. We don't trust elites we don't trust them in. The reason is because you know when the kaufman's came to the united states that were not landed. Gentry probably running from some godforsaken shuttle in eastern europe. Or something right actually. My grandmom escaped the pogroms in russia. So there you go and she was basically everybody listening to us Almost everybody listening to us. Summit assume descends from ambitious riffraff where they were running away from people who had all the power from the experts from the elites from the people who had the goods coming to the united states where they could build themselves. Notwithstanding the fact that they were nobodies while we're a country of nobody's in the descendants of nobody's we have a kind of a healthy suspicion of the people who of the somebody's and so you know you and i have been really really fortunate and we've had a lot of privilege to be able to develop our intellect to get some expertise. You know the the guys with the phd's which i if rhapsodised. I understand that that there. You can get a lot of seat with that as well. and so i'm kinda. I'm not a populist. I sort of admire the healthy. The healthy suspicion of skepticism. That people have of me too. I love the skepticism. Until it's directed at me. And then i don. I don't love it and it's funny. I want people.

thirty minutes russia eastern europe twenty five twenty five minutes ten thousand hours Two one today two reasons kaufman united states united states
"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"arthur brooks" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Today it's great to chat with arthur brooks on the podcast arthur's the william henry bloomberg professor of the practice of public leadership the harvard kennedy school and professor of management practice at the harvard business school before joining the harvard faculty in july of two thousand nineteen. He served for ten years as president of the washington. Dc based american enterprise institute by one of the world's leading think tanks arthur's the bestselling author of eleven books on topics ranging from economic opportunity to human happiness. His most recent bestseller love. Your enemies love that title by the way is a guide to building a better country and mending personal relationships amidst our culture of political polarization arthur. I'm so glad finally chat with you on this podcast. Thank you and congratulations on the phenomenal success. In the psychology podcast. I'm an avid listener. I love it i mean. I think it's a great podcast. And and i'm obviously not alone. Because number one psychology. Podcast in the world. Congratulations on that. Of thank you. So much arthur. I don't know if you remember me you probably you. Probably don't. there are a lot of people in the room that day when you came the positive psychology center. You gave a talk about three years. Ago i i was i use. The word. smitten doesn't doesn't mean that it's not quite the right word but not quite not quite i was. I was just so impressed. With the way that you're able to balance a kind of extreme views and kind of have the nuance about it. Thanks i appreciate that and you know you're you've been you're a mardi guy marty seligman guy and so you you know that's an so i've been a big fan of martin and those of us who are in in the kind of the mardi cosmos Uncommon basically trying to make people that are off trying to lift a lot trying to bring bring people together and the confidence that we can actually do so. And that's actually what. I'd like so much about your guests. Not just the gee whiz kind of deal it's Every episode you have the science you have the application to your life and you have the exaltation to share with others. That's actually the formula frigging happier understand. Apply share. and you do it every day. Thank you so much thank you. That means a lot. I love your podcast to. Hey i though it started off with a quote from joan goldberg. Who was describing you your character. Structure and since psychology podcast. I thought this would be an appropriate place to start jonah. Goldberg described you as quote a strange creature by washington standards heck a strange creature by bipedal standards a former french horn player. Who decided to be an egghead late in life. He's a unique mix of catholic. Piety data obsession sartorial connoisseurs. Physical fitness old soul wisdom and basic decency. Now he's wondering. How do you feel about this description of yourself. Jones a good writer for the listeners. In general burke longtime sas from the national review and general public intellectual around town also When he wrote that he was my employee at the american enterprise institute. So we if anything is nice about it. We can't take it seriously the truth there though there's like a grain they're great and he's he's fantastic and he's also a really acute to of his guy. He's a good commentator and he's got a great. I and so this idea of the these salient characteristics of my personality are all knit Knit together into this. One portrait of weirdness. I kinda like it. I like it i well. One thing there horn part. Now you're a you're you are like legit a musician right. That's a part of that was was the my my goal in life. Starting when i was nine years old. I had literally one goal in life which was to be the world's greatest french horn player yet. I didn't america great. Yeah you say. I want to be the world's french horn player in sexually not an impossible dream so i did nothing but nothing but that i basically slacked off in school did nothing but play in every unsolvable every competition. I stayed with the best horn players. They could possibly find through lower middle class. Family made huge sacrifices. So that i could do that and when i was. I went to college reluctantly. Eighteen in and promptly dropped required courses and and was invited to earn my success outside the college and so i went pro. I was nineteen. I spent my entire twenties playing chamber music in symphony orchestras winding up for a long time in the barcelona symphony spain and then only in my late twenties that i started doing my college education. I graduated from college before my thirtieth birthday left music. Business at thirty one start. H date and tell me tell me about your phd topic. And what department was it in. It was actually at the rand graduate school. Which is part of the rand corporation of famous old. Old think tank in santa monica was matter of fact and And i went there. Part of it was because i was at the time older than most. Phd students that i wanted to maintain the conceit that i was working as opposed to studying and so at thirty one thirty two years old thirty three. I was doing work on public policy analysis. Which is what. I ultimately my phd by fields in applied microeconomics mathematical modeling and was doing theater level. Combat nelson's for the air force operations military operations research so levels while level military. A while i was doing theater level comedy terror level. What does that mean. What does it get too wonky accident but that means is. I was doing large scale military simulations of different theaters of war. I see that's so that's so cool. That's that's that's the terminology for that. Yeah yeah. I just learned something new. I love that. I love that. Yeah i was doing craft survivability using a pretty sophisticated early artificial intelligence modeling line. You know bunch of mainframes all kind of linked together for large we rang two hundred and fifty thousand line. Four tran models cetera. Just to to to simulate war situations had never actually been fought and using pretty sophisticated math to do it and that was a really big departure from obviously from playing the french horn but it was part of the the cognitive development is the great thing. Those were listening to us the great thing about doing a phd in any topic. Is you get somewhere between four and six years of an apprenticeship in hard.

arthur brooks joan goldberg marty seligman william henry bloomberg ten years Today eleven books Eighteen arthur thirty three Goldberg four rand graduate school santa monica Jones martin jonah six years harvard kennedy school two hundred
Biden Planning Ten Day Blitz Of  Executive Actions

Squawk Pod

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Biden Planning Ten Day Blitz Of Executive Actions

"In washington it is also a very very big week. President-elect biden scheduled to be sworn in as president at noontime tomorrow chief-of-staff ron claim saying the biden is planning a ten day blitz of executive actions. And for that. I'm gonna go over to joe. Who i think's going to go to washington. Yes to lon moy is going to. I don't know if she's got every executive action she's ready to go into but she's going to have the latest on the inauguration and everything surrounding The inauguration the biden teen plan for a ten day blitz. So we got that going for us. I i whatever. I'm ready for it long. That's what presidents do but i've got a little trepidation with some of it but elections have consequences. It's coming keystone. That's going away at not taking. I think that over the next over the next few days we're going to see is just a real sort of divide and juxtaposition between some of the pomp and circumstance and then some of the policy so obviously the inaugural ceremony is gonna be dramatically scaled back today. We're going to see biden and leave delaware. Make his way down to dc the not by amtrak. Because of the heightened security measures. Tonight he will be at the lincoln memorial for ceremony honoring those who have lost their lives. Tacoma nineteen but in the midst of this pandemic. there's a real desire in the administration to be seen is hitting the ground running and it's one of the reasons why we're going to see five of biden's talk nominees. Have their senate confirmation hearings today. That includes janet yellen for treasury secretary along with his director of national intelligence homeland. Security secretary of state and defense secretary. I got an early copy of yellen opening statement and she does plan to make a forceful for that one point nine billion dollar covert rescue package. That was outlined last week. She says without further action we risk a longer and more painful recession now and long term scarring of the economy later. She also says that with great at historic lows. The smartest thing we can do now is to act big now. As for that flurry of executive orders abiding planning within his first few days many of them will reverse the decisions made by president trump. The latest example came just last night on restricting travel from europe and from brazil the trump administration had said plan to lift those restrictions on january. Twenty six though visitors would still have to provide a negative cova test biden spokesperson immediately. Push back on that saying that the new administration would not lift the ban and instead she tweeted with the pandemic worsening the more contagious variants emerging around the world. This is not the time to be lifting restrictions on international travel by is also planning other executive action on immigration the keystone pipeline. The paris climate accord the world health organization. So the goal of the biden administration is to show here that they're the ones who were serious about

Biden Elect Biden Ron Claim Lon Moy Washington Janet Yellen National Intelligence Homeland Yellen Lincoln Memorial Amtrak JOE Tacoma Delaware Treasury Senate Brazil Europe Biden Administration World Health Organization Paris
Love your enemies? Trump unloads on foes at prayer breakfast

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Love your enemies? Trump unloads on foes at prayer breakfast

"At the annual national prayer breakfast Harvard professor Arthur Brooks reminded the crowd of what Jesus said about your enemies love them and a political opponents they're not stupid and not evil the president sat near Brooks and disagreed I don't know about this gonna like what I'm going to say stunned the crowd by ripping the impeachment process and to those behind it some very dishonest and corrupt people including house speaker Nancy Pelosi four seats away here at the White House later the president did call his opponents evil and scum and sleaze bags among other things Sager make Donnie at the White House

Arthur Brooks Jesus President Trump White House Sager Donnie Professor Nancy Pelosi
List of copyrighted works entering the public domain in 2020

The Takeaway

04:16 min | 2 years ago

List of copyrighted works entering the public domain in 2020

"As the clock strikes midnight on new year's eve get this thousands of copyrighted works will finally entered the public domain and that includes books movies music all sorts of creative works that were first published in the U. S. in nineteen twenty four and if you're a little hazy on came out that year here's one the first movie adaptation of Peter Pan okay yeah we would have had a clip for that but that one was a silent film but also one of the things coming out this year blues legend of ma Rainey song CC right I'm enters the public domain it means it's no longer protected by copyright and the public can use and consume it without permission and at no cost and without the public domain we wouldn't have so much art that rests on the work of authors like Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare and these mass expirations used to happen every year in nineteen ninety eight though Congress passed the copyright term extension act it extended copyright protections for existing works for twenty years January first twenty nineteen so the first public domain dump since nineteen ninety eight for more on this host and you have a your recently spoke to Jennifer Jenkins a clinical professor of law and director of the center for the study of public domain at Duke University Jennifer thanks for joining me thanks so much for having me on the show tunes in so give us a couple of examples of maybe more of the popular works in the public domain and that some of our listeners might be familiar with well works from before copyright existed such as the works of Shakespeare the works of Mozart the works of Beethoven the works of Charles Dickens all of these are in the public domain and your listeners might be familiar with them because if you think think about the contributions of Shakespeare to our culture because Romeo and Juliet was in the public domain letter bursting was free to write West Side Story the movie's Gnomeo and Juliet and for me unless di did not have to get in touch with his errors and they were not subject to a veto and Shakespeare himself through in the public domain before him Romeo and Juliet you on Arthur Brooks the tragical history of Romeo and Juliet which in turn on all of its Pyramus and Thisbe and so your audience may be able to think of you know scores of works that drew on public domain material when something is not in the public domain what happens then because I understand that the song Happy Birthday was not in the public domain isn't that interesting it is now when something's not in the public domain that means that if you want to use the work you have to locate the copyright holder and you have to get permission from the copyright holder is welcome to say no are they can charge you a fair fee or they can charge you an exorbitant fee now this is a good thing copy rights are very important the public coming in as the yen to the gang of copyright protection so the design of the copyright system is there will be a term of copyright protection when you meet any of us you know enjoy exclusive rights over creative works then after a certain period of time that copyright expires in those works go into the public domain where anyone else is free to use and build upon them so there's some work entering the public domain and twenty twenty what might people be excited about what's coming into our public domain wonderful music so my favorite musical piece going to public domain is George Gershwin's Rhapsody in blue some literary works Thomas Mann's the magic mountain EM Forster's passage to India wonderful children's book a a Milne when we were very young there are also some wonderful silent films works featuring Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd silent film called Dante's inferno which itself to a public domain works Dante's divine comedy of course but also intermixing that with elements from Charles Dickens and the Christmas Carol so they're really great works going to the public domain next year and I know a lot of us are very excited about that so if

William Barr, Democrats Clash Over Robert Mueller's Report

Ben Shapiro

02:09 min | 3 years ago

William Barr, Democrats Clash Over Robert Mueller's Report

"Four year here. We're going to go over William buyer attorney general in congress speaking before the Senate Judiciary committee Democrats, making fools out of themselves bars, basically running circles around the mainly because he's not adult and this entire charade where William bar. The attorney general is supposed to be some sort of corrupt actor covering for Donald Trump's guilt on obstruction of Justice. It's just asinine. The report is publicly available. There is no cover up. What the hell? Are you all talking about that in just a second? Plus a little bit later on in the show. We're going to be getting to Arthur Brooks, he's going to be joining us from the American Enterprise Institute will ask him about Venezuela. We'll ask him about the state of domestic politics as well. And we will be talking about a city Denver which now wants to give homeless folks the rights to camp anywhere in the city. Can't see how that goes wrong. But let's get direct to the actual testimony by William bar in these. Senate Judiciary committee today. So click forty-three William Barr says correctly that the intense focus on his summary of the report is mind, bending -ly. Bizarre. This is obviously true. So the fact is that if you remember the time line Muller turned in his report to William bar William bar, then a few days later issued a four page letter over the weekend, he should four page letter summarising, the findings no collusion, and he says in the letter that Muller had not said whether from should be prosecuted on obstruction. He declined to make a recommendation on prosecution, but in his view, there was no evidence sufficient to lend itself to a successful prosecution in that case. And then a few weeks later the entire report is released. And so we all see it now. And nothing bar said was a lie. Nothing bar said was untrue. And yet Democrats eager to suggest that secretly secretly. Even though Muller didn't recommend prosecution secretly Muller wanted to recommend prosecution and William bar secretly decided that he was going to question on behalf of the various from administration, and that he then released a letter that undercut the conclusions of the report, which is now publicly available, and we can all read which didn't have to do by the way, never release

William Bar Donald Trump Muller William Barr Senate Judiciary Committee Attorney Senate Judiciary Arthur Brooks American Enterprise Institute Denver Congress Venezuela Four Year