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Review: 'Artemis Fowl' wasn't worth the wait after all

Radio From Hell

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Review: 'Artemis Fowl' wasn't worth the wait after all

"We had shown means on the show yesterday from Salt Lake Tribune and he said his review of Artemis fowl has was embargoed until ten o'clock I just saw the review this morning and well the headline says Disney's Artemis fowl does not fly as the next Harry potter so Disney and hopes that it would be a franchise to rival Harry potter but not according according to Shawn's review no not so much he said you can see what they're trying to do their the there there's all kinds of visual effects and narrative short cuts they're trying to there is a fast moving adventure franchise and they wanted to be the next Harry potter but kneeing maybe

Salt Lake Tribune Disney Harry Potter Shawn
SHIIVER: Changing the way NASA keeps its cool

Innovation Now

01:14 min | Last month

SHIIVER: Changing the way NASA keeps its cool

"We really want to go somewhere in space. If we really want to go to the moon we have got to figure out a way to keep propellants cold long enough. This is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shaped the future. Cryogenics is the study of things at very low temperatures. Here's Monica Kuzyk. An Aerospace Engineer at NASA Glenn Research Center to explain why NASA is changing the way they keep their cool so we want to store things like oxygen or hydrogen. If we make them really really cold they turn into a liquid and as we all know. Liquids are denser than gases so they're way more efficient to store when Artemis missions launched to the moon or Mars they will carry liquids with them for fuel and life support but ask. The extreme environment of space warms spacecraft. The fuels begin to or boil off. That's where cry. Oh coolers like shiver the largest cryogenic tank NASA has ever built come into play. Credit is really are in enabling technology to get to where we need to go when we improve cryogenic technologies here for space applications. It always a trickle down effect to the Earth for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer Paulie

Nasa Nasa Glenn Research Center Jennifer Paulie Artemis Missions Aerospace Engineer Monica Kuzyk
Disney+ streaming service reaches 50 million subscribers in 5 months

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

03:18 min | 3 months ago

Disney+ streaming service reaches 50 million subscribers in 5 months

"Disney plus reach a milestone in the past couple of days fifty million paid subscribers did for Disney plus around the world. That is well ahead of the most optimistic projections but then again maybe there's some nuance to those numbers. Yeah I mean it's interesting. Because they put out a big press release and are justifiably ecstatic about that fifty million number especially as other parts of the Walt Disney Company including the theme park business. The movie business the crews and resorts business. Espn are all just a big dumpster. Fire this is a very big number but there are a couple caveats. Mean eight million of those subscribers are coming from hot star in India which was a Fox pay-tv asset and is now in the Disney conglomerate. And that's a tear that comes with Disney plus so it's not exactly a huge resounding success in India and a lot of those subscribers in the. Us are coming from verizon which did a big deal with Disney to offer verizon customers a free subscription but this is a big number regardless and it's a testament to the brand Disney brand is gigantic. People are stuck indoors there with their kids and they are subscribing. Yeah they are hurrying up some things you know. They put frozen to on Disney plus faster than it normally would be if we were in the world where it goes from theaters to on demand to different. You know windows. They moved onward the Pixar film there and this artemis fowl film also moving onto Disney plus onward after a short theatrical release that was curtailed by the pandemic and Artemis Fowl. Not at all you know and these movies we've talked about. How on demand doesn't necessarily help so they don't make as much money by any means they might do even from so-so theatrical release. You know some people have said in the case of those films onward and Artemis Fowl and Universal. The same thing in terms of trolls which was quickly moved into the on demand space. You know if the student doesn't have a ton of confidence this is what they do if they think well. It wouldn't have been a huge. Hit The optically. This is what they do so it seems like this is what Disney plus. Yeah and I think we're GONNA see more of that as we go forward especially if these stay at home mortars stay into effect into the summer you're going to see such a demand for a at home content that you're gonNA see more and more of these streaming services take Take their windows from other places and put things on there but you know the Disney thing is very interesting because compared to a lot of the other services there isn't as much new content going onto Disney plus in especially net flicks and even Amazon and Hulu. There's new stuff. They're pretty much every week yet with Disney. Plus it's relying still on mostly that library content. And yes there are originals. And there's new stuff they just put a simpsons movie up this week and they've got other things that are coming but it really just is a testament to the power of that Disney Library and how powerful that is for families with children who are at home right now and that seven dollar price point is pretty good. Although that can't be sustained indefinitely thank you that

Walt Disney Company Disney Library Artemis Fowl India Verizon Espn Pixar FOX Amazon Hulu
SpaceX wins NASA contract to send cargo to lunar Gateway with new Dragon XL craft

SPACE NEWS POD

06:56 min | 3 months ago

SpaceX wins NASA contract to send cargo to lunar Gateway with new Dragon XL craft

"NASA SPACEX are working together on the the freaking Moon Orbiter Right. So we have the same coming up in two thousand twenty four. Nasa is going to be landing people on the Moon in twenty twenty four the artist program and they have a lunar orbiter. It's a station. It's like a waystation that astronauts will go to before they go down to the moon so they'll dock with this thing and then they'll get resupplied get whatever they need to get done you know. Grab a bite. E whatever they gotta do and then they'll go down to the surface of the Moon in when they're done with the surface stuff whenever they're done with their silencing they're gonNA go back up to this orbital laboratory and do what they gotta do and then come back home back to Earth which is amazing. So that being said NASA has partnered with SPACEX AND SPACEX. Going to be making a capsule that goes to the resupply station or on the Moon. The deep space resupply. It's called the cargo dragon. Xl Cargo Dragon Xl. It's insane it's insane. This is actually happening right so we WANNA make sure that everybody knows what's going on the Dragon. Xl has been revealed and it is huge huge news for the Lunar Gateway. Because before this we didn't know what was going on. We didn't even know like a couple of weeks ago we didn't even able to lunar gateway was still going to be a thing. People that are in charge of the money for NASA or thinking. You know maybe we're GonNa pull some funding away. Maybe we don't need the lunar gateway. Maybe these people don't need a way station between the Earth and the moon but NASA today said. Hey we need this. We do need a lunar gateway and we're going to be hiring spacex to do artists contracts. So in their press release they say NASA has selected spacex of Hawthorne California as the first US commercial provider out of the gate logistics services contract to deliver cargo experiments at other supplies to the agency's Gateway in Lunar Orbit. The award is a significant step forward for Nasr's Artemis programme that will land the first woman in the next man on the Moon in twenty twenty four and build sustainable human lunar presence at the moon and his partners will gain the experience necessary to mount a historic human mission to Mars and Jim Brian Stein. Who's the head of NASA? The administrator? He says this contract award is another critical piece of our plan to return to the moon. Sustainably the gateway is the is the cornerstone of the long-term artists architecture and deep space commercial cargo capability integrates yet another human industry partner or American industry partner into our plans for human exploration in preparation for a future mission to Mars spacex his contract. How crazy is that space x kind new to this space stuff right? I mean they've been in a for a while but they're the new kid on the block. They haven't been around as long. As somebody like Boeing. They're not as big as somebody like the U. L. A. The aren't part of you. Know the normal kind of architecture like Northrop Grumman. Somebody like that spacex has been doing a lot of missions though. They've been sending a lot of things to the Space Station for a long time. They had twenty s missions to the space station. And they've done a great job that so because of those things they know. The SPACEX can make the craft that can supply the lunar orbiter the lunar gateway with the essentials for humans to go to the moon. And this is the Dragon. Xl It's awesome looking. Well it's pretty boring to be honest with you. It's cylinder and has you know solar ray solar wings if you will on either side and it's just basically cylinder but it doesn't need to look cool you know. It doesn't need the look amazing or sweet but it's very Trustworthy sure because when the star business thing and they get it to a place where SPACEX and Nassar happy with it. That's only four years away in these times that we're living in right now for years away. It's really not that far everyone So for years away something look forward to and they have to send supplies before the people get there and they have to make sure that this lunar gateway works before the people get to the moon so this is GonNa happen before for years. It'll happen probably in the next couple of years before anybody gets there they have to send stuff up there before People get there and they have to make sure they do the test to make sure that thing is capable of handling people while it's in lunar orbit the Lunar Gateway has to be in a good spot technically before people board the thing so they're going to get supplies up they're gonNA get people up there and then when they send the people to Lunar Gateway. Those people are going to go to the moon might even send people to the lunar gateway to be like. Hey we're in the lunar gateway and we're going to hang out here for a little bit to make sure this thing works and you know they're gonNA be there for a couple of days probably check it out and then go down to the mood. I'm not sure the timeline of what's going to happen. Because they haven't they haven't even released that yet. They're not one hundred percent sure but they have this huge gateway configuration in. It's GONNA turn out to be something like the International Space Station. They have ISA involved with this. The power and perform Propulsion they have international habitation module. They have robotic arms from Canada. They have another candidate arm. They have an Isa Orion Service Module They have a multipurpose module. They have Habitation modules from NASA all sorts of things going on at huge huge solar. Ray So this is going to be a big thing. It's going to be a big deal. So basically we have a space station which is lower here in his orbiting the earth right now and You know from there were. We've just been stuck in that orbit for a long time at the International Space Station. Haven't really gone farther than that. Other than Hubble a longtime since since the Space shuttle. So yeah. That's it's a new thing you know and it's going to be really awesome

Lunar Gateway Spacex Nasa Space Station International Space Station Northrop Grumman Boeing Jim Brian Stein Hawthorne California RAY Nasr Administrator Hubble Partner United States Canada Nassar
Apply Today to NASA

Innovation Now

00:44 sec | 3 months ago

Apply Today to NASA

"The nineteen sixties NASA has selected three hundred fifty people to train as astronaut candidates for its increasingly challenging missions to explore space but with the twentieth year of continuous presence aboard the International Space Station and the plan to send the first woman and next man to the moon by twenty twenty four NASA will need a larger astronaut corps to crew the spacecraft bound for multiple destinations and propel exploration forward to Mars as part of the Artemis missions astronaut. Candidates must be. Us citizens have a master's degree in a stem field. Have at least two years of professional experience or one thousand hours of pilot in command time jet aircraft and be able to

Nasa Artemis Missions International Space Station United States
NASA is changing the way they keep their cool

Innovation Now

00:59 sec | 4 months ago

NASA is changing the way they keep their cool

"Is the study of things at very low temperatures. Here's Monica Kuzyk. An Aerospace Engineer at NASA Glenn Research Center to explain why NASA is changing the way they keep their cool so we want to store oxygen or hydrogen. If we make them really really cold they turn into a liquid and as we all know liquids and gases so they're way more efficient to store. When Artemis missions launched to the Moon or Mars they will carry liquids with them for fuel and life support but ask the extreme environment of space warms spacecraft. The fuels begin to or boil off. That's where cry. Oh coolers like shiver the largest cryogenic tank NASA has ever built come into play. Credit is really our enabling technology to get to where we need to go when we improve cryogenic technologies here for space applications. It always a trickle down effect to the Earth for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer Paulie

Nasa Nasa Glenn Research Center Jennifer Paulie Monica Kuzyk Aerospace Engineer Artemis
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

06:45 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hey, it's actually going to be two hours later than what you thought now you have six hours to finish that research. According to Parkinson's law that the work of that research will actually expand for that six hours. That does not necessarily mean that the podcast I record is going to be longer than it would have been if it had stated its original studio time, or that will even be better than it would have been when I was supposed to go in rather just the work itself expanded to fill in those extra two hours. Hours so let's say we're working on a project and we're not sure how long it's going to take us to complete this project, but we're supposed to give an estimate so if we're conservative, then we'll give an estimate that's further out than what we think we actually need and the idea being well. Things are GONNA pop up. We're going to have to deal with them, so let's let's plan for it to take. Twenty days, but we think it's really only take ten well, according to Parkinson's law, the work we're doing is actually going to expand fill those extra ten days so at the end we're going to say boy. Are We glad we said twenty days because it turned out? That's how long we needed. But There's also the possibility that you could have completed in ten days, and that you really just the work to expand to fill that space that if you had given a ten day deadline, you still got the work done. There is a diminishing return here though there is a point where you might give a a deadline. That's just too aggressive. Right that maybe you say. Say Oh. It's going to take us five days when you really think it's GonNa take you ten, and you're doing it, said you motivate yourself, but turns out. You've sabotage the whole project because there's just no way to get it all done in five days. That can also happen, so it's a delicate line. You have to walk right. So Parkinson's law is really more. More about how we let time get away from us or how we allow bureaucracy to play a large role in things or otherwise bog ourselves down in the stuff that keeps us from getting the core work done. However, it does not mean we can set these arbitrarily short deadlines, and then magically get things done faster as I said there is that tipping point that. That you have to look at NASA approach is to set aggressive, but potentially achievable deadlines that interns sets, expectations and the pace of work. It also gets people into the habit of looking at practical approaches. If the goal is to get people back on the moon by twenty twenty four water are the things that have to happen in order to achieve that goal. We're going to send people to Mars in the following decade in Twenty thirty s. what do we absolutely have to have nailed down to make that happen rather than just having feature creep. Come in where we say oh, wouldn't it be nice if we also added this? By saying these aggressive goals, you kind of push feature creep to the side because you say listen our main concern. Is this to happen by this date? The things that would be nice. Are Out of the discussion because that doesn't contribute to what we actually have as our goal. So. That's kind of what happened in the nineteen sixties to a large extent, and it does work as a motivating factor to a certain level now besides these these timelines aggressive, anyway because NASA can't count on having a budget sufficient for achieving its goals from one year to the next, definitely not between presidential administrations, and there's the potential for the presidential administration to make a big change in two thousand and twenty. So who knows what the next president might? Prioritize when it comes to budgets, so if they set longer timelines, NASA said okay. We're GONNA we're going to give ourselves more space. No Pun intended to get the stuff done. There'd be a lot more chances for things like budget cutbacks, which would sabotage mission just as effectively as hitting some sort of technical or design challenge that would become harder to solve than you thought. NASA is moving forward with their goals that we're gonNA, have to wait and see if they actually are achievable. But in the meantime the agency has opened up the application process for people who are interested in becoming astronauts right now. The US astronaut program about forty. Forty eight people in it. NASA needs more for this pro program to be workable, so it's possible someone. Listening to this podcast could be the first woman or the next man to set foot on the moon to apply. You have to meet some pretty high standards, which again is understandable. There are three general types of folks that NASA's looking for. During this application process, they're looking for people who hold at least a master's degree in a stem related fields like engineering or astrophysics or something like that. They are also looking for people who are medical doctors It gets more specific than that, but that's one of the three types and the third are people who are certified test pilots, those are the three types that Nasr's looking for. So if you belong to one of those three groups, you can look into the requirements that NASA has in place to see. If you meet all the criteria, the application process includes an online component for the very first time, which as I understand, it takes a couple of hours to complete. I would know because I. Don't meet the initial criteria, but maybe one of you guys can find out. And we'll have to wait and see if artem is actually gets people to the moon. We just don't know if it's going to be possible yet. I have high hopes. I would love to see it happen. I don't know how useful it will be in the long-term, unless we're actually able to use the stuff we learn on the moon as a platform for learning how we can get to Mars, but it's definitely something that is inspirational, and that alone has value. You just have to weigh that value against other considerations like risk and the other goals that you have with the agency because NASA's doing obviously a lot more than just these programs and you don't want to have a big. Big High Risk High Payoff Project Fail like the Constellation Project did and potentially set the agency backward, so it's a complicated thing, but we'll have to keep our eyes open I'm sure I'll do an update on this in the future once we know more about what the ornaments programs going to be moving forward, and whether those deadlines stay in place, or if they shift around and in the meantime. If you guys have any suggestions for future topics whether their space, related or a tech company or some trended technology, you wanNA know more about. Send me a message. Begin contact me on social media, facebook or.

NASA Parkinson twenty twenty US facebook president Nasr artem
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:26 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"Now besides these these timelines aggressive anyway because NASA can't count on having a budget sufficient for achieving its goals from one year to the next definitely not between presidential administrations and there's the potential for the presidential administration to make a big change in twenty twenty. So who knows what? The next president might prioritize when it comes to budgets so if they set longer timelines NASA said. Okay we're going to. We're going to give ourselves more space. No Pun intended to get the stuff done. There'd be a lot more chances for things like budget cutbacks. Which would sabotage mission just as effectively as hitting some sort of technical or design challenge. That would become harder to solve than you thought. Nasa is moving forward with their goals. That we're GONNA have to wait and see if they actually are achievable. But in the meantime the agency is opened up the application process for people who are interested in becoming astronauts right now the U. S. astronaut program about forty eight people in it NASA needs more for this pro program to be workable so it's possible someone listening to this. Podcast could be the first woman or the next man to set foot on the moon to apply. You have to meet some pretty high standards. Which again is understandable. There are three general types of folks that NASA's looking for during this application process. They're looking for people who hold at least a master's degree in a stem related fields like engineering or astrophysics or something like that. They are also looking for people who are medical doctors It gets more specific than that. But that's one of the three types and the third are people who are certified test pilots. Those are the three types that Nasr's looking for so if you belong to one of those three groups you can look into the requirements that NASA has in place to see if you meet all the criteria. The application process includes an online component for the very first time which as. I understand it takes a couple of hours to complete. I would know because I don't meet the initial criteria. But maybe one of you guys can find out and we'll have to wait and see if Artemis actually gets people to the moon. We just don't know if it's going to be possible yet. I have high hopes I would love to see it happen. I don't know how useful it will be in the long-term unless we're actually able to use the stuff. We learn on the moon as a platform for learning how we can get to Mars but It's definitely something that is inspirational and that alone has value. You just have to weigh that value against other considerations like risk and the Other goals that you have with the agency because NASA's doing obviously a lot more than just these programs and you don't want to have a big high risk. High PAYOFF PROJECT. Fail like the Constellation Project did and potentially set the agency backward. So it's a complicated thing but we'll have to keep our eyes open. I'm sure I'll do an update on this in the future. Once we know more about what the ornaments programs going to be Moving forward and whether those deadlines stay in place or if they shift around and in the meantime if you guys have any suggestions for future topics whether their space related or a tech company or some trended technology you WANNA know more about. Send me a message begin. Contact me on social media facebook or.

NASA Artemis president Nasr
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

05:00 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"Has since been disputed by NASA, so acquainted original timeline, or at least the manifest line NASA planned for the first crude or Orion mission, the first mission to have astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft. Which would be called? The artists to mission would launch in January twenty twenty three. The mission will use a block one S. L. S. as the launch vehicle, and it would see the astronauts go on a path around the moon and back to Earth, not landing on the moon, but doing an orbit of the Moon, and then returning now maybe even four but I think it's just a fly by behind the the moon similar to some of the earlier Apollo missions. In August twenty twenty four NASA plans to launch the artists three mission. This mission's purpose is to send a Lunar Lander to the moon on a block one B S ls. More on the whole Lunar Lander in a bit because that part of the plan has definitely changed a couple of times. Twenty twenty four is the big one that would be a mission called artists four, and the purpose would be to send astronauts to actually set foot on the moon, including at least one woman. This mission would use a bloc. One S LS to send the Orion to rendezvous with. A thing around the moon's orbit. We'll get back to that because it has changed originally was just going to be a lunar lander. Now it's a slightly different, and this does not end the artist program right. The the landing on the moon is not the ultimate end of artists. NASA plans a few other missions. One would happen in September twenty twenty five. This one is not not technically an artist's mission, but it will use the same spacecraft. It'll news The the S LS blocked one in order to launch a satellite called the Europa Clipper and this one would fly over to Jupiter and get an orbit around Jupiter and do. Do Fly bys of Jupiter's Moon Europa to get a closer look and part of the purpose of this mission is to see if you roper has environments that could potentially support life, so that's really exciting then in June twenty twenty six NASA plans to send another mission to the moon, this one designated artists five with more astronauts, visiting old Luna using a block. One B s ls to get there. So this is the slightly larger version of the S.. The following June NASA would launch a lander to head to Europa, giving us an even closer. Look at Uber's Moon, because we'd have a lander setting foot a lander on crude lander. Setting foot or landing on Europa but that would be super cool and August. Twenty Twenty, eight, NASA acquainted this manifest would plan to launch the six mission, which would once again take astronauts to the moon, but this time aboard a block one B. And in February twenty twenty-nine, Artemis seven would send cargo to the moon, and would be the first mission to rely on a block to s LS August twenty, two, thousand nine also brings us to Artemis. Eight and that is also using block to SOS to send people astronauts aboard and Orion mission I have no idea where that one specifically going and might be a mission to test the block, two or a manned spaceflight mission in general. But. Maybe it's going to I don't know the manifest was unclear and the final two artists missions that were in that manifest included a twenty thirty, one called Artemisinin that would be a cargo mission using an S. L. S. block to an artist ten that would also use a astronaut led mission on a block to SOS. So that's what the manifest had laid. Laid out which NASA again has disputed saying that there are numerous errors or discrepancies with their current plan, but that's the most information I have..

NASA Twenty twenty Orion SOS Artemis
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:27 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"This one is not not technically an artist's mission, but it will use the same spacecraft. It'll news The the S LS blocked one in order to launch a satellite called the Europa Clipper and this one would fly over to Jupiter and get an orbit around Jupiter and do. Do Fly bys of Jupiter's Moon Europa to get a closer look and part of the purpose of this mission is to see if you roper has environments that could potentially support life, so that's really exciting then in June twenty twenty six NASA plans to send another mission to the moon, this one designated artists five with more astronauts, visiting old Luna using a block. One B s ls to get there. So this is the slightly larger version of the S.. The following June NASA would launch a lander to head to Europa, giving us an even closer. Look at Uber's Moon, because we'd have a lander setting foot a lander on crude lander. Setting foot or landing on Europa but that would be super cool and August. Twenty Twenty, eight, NASA acquainted this manifest would plan to launch the six mission, which would once again take astronauts to the moon, but this time aboard a block one B. And in February twenty twenty-nine, Artemis seven would send cargo to the moon, and would be the first mission to rely on a block to s LS August twenty, two, thousand nine also brings us to Artemis. Eight and that is also using block to SOS to send people astronauts aboard and Orion mission I have no idea where that one specifically going and might be a mission to test the block, two or a manned spaceflight mission in general. But. Maybe it's going to I don't know the manifest was unclear and the final two artists missions that were in that manifest included a twenty thirty, one called Artemisinin that would be a cargo mission using an S. L. S. block to an artist ten that would also use a astronaut led mission on a block to SOS. So that's what the manifest had laid. Laid out which NASA again has disputed saying that there are numerous errors or discrepancies with their current plan, but that's the most information I have. As of the recording of this podcast, it gives us a general idea of what they were thinking. When we come back I'll talk about some other things that have complicated this, but.

NASA Twenty Twenty SOS Artemis
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

07:38 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"NASA would task a block one S. l.. S. Launch Vehicle. Carrying an unmanned, Orion, spacecraft, a mission dubbed Ornaments one, so that raises a question once a block one S. L. S. well the S. l.. S. is designed in a way that will allow NASA to swap out elements further down the line to give it A. Boost in performance specifically will allow NASA to include more powerful boosters and rockets that are intended to get a crew to Mars, but those are still being designed and constructed, and so we don't even have an example to point at for the the more advanced ones, and rather than wait on all of that to finish before making any other progress NASA has placed a strategy in. In which an initial version of the space launch system block, one will be used to get the Orion into orbit, or to send it to the moon, and the future will get a more powerful block to s L. S. that would be able to send the Orion and cargo to Mars. So how does all this play out will keep in mind that the block to? Exist yet, so things could change dramatically by the time we actually have something built if it even gets built the bloc one. s the version that's currently being finalized now, and it will have to boosters similar to the space shuttle, and it will also have a core stage like a central like rocket tank with four engines the. Pair of solid propellant, rocket boosters are really similar to what the space shuttle used. In fact, some of the early SA. L. S. launch vehicles. will be using all unused space shuttle booster casings, then in the future new casings waft to be made because we'll have run out of ones that weren't used in the spatial program, but the old space shuttle boosters had four segments of solid propellant rocket fuel the block one s boosters. will have five segments the core stage that central rocket We'll have four engines, and we'll use liquid propellant. Propellant once in space and Orion spacecraft separates from its launch vehicle. The Orion spacecraft will use what is called the interim cryogenic propulsion stage to travel to its destination such as the moon. This version of the S. L. S. will be able to send fifty seven thousand pounds or twenty six metric tons of payload into space. In fact, it'll be able to deliver payloads of that size into orbits beyond the moon. Now between block one and block to NASA also plans a version of the S.. L. S. called block one B it will have a little bit more. The central core will have more fuel. It'll be a bigger. Fuel tank, and it will be able to put not just the Orion spacecraft into orbit, but an orbiting habitat up into space can lift a heavier payload up into space, creating opportunities for missions and. More ambitious goals blocked twos. Goal is to create a launch vehicle capable of putting forty five tons of payload into deep space, and will be used for missions that aim to go to Mars. Let's get back to this timeline that has since been disputed by NASA, so acquainted original timeline, or at least the manifest line NASA planned for the first crude or Orion mission, the first mission to have astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft. Which would be called? The artists to mission would launch in January twenty twenty three. The mission will use a block one S. L. S. as the launch vehicle, and it would see the astronauts go on a path around the moon and back to Earth, not landing on the moon, but doing an orbit of the Moon, and then returning now maybe even four but I think it's just a fly by behind the the moon similar to some of the earlier Apollo missions. In August twenty twenty four NASA plans to launch the artists three mission. This mission's purpose is to send a Lunar Lander to the moon on a block one B S ls. More on the whole Lunar Lander in a bit because that part of the plan has definitely changed a couple of times. Twenty twenty four is the big one that would be a mission called artists four, and the purpose would be to send astronauts to actually set foot on the moon, including at least one woman. This mission would use a bloc. One S LS to send the Orion to rendezvous with. A thing around the moon's orbit. We'll get back to that because it has changed originally was just going to be a lunar lander. Now it's a slightly different, and this does not end the artist program right. The the landing on the moon is not the ultimate end of artists. NASA plans a few other missions. One would happen in September twenty twenty five. This one is not not technically an artist's mission, but it will use the same spacecraft. It'll news The the S LS blocked one in order to launch a satellite called the Europa Clipper and this one would fly over to Jupiter and get an orbit around Jupiter and do. Do Fly bys of Jupiter's Moon Europa to get a closer look and part of the purpose of this mission is to see if you roper has environments that could potentially support life, so that's really exciting then in June twenty twenty six NASA plans to send another mission to the moon, this one designated artists five with more astronauts, visiting old Luna using a block. One B s ls to get there. So this is the slightly larger version of the S.. The following June NASA would launch a lander to head to Europa, giving us an even closer. Look at Uber's Moon, because we'd have a lander setting foot a lander on crude lander. Setting foot or landing on Europa but that would be super cool and August. Twenty Twenty, eight, NASA acquainted this manifest would plan to launch the six mission, which would once again take astronauts to the moon, but this time aboard a block one B. And in February twenty twenty-nine, Artemis seven would send cargo to the moon, and would be the first mission to rely on a block to s LS August twenty, two, thousand nine also brings us to Artemis. Eight and that is also using block to SOS to send people astronauts aboard and Orion mission I have no idea where that one specifically going and might be a mission to test the block, two or a manned spaceflight mission in general. But. Maybe it's going to I don't know the manifest was unclear and the final two artists missions that were in that manifest included a twenty thirty, one called Artemisinin that would be a cargo mission using an S. L. S. block to an artist ten that would also use a astronaut led mission on a block to SOS. So that's what the manifest had laid. Laid out which NASA again has disputed saying that there are numerous errors or discrepancies with their current plan, but that's the most information I have. As of the recording of this podcast, it gives us a general idea of what they were thinking. When we come back I'll talk about some other things that have complicated this, but.

NASA Orion Twenty twenty SOS SA L. S. Artemis
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

06:59 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"However, as of the time of this recording is the. The most recent version of the plan I can find. Everything else is kind of gone dark, so I'll explain the the manifest version of the mission here with the caveat that things have already changed, but this plan kind of gives us a peek into the ambition surrounding the artist program, even if the subsequent plan that will get announced probably right around the time. This episode publishes might have more details so here we go in April twenty, twenty, one according to this manifest. NASA would task a block one S. l.. S. Launch Vehicle. Carrying an unmanned, Orion, spacecraft, a mission dubbed Ornaments one, so that raises a question once a block one S. L. S. well the S. l.. S. is designed in a way that will allow NASA to swap out elements further down the line to give it A. Boost in performance specifically will allow NASA to include more powerful boosters and rockets that are intended to get a crew to Mars, but those are still being designed and constructed, and so we don't even have an example to point at for the the more advanced ones, and rather than wait on all of that to finish before making any other progress NASA has placed a strategy in. In which an initial version of the space launch system block, one will be used to get the Orion into orbit, or to send it to the moon, and the future will get a more powerful block to s L. S. that would be able to send the Orion and cargo to Mars. So how does all this play out will keep in mind that the block to? Exist yet, so things could change dramatically by the time we actually have something built if it even gets built the bloc one. s the version that's currently being finalized now, and it will have to boosters similar to the space shuttle, and it will also have a core stage like a central like rocket tank with four engines the. Pair of solid propellant, rocket boosters are really similar to what the space shuttle used. In fact, some of the early SA. L. S. launch vehicles. will be using all unused space shuttle booster casings, then in the future new casings waft to be made because we'll have run out of ones that weren't used in the spatial program, but the old space shuttle boosters had four segments of solid propellant rocket fuel the block one s boosters. will have five segments the core stage that central rocket We'll have four engines, and we'll use liquid propellant. Propellant once in space and Orion spacecraft separates from its launch vehicle. The Orion spacecraft will use what is called the interim cryogenic propulsion stage to travel to its destination such as the moon. This version of the S. L. S. will be able to send fifty seven thousand pounds or twenty six metric tons of payload into space. In fact, it'll be able to deliver payloads of that size into orbits beyond the moon. Now between block one and block to NASA also plans a version of the S.. L. S. called block one B it will have a little bit more. The central core will have more fuel. It'll be a bigger. Fuel tank, and it will be able to put not just the Orion spacecraft into orbit, but an orbiting habitat up into space can lift a heavier payload up into space, creating opportunities for missions and. More ambitious goals blocked twos. Goal is to create a launch vehicle capable of putting forty five tons of payload into deep space, and will be used for missions that aim to go to Mars. Let's get back to this timeline that has since been disputed by NASA, so acquainted original timeline, or at least the manifest line NASA planned for the first crude or Orion mission, the first mission to have astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft. Which would be called? The artists to mission would launch in January twenty twenty three. The mission will use a block one S. L. S. as the launch vehicle, and it would see the astronauts go on a path around the moon and back to Earth, not landing on the moon, but doing an orbit of the Moon, and then returning now maybe even four but I think it's just a fly by behind the the moon similar to some of the earlier Apollo missions. In August twenty twenty four NASA plans to launch the artists three mission. This mission's purpose is to send a Lunar Lander to the moon on a block one B S ls. More on the whole Lunar Lander in a bit because that part of the plan has definitely changed a couple of times. Twenty twenty four is the big one that would be a mission called artists four, and the purpose would be to send astronauts to actually set foot on the moon, including at least one woman. This mission would use a bloc. One S LS to send the Orion to rendezvous with. A thing around the moon's orbit. We'll get back to that because it has changed originally was just going to be a lunar lander. Now it's a slightly different, and this does not end the artist program right. The the landing on the moon is not the ultimate end of artists. NASA plans a few other missions. One would happen in September twenty twenty five. This one is not not technically an artist's mission, but it will use the same spacecraft. It'll news The the S LS blocked one in order to launch a satellite called the Europa Clipper and this one would fly over to Jupiter and get an orbit around Jupiter and do. Do Fly bys of Jupiter's Moon Europa to get a closer look and part of the purpose of this mission is to see if you roper has environments that could potentially support life, so that's really exciting then in June twenty twenty six NASA plans to send another mission to the moon, this one designated artists five with more astronauts, visiting old Luna using a block. One B s ls to get there. So this is the slightly larger version of the S.. The following June NASA would launch a lander to head to Europa, giving us an even closer. Look at Uber's Moon, because we'd have a lander setting foot a lander on crude lander. Setting foot or landing on Europa but that would be super cool and August. Twenty Twenty, eight, NASA acquainted this manifest would plan to launch the six mission, which would once again take astronauts.

NASA Orion Twenty twenty SA L. S.
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:29 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"This was much less than what the agency spent during the Apollo program years. But that delay of the program, and the twenty six percent overrun in costs gave constellation a really bad reputation that was a reputation that President Barack, Obama actually referenced back in two thousand eight NASA. Also predicted that the program would continue to cost more than had been originally projected with an increase of about one hundred forty percent of the original budget marked out for. For the years between two, thousand, ten and two, thousand, fourteen, not great news on top of that the focus of NASA was almost entirely on the Orion spacecraft and the areas one launch vehicle again. No big surprise here. The idea of sending people to the moon is generally one that people really get excited about and excitement translates into governments approving bigger budgets because. Representatives want to support the things that their constituents are really excited about, but that meant that the areas five rocket, the heavy lifting rocket had a much smaller development budget that all the focus was on the the crude stuff. The Orion crew doesn't see R. E. W. E., D. The Orion. Spacecraft Aries one launch vehicle, not the areas five. The areas five was going to need a lot of money. I mean. This was a a heavy. Heavy lifting rocket concept, but that meant that because it didn't get that big budget, the development was gained delayed over and over again, and that led to a point where analysts believed that based on the budgetary trajectory at NASA the earliest, the five rocket would be able to launch the lunar landing hardware that would be necessary to actually land on. The Moon would be sometime in the twenty thirties if that were at all possible even then. That would delay that that deadline of landing on the moon by more than a decade, the idea here was that the space agency would put a lunar landing spacecraft into Earth orbit, and it was to be called the lunar surface. Module or L. Sam L. later it was renamed the al-Tair and an aries five would launch this tear into Earth Orbit because it was heavier than the Orion spacecraft, so you wouldn't want to use like an areas one rocket. You need the heavy lifting rocket there. A separate areas one rocket would launch an Orion spacecraft into earth orbit, and then the Orion spacecraft would rendezvous with the orbiting tear the two would dock, and then together they would make the rest of the trip to the moon upon entering lunar orbit, the two spacecraft could separate the entire crew of the Orion could move over into the Americas. The Orion would be automated, and it would just remain in orbit around the moon. Then the outer would land on the moon. The astronauts would go out and. Do Moon stuff then they would come back to the Tair launch off the moon back into orbit dock with the Orion transfer back over to the Orion spacecraft, and then they could make the trip back to Earth, but because of these budget limitations the focus on the Orion and the aries, one vehicles meant that. All of this other stuff, the aries five and the lunar module, all of that just remained hypothetical, it was a proposal, not an actual spacecraft, so while the agency might have produced an Orion spacecraft in time to get into space by two thousand fifteen, there was just no hope of making enough progress to land on the moon any earlier than the twenty thirties and some people thought that even that was too ambitious. Meanwhile NASA the agency was struggling with budget constraints in general, not just for the Constellation Program sometimes one project would have to siphon funds intended for a totally different project. You had a lot of internal battles. NASA as different project leads, would kind of. Squirrel budgetary money away. That was intended for some other project for their own that did not help morale in the agency. Then moreover, it was never enough to cover all the costs that were mounting up. In two thousand ten Nasser received its new budget from the US government and that budget listed. Zero for the Constellation Project. Now explain more in just a moment, but we'll take a quick break. The perfect hire can have an impact on your business for years to come so when you need to find the.

Orion NASA Constellation Project President Barack US Nasser L. Sam L. R. E. W. E. Tair Americas
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:29 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"This was much less than what the agency spent during the Apollo program years. But that delay of the program, and the twenty six percent overrun in costs gave constellation a really bad reputation that was a reputation that President Barack, Obama actually referenced back in two thousand eight NASA. Also predicted that the program would continue to cost more than had been originally projected with an increase of about one hundred forty percent of the original budget marked out for. For the years between two, thousand, ten and two, thousand, fourteen, not great news on top of that the focus of NASA was almost entirely on the Orion spacecraft and the areas one launch vehicle again. No big surprise here. The idea of sending people to the moon is generally one that people really get excited about and excitement translates into governments approving bigger budgets because. Representatives want to support the things that their constituents are really excited about, but that meant that the areas five rocket, the heavy lifting rocket had a much smaller development budget that all the focus was on the the crude stuff. The Orion crew doesn't see R. E. W. E., D. The Orion. Spacecraft Aries one launch vehicle, not the areas five. The areas five was going to need a lot of money. I mean. This was a a heavy. Heavy lifting rocket concept, but that meant that because it didn't get that big budget, the development was gained delayed over and over again, and that led to a point where analysts believed that based on the budgetary trajectory at NASA the earliest, the five rocket would be able to launch the lunar landing hardware that would be necessary to actually land on. The Moon would be sometime in the twenty thirties if that were at all possible even then. That would delay that that deadline of landing on the moon by more than a decade, the idea here was that the space agency would put a lunar landing spacecraft into Earth orbit, and it was to be called the lunar surface. Module or L. Sam L. later it was renamed the al-Tair and an aries five would launch this tear into Earth Orbit because it was heavier than the Orion spacecraft, so you wouldn't want to use like an areas one rocket. You need the heavy lifting rocket there. A separate areas one rocket would launch an Orion spacecraft into earth orbit, and then the Orion spacecraft would rendezvous with the orbiting tear the two would dock, and then together they would make the rest of the trip to the moon upon entering lunar orbit, the two spacecraft could separate the entire crew of the Orion could move over into the Americas. The Orion would be automated, and it would just remain in orbit around the moon. Then the outer would land on the moon. The astronauts would go out and. Do Moon stuff then they would come back to the Tair launch off the moon back into orbit dock with the Orion transfer back over to the Orion spacecraft, and then they could make the trip back to Earth, but because of these budget limitations the focus on the Orion and the aries, one vehicles meant that. All of this other stuff, the aries five and the lunar module, all of that just remained hypothetical, it was a proposal, not an actual spacecraft, so while the agency might have produced an Orion spacecraft in time to get into space by two thousand fifteen, there was just no hope of making enough progress to land on the moon any earlier than the twenty thirties and some people thought that even that was too ambitious. Meanwhile NASA the agency was struggling with budget constraints in general, not just for the Constellation Program sometimes one project would have to siphon funds intended for a totally different project. You had a lot of internal battles. NASA as different project leads, would kind of. Squirrel budgetary money away. That was intended for some other project for their own that did not help morale in the agency. Then moreover, it was never enough to cover all the costs that were mounting up. In two thousand ten Nasser received its new budget from the US government and that budget listed. Zero for the Constellation Project. Now explain more in just a moment, but we'll take a quick break. The perfect hire can have an impact on your business for years to come so when you need to find the.

Orion NASA Constellation Project President Barack US Nasser L. Sam L. R. E. W. E. Tair Americas
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

06:54 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"I ran the math even adjusted for inflation. That comes out to just under seventeen billion dollars. It is an enormous amount less than what was spent in nineteen sixty six or the equivalent of what was spent in one thousand nine hundred sixty six and yet griffin was describing constellation as Apollo on steroids. So they got a lot of people asking. Can you really design Apollo on steroids? If you're using a budget that's less than half of what Apollo's program spent in nineteen sixty six so this was a question that a lot of people are asking and ultimately the answer appears to be now. You can't really do it so despite having access to less money NASA still really tackled this challenge. I mean a lot of people poured a ton of work and effort into trying to make this happen. In Two thousand nine the agency released a statement saying the Orion would not be ready for a two thousand fourteen launch. They were hoping that they could maybe make it a twenty fifteen deadline But here's the thing while on on the surface that says. Oh it's a delay of just one year but it's actually not that bad. Especially when you consider the budgetary restraints. It actually was three years later than what Griffin had been hoping for. He had hoped to have the Orion ready for launch by twenty twelve. So now they were sure it wasn't gonNA be ready to at least two thousand fifteen. The agency really trying to narrow a gap that was gone exist when the space shuttle's retired and the USA would no longer have a spacecraft capable of launching and docking with the newly finished International Space Station so the ISS gets finished around twenty ten as the same time. The space shuttle program retires now. The USA is reliant on other countries and their space program in order to get astronauts to and from the space station. typically Russia so that's not ideal and They were waiting on commercial. Space companies like SPACEX to catch up. But that just hadn't happened yet so the real hope was that the Orion spacecraft could take over those duties and make USA independent of other countries and also of commercial spacecraft Companies where NASA would be owning operating these vehicles. But that just wasn't going to happen. That gap was going to get wider and wider not narrower NASA did have a cost overrun of three point. One billion dollars though again. This was much less than what the agency spent during the Apollo program years but that delay of the program and the twenty six percent overrun in costs gave constellation a really bad reputation that was a reputation that President Barack Obama. Actually referenced back in Two Thousand Eight. Nasa also predicted that the program would continue to cost more than had been originally projected with an increase of about one hundred forty percent of the original budget marked out for the years between two thousand ten and two thousand fourteen. Not Great News on top of that. The focus of NASA was almost entirely on the Orion spacecraft and the areas one launch vehicle again. No big surprise here. The idea of sending people to the moon is generally one that people really get excited about and excitement translates into governments approving bigger budgets because representatives want to support the things that their constituents are really excited about but that meant that the areas five rocket the heavy lifting rocket had a much smaller development budget. That all the focus was on the the crude stuff. The Orion crew doesn't C. R. E. W. E. D. The Orion spacecraft aries one launch vehicle. Not The areas five. The areas. Five was going to need a lot of money. I mean this was a heavy lifting rocket concept but that meant that because it didn't get that big budget the development was gained delayed over and over again and that led to a point where analysts believed that based on the budgetary trajectory at NASA the earliest aries five rocket would be able to launch the lunar landing hardware. That would be necessary to actually land on the moon would be sometime in the twenty thirties if that were at all possible even then so that would delay that that deadline of landing on the moon by more than a decade. The idea here was that the space agency would put a lunar landing spacecraft into Earth orbit and it was to be called the lunar surface module or L. Sam L. later it was renamed the al-Tair and an aries five would launch this al-Tair into Earth Orbit Because it was heavier than the Orion spacecraft so you wouldn't want to use like an areas one rocket you need the heavy lifting rocket there a separate areas one rocket would launch an Orion spacecraft into earth orbit and then the Orion spacecraft would rendezvous with the orbiting al-Tair the two would dock and then together they would make the rest of the trip to the moon upon entering lunar orbit the two spacecraft could separate the entire crew of the Orion could move over into the Americas the Orion would be automated and it would just remain in orbit around the moon then the outer would land on the moon the astronauts would go out and you know do moon stuff then they would come back to the hair launch off the moon back into orbit dock with the Orion transfer back over to the Orion spacecraft and then they could make the trip back to Earth but because of these budget limitations the focus on the Orion and the aries. One vehicles meant that all of this other stuff the aries five and the lunar module. All of that just remained hypothetical it was a proposal not an actual spacecraft so while the agency might have produced an Orion spacecraft in time to get into space by two thousand fifteen. There was just no hope of making enough progress to land on the moon any earlier than the twenty thirties and some people thought that even that was too ambitious meanwhile NASA. The agency was struggling with budget constraints in general. Not Just for the Constellation Program. Sometimes one project would have to siphon funds intended for a totally different project you had a lot of internal battles NASA as different project. Leads would kind of squirrel budgetary money away? That was intended for some other project for their own. That did not help morale in the agency then moreover it was never enough to cover all the costs. That were mounting up. In two thousand ten Nasser received its new budget from the US. Government and that budget listed zero for the Constellation Project. Now explain more in just a moment.

Orion NASA Apollo USA Griffin Constellation Project International Space Station SPACEX Barack Obama Russia President Nasser R. E. W. E. D. L. Sam L. Americas
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

08:56 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"President George W Bush and he was asking NASA to really shoot for these goals. He wanted something. Something really aspirational and inspirational to kind of get people excited about this. Presidents tend to do this by the way when they need a kind of a boost in their own popularity. It's great that we benefit from it from a scientific perspective, but it does not always come from a genuine desire to push science. Sometimes desire is more linked to the politics of the situation than the actual scientific goal of the situation, and in fact, there are plenty of people who argued that. This whole approach was not the right thing for NASA to do that. Putting people back on the moon didn't really solve any big issues or didn't open up any other opportunities we had already been to the moon. People were arguing that maybe we wouldn't be able to learn anything new by going back to the moon that we should instead dedicate our efforts toward other things, but. The moon is one of those things that's easy to point at and say that is a big challenge. How do we get back there? And then you can worry about the other stuff later on down the line. I think that there is value going back to the moon by the way I don't want to dismiss it out of hand, but I can see the validity of arguments that state. We should look at other goals. Instead goals that might have a more obvious payout in either the benefits we get from technological advancement or the direct result of the missions themselves so I can see both sides of both arguments, and so I haven't I guess I haven't really fully made up my mind, which side I really subscribed to anyway, so we get this deadline set for this idea of going back to the moon. The vehicle the Orion spacecraft was supposed to be ready by twenty fourteen, and then you had the goal of actually getting people back on the moon by twenty twenty. Twenty, twenty and spoiler alert that ain't gonNA happen this year. NASA administrator Michael Griffin, unveiled this plan in two thousand five, and that included a plan for two new rocket systems that would provide the only needed to get the Orion spacecraft out into space on its way to the moon or the International Space Station and those rockets were the aries, one and the aries, five launch vehicles, no two and three, just one and five, and they were or for I should say but one in five were also meant to kind of mirror the Saturn. Saturn five rockets that were used. Used in previous NASA programs areas, one was the smaller of the two rockets that one was intended to launch payloads like the Orion spacecraft and its crew into orbit, the areas five would be a heavy lifting rocket, and it would be used to launch significance amounts of a payload into space cargo, so if you wanted to create, say ace Moon Station, you know to actually build a station on the moon. You would use a series of areas five rockets to launch those payloads into space, and then presumably you would find a way of getting them to the moon for construction. So it's not that different from models like SPACEX, where they have the Falcon, nine rocket or launch vehicle that can send a capsule into space or the nine heavy, which is meant to push much heavier payloads into space, developing the rockets would be another really big task on top of building. This Orion spacecraft, but this was a thing that Griffin thought was necessary. Lunar missions are going to require a lot. Lot of support systems in order to make sure the astronauts can get to the moon. They can land there that can operate on the moon, and then they can return from the moon safely back to Earth, that requires a lot of work, so according to NASA estimates relying on older launch vehicles like the Delta or Atlas rockets would require many more launches to get the required equipment back into space. So, that would drive up the cost. The program and Griffin was saying well. It's going to cost a huge amount of money to develop new rockets. Lost another huge amount of money if we rely on older rockets because we're having, we'll have to use more of them. And so he was weighing those two options, and ultimately decided that it made more sense to push for brand new launch systems now spoiler alert this whole plan that was laid out in two thousand five did not pan out at least not as constellation. Constellation had laid it all out. We didn't have a spacecraft ready in time, nor are we ready to put anyone on the moon? This year and one of the main contributors to the shortfall was down to budget. The original Apollo Program had a budget of twenty five point eight billion dollars from nineteen sixty to nineteen seventy-three if we adjust that for inflation and look at. At it in today's money that would come out to about two hundred sixty billion dollars, a truly princely sum, but that was across the entire life span of the Apollo program, not just one particular year in nineteen, sixty six, the peak year, the Apollo Program from a budgetary perspective. The agency spent the equivalent of forty seven point eight billion dollars in today's money and that. That was just for the Apollo program, so the budget for all of NASA in two thousand five, not just constellation, but all the programs that NASA over his was fifteen point six billion dollars. That's a lot less than forty seven point eight billion trust me I ran the math, even adjusted for inflation that comes out to just under seventeen billion dollars. It is an enormous. Amount less than what was spent in nineteen, sixty, six or the equivalent of what was spent in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six, and yet Griffin was describing constellation as Apollo on steroids, so they got a lot of people asking. Can you really design Apollo on steroids? If you're using a budget? That's less than half of what Apollo's program spent in nineteen, sixty six. So. This was a question that a lot of people are asking, and ultimately the answer appears to be now. You can't really do it. So despite having access to less money NASA. Still really tackled this challenge. Mean a lot of people poured a ton of work and effort into trying to make this happen. In two thousand nine. The agency released a statement, saying the Orion would not be ready for a two thousand fourteen launch. They were hoping that they could maybe make it a twenty fifteen deadline But here's the thing while on on the surface that says Oh. It's a delay of just one year, but it's actually not that bad especially when you consider the budgetary restraints. It actually was three years later than what Griffin had been hoping for. He had hoped to have the Orion ready for launch by twenty twelve so now they were sure it wasn't going to be ready to. At least two thousand fifteen, the agency, really trying to narrow a gap that was gone exist when the space shuttles retired, and the USA would no longer have a spacecraft, capable of launching and docking with. With the newly finished International Space Station, so the ISS gets finished around twenty ten as the same time. The space shuttle program retires now. The USA is reliant on other countries and their space program in order to get astronauts to and from the space station. typically Russia, so that's not ideal and They were waiting on commercial space. Companies like SPACEX to catch up, but that just hasn't happened yet. So the real hope was that the Orion spacecraft could take over those duties and make USA independent of other countries, and also of commercial spacecraft companies where NASA would be owning operating these vehicles, but that just wasn't going to happen. That gap was going to get wider and wider, not narrower. NASA did have a cost overrun three point one billion dollars though again. This was much less than what the agency spent during the Apollo program years. But that delay of the program, and the twenty six percent overrun in costs gave constellation a really bad reputation that was a reputation that President Barack, Obama actually referenced back in two thousand eight NASA. Also predicted.

NASA Michael Griffin Orion International Space Station Apollo ace Moon Station NASA administrator President George W Bush SPACEX USA twenty twenty President Barack Russia
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

13:38 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"And a love all things tech and today we're going to talk about space and As-as most recent program intended to put American astronauts back on the moon and eventually to go beyond the moon but first let's do a quick look back into the history of the space program so back in the early nineteen sixty S. The United States was in a fierce competition with the then Soviet Union. The Soviets had shocked Americans upon the launch of the Satellite Sputnik. That was the man made. Object launched into orbit around the Earth. Splitting didn't really do a whole lot. Other than send out a little beep of a radio signal as it traveled miles above the earth's surface but the implications of that launch were enormous. I the fact that the Soviets could launch an object into orbit suggested that the USSR also had the capability of launching. Say you know a missile somewhere else. Like across the world at the United States coupled with a nuclear warhead that was a chilling thought the US and the USS are held a great deal of animosity for each other which is putting it lightly or at least. The governments of those countries did and each government supported an awful lot of propaganda aimed at vilifying the other side as a child of the eighties. I remember a lot of sort of anti-soviet anti Russian kind of messaging in pop culture and beyond well anyway. The second part of this is that the world is a stage as Shakespeare once wrote and on that stage the Soviets were poised to take on the role of most technologically and scientifically advanced nation on the planet. And that was something that the. Us Government wasn't too keen on either and so there was a very strong incentive to give the US space industry its own shot in the arm to catch up and then ultimately to pass the Soviet space program. The space race would showcase the best and worst of human traits among the best were ingenuity problem solving collaboration and exploration and curiosity among the worst. You had pride. You had boasting not to mention the fact that the finish line kept getting pushed back whenever one side would achieve something notable Nike might say. Oh well really. The real test is to put the first person up in space and then the Soviets did that in the American said well really the real test is docking to spacecraft in space together and the Americans did that in the Soviet. Said well really. It's and so. They kept pushing that back until finally it got to. The real goal isn't to put something into orbit but to get to the moon and that was viewed as the ultimate goal the ultimate. Finish line. Now I mean for reals a lot of the space race was really just about moving those goalposts so that one side could not easily declare victory and superiority over the other side and yes. It is more than a little bit childish. It might remind you of kids playing a game where they keep changing the rules whenever it seems like they're losing however that childish desire is also what helped drive and perhaps more importantly fund the actual engineering and science that would lead to some of the greatest achievements in human history. These are achievements that spinoff. Numerous beneficial technologies that we rely upon and benefit from today anyway in nineteen sixty three the US space agency NASA initiated a new program named Apollo. And this was an official response to a promise that had been made in nineteen sixty one by us. President John F. Kennedy. He announced a commitment to get astronauts to the moon by the end of that decade non Greek mythology. Apollo is the son of Zeus. He's the God the arts of poetry and of the son. The Apollo missions sought several successful moon landings beginning with Apollo eleven in July nineteen sixty nine and ending with apollo seventeen in December nineteen seventy-two. The program also had its share of tragedy in nineteen sixty seven. Three astronauts died in a preflight test. When a fire broke out in the cockpit of the command module NASA would later designate. This mission originally known as Apollo Four Apollo one in an effort to honor the three astronauts who lost their lives in this accident. Apollo seventeen would mark the last time a human would set foot on the moon and that stands true up to the date of this recording. No human has been back to the moon since December nineteen seventy two and. That's what brings us to today's topic. Because once again NASA and numerous partnering companies and organizations are looking to send people back to the Moon's surface this time the goal is to include women astronauts in the project. Something that just didn't happen. Back in the sixties and seventies the new program is called artists now like Apollo the name Artemis comes to us from Greek mythology. She's actually Apollo's twin sister. Which makes sense. This is sort of the twin sister project to Apollo. Now frankly I would. Argue is much better suited as a name for this project. Because she's the goddess of the Moon. She's also the goddess of the Wilderness in hunting and other stuff. The Greek gods were famous multi-taskers as goddess of the Moon. She does have the perfect name for the NASA endeavor to put people up there. She did not just spring into being either in mythology or in the space project in space terms. Artists follows some earlier attempts to get astronauts back to the moon. She sort of the evolution of some earlier programs that have since been either cancelled or just a transformed so this means we need to look at a span of time between the Apollo missions and the upcoming Artemis missions in the first decade of the twenty first century NASA announced a program called Constellation. The scope of Constellation was pretty darned big. It laid out. The many advances NASA identified as being pivotal for the most extensive missions to the moon and beyond a called for the retirement of the space shuttle program. It was already on. Its way out and so the reason for that was that the space shuttle program was limited in its ability really could only go into orbit. Can't go to the moon or beyond and also The Columbia disaster had brought up serious questions about the viability of the space shuttle program. In general it was an aging fleet of spacecraft so this particular constellation program laid out requirements for a new type of spacecraft called Orion Also known as the crew exploration vehicle and it's similar to the old Apollo capsules but it's actually larger the and has a lot more features and could support a crew of astronauts on a mission to the moon and back or extended trips to the International Space Station I'll talk more about the Orion in detail a little bit later. So the Constellation Program in turn was a response to a call from the US President George W Bush and he was asking NASA to really shoot for these goals he wanted something really aspirational and inspirational to kind of. Get people excited about this. Presidents tend to do this by the way when they need a kind of a boost in their own popularity. It's great that we benefit from it from a scientific perspective but it does not always come from a genuine desire to push science. Sometimes desire is more linked to the politics of the situation than the actual scientific goal of the situation and in fact there are plenty of people who argued that this whole approach was not the right thing for NASA to do that. Putting people back on the moon didn't really solve any big issues or didn't open up any other opportunities. We had already been to the moon. People were arguing that maybe we wouldn't be able to learn anything new by going back to the moon that we should instead dedicate our efforts toward other things but the moon is one of those things that's easy to point at and say that is a big challenge. How do we get back there? And then you can worry about the other stuff later on down the line. I think that there is value going back to the moon. By the way I don't want to dismiss it out of hand but I can see the validity of arguments that state. Maybe we should look at other goals. Instead goals that might have a more obvious payout in either the benefits we get from technological advancement or the direct result of the missions themselves so I can see both sides of both arguments And so I haven't I guess I haven't really fully made up my mind which side I really subscribed to anyway so we get this deadline set for this idea of going back to the moon the vehicle the Orion spacecraft was supposed to be ready by twenty fourteen. And then you had the goal of actually getting people back on the moon by twenty twenty twenty twenty and spoiler alert. That ain't gonNA happen. This year NASA administrator Michael Griffin unveiled this plan in two thousand five and that included a plan for two new rocket systems that would provide the only needed to get the Orion spacecraft out into space on its way to the moon or the International Space Station. And those rockets were the aries one and the aries five launch vehicles. No two and three just one and five and they were or for. I should say but one in five were also meant to kind of mirror. The Saturn Saturn five rockets that were used in previous NASA programs areas. One was the smaller of the two rockets that one was intended to launch payloads like the Orion spacecraft and its crew into orbit the areas. Five would be a heavy lifting rocket and it would be used to launch significance amounts of a payload into space cargo. So if you wanted to create say ace moon station you know to actually build a station on the moon. You would use a series of areas five rockets to launch those payloads into space. And then presumably you would find a way of getting them to the moon for construction. So it's not that different. From models like spacex where they have the Falcon nine rocket or launch vehicle. That can send a capsule into space or the Falcon nine heavy which is meant to push much heavier payloads into space. Developing the rockets would be another really big task on top of building this Orion spacecraft but this was a thing that Griffin thought was necessary lunar missions are going to require a lot of support systems in order to make sure the astronauts can get to the moon they can land there that can operate on the moon and then they can return from the moon safely back to Earth that requires a lot of work so according to NASA estimates relying on older launch vehicles like the Delta or Atlas rockets would require many more launches to get the required equipment back into space. So that would drive up the cost of the program and Griffin was saying. Well it's going to cost a huge amount of money to develop new rockets but it will cost another huge amount of money if we rely on older rockets. Because we're having we'll have to use more of them and so he was weighing those two options and ultimately decided that it made more sense to push for brand new launch systems. Now spoiler alert this whole plan that was laid out in two thousand five. Did NOT PAN out at least not as constellation had laid it all out. We didn't have a spacecraft ready in time. Nor are we ready to put anyone on the moon this year and one of the main contributors to the shortfall was down to budget. The original Apollo Program had a budget of twenty five point. Eight billion dollars from nineteen sixty to nineteen seventy-three if we adjust that for inflation and look at it in today's money that would come out to about two hundred sixty billion dollars a truly princely sum but that was across the entire life span of the Apollo program not just one particular year in nineteen sixty six the peak year the Apollo Program from a budgetary perspective. The agency spent the equivalent of forty seven point. Eight billion dollars in today's money and that was just for the Apollo program so the budget for all of NASA in two thousand five not just constellation but all the programs that NASA overseas was fifteen point six billion dollars. That's a lot less than forty seven point. Eight billion trust me..

NASA Apollo United States International Space Station ace moon station Orion USSR Michael Griffin Soviet Union Nike President John F. Kennedy NASA administrator Shakespeare official President George W Bush Saturn Artemis twenty twenty twenty twenty
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:24 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"To the moon since December nineteen, seventy two, and that's what brings us to today's topic because once again. NASA and numerous partnering companies and patients are looking to send people back to the Moon's surface. This time the goal is to include women astronauts in the project. Something that just didn't happen back. Back in the sixties and seventies, the new program is called artists now like Apollo. The name Artemis comes to us from Greek mythology. She's actually Apollo's twin sister, which makes sense? This is sort of the twin sister project to Apollo now. Frankly I would argue is much better suited as a name for this project because she's the goddess of the Moon She's also the got us of the Wilderness in hunting and other stuff. The Greek gods were famous multi-taskers. As Goddess of the Moon, she does have the perfect name for the NASA endeavor to put people up there. She did not just going into being either in mythology or in the space project in space terms, artists follows some earlier attempts to get astronauts back to the moon. She sort of the evolution of some earlier programs that have since been. Either cancelled or just a transformed so this means we need to look at a span of time between the Apollo missions and the upcoming Artemis missions. In the first decade of the Twenty First Century, NASA announced a program called Constellation the scope of constellation was pretty darned big. It laid out the many advances. NASA identified as being pivotal for the most extensive missions to the moon, and beyond a called for the retirement of the space shuttle program. It was already on its way out, and so the reason for that was that the space shuttle program was limited in its ability. Really could only go into orbit can't go to the moon or beyond. And also the Columbia disaster had brought up serious questions about the viability of the space shuttle program. In general, it was an aging fleet of spacecraft. So, this particular Constellation Program laid out requirements for a new type of spacecraft called Orion also known as the crew exploration. And it's similar to the old Apollo capsules, but it's actually larger the and has a lot more features, and could support a crew of astronauts on a mission to the moon, and back or extended trips to the international, space station, I'll talk more about the Orion in detail a little bit later, so the Constellation program in turn was a response to a call from the US. President George W Bush and he was asking NASA to really shoot for these goals. He wanted something. Something really aspirational and inspirational to kind of get people excited about this. Presidents tend to do this by the way when they need a kind of a boost in their own popularity. It's great that we benefit from it from a scientific perspective, but it does not always come from a genuine desire to push science. Sometimes desire is more linked to the politics of the situation than the actual scientific goal of the situation, and in fact, there are plenty of people who argued that..

NASA Artemis Apollo Artemis missions President George W Bush Orion Columbia US
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

07:30 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"Most recent program intended to put American astronauts back on the moon, and eventually to go beyond the moon, but first. Let's do a quick look back into the history of the space program so back in the early nineteen sixties. The United States was in a fierce competition with the then. The union the Soviets had shocked Americans upon the launch of the satellite sputnik that was the man made object launched into orbit around the earth. Splitting didn't really do a whole lot other than send out a little beep of a radio signal as it traveled miles above the earth's surface. But. The implications of that launch were enormous I the fact that the Soviets could launch an object into orbit suggested that the USSR. Capability of launching say you know a missile somewhere else like across the world at the United States. Coupled with a nuclear warhead that was a chilling thought the US and the USS are held a great deal of animosity for each other, which is putting it lightly, or at least the governments of those countries did and each government supported an awful lot of propaganda, aimed at vilifying the other side as a child of the eighties I remember a lot of sort of anti-soviet anti Russian kind of messaging in pop culture, and beyond well anyway, the second part of this is that the world is a stage as Shakespeare once. Once wrote and on that stage the Soviets were poised to take on the role of most technologically and scientifically advanced nation on the planet, and that was something that the US government wasn't too keen on, either, and so there was a very strong incentive to give the US space industry, its own shot in the arm to catch up, and then ultimately to pass the Soviet space program, the space race would showcase the best and worst of human traits among the best were ingenuity, problem, solving collaboration and exploration and curiosity. Among the worst, you had pride, you had boasting not to mention the fact that the finish line kept getting pushed back whenever one side would achieve. Something Notable Nike might say. Oh, well, really. The real test is to put the first person up in space. And then the Soviets did that in the American said well, really the real test is docking to spacecraft in space together, and the Americans did that in the Soviet, said well, really it's and so they kept pushing that back until finally got to the real goal isn't to put something into orbit, but to get to the moon, and that was viewed as the limit goal, the ultimate finish line now I mean for reals. Race was really just about moving those goal posts, so that one side could not easily declare victory and superiority over the other side, and yes, it is more than a little bit childish. It might remind you of kids playing a game where they keep changing the rules whenever it seems like they're losing. However that childish desire is also what helped drive, and perhaps more importantly fund the actual engineering and science that would lead to some of the greatest achievements in human history, these are achievements that spinoff numerous beneficial technologies that we rely upon and benefit from today anyway. In nineteen, sixty three, the US space agency NASA initiated a new program named Apollo, and this was an official response to a promise that had been made in nineteen, sixty one by us. President John F. Kennedy. He announced a commitment to get astronauts to the moon by the end of that decade, Non Greek Mythology Apollo is the son of Zeus. He's the God the arts of poetry and of the son. The Apollo missions sought several successful moon landings beginning. Beginning with Apollo eleven in July nineteen, sixty, nine and ending with Apollo Seventeen in December nineteen, seventy seventy-two, the program also had its share of tragedy. In nineteen, sixty seven three astronauts died in a preflight test when a fire broke out in the cockpit of the command module, NASA would later designate this mission originally known as Apollo two. Oh four Apollo one in an effort to honor the three astronauts who lost their lives in this accident apollo seventeen would. Would mark the last time. A human would set foot on the moon, and that stands true up to the date of this recording. No human has been back to the moon since December nineteen, seventy two, and that's what brings us to today's topic because once again. NASA and numerous partnering companies and patients are looking to send people back to the Moon's surface. This time the goal is to include women astronauts in the project. Something that just didn't happen back. Back in the sixties and seventies, the new program is called artists now like Apollo. The name Artemis comes to us from Greek mythology. She's actually Apollo's twin sister, which makes sense? This is sort of the twin sister project to Apollo now. Frankly I would argue is much better suited as a name for this project because she's the goddess of the Moon She's also the got us of the Wilderness in hunting and other stuff. The Greek gods were famous multi-taskers. As Goddess of the Moon, she does have the perfect name for the NASA endeavor to put people up there. She did not just going into being either in mythology or in the space project in space terms, artists follows some earlier attempts to get astronauts back to the moon. She sort of the evolution of some earlier programs that have since been. Either cancelled or just a transformed so this means we need to look at a span of time between the Apollo missions and the upcoming Artemis missions. In the first decade of the Twenty First Century, NASA announced a program called Constellation the scope of constellation was pretty darned big. It laid out the many advances. NASA identified as being pivotal for the most extensive missions to the moon, and beyond a called for the retirement of the space shuttle program. It was already on its way out, and so the reason for that was that the space shuttle program was limited in its ability. Really could only go into orbit can't go to the moon or beyond. And also the Columbia disaster had brought up serious questions about the viability of the space shuttle program. In general, it was an aging fleet of spacecraft. So, this particular Constellation Program laid out requirements for a new type of spacecraft called Orion also known as the crew exploration. And it's similar to the old Apollo capsules, but it's actually larger the and has a lot more features, and could support a crew of astronauts on a mission to the moon, and back or extended trips to the international, space station, I'll talk more about the Orion in detail a little bit later, so the Constellation program in turn was a response to a call from the US..

NASA United States Apollo Orion USSR Nike President John F. Kennedy Artemis missions Columbia Artemis Shakespeare official
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

07:20 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"Most recent program intended to put American astronauts back on the moon, and eventually to go beyond the moon, but first. Let's do a quick look back into the history of the space program so back in the early nineteen sixties. The United States was in a fierce competition with the then. The union the Soviets had shocked Americans upon the launch of the satellite sputnik that was the man made object launched into orbit around the earth. Splitting didn't really do a whole lot other than send out a little beep of a radio signal as it traveled miles above the earth's surface. But. The implications of that launch were enormous I the fact that the Soviets could launch an object into orbit suggested that the USSR. Capability of launching say you know a missile somewhere else like across the world at the United States. Coupled with a nuclear warhead that was a chilling thought the US and the USS are held a great deal of animosity for each other, which is putting it lightly, or at least the governments of those countries did and each government supported an awful lot of propaganda, aimed at vilifying the other side as a child of the eighties I remember a lot of sort of anti-soviet anti Russian kind of messaging in pop culture, and beyond well anyway, the second part of this is that the world is a stage as Shakespeare once. Once wrote and on that stage the Soviets were poised to take on the role of most technologically and scientifically advanced nation on the planet, and that was something that the US government wasn't too keen on, either, and so there was a very strong incentive to give the US space industry, its own shot in the arm to catch up, and then ultimately to pass the Soviet space program, the space race would showcase the best and worst of human traits among the best were ingenuity, problem, solving collaboration and exploration and curiosity. Among the worst, you had pride, you had boasting not to mention the fact that the finish line kept getting pushed back whenever one side would achieve. Something Notable Nike might say. Oh, well, really. The real test is to put the first person up in space. And then the Soviets did that in the American said well, really the real test is docking to spacecraft in space together, and the Americans did that in the Soviet, said well, really it's and so they kept pushing that back until finally got to the real goal isn't to put something into orbit, but to get to the moon, and that was viewed as the limit goal, the ultimate finish line now I mean for reals. Race was really just about moving those goal posts, so that one side could not easily declare victory and superiority over the other side, and yes, it is more than a little bit childish. It might remind you of kids playing a game where they keep changing the rules whenever it seems like they're losing. However that childish desire is also what helped drive, and perhaps more importantly fund the actual engineering and science that would lead to some of the greatest achievements in human history, these are achievements that spinoff numerous beneficial technologies that we rely upon and benefit from today anyway. In nineteen, sixty three, the US space agency NASA initiated a new program named Apollo, and this was an official response to a promise that had been made in nineteen, sixty one by us. President John F. Kennedy. He announced a commitment to get astronauts to the moon by the end of that decade, Non Greek Mythology Apollo is the son of Zeus. He's the God the arts of poetry and of the son. The Apollo missions sought several successful moon landings beginning. Beginning with Apollo eleven in July nineteen, sixty, nine and ending with Apollo Seventeen in December nineteen, seventy seventy-two, the program also had its share of tragedy. In nineteen, sixty seven three astronauts died in a preflight test when a fire broke out in the cockpit of the command module, NASA would later designate this mission originally known as Apollo two. Oh four Apollo one in an effort to honor the three astronauts who lost their lives in this accident apollo seventeen would. Would mark the last time. A human would set foot on the moon, and that stands true up to the date of this recording. No human has been back to the moon since December nineteen, seventy two, and that's what brings us to today's topic because once again. NASA and numerous partnering companies and patients are looking to send people back to the Moon's surface. This time the goal is to include women astronauts in the project. Something that just didn't happen back. Back in the sixties and seventies, the new program is called artists now like Apollo. The name Artemis comes to us from Greek mythology. She's actually Apollo's twin sister, which makes sense? This is sort of the twin sister project to Apollo now. Frankly I would argue is much better suited as a name for this project because she's the goddess of the Moon She's also the got us of the Wilderness in hunting and other stuff. The Greek gods were famous multi-taskers. As Goddess of the Moon, she does have the perfect name for the NASA endeavor to put people up there. She did not just going into being either in mythology or in the space project in space terms, artists follows some earlier attempts to get astronauts back to the moon. She sort of the evolution of some earlier programs that have since been. Either cancelled or just a transformed so this means we need to look at a span of time between the Apollo missions and the upcoming Artemis missions. In the first decade of the Twenty First Century, NASA announced a program called Constellation the scope of constellation was pretty darned big. It laid out the many advances. NASA identified as being pivotal for the most extensive missions to the moon, and beyond a called for the retirement of the space shuttle program. It was already on its way out, and so the reason for that was that the space shuttle program was limited in its ability. Really could only go into orbit can't go to the moon or beyond. And also the Columbia disaster had brought up serious questions about the viability of the space shuttle program. In general, it was an aging fleet of spacecraft. So, this particular Constellation Program laid out requirements for a new type of spacecraft called Orion also known as the crew exploration. And it's similar to the old Apollo capsules, but it's actually larger the and has a lot more features, and could support a crew of astronauts on a mission to the moon, and back or extended trips to the international,.

NASA Apollo United States USSR Nike President John F. Kennedy Artemis missions Columbia Artemis Orion Shakespeare official
"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

06:52 min | 4 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on TechStuff

"Most recent program intended to put American astronauts back on the moon, and eventually to go beyond the moon, but first. Let's do a quick look back into the history of the space program so back in the early nineteen sixties. The United States was in a fierce competition with the then. The union the Soviets had shocked Americans upon the launch of the satellite sputnik that was the man made object launched into orbit around the earth. Splitting didn't really do a whole lot other than send out a little beep of a radio signal as it traveled miles above the earth's surface. But. The implications of that launch were enormous I the fact that the Soviets could launch an object into orbit suggested that the USSR. Capability of launching say you know a missile somewhere else like across the world at the United States. Coupled with a nuclear warhead that was a chilling thought the US and the USS are held a great deal of animosity for each other, which is putting it lightly, or at least the governments of those countries did and each government supported an awful lot of propaganda, aimed at vilifying the other side as a child of the eighties I remember a lot of sort of anti-soviet anti Russian kind of messaging in pop culture, and beyond well anyway, the second part of this is that the world is a stage as Shakespeare once. Once wrote and on that stage the Soviets were poised to take on the role of most technologically and scientifically advanced nation on the planet, and that was something that the US government wasn't too keen on, either, and so there was a very strong incentive to give the US space industry, its own shot in the arm to catch up, and then ultimately to pass the Soviet space program, the space race would showcase the best and worst of human traits among the best were ingenuity, problem, solving collaboration and exploration and curiosity. Among the worst, you had pride, you had boasting not to mention the fact that the finish line kept getting pushed back whenever one side would achieve. Something Notable Nike might say. Oh, well, really. The real test is to put the first person up in space. And then the Soviets did that in the American said well, really the real test is docking to spacecraft in space together, and the Americans did that in the Soviet, said well, really it's and so they kept pushing that back until finally got to the real goal isn't to put something into orbit, but to get to the moon, and that was viewed as the limit goal, the ultimate finish line now I mean for reals. Race was really just about moving those goal posts, so that one side could not easily declare victory and superiority over the other side, and yes, it is more than a little bit childish. It might remind you of kids playing a game where they keep changing the rules whenever it seems like they're losing. However that childish desire is also what helped drive, and perhaps more importantly fund the actual engineering and science that would lead to some of the greatest achievements in human history, these are achievements that spinoff numerous beneficial technologies that we rely upon and benefit from today anyway. In nineteen, sixty three, the US space agency NASA initiated a new program named Apollo, and this was an official response to a promise that had been made in nineteen, sixty one by us. President John F. Kennedy. He announced a commitment to get astronauts to the moon by the end of that decade, Non Greek Mythology Apollo is the son of Zeus. He's the God the arts of poetry and of the son. The Apollo missions sought several successful moon landings beginning. Beginning with Apollo eleven in July nineteen, sixty, nine and ending with Apollo Seventeen in December nineteen, seventy seventy-two, the program also had its share of tragedy. In nineteen, sixty seven three astronauts died in a preflight test when a fire broke out in the cockpit of the command module, NASA would later designate this mission originally known as Apollo two. Oh four Apollo one in an effort to honor the three astronauts who lost their lives in this accident apollo seventeen would. Would mark the last time. A human would set foot on the moon, and that stands true up to the date of this recording. No human has been back to the moon since December nineteen, seventy two, and that's what brings us to today's topic because once again. NASA and numerous partnering companies and patients are looking to send people back to the Moon's surface. This time the goal is to include women astronauts in the project. Something that just didn't happen back. Back in the sixties and seventies, the new program is called artists now like Apollo. The name Artemis comes to us from Greek mythology. She's actually Apollo's twin sister, which makes sense? This is sort of the twin sister project to Apollo now. Frankly I would argue is much better suited as a name for this project because she's the goddess of the Moon She's also the got us of the Wilderness in hunting and other stuff. The Greek gods were famous multi-taskers. As Goddess of the Moon, she does have the perfect name for the NASA endeavor to put people up there. She did not just going into being either in mythology or in the space project in space terms, artists follows some earlier attempts to get astronauts back to the moon. She sort of the evolution of some earlier programs that have since been. Either cancelled or just a transformed so this means we need to look at a span of time between the Apollo missions and the upcoming Artemis missions. In the first decade of the Twenty First Century, NASA announced a program called Constellation the scope of constellation was pretty darned big. It laid out the many advances. NASA identified as being pivotal for the most extensive missions to the moon, and beyond a called for the retirement of the space shuttle program. It was already on its way out, and so the reason for that was that the space shuttle program was limited in its ability. Really could only go into orbit can't go to the moon or beyond. And also the Columbia disaster had brought up serious questions about the viability of the space shuttle program..

NASA United States Apollo USSR Nike President John F. Kennedy Artemis missions Columbia Artemis Shakespeare official
NASA struggling to control moon rocket program costs

Dana Loesch

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

NASA struggling to control moon rocket program costs

"Coverage twenty twenty will not be the year American astronauts return to the moon NASA audit shows the Artemis program is struggling to stay on track NASA's heavy lift rocket the SLS was supposed to launch in November despite increased pressure to get boots on the lunar surface and in four years time we return American astronauts to the moon cost overruns have reached two billion dollars earliest SLS will fly will likely be spring twenty twenty one that delay could cost the agency another one point four billion

Nasa SLS
Dr. Seuss in Space

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Seuss in Space

"In honor of one of our favorite American authors we bring you this special innovation now because there really is no place like space this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future children of all ages are familiar with author Dr Seuss. His whimsical characters have captured our hearts but nothing captures our imaginations quite like space. Nasa is planning more spacecraft. They're off to have fun. They'll visit the planets the stars and the Sun New Horizons has left Pluto behind now missions like Mars. Twenty twenty are being designed. Scientists learned water once flowed upon Mars and Hubble has captured the birth of some stars a Cyrus. Rex has traveled to asteroid Banou. An artist will take the first woman and next man to the moon inside is listening to Mars underground discoveries about our own Sun have been found for twenty years. Astronauts have lived on the station now. Nasa is testing new laser. Communications just remember. There's no place like space. So Nasr's building the world's largest rocket you are the Artemis generation and spaces waiting for you to explore it for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer. Pulley

Nasa Sun New Horizons Twenty Twenty Dr Seuss Nasr REX
Apple's surprise sales warning pressures futures

Bloomberg Surveillance

08:35 min | 5 months ago

Apple's surprise sales warning pressures futures

"Right now an apple with a short of of of of Switzerland new Campoli joins us right now with the with the broader somatic view on apple Neil how do you take apple over to other tech companies in China is there a legitimate exercisers is just too much guessing well I think for for one thing I thought was the first major had explicitly that come out with a warning for the Q. one so they will be impacted even though they have actually given us the quantifiable of how big the impact is and we expect many others to to follow yeah they're all the supply chain risks for apple itself can I please twelve percent of global semiconductor Damone purchases there's also the fact that if we look at the S. and P. five hundred in totality to date we've had earnings cools from three hundred and sixty four companies of the S. and P. five hundred also is only thirty four have said that there will be an impact from corona virus in a guidance school modified guidance in some capacity to to the forest to the false majority have not mentioned the forest by the because they just do not know yet or in a few instances because they want be an impact because perhaps your utility company but the majority I think it is safe to say just don't yet know how big the impact will be but this is an ongoing dynamic situation yeah which is is still to play out I think for many companies and the lasting surprise that so many companies we haven't seen the kind of news that was dropped by apple yesterday but I guess to your point the discounted the hands around this yet what's been amazing for many of us reading through the sell side research now it's getting our hands around the analyst community in Banff use is the T. word just keeps coming up again and again and again transitory to improve transit tree temporary milliwatt point you look at things inside perhaps this one B. is trying to trace some people think I think that's when we have to still thinking that if you think the insurance the city Klay given the size of the economy there is basically no no radio envelope season for this year the now we sing some data such as the the German video you take to this morning such is the way of a from Angie's surveys throughout being impacted in terms of low confidence we'll saying issues in terms of hitting a European confidence and that the risk I think is that the one thing is not back potentiating Q. two because of this kind of hang over effect affects many industries and he's not just specific to Q. a Chinese Dimond so you know the risks of five G. small things in the second half of the year could be impacted travel tourism retell easily see having having the fronts of us some issues as well we've heard from you will have selective under on the little squeak and Ralph Lauren as well trying to get some some qualification around how risky this could be going forward I think that we have and that is not yet but it will be an issue Neil with all your experience at Mehrabad securities as you look at the broader effects an implication in response to the corona virus and wondering what you're seeing is some of the emerging Asian economies a lot of people saying that China is responding with more stimulus they'll be able to stave off some of the economic slowdown some of these other economies less prepared to do so what type of demand cannibalization what kind of loss into manta we're gonna see from those nations that's a great question I think that we're already done saying for example visions down to Singapore GDP for example we had South Korea potions going out just this morning and talking about a a risk of an existential crisis provisional controlled you'll sing impacts on also vendors in in South Korea you would naturally expect some full out into other countries such as Vietnam so supply chain that exists around China is essential for the whole of the the the economic region what do you study my sales view specter guesstimate of the elasticity of cutting expenses for industrial and tack in TMD can they do they have the wiggle room to cut costs fast given revenue prospects are slower I think we we generate Germany see if he'll if you'll a company is willing or industrial you'll you'll take Haiti is very difficult to reach you such a key thing called if you up the capacity utilization focused semiconductor fat you money to people that you would need a home hallways wife and city but you have to keep those five said ninety percent plus capacity utilization rates otherwise your margins get negatively impacted very quickly I was also very slow to to to increase class again once he's been caught so it's often not something you can just dial down for two weeks I know I have an impact they're also going to tend to something can't just to wrap things up and that's the trump administration according to several reports considering new restrictions on exports to kind of get technology into China this is something the over the last month or so it's been increasing the other look because of what's been happening with the corona virus how close the eight looking at those kind of movies potentially coming up this year they'll I think it's it's something which he described as I'm going on a P. war between China and the U. S. which is very concerning to supply chains for one thing I think that we've had to oversee the blacklisting of Kool aid Austria but actually what what ended up happening was so cool which is supplied components supplies from other countries outside of the U. S. and displacing the U. S. component companies so U. S. is now looking at other tactics if you basically binder Quitman being shipped out to China a note giving those licenses has ramifications full for many companies around the world and I think basically what is happening is we have a a superpower battle to which which superpower nation becomes the leader for five G. technologies because many reports suggest is fourteen trillion dollars of economic gains tension between now and twenty thirty five from five G. and not I think he's hall what's going on in this battle I teach you to see right now between the United States and China and Europe tell your funniest somebody stuck somewhere in between and prime minister Johnson maybe more in between is than the others in between you know they are and where is this trip was canceled or somebody's trip was canceled I'm saying that yeah I think we saw the results of the weekend he's not getting along with the president of the United States the Bloomberg NJ IT stem report brunch by New Jersey institute of technology a top one hundred National University in the latest US news and World Report college rankings learn more at news dot NJ I. T. dot EDU his name in there Tom John Lisa good morning the big news in science technology engineering and math you just mentioned the trump administration is considering new export restrictions on cutting edge technology to China for people familiar with the discussions say it's part of a push to further clamp down on Wall ways access to vital semiconductors and to limit development of passenger jets by the country senior officials could decide in the next week and a half on whether to block China for buying jet engines made by a joint venture of General Electric and France based sovereign designed for the Chinese made C. nine nineteen passenger jet which is currently undergoing flight test some administration officials want more aggressive efforts to limit China's technological rice and contain what they see as potential threats to national security demand for smartphones is likely to fall this year by as many as twenty million units given the corona virus outbreak that's according to a note from Morgan Stanley which also forecast consumers may spend more on medical products suffer a loss of income and face potentially higher unemployment and to some higher flying news I guess you could say if you have the right stuff to be one of NASA's so called Artemis generation astronauts this could be your chance applications are being accepted to become an astronaut between March second and the thirty first it is a rigorous process as you might imagine so are the requirements not only do you need to be a U. S. citizen but you also have to hold a master's degree in a stem field astronaut candidates also need to pass the long duration space flight physical has become famous part of NASA astronaut training new class will trains to

Apple Campoli China Switzerland
NASA's Artemis program will return astronauts to the moon and give us the first female moonwalker by 2024

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 5 months ago

NASA's Artemis program will return astronauts to the moon and give us the first female moonwalker by 2024

"Was the twin sister of Apollo and goddess of the Moon in Greek mythology now artemis is the name of NASA's program to return astronauts to the lunar surface by twenty twenty four. This is innovation now when we land American astronauts on the moon again the first woman and next man will step foot where no one has been before the Moon's South Pole working with US companies and international partners NASA will push the boundaries of human exploration as a result of artists NASA will be able to establish a sustainable human presence on the moon just as Apollo inspired a generation fifty years ago. Artists will serve as an example of what humanity can do when it comes together to achieve a common goal. The moon is a treasure chest of science. Water is that may be held in the polls represents fuel and a source of power lessons we can learn about using local resources will help us prepare for exploration to farther locations and with NASA's goal of sending humans to Mars. Artists is the first step to the next era of

Nasa Apollo United States
What’s in President Trump’s Fiscal 2021 Budget, Nasa.

The KDKA Radio Morning News with Larry Richert and John Shumway

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

What’s in President Trump’s Fiscal 2021 Budget, Nasa.

"Meanwhile the president the trump has trump administration requesting twenty five point two billion dollars for NASA in the fiscal year twenty twenty one that number is a twelve percent increase that includes three point three billion dollars to kickstart development of a human rated lander for a moon program nearly half of the budget request twelve point three billion is devoted to new and ongoing projects focused on the return of the moon and eventual flights to Mars NASA documents indicate it will cost about thirty five billion dollars to fund the Artemis moon program whether a generally support of Congress will go along with that level of spending in this error of bi partisan conflict remains to be seen mac Piper CBS news so it seems like at some point barely soon one way or another man will go back to the

President Trump Nasa Congress Mars Nasa CBS
What the recent budget deal means for NASA

Orlando's Morning News

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

What the recent budget deal means for NASA

"NASA's in line for big funding boost and president trump's budget now so would get a twelve percent twelve percent more funding the twenty twenty fiscal year which would give the agency a budget of over twenty five billion dollar almost half of the funding would go toward putting the first woman on the moon by twenty twenty four presidents twenty twenty one budget supports these critical elements of the arctic Artemis architecture that will enable us to explore the moon in a way that's never been done before Congress of course has to

Nasa Donald Trump Congress President Trump Arctic Artemis
Technologies for the Moonwalk

Innovation Now

01:06 min | 5 months ago

Technologies for the Moonwalk

"Fifty years ago the Apollo Program developed technologies at an unprecedented pace technology developed for the launch and journey into orbit evolved into shock absorbers that keeps structures standing during breaks and medical monitors that help save lives every day technologies created for the historic moonwalk advanced into radiant barrier insulation space blankets that safeguard both people and homes news and polymer fabrics that protect firefighters. The military and civilians technology engineered forgetting the astronauts home safely grew into inflatable rafts offs. That have saved countless lives and rechargeable hearing aid batteries. That help people hear the world around them. Getting to the moon was hard but the benefits benefits for all were huge. Today as we go forward to the moon and onto Mars we are building cutting edge technologies that Dr Exploration and in another fifty years will be celebrating the contributions from the Artemis programme that will transform our lives for generations to

Dr Exploration
Orion Suits

Innovation Now

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

Orion Suits

"Are hours away from launching on Artemis missions to the moon they'll put on brightly colored orange spacesuits called the Orion crew survival system suit drying on six decades of spaceflight experience NASA has re-engineered the suit worn on the space shuttle to

Nasa
NASA's Artemis Program Identity Makes Its Debut

Innovation Now

01:07 min | 6 months ago

NASA's Artemis Program Identity Makes Its Debut

"Mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo missions NASA is preparing for its next giant leap and recently unveiled the new artists program identity. The new identity draws inspiration from the Apollo a program logo but has a bold. Look that embodies. The determination of the men and women who will carry the missions forward. Each part of the identity has has meaning the a represents launch the Earth Crescent shows missions from humanities perspective from Earth. We go what what we learn and develop will return to earth to benefit all the red color in. The trajectory symbolizes our path to Mars. Just as those. Those first missions to the moon inspired many artists will inspire future generations. Here's Nasr's chief technologist. Dr Douglas Terry and I was very fortunate that I had that kind of defining moment. I think for all young people. The key is to find your Apollo Artemis and pursue it relentlessly for innovation now. I'm Jennifer. pulley

NASA's Artemis Program Identity Makes Its Debut

Innovation Now

01:07 min | 6 months ago

NASA's Artemis Program Identity Makes Its Debut

"Mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo missions NASA is preparing for its next giant leap and recently unveiled the new artists program identity. The new identity draws inspiration from the Apollo a program logo but has a bold. Look that embodies. The determination of the men and women who will carry the missions forward. Each part of the identity has has meaning the a represents launch the Earth Crescent shows missions from humanities perspective from Earth. We go what what we learn and develop will return to earth to benefit all the red color in. The trajectory symbolizes our path to Mars. Just as those. Those first missions to the moon inspired many artists will inspire future generations. Here's Nasr's chief technologist. Dr Douglas Terry and I was very fortunate that I had that kind of defining moment. I think for all young people. The key is to find your Apollo Artemis and pursue it relentlessly for innovation now. I'm Jennifer. pulley

Apollo Chief Technologist Dr Douglas Terry Nasa Jennifer. Pulley Nasr
Microsoft shares new technique for detecting online grooming of children in video game chat

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 6 months ago

Microsoft shares new technique for detecting online grooming of children in video game chat

"Microsoft says it has developed a technique to detect online predators who try to groom children for sexual purposes using that chat function and multi player video games that company which has the Xbox gaming system is announcing its sharing the tool with nonprofit organizations and other gaming in message service developers nicknamed project Artemis the tool automatically scans text based conversations and rate them on the probability that the user may be trying to sexually exploited

Microsoft
"artemis" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

10:53 min | 7 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We we bring in experts. Scientists engineers astronauts all to let you know what's going on in the world of human spaceflight so on October fifteenth two thousand nineteen NASA unveiled the next generation of space suits. That will take humans to the moon with Nasr's artists program. I say spacesuits plural because there are two one forgetting to the moon and back and one for exploring the surface of the moon the Orion crew survival suit does exactly what it sounds like helps the crew survive in Orion the deep space capsule that will transport the crew to and from the moon but there are many layers to that and a lot of interesting technologies added to the spacesuit that you might not have thought about then there's the X.. EMU that will be used on on the moon's surface for those familiar with human spaceflight or those who have listened to our space suits episode episode. Sixteen intent you might recognize the extra drove the Hitler Mobility Unit in there the EMU. This is the suit used for spacewalks on the space station. Today the X.. In front is for exploration. Sure the name looks a little a little bit of the same but there are a lot of differences that makes the suit the right one for the moon so here to go into great detail about each of these suits and what we have to look forward to. Is Chris Hansen Jason. Chris is the manager of the extra vehicular activity office here at the Johnson Space Center. And he's here with us to go over the intricate details of the Orion crew. Survival suit the OX and the X.. Amu some of the development and testing and some of the milestones to look forward to until we actually see these suits in action both for testing and for when they're done take the first steps on the moon since nineteen seventy two so here we go. ARTEM is generation spacesuits with Chris Hanson. Enjoy the county. You have Chris Hansen. Thanks for coming on the podcast today. Sure thanks for having big event recently at headquarters the administrator brought out It was Chris Davis and Dust Gohmert and my per se awesome event. They were right in the suits. They were moving around. It looked really cool. Then you had accused with the administrator Kate Rubens was there and everything everything how is that. How was the whole then? Yeah so it's really exciting for me. It's the first time I've really spent any kind of close time with the administrator so that was really exciting. He's a very interesting in guy he's like a a storm roll into the room and he's very excited about what we do. He's very supportive of what we do. for those that have ever been lucky enough to meet Kate Ruins silence. She's also really really cool. She's one of the nicest smartest people I've ever Manso. It was really fun to be able to do that. Event with those two particularly talking about space suits and it was great because we're talking about the next generation of suits. I know a lot of us. You know we the EMU we've had a podcast about before this is the this is the space that's on the International Space Station right now but thinking about that next generation. You know you're looking at it and it feels real. It's like wow. That's that's going to be the suits we're going to be seeing on on. The surface of the moon is pretty cool so I wanted to go into all all the details with you. This will be great. You are the manager of the extra vehicular activity office mostly over the axiom. You write one of the WE'RE GONNA be talking about today so not mostly so actually my responsibility ability for EVA activities across the entire agency so everything and that includes the current Uva work. We do on space station with the AMU so my office is responsible for all of that. including exploration. Work that we do with the axiom. You and the TV systems that we'll be talking about today okay. Well let's start with the. Va Part of things. Because I think that's where you're at your expertise here we're talking about the X.. Is the exploration extravehicular mobility unit. We Love acronyms. So what is the. What are the main differences if you if you had a if you compare the EMU that we know today on the space station to the this X. Amu what the main differences that you would highlight? Yes let me start with a little bit of we've been doing. EVs for fifty years all the way back from Gemini by the Apollo Program. You saw hopping around on the moon. We learned learned so much from that. And then we we graduated into the space shuttle program so the EMU that we use today was actually developed in the late seventies early eighties and hasn't been modified significantly for use on the International Space Station. So the suit you see today is fundamentally the same suit. We used back in the late seventies early eighties. So we've learned a lot using that suit and so today we've tried to take everything we've learned about the old suit and an upgraded it improved. It tried to make it better for the axiom. You so in the axiom you. A lot of those lessons learned have been rolled in inc.. If we start with the part that you can see so Chris Chris was out walking around and you got to see one of the main features features of what we call it the pressure garment system so the pressure garment system for sues. The part that you can see on the EMU it's white part. It's the arms the legs the body the helmet all of that is what we call the pressure garment. The other part of that system is the portable life support system which is in the backpack. There's a lot of things in the background. It's a backpack. It's a very high tech check system There's a lot of differences between that and the current immune. I'll talk but let me start with the part. You could see so yes so. Chris was walking around the stage. And that's one of the important differences what we want when we go back to the moon this time and on to Mars is to actually do exploration and to do that. We have to allow astronauts to work like geologists fundamentally a a lot of science will be doing early on on the moon is geology. And if you've ever hung around with a geologist They don't like taking pads. They like getting off ties. They like climbing over rocks. They like interacting with the environment around them to learn. And so we've got to have a suit that allows them to do that. The original policy. It's it was very difficult for the crew to bend their knees. Bend down to loans wants to grab things they practically fall over At to pick up a rock and kind of do a push up to get back to back up and so we want to suit that enables them to move. And what you saw in the Xia Mu was a suit that's got lower torso mobile. You can actually bend your knees in. Bend your legs and Ben Down USA even in one G which is six is times more gravity than we'll have on the surface of the moon. Chris Chris was able to bend down. pick up a rock on the stage handed to the administrator In addition to that. So that's lower body mobility we've learned the current suit that upper body mobility is almost just as important the crew needs to be able to move their arms particularly are are smaller crew members in this suit it's gotta be fitted to them in such a way that allows them to move so that the joints lineup with joint of your body so that it acts really much more like your body so the axiom. You has some very important features in the shoulders that allow you to move the bearings at the shoulder. We call them the side bearings s why the Siberians are much closer into the body. So aligns much better with Are Smaller crew members and allows them to move much more. Naturally Chris did. Some demonstrations demonstrations where she could actually really reach all the way across her body to grab something. In the current EMU are smaller crew members. Have a lot of difficulty doing that. It's a very difficult to reach the controls up around their head where the lights are where the cameras cameras are. It's much more difficult. So this is changing a lot of that and the pressure system. In addition what. You didn't see some problems. We'll have to tackle as the environments very different on the surface of the moon than it is in the space station. One of those is microgravity On the Space Station in one sixth gravity on the surface of the moon. So we have to deal with that. In addition there's there's a lot of dust We Learn Apollo. We took we brought a lot of that dust back with us. That dust is very sharp. It's very corrosive gets into our equipment and gets into the materials tinkle's in the bearings and so this suit has to protect itself from all of those environments. I'm so that's from the pressure garment. The helmet was different. The helmet hemispheric and it allows the crew members inside that suit ability to look down and see their feet to look up and see the sky look right and left to have a much wider range of vision in this suit from the pressure garment side now in going. Well what I'm hearing now is if if thinking about the the space that we have on the space station Shen if you look at them actually doing spacewalks. They're not really using their feet too much. They're using mostly arms. They need that mobility. But what I'm hearing now is the Xia Mu is All about mobility is about mobility about the flexibility of the legs. It's about the mobility of your arms. It's about that reach. You're getting all of those little extra things that are going to help you. You in exploring the surface of the moon exactly right. That's one of the major differences in terms of the pressure garments system. Now the life support system is also very different now the was is a beautiful youthful machine. It hasn't worked really well for us. But there's some features in that suit that we definitely WANNA change one of those as we wanNA make it safer. We wanted to have fewer failure modes a lot. Are you familiar with the NBA. twenty-three incident we had water in the helmet. Some of that is because of the complexities in that design. The water and air loops are in kind of close contact so we wanted to separate those sloops of the loops are completely separate. I'm in addition if you ever watch. TV as one of the main limitations for how long we can go is how much co two absorption capability the suit has has to absorb co two as the crew members bill work and build up that. Co Two in the system every system. We have today. Let him dockside the metrics cans that we use. Today I'll have a limited capacity once that system is full of carbon dioxide. You're finished you have to come back inside so it's A. It's a limit for how long you can stay outside the new system we built this. Call a swing swing bed That's been tested out on the space station or Ryan uses the system and it continuously scrub co two so it has to absorption beds. One of those beds is active. It's actively absorbing co two when it gets full we switch the system over to the other bed and we let it absorbs co two and while it's absorbing co two that I bet is exposed to vacuum and so all that co two was burned off into the environment and it empties the the case as you were and then when it's full then we switch back and forth back and forth so we have a continuous with ability to get rid of CO two out of the system. So what is it will no longer be a consumable limitation for us. We can go for as long as we have battery power on it will. We'll continue to develop CEO's so that's a big difference from the system we use today. That's huge these are. I can't wait to go into the details I do. I did want to switch over to the other to the other suit because I really wanted to do like a high level of like what is what is this suit and it sounds like it's it's just this it's this if you wanted to go outside of a habitat ed or your your land or whatever and explore the moon. This thing is great because of these reasons perfectly it now this Orion crew survival suit. This was the other one that they rolled out. It looks a little bit different now. What purpose does this? So there's something similar between both home. Fundamentally they have the same job they have to keep a human alive in a very extreme environment airmont but the environments that are designed to work in our significantly different.

Space Station Chris Chris EMU Chris Hansen International Space Station Orion Kate Rubens Johnson Space Center Chris Hanson NASA OX Nasr Chris Davis Xia Mu ARTEM Dust Gohmert Uva USA
"artemis" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

10:53 min | 7 months ago

"artemis" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We we bring in experts. Scientists engineers astronauts all to let you know what's going on in the world of human spaceflight so on October fifteenth two thousand nineteen NASA unveiled the next generation of space suits. That will take humans to the moon with Nasr's artists program. I say spacesuits plural because there are two one forgetting to the moon and back and one for exploring the surface of the moon the Orion crew survival suit does exactly what it sounds like helps the crew survive in Orion the deep space capsule that will transport the crew to and from the moon but there are many layers to that and a lot of interesting technologies added to the spacesuit that you might not have thought about then there's the X.. EMU that will be used on on the moon's surface for those familiar with human spaceflight or those who have listened to our space suits episode episode. Sixteen intent you might recognize the extra drove the Hitler Mobility Unit in there the EMU. This is the suit used for spacewalks on the space station. Today the X.. In front is for exploration. Sure the name looks a little a little bit of the same but there are a lot of differences that makes the suit the right one for the moon so here to go into great detail about each of these suits and what we have to look forward to. Is Chris Hansen Anson. Chris is the manager of the extra vehicular activity office here at the Johnson Space Center. And he's here with us to go over the intricate details of the Orion crew. Survival suit the OX and the X.. Amu some of the development and testing and some of the milestones to look forward to until we actually see these suits in action both for testing and for when they're done take the first steps on the moon since nineteen seventy two so here we go. ARTEM is generation spacesuits with Chris Hanson. Enjoy the county. You have Chris Hansen. Thanks for coming on the podcast today. Sure thanks for having big event recently at headquarters the administrator brought out It was Chris Davis and Dust Gohmert and my per se awesome event. They were right in the suits. They were moving around. It looked really cool. Then you had accused with the administrator Kate Rubens was there and everything everything how is that. How was the whole then? Yeah so it's really exciting for me. It's the first time I've really spent any kind of close time with the administrator so that was really exciting. He's a very interesting in guy he's like a a storm roll into the room and he's very excited about what we do. He's very supportive of what we do. for those that have ever been lucky enough to meet Kate Ruins silence. She's also really really cool. She's one of the nicest smartest people I've ever Manso. It was really fun to be able to do that. Event with those two particularly talking about space suits and it was great because we're talking about the next generation of suits. I know a lot of us. You know we the EMU we've had a podcast about before this is the this is the space that's on the International Space Station right now but thinking about that next generation. You know you're looking at it and it feels real. It's like wow. That's that's going to be the suits we're going to be seeing on on. The surface of the moon is pretty cool so I wanted to go into all all the details with you. This will be great. You are the manager of the extra vehicular activity office mostly over the axiom. You write one of the WE'RE GONNA be talking about today so not mostly so actually my responsibility ability for EVA activities across the entire agency so everything and that includes the current Uva work. We do on space station with the AMU so my office is responsible for all of that. including exploration. Work that we do with the axiom. You and the TV systems that we'll be talking about today okay. Well let's start with the. Va Part of things. Because I think that's where you're at your expertise here we're talking about the X.. Is the exploration extravehicular mobility unit. We Love acronyms. So what is the. What are the main differences if you if you had a if you compare the EMU that we know today on the space station to the this X. Amu what the main differences that you would highlight? Yes let me start with a little bit of we've been doing. EVs for fifty years all the way back from Gemini by the Apollo Program. You saw hopping around on the moon. We learned learned so much from that. And then we we graduated into the space shuttle program so the EMU that we use today was actually developed in the late seventies early eighties and hasn't been modified significantly for use on the International Space Station. So the suit you see today is fundamentally the same suit. We used back in the late seventies early eighties. So we've learned a lot using that suit and so today we've tried to take everything we've learned about the old suit and an upgraded it improved. It tried to make it better. Her for the axiom. You so in the axiom you. A lot of those lessons learned have been rolled in inc.. If we start with the part that you can see so Chris Chris was out walking around and you got to see one of the main features features of what we call it the pressure garment system so the pressure garment system for sues. The part that you can see on the EMU it's white part it's the arms the legs the body the helmet all of that is what we call the pressure garment. The other part of that system is the portable life support system which is in the backpack. There's a lot of things in the background. It's a backpack. It's a very high tech check system There's a lot of differences between that and the current immune. I'll talk but let me start with the part. You could see so yes so. Chris was walking around the stage. And that's one of the important differences what we want when we go back to the moon this time and on to Mars is to actually do exploration and to do that. We have to allow astronauts to work like geologists fundamentally a a lot of science will be doing early on on the moon is geology. And if you've ever hung around with a geologist They don't like taking pads. They like getting off ties. They like climbing over rocks. They like interacting with the environment around them to learn. And so we've got to have a suit that allows them to do that. The original policy. It's it was very difficult for the crew to bend their knees. Bend down to loans wants to grab things they practically fall over At to pick up a rock and kind of do a push up to get back to back up and so we want to suit that enables them to move. And what you saw in the Xia Mu was a suit that's got lower torso mobile. You can actually bend your knees in. Bend your legs and Ben Down USA even in one G which is six is times more gravity than we'll have on the surface of the moon. Chris Chris was able to bend down. pick up a rock on the stage handed to the administrator In addition to that. So that's lower body mobility we've learned the current suit that upper body mobility is almost just as important the crew needs to be able to move their arms particularly are are smaller crew members in this suit it's gotta be fitted to them in such a way that allows them to move so that the joints lineup with joint of your body so that it acts really much more like your body so the axiom. You has some very important features in the shoulders that allow you to move the bearings at the shoulder. We call them the side bearings s why the Siberians are much closer into the body. So aligns much better with Are Smaller crew members and allows them to move much more. Naturally Chris did. Some demonstrations demonstrations where she could actually really reach all the way across her body to grab something. In the current EMU are smaller crew members. Have a lot of difficulty doing that. It's a very difficult to reach the controls up around their head where the lights are where the cameras cameras are. It's much more difficult. So this is changing a lot of that and the pressure system. In addition what. You didn't see some problems. We'll have to tackle as the environments very different on the surface of the moon than it is in the space station. One of those is microgravity On the Space Station in one sixth gravity on the surface of the moon. So we have to deal with that. In addition there's there's a lot of dust We Learn Apollo. We took we brought a lot of that dust back with us. That dust is very sharp. It's very corrosive gets into our equipment and gets into the materials tinkle's in the bearings and so this suit has to protect itself from all of those environments. I'm so that's from the pressure garment. The helmet was different. The helmet hemispheric and it allows the crew members inside that suit ability to look down and see their feet to look up and see the sky look right and left to have a much wider range of vision in this suit from the pressure garment side now in going. Well what I'm hearing now is if if thinking about the the space that we have on the space station Shen if you look at them actually doing spacewalks are not really using their feet too much. They're using mostly arms. They need that mobility. But what I'm hearing now is the Xia Mu is All about mobility is about mobility about the flexibility of the legs. It's about the mobility of your arms. It's about that reach. You're getting all of those little extra things that are going to help you. You in exploring the surface of the moon exactly right. That's one of the major differences in terms of the pressure garments system. Now the life support system is also very different. Now the was is a beautiful beautiful machine. It hasn't worked really well for us. But there's some features in that suit that we definitely WANNA change one of those as we wanNA make it safer. We wanted to have fewer failure modes a lot. Are you familiar with the NBA. twenty-three incident we had water in the helmet. Some of that is because of the complexities in that design. The water and air loops are in kind of close contact so we wanted to separate those sloops of the loops are completely separate. I'm in addition if you ever watch. TV as one of the main limitations for how long we can go is how much co two absorption capability the suit has has to absorb co two as the crew members bill work and build up that. Co Two in the system every system. We have today. Let him dockside the metrics cans that we use. Today I'll have a limited capacity once that system is full of carbon dioxide. You're finished you have to come back inside so it's A. It's a limit for how long you can stay outside the new system we built this. Call a swing swing bed That's been tested out on the space station or Ryan uses the system and it continuously scrub co two so it has to absorption beds. One of those beds is active. It's actively absorbing co two when it gets full we switch the system over to the other bed and we let it absorbs co two and while it's absorbing co two that I bet is exposed to vacuum and so all that co two was burned off into the environment and it empties the the case as you were and then when it's full then we switch back and forth back and forth so we have a continuous with ability to get rid of CO two out of the system. So what is it will no longer be a consumable limitation for us. We can go for as long as we have battery power on it will. We'll continue to develop CEO's so that's a big difference from the system we use today. That's huge these are. I can't wait to go into the details I do. I did want to switch over to the other to the other suit because I really wanted to do like a high level of like what is what is this suit and it sounds like it's it's just this it's this if you wanted to go outside of a habitat ed or your your land or whatever and explore the moon. This thing is great because of these reasons perfectly it now this Orion crew survival suit. This was the other one that they rolled out. It looks a little bit different now. What purpose does this? So there's something similar between both home. Fundamentally they have the same job they have to keep a human alive in a very extreme environment airmont but the environments that are designed to work in our significantly different.

Space Station Chris Chris EMU International Space Station Chris Hansen Anson Orion Chris Hansen Kate Rubens Johnson Space Center Chris Hanson NASA OX Nasr Chris Davis Xia Mu ARTEM Dust Gohmert Uva
Custom Fit Spacesuits

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 8 months ago

Custom Fit Spacesuits

"When it comes to spacesuits orange is the new gray this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave save our future when astronauts are hours away from launching on Artemis missions to the moon they'll put on brightly colored orange spacesuits called the Orion crew survival system suit drying on six decades of spaceflight experience NASA has re-engineered the suit worn on the space shuttle to enhance range of motion and improve safety for the astronauts? The helmet is lighter stronger comes in more than one size is helps reduce noise and is easier to connect to communication systems the outer cover is orange to make crewmembers easily visible bowl especially for sea rescues a re-engineered Zipper allows astronauts to put the suit on quickly gloves are more durable and touchscreen screen compatible each suit is equipped with a suite of survival gear that would allow astronauts to stay inside the suit for up to six days if necessary necessary Orion suits will be custom fitted for each crew member designed to accommodate astronauts of all sizes for innovation innovation.

Orion Nasa Six Decades Six Days