20 Burst results for "Art Hughes"

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:54 min | 2 d ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm art Hughes in for Antonio Gonzalez, a new policy requires Washington state university to seek consultation and better coordination with tribes when conducting research or developing academic programs. The WSU insider reports the added measures also apply to other activities that affect tribal members or tribal sovereignty. The policy on tribal engagement consultation and consent was developed over two years. It specifically requires the university to obtain consent from tribal governments before engaging in activities that would affect the tribe or its members in a way that would be different from the general public. Zoey high eagle strong, the university's executive director of tribal relations told the news outlet, the policy aims to further develop genuinely collaborative work with tribes because she says scientific and other forms of knowledge benefit from multiple perspectives. The policy applies to all federally recognized tribes and those recognized by the state of Washington. Renowned Minnesota ojibwe artist, George Morrison is among those whose work will be featured on a series of postage stamps in 2022. Morrison, a member of the grand portage band of Lake Superior ojibwe, was contemporaries with Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. In choosing Morrison officials with the U.S. Postal Service say he challenged prevailing ideas of what Native American art should be. In an interview with Minnesota native news reporter Leah lem, Morrison's son, briand Morrison, said his father's work is getting more notice since his death in 2000. The major shows that have happened have spurred on dialog on the subject of what is made of art. Anyway, so they coined the phrase native modernism. That's the name of our movement. And then they attributed George Carson to be the founder of the new modern art world. Morrison is known for colorful expressionist landscapes and wood collages. 5 of his paintings will be reproduced on stamps. They will be available in the spring of next year. This week we are featuring some of the recent inductees to the Native American Hall of Fame. Among those honored is Dave Anderson. He is the founder of the famous Dave's chain of barbecue restaurants. He also served as the assistant secretary of the interior for Indian affairs during the George W. Bush administration. In an interview following the Hall of Fame ceremony Anderson told native America calling producer Andy Murphy, his success did not come easy, but he says his happiness comes from helping others. Somebody once said, God, what I love to be in your shoes seems that everything you touch turns to gold. And I had to laugh at him. I said, you have no idea what you just asked for because my life has been filled with adversity, tough challenges, many times I never thought we would make it. But I never gave up and I think that's probably one of the biggest lessons is never give up on your dreams, but also I think the day changed for me when I quit trying to do stuff for Dave Anderson and I really focused on other people in it was all about learning that I should focus on the happiness of other people and not my happiness. That is restaurant magnate, Dave Anderson. He was inducted this month, along with 7 others into the Native American Hall of Fame..

Antonio Gonzalez Morrison George Morrison grand portage band of Lake Sup Washington state university Leah lem briand Morrison WSU George Carson Minnesota Hughes Willem de Kooning Native American Hall of Fame Jackson Pollock Dave's chain of barbecue resta U.S. Postal Service interior for Indian affairs Dave Anderson Andy Murphy Washington
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:46 min | 4 d ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Welcome to native America calling in Albuquerque New Mexico, I'm Andy Murphy. November is a busy month to celebrate and talk about food as part of our Native American heritage. And it turned out to be a good month for one California chef to open her new indigenous restaurant and another to release her new cookbook. They don't call this the Native American food movement for nothing. In this special monthly food show I'm putting the spotlight on all things new and newsy in the world of Native American food and food sovereignty. Join us after national native news. This is national aid of news. I'm art Hughes in bre Antonio Gonzalez, a federal panel says human remains and other artifacts held by the university of Alabama are connected to 7 tribes working to get the items returned. Newsweek reports the Native American graves protection and repatriation review committee concluded there is a preponderance of evidence for cultural affiliation between the tribes and the items stored at the moundville archeological park. The muskogee creek nation, the choctaw nation of Oklahoma and 5 other tribes filed a petition under nagpra to have the items returned. Muskogee principal chief David hill issued a statement, saying the excuses for delay are over, and there is no reason to wait any longer to return the nation's ancestors. The university estimates there are almost 6000 human remains and funerary artifacts taken from a former settlement in Alabama, while the committee can issue findings, it can't unilaterally require the university.

Andy Murphy Antonio Gonzalez Native American graves protect Albuquerque New Mexico moundville archeological park muskogee creek university of Alabama America nagpra Hughes California Newsweek David hill Muskogee Oklahoma Alabama
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:58 min | 5 d ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm art Hughes in bra Antonio Gonzalez. The word squaw is derogatory and is on its way out for any federal places bearing the name. That's the bottom line of a formal declaration by U.S. department of interior secretary Deb Holland. The order also includes an investigation to replace other derogatory names. Holland's action forms a task force to identify and replace what she says are racist terms used by the federal government. She says names should celebrate a shared cultural heritage, not to in her words, perpetuate the legacies of oppression. Earlier this year, the privately owned California ski resort changed its name from squaw valley after decades of pressure from local tribes, at least two states have laws prohibiting using the word for place names. The federal legislation known as Savannah's act has seen its first deadline come and go, and at least two members of Congress are seeking answers. The act of facilitate better coordination and expand data collection to combat the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women calls for the Justice Department to give regular reports to Congress. The act was signed into law in October 2020. No reports from DOJ are scheduled. Washington state Republican Dan newhouse issued a statement, saying he is deeply disappointed that the deadline was missed given the extent of the crisis in his state and across the country. California Democrat Norma Torres urges complete transparency from the department relating to the act's implementation. The law was named for Savannah lafontaine grey wind a pregnant 22 year old spirit Lake Dakota woman, who was murdered in 2017. Another bipartisan group of lawmakers are calling on the U.S. attorney general to act on recommendations on a report by the general accounting office that finds among other things, there is no comprehensive data on missing and murdered indigenous people. Noted Lakota elder Marcello bow has died. She was a decorated World War II veteran serving as a nurse in the U.S. Army nurse corps, a citizen of the Cheyenne river Sioux tribe, she served on that nation's council for four years. This month, she was inducted into the Native American Hall of Fame at age 102. She told native America calling producer Andy Murphy, how much she appreciated the recognition. Do you know I've had many honors in my life, but to be honored by Native American people as the greatest honor I have ever received. Lebeau served as the director of nursing at the eagle Butte IHS hospital and among other things, she was known for her leadership and health and wellness and health policy. She was also a champion of the effort to rescind the medals of honor from the soldiers who participated in the wounded knee massacre in 1890. At the presidential candidates forum and 2019, she asked each of the candidates the same question, whether they would support the remove the stain act. Back on our reservation on the same river reservation, there is a pervasive sadness that exists there because of wounded knee and what happened there..

bra Antonio Gonzalez U.S. department of interior Deb Holland California ski resort Justice Department Dan newhouse Norma Torres Savannah lafontaine squaw valley Congress Hughes Marcello bow Holland U.S. Army nurse corps federal government Cheyenne river Sioux tribe Savannah Native American Hall of Fame Andy Murphy general accounting office
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:28 min | 6 d ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm art Hughes in for Antonia Gonzalez, a federal review committee is scheduled this week to consider whether remains and artifacts at the university of Alabama are tied to 7 tribes who are trying to get the remains back. AL dot com reports the committee can rule on whether the tribes are connected to the remains, but can't force the university to turn them over. The news outlet reports the muskogee creek nation and the other tribes have tried to recover the remains from the mound ville, archeological park for years without success. Tribal officials filed a claim under the Native American graves protection and repatriation act, but say they continued to be hampered by bureaucratic red tape. The National Congress of American Indians issued a resolution calling for the university to turn the items over to the tribes. Archeologists date the remains to 6000 years ago, the university spokesperson released a statement saying the university has worked with several tribes to return the ancestral remains, and that they desire to continue collaborating with tribes on their requests. Michelle latimer is dropping her defamation lawsuit against the CBC and four of its journalists, APT and news reports a court document doesn't explain why she is discontinuing the civil suit. Vladimir is a filmmaker and former director of the trickster TV series. She said she was of algonquin mate and French heritage, but the CBC reported that tribal officials questioned her indigenous identity. She resigned from the show and her film inconvenient Indian lost its distribution. While most tribal officials praised the recently concluded tribal nation summit with the Biden administration, at least one chairman is strongly critical of the event. In a written statement, Cheyenne river Sioux chairman Harold Frazier says he was prevented from expressing what he says is really happening in Indian country. Frazier's concerns were mostly centered around the Indian health service complaining that COVID infections are creating serious problems. Frazier says Cheyenne river citizens are having to wait as long as 36 hours to receive lifesaving treatment. For good or bad Frazier says his tribe must rely on IHS, but the federal government's failure to honor its treaty responsibility is constant lives. Minnesota's governor appointed the first Native American to that state's Court of Appeals. Sarah wheelock a citizen of the Moscow nation was serving as the legal counsel for the shock of ensue community. The St. Paul pier press reports wheelock also previously served as an appellate judge on the white earth band of ajibwe Court of Appeals and was an adjunct professor with Mitchell Hamlin college of law. In a written statement about his appointment, governor Tim wall said we lock has repeatedly shown that she is a dedicated public servant committed to advancing the common good. This week we are featuring the voices of several of the recent inductees into the Native American Hall of Fame, among those honored was Ben nighthorse Campbell, the former Republican U.S. senator from Colorado. In an interview after the event Campbell said whenever he speaks publicly to native audiences, he makes sure to encourage them to run for office. And we're gaining when I was in Washington, the last native person in Congress before me was a rosebud Sioux, named Ben rifle. He then served in 1976, and he left retired I was the next one there, and all the time I was in Washington, House and Senate. I was the only one there. So I got elected from Colorado, but the word goes out through what we call a mox and Grapevine. And I sort of inherited a national constituency of Indian people all over the country who had problems that needed help with. So our staff really did double duty trying to keep up with that. That was Ben knight horse Campbell, the interview was reported by Andy Murphy. Campbell served 22 years in public office. He was first elected to office as a Colorado state legislator. He went on to represent Colorado's third congressional district. He then served as a U.S. senator from 1993 until 2005. He was the first Native American to ever lead the Indian affairs committee..

Antonia Gonzalez muskogee creek archeological park Frazier Michelle latimer CBC Biden administration Cheyenne river Sioux National Congress of American Harold Frazier university of Alabama Sarah wheelock Hughes legal counsel for the shock of St. Paul pier white earth band of ajibwe Cou Mitchell Hamlin college of law Cheyenne river governor Tim wall Indian health service
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:22 min | Last week

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Something that people are also able to check on? I believe it's a small local thing. I know they're just getting ready for it, but they've done a couple of broadcasts just revisiting community. For the past two or three winters, I believe? So then they're fantastic. It's gotten better every year. So it's something I look forward to. Well, I hope we can catch up to some other time and I'd really love to check that out because this conversation has really piqued something in me that, you know, isn't talked about enough. And again, it's these relationships that go way back. We're talking thousands of years here and we've had an insightful conversation with our guest today Derrick nickel, Nicholas, excuse me, doctor cyler Conrad and Candace qam. Doctor Conrad, just another question or two as we wrap up our time together today. Are you working on any other research involving turkeys right now? Yes, yes. Thank you for asking one of the projects that I've been trying to do. And again, this is back to this idea of taking previous records and trying to reexamine them to gain a different understanding. And so right now I'm going back to Turkey metric studies where archeological Turkey bones have been measured. And originally that was the basis for a lot of arguments about different species of turkeys and that has changed as Turkey genetic studies have essentially provided a specific answer to some of those questions. But what's interesting to me is that Turkey metrics provide insight into demographics. And so what were these Turkey fox like for past ancestral peoples here within the southwest? Where there are toms where these mostly hills, what is the diversity within those flocks? And then again, what does this mean for that type of human management and that relationship? And so I'm trying to look back at these metric analyses to see what else we can gain a slightly more nuanced understanding of this relationship. Any projected time frame on when this work will be published? How am I? That's a great question. Hopefully, within the next couple of years, we'll see how it goes. Well, thank you very much for your insight today, doctor Conrad, and especially for being an ally to our feathered Friends and, of course, for helping the non indigenous person to realize the significance of turkeys as well. We've officially reached the end of the hour when quick Internet I'd like to say thank you to our guests and silicon red, Derek Nicholas and Candice Kwame. Join us next week for another lineup of discussions about indigenous issues and topics. Our executive producer is art Hughes are associate producers Andy Murphy, Marino Spencer is the engineer. We had helped this week from Kim baka and louella Brian. Nola Dave's Moses is the distribution director and bob Peterson is the network manager for native voice one. Clifton Chadwick is our national underwriter underwriting sales director. Antonio Gonzalez is the anchor for national native news. Charles say there is our chief operating officer at the president and CEO of chronic broadcast.

Turkey Derrick nickel cyler Conrad Candace qam Conrad Nicholas Derek Nicholas Candice Kwame Andy Murphy Marino Spencer Kim baka louella Brian Nola Dave Clifton Chadwick Hughes bob Peterson Antonio Gonzalez Moses Charles
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:07 min | 2 weeks ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I think for me, it's important. I guess throughout my whole career, I always wanted to be part of storytelling that held stories from Indian country and the story does that for all of the for all of the, I guess what people would consider terrible things as the poverty alcoholism of Indian reservation, but there are so much more positive stuff going on in Indian country these days. We have gotten Indian professionals. We have got we've got a language and a culture to be very proud of. And many times in Hollywood and documentaries, the positive things are never really highlighted, and I think we go from with charmaine story experiencing all of those things, you know, from everything from the beginning of the show, there is a maybe screw up the quote, but I think it's something like the wind river reservation is a hard place or something like that. But as we started the journey with charmin, we see positive change coming for her farm positive change coming for her family. And hopefully the change would go throughout the community. I'm glad to hear that I'm sure may sober in doing well. So that's obviously a good thing. So that's what I've taken away from it. I thank you all for your insight today. Charmaine, I just have one last quick question for you. What is your hope for this film, as people see it? I would like them to get the visual idea of what it is like on a reservation for a Native American and some are usually cowboys or Indians. They still see us like that, which we are, you still carry that, you know, we still put TVs and do all that to overall very little more serious about it. I guess you could say because we're only like. Over the past, it's even present now. So these are things that we do today. Not vaccine. You're still carrying those. So the documentary is pure grid debuts at the Denver film festival today. I can thank our guests enough and that is officially all the time we have for today's show. Once again, I want to thank all my guest today, charmaine weed Kim bartlet and Daryl baguette, we're back live on Monday with the show about a Pueblo design school curriculum to counter decades of eurocentric instruction. Our executive producer is art Hughes. Marino Spencer is the engineer. We had this week from Kim bakka and llewella Bryan. Nola Dave's Moses is the distribution director and bob Peterson is the network manager for native voice one. Clifton Chadwick is our national underwriting sales director Antonia Gonzalez is the anchor for national native news. Charles say there is our chief of operations the president and CEO of chronic broadcast corporation.

wind river reservation charmaine Charmaine Hollywood charmaine weed Kim bartlet Daryl baguette Marino Spencer Kim bakka llewella Bryan Nola Dave Denver Clifton Chadwick bob Peterson Hughes Antonia Gonzalez Moses Charles chronic broadcast corporation
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

06:06 min | 3 weeks ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Something he learned in church when he was young boy, so he brought that all together for that performance. So that was the kind of an impromptu thing that he threw together. But also this thing is interesting. You mentioned about the fact wondering if there were native people there. I did not know this until I was interviewing him. I noticed that one of the things that has interviewers, you know, we look at the person we're interviewing and see if there's any clues anything you want to talk about. And I notice you had Native American jewelry. Necklaces and such that he was wearing and I asked him that I told him that, he said, you know, I see you've got this, I said, can you speak? Can you speak about that? And he told me that his grandfather had been part of Buffalo Bill Cody's wild west show in a he traveled with him with bubble bill and then when they got to the New York area that his grandfather left the show then. And he said, Richie even said that when he was young kid, they used to go to a reservation there and he never knew why until later on in his life that that was wise because they were connected to that. And I can't think of that tribe now that he was a part of, but that was part of the heritage. Well, thank you so much. Daryl for those comments. Charlie, I want to ask you were running down to the why her on her show, but in one word, how would you describe your Woodstock experience Charlie bird? Wow. Charlie, what happened after the concert? How did you get home? Oh, that was easy. Once again, John Morris told us that they had room booked for us in some hotel in New York City. Unfortunately, this a bunch of us went and maybe ten or 15 of us. And we found the hotel, but they would not honor our reservation because I guess they heard that the place was going to go bankrupt. And so we had to get our own room and it was interesting and fun buzzing around Times Square looking for a decent room and it was a very interesting location. But we made out. I made I think I was one of the people that made any money there because like I said, a lot of the artwork didn't get delivered. And so they didn't get a chance to sell it, but I had jewelry in which was in a small case, which I could carry with me. And I set that up and I was basically by myself. And. What I thought was quite a bit of money at the time. So it was great. So you were able to sell some artwork. That's great. What kind of artwork did you have with you? What kind of artwork did you have that you were able to sell? What was your jewelry? Just like a couple of bracelets, some rings, some necklaces. The thing that my aunt was trying to make me take were there are these things that I don't know who makes them, I think. They're made some factory in Japan or something, but they're these with glass bees here and there. And they're nice and they've retailed like for $5. And she wanted me to take a bunch of them and I refused not refuse, I just said, no, because this is a New York and everybody's got a lot of money and very wrong. And I sold all the ones that I had. And it was just fun eating all of those people talking to them. And like I said, it was just I just set up open yeah, great, great, great stories, Charlie, Sharon, sandy, folks, were quickly approaching the end of our hour for today's show, a story of a group of young native artists who took an extraordinary trip in the summer of 1969. Before we wrap up, I'd like to take a moment to explain the inspiration for our show. As many of you know, I've been hosting Native American calling this fall, and it's been an incredible experience for which I'm extremely grateful. I first learned about the group from IAA that traveled to Woodstock a few years ago. I reached out to living members. I was able to track down, did some interviews, studied up on events. I wasn't sure what to do with the information, but I knew I had something special and it had to be documented. So I filed my notes for a rainy day. Well, that rainy day arrived today. Like the torrential downpour that drenched cleansed and empowered the Woodstock generation. With that, let me thank my guests, Charlie Byrd, sandy fife Wilson, Sharon mouse, and their Woodstock companions who either by fate or circumstance were not able to join us today. You have gifted us all with understanding, you have gifted us with inspiration. You have gifted us with pride and on behalf of all native people. Let me just say rock. We're back again on Monday with a show about a program that provides support for indigenous prisoners in the Pacific Northwest. Our executive producer is art Hughes, our associate producer is Andy Murphy. We had helped this week from luella Bryan. Marino Spencer is the engineer. Nola Dave's Moses is the distribution director and bob Peterson is the network manager for native voice one. Clifton Chadwick is our national underwriting sales director, Antonio Gonzalez is the anchor for national native news. Charles sather is our chief of operations, the president and CEO of khanak broadcast corporation is Jacqueline.

Charlie bird Charlie Bill Cody John Morris Richie Daryl New York Buffalo Times Square New York City Woodstock Charlie Byrd sandy fife Wilson Sharon mouse IAA Japan Sharon sandy art Hughes
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:31 min | 2 months ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Derek <hes> said that. I thought that spurred this thought was in your film. You depicted the rivalry game with catcher can. Can you talk about what filming that was like. I mean it seemed very exciting. The reveller catch. Can they right across the channel. Can you talk about that experience. Yeah i heard about the cat. Skin robbery for quite a while. I think you know certainly talking to the old timers as they would call themselves You know the that the rivalry that goes back generation than it's super competitive. I think friendly for the most part but again the super competitive and a lot of pride in that you know. Ketchikan is much larger community. Numbers wise locality But it's been a fairly competitive rivalry over time which is funny. Think any sport. And you're looking for those david and goliath upsets in any time. A small school can challenge a bigger school. There's always an extra level of buzz and excitement there. So yeah it was. It was super exciting. And i think honestly anytime you see. Any of these schools play out. It was just a cool reason to celebrate. Because i think as you know i think someone mentioned earlier. There's a sexualization level that comes with it. And like you know danny and dj and all these kids like their friends with many of the kids in ketchikan their friends of many of the kids in petersburg and hanes and even beyond i think there's just <hes> probably the reason he's rivalries or so exciting is because your dad played against them. Your grandfather played against them. Your great grandfather played against them. And it's just kind of carried on throughout time. So i mean it just it just means more because it is more than the photos last forever. I mean you can't walk through my uncle's house in ketchikan. Without looking at all of the basketball photos becomes a shrine. I need to ask you. Alaskan premiered at santa barbara film festival wearing win. Is it available to the public. We have some news we can't share yet. It's not public But this winter. I can kind of foreshadow. There'll be a really cool opportunity For a few months I can't say anything about it just yet But basically anyone who is listening here. Anyone who wants to see the film will be a chance to bring the film to your community to your school Kind of young lookout for updates on that certainly follow the facebook and instagram. Page at alaskan nets. And we'll give you updates there And then the spring the movie all kind of come out and be available kinda far and wide but really mostly excited about this development. It's coming this kind of basketball season to bring the film to communities all over the country. Thank you and. I hope that when people see your film they realize how much how much simion values are infused into the basketball culture. And just how important basketball is to alaska native communities and particularly to the community of mettler. Kotla wanna thank you say. Thank you to all of our guest. We had jeff hersal which we had Coach tj scott. Had a team grandma melody lease and her daughter. Naomi lease and a school counselor chelsea. Martinez that's all the time we have for today show. I'm back again on monday. For the first of a two part look at the fifty year anniversary of the alaskan native claim settlement act. Our executive producer is art hughes. Our associate producer is andy murphy. Marino spencer's engineer. Nola davis moses is the distribution director and bob. Peterson is the network manager for native voice. One clifton chadwick our national underwriting sales director antonio gonzales is the anchor for national native news. Charles safer chief operations and the presidency of quantum broadcasts corporation is jacqueline salim. I'm your host elissa. London and this native american calling have

ketchikan basketball Ketchikan Derek goliath alaskan nets hanes petersburg danny Alaskan david santa barbara jeff hersal Coach tj scott Naomi lease instagram facebook andy murphy Marino spencer Nola davis moses
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:41 min | 2 months ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I still got is my biggest inspiration. I think you're going to do a lot of good work. Not only as an artist but as a biologist working through medical school and given that you're painting speaks to the effects of uranium contamination on the body. It seems like a perfect mix of your skill sets that you're also looking to find ways is a healthcare worker to help those in indian country or in your community that have been affected by uranium mining Mallory where can people see your work. I can be found Mainly on instagram My most up to date. I am at 'em dot u. e. t. w. k. i. dot art and If you're ever in the unm area. i'm right next to the domenici center at stanford house College of pharmacy. And you can do all the original artwork that i have done for the program. Thank you and adrian. Where can people find your work I have a website. Stimpson dot com h. e. r. i a. n. f. t. m. s. o. n. dot com. And if you googled meet articles come thank you so again. This show has been about the art exhibit called exposure at the i a museum of contemporary native arts in santa fe it features art from indigenous artists inspired by nuclear contamination in their native lands. And we hope it caused you to contemplate of the radioactive accents are manmade disasters in your own native community and also hope it causes you to contemplate how you feel about that and what art can possibly do in order to Continue a conversation a fight against this so we have reached the end of the hour and the like to say thank you to our guests manuela. Well off man. Tania willard mallory kentucky and adrian stimpson. I'm back next week for another lineup. Discussions about indigenous issues and topics. Our executive producer is art hughes. Our associate producer. Andy murphy reno. Spencer is the engineer. Nola davis most distribution director and. Bob peterson is the network manager for native voice. One clifton chadwick our national underwriting. Sales director antonio gonzalez is the anchor for national native news and we had additional help this week from trip krause and megan cambric and charles. Saether is our chief operations officer. The president and ceo of broadcast corporation is jacqueline. Slee and i'm your host elissa. London have a.

domenici center stanford house College of phar Mallory Tania willard mallory adrian stimpson adrian santa fe Andy murphy reno Nola davis manuela clifton chadwick antonio gonzalez Bob peterson kentucky national native news hughes Spencer megan cambric Saether krause
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:27 min | 4 months ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"It's all about the vibes for me. It's like what can i make. What how can. I make somebody feel this. How can i. How can i put this type of energy and just getting the chance to do that. it's it's it's it's it's rewarding for me and knowing that That someone is there is Either feeling something from my songs or like they're get it brings them back to a certain time where it brings them back to a certain emotion. Like that's pretty much. Like i. I just for me Making songs Making songs producing songs writing songs recording all of that. It just all of that effort in hearing that hit knowing that I brought somebody to like time in their life for Just making a memory. Will they listen to the song just knowing that it. It makes all the work while sure. And there's lots of memories to behead when when you pop this in your playlists a you what. Let's go back to the phone lines. We have eastern cuts abuse. Alaska tuned in on kota's z. Esther thanks for calling ahead. You're on air good morning. I've never really listen to a native route and i grew up in the nineties. You know we hear all the real round you know everybody feel it to the core and then hearing him the first native rob but i heard you know each hells in my body and it makes me think you know like this could this. This young kid is harder. Just like to park and biggie. They they dated from their heart from experience. You know and that's so awesome proud to you do. I don't know how you feel inside. How mazing your grandparents me feel. You know where you're trying to come martin. Whatever you know it just so cool you inspires so many young people and you know if i can get a cd or whatever you know also people here and constantly deal allows. I got young friends old friends. You know who probably wouldn't mind listening to in if it gave me chills. I'm sure it's gonna go some of these other guys chose to air sure and even taking you back. I'm glad you mentioned that. To esther and matt mack. We got to wrap things up in a few. Wanna tell esther anything or leave us with any final thoughts. The floor is yours. yeah I really appreciate that Feel like there's like If to me this like making hip hop And rap music. It's it's absolutely Great for me to know that The are i represented the only my indigenous culture but only am i representing mindedness culture also like representing the blind community and to know that anything is pretty much possible. If you put your mind to it whether if you're indigenous blind or if you're if you don't really have that much talent and you want to build up musical talent if you're starting late if you're starting early doesn't matter it's just if you if you have enough passion you'll do it. You'll make. That's i i tell myself stuff. That's something i tell myself all the time and then you make this great music. Well congratulations on this album. Matt mack. Thank you for joining us today. The name of it is twenty twenty. Thank you for being here with us. And thank you to matt. Mack as well is now. He's young records for also providing cds to our listeners. Today and that's going to wrap it up for july music maker. Thanks to our crews well. Our executive producer art hughes associate producer any murphy marino spencer. Our engineer nola days moses. The distribution director and. Bob peterson the network manager. Both for native voice one also thanks to antonio national meet news. I'm your host and producer. Tara gatewood.

matt mack kota Esther Alaska rob esther martin Matt mack art hughes murphy marino spencer Mack matt nola Bob peterson moses Tara gatewood
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:47 min | 5 months ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"People to take away from this today. Thank you for that. And you know something i heard from joseph marshall talking about all this is just to remind this is a big reminder that where people were fighting to keep their way of life going and i think that's another big lesson that we learn all of this and we see where that came from because there are many different native nations today who are still standing and have have their histories and as we heard from two individuals on this hour today have the language in waddling which is important in how it weaves into all of this A learned today so much more to be discussed when we talk about this Day the significant day in history and there is still more to be shared. We sure hope you'll continue to reach out to us and share some of this history. Maybe something that isn't in a book. Something that your elders taught you Or leader in your community that you know about this day. We sure hope you'll do that. You can always reach out to us. Comments at native america calling dot com. And thank you to both of our guests. Jim real bird and and dr. jeffrey means we're back on monday with another lineup. Or kicking off another lineup. A great show starting with a discussion on strawberries and how they connect to our nation's our executive producer is art hughes senior producer. Is monica brain. Associate producer is andy murphy marina. Spencer is engineer nola days moses is distribution director and bob. Peterson is a network manager. Both for nita voice one tad wick is our resource development specialists antonio all the anchor and producer for national native news. Charles say there is chief of operations and president and ceo of chronic broadcast corporation. Is jacqueline salih. I'm your host and producer tara. Gatewood we sure hope. You'll meet us here on monday for another discussion. And if you missed anything today you can find it on our website. Native.

joseph marshall jacqueline salih monday today Spencer Charles antonio both dr. jeffrey two individuals bob andy murphy marina tara nola days moses Both Jim real bird tad wick Peterson america art hughes
"art hughes" Discussed on Cell Culture Dish Podcast

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Cell Culture Dish Podcast

"At Mariah's but you'll need time on the qualification shutdown costs are cutting hav because Montanez is life little fewer will impact in this. Could you please explain for listeners an art? With mean by out paradigm, how this system fits for that purpose? Let's MIA by. Up. To drop subsidies production who held needs Flynn this. At. The woody by Latics were you single use reactors lack quantity of material Our sense is doing latest or commercial production we simply at one or more same sized by Irag to the manufacturer. To just skill need is that of gaming up to larger than, life. Deal. Multiple benefits today's approach with include reducing any skill. OPS. Risks who product UNAGREED delayed reveals process validation I afford to required manufacturer because the ski loved the money by train from a bio reactor respect you as not tinge same system based on the same footprint on the modular design of the unions. Full older read doesn't which he ruled small footprint. nope. Capital requirements the speed please all wildaid sing. At other. By systems scale. You A DP product. whereas. Used that is hotting in a new advocate of commercial. Which at the review of a time? Lag, by, our academic. Lay that the process validation Egypt to read the data reveals by simply using a Nada by. Rex. have. You done this already. We are in the process of adding. In. AGO New manufacture facilities in China on the US. On the we applied. Multiple commercial entities is a up to aid wildlife fins. You mentioned several times so far risk reduction as a key element for use with system risk reduction is a huge issue and something that the industry is constantly striving to achieve. Could you explain how this system reduces risk? Up totally being galvanize and the robotic midlife life human in version at the does higher authentic processing countries. Robotic. Functions are simply mall reliable and the pre size. So phillies than more accurately is fewer mistakes. Jack the products. Reveal just save them. Is isolate their. Base. Uses on single use components. So agreeing is the ideal from Siberia processing way achieved I exercised. Why're BBC's Ilene -spense using the toddy. Compared to those traditional years out of. The a single blow pass for the draft products into the container thus reducing risk ladder we integrate. Are, you reveal the Scott, human mistakes in generation of the reveal of Bachelors Letters. How long has she biologic spin utilizing this system in what has been the performance thus far? The system came online on the weather yet cute three on nineteen and we the was successfully feel batches of previewed thread. Affections read up to ninety nine point one percent. While failing or effective or read it a union higher. I, the ninety nine on six. Seems to afford the Yankee run. In July nineteen, we have Saito. Is Cursing. I will suck pass old fall media feels is allowed percents accessory, and the we have also successfully company by his drug bras in ocoee you. And the Klein Body. The obvious is not emanates. Him I really helped us expand our capacity and the cable projects on the handed. The time line as money runs are now deal through the end of the puppy plenty endings within the next year, we continuously adding water leaving malls at. An related tighten his own using the faith The want. With any new technology, the question always becomes has the regulatory agencies approved product from these systems. Would you mind addressing that? We know from the manufacturer. System at multiple clinical trial Ian Conduct using the EP manufactured in. This is them. BE ALL AS A. Not Farmer -ocial adopting the is touting as well. US contenders. closers are now in widespread use in the industry. To Go back and discuss your last a little further you mentioned system utilizes Art Hughes and some of the advantages. Why would the Industry Move Towards these new CCS? Mission previously a reduction in because of the nature of the material used in appeals an additional contact feels. Eliminating potential breakage Olga's particules, and you'll also get a high cosmetic. Body is well fewer components in life Collini at the sterilization costs at the to. Held reveals put run CASK and the human bays and story. The costs are the data also reader flexibilities and the efficiency because most of the manufacturers using the same. For the wary side of appeals, making loading and unloading where he visited the one page added a clinical side as well in that is a confessional reasons hannitized open there. Fewer risks associated with that making actors allows they tried to open a work which she is. Why thank you for walking us through that? I? Really appreciate your donation there appear to be a lot of advantages using this system. Are you moving entirely to this type of DP feeling system? While from a CIO perspective, they are significant other Wednesday is using in system. Is isolate a multi year multi product multi has stated.

phillies Latics US Klein Body Olga Flynn Mariah Montanez Irag CIO BBC Egypt Siberia Rex. Jack Ilene -spense Scott Art Hughes Ian Conduct Collini
"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national news I'm Hughes Infrared Antonio Gonzales. The Navajo nation is laying off hundreds of gaming employees. The Navajo Times reports notices started going out over the weekend for more than nine hundred employees. Another one hundred forty workers will remain through this week. The nation's four casinos have been closed since March. Nearly twelve hundred employees remained on the payroll since that time gaming executive Brian Parish warns last week. Cash reserves are depleted, and the operation would not be able to sustain keeping the workers any longer. The trump administration announced the start of an effort to tackle cases of missing and murdered native people. Department of Interior and justice officials announced the opening of the missing and murdered native Americans, cold-case office in Minnesota's twin cities, it is scheduled to be the first of seven offices dedicated to reviewing some fourteen hundred unresolved native missing persons cases in the country. The efforts stems from President Trump's executive order last year in a written statement assistant secretary of Indian Affairs Tara Sweeney, said cold cases in Indian country will be addressed the determination and the understanding that the victims in these cases will be accorded some measure of dignity and compassion. Democrats on the House Natural Resources Committee are exploring a range of options for how to deal with healthcare woes that were plaguing Indian country before the pandemic hit Matt Laszlo has the story from Washington as native communities continued to face high corona virus infection rates, longstanding struggles with healthcare access are being seen under a new light under the current system. Many native American veterans are forced to leave their communities to get treatments. However, during pandemic, leaving tribal communities introduces new risks for Native Veterans Acting Chairman of the national. Indian Health Board is William Smith told lawmakers the marine bursts for travel through the Indian health services aren't workable during a pandemic in Alaska. The behind did converse Indian. Health Service. mitric anchorage to say by Dr Up there they'll pay for transportation. They won't pay very housing because they think it's. My back, but with coq nineteen going on, you can't fly out, so you have to do a drive up three hundred six miles to anchorage and out of pocket you'd have to spend the night. Smith says of the sixteen billion dollars earmarked for veterans and cove relief, only one billion was given to the native health service that's left. Native communities underfunded once again besides veterans, lawmakers are also working on the coverage for urban Indian Health Providers Act. It would make it so. So individual clinics no longer have to use their own funds to purchase liability coverage at could save some clinics up to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars annually, which some officials want to go directly to patient Care Robin Sunday Allen is Vice President of the National Council of Urban Indian health. She says tribes need any extra funds they can find now. Insurance has increased fourteen percent over the past five years so becoming increasingly more burdensome for us to carve out that money. Money that we wish could go back to direct patient care. All the coronavirus pandemic brought these health issues in Indian country to the forefront. They're persistent problems. Tribal leaders are hoping we'll finally get a permanent solution for National Native News I'm Matt Lies Low in Washington a California tribe has completed purchase of twelve hundred acres of land for four and a half million dollars. The San Jose Mercury News reports. It's the first land acquisition for the excellent tribe of Monterey. County in. In nearly two hundred fifty years, Esselin chairman Tom Little. Bear Nason told the paper. He is elated by the purchase saying the land is the tribes homeland and the origin of their creation. The mercury news reports tribal leaders expect to use the land to reinvigorate tribal culture conduct, traditional ceremonies, and inform the general public about their culture and history, the tribes, traditional culture and language were nearly wiped out by Spanish missionaries backed by the military starting in the late seventeen hundreds. With national native news I'm Art Hughes.

President Trump Navajo Times executive Army Corps of Engineers Antonio Gonzales Tara Sweeney Bristol Bay America Albuquerque Department of Interior Matt Laszlo House Natural Resources Commit Alaska assistant secretary Minnesota Brian Parish Washington
A California tribe has land to call its own for the first time in more than two centuries

Native America Calling

04:00 min | 1 year ago

A California tribe has land to call its own for the first time in more than two centuries

"This is national news I'm Hughes Infrared Antonio Gonzales. The Navajo nation is laying off hundreds of gaming employees. The Navajo Times reports notices started going out over the weekend for more than nine hundred employees. Another one hundred forty workers will remain through this week. The nation's four casinos have been closed since March. Nearly twelve hundred employees remained on the payroll since that time gaming executive Brian Parish warns last week. Cash reserves are depleted, and the operation would not be able to sustain keeping the workers any longer. The trump administration announced the start of an effort to tackle cases of missing and murdered native people. Department of Interior and justice officials announced the opening of the missing and murdered native Americans, cold-case office in Minnesota's twin cities, it is scheduled to be the first of seven offices dedicated to reviewing some fourteen hundred unresolved native missing persons cases in the country. The efforts stems from President Trump's executive order last year in a written statement assistant secretary of Indian Affairs Tara Sweeney, said cold cases in Indian country will be addressed the determination and the understanding that the victims in these cases will be accorded some measure of dignity and compassion. Democrats on the House Natural Resources Committee are exploring a range of options for how to deal with healthcare woes that were plaguing Indian country before the pandemic hit Matt Laszlo has the story from Washington as native communities continued to face high corona virus infection rates, longstanding struggles with healthcare access are being seen under a new light under the current system. Many native American veterans are forced to leave their communities to get treatments. However, during pandemic, leaving tribal communities introduces new risks for Native Veterans Acting Chairman of the national. Indian Health Board is William Smith told lawmakers the marine bursts for travel through the Indian health services aren't workable during a pandemic in Alaska. The behind did converse Indian. Health Service. mitric anchorage to say by Dr Up there they'll pay for transportation. They won't pay very housing because they think it's. My back, but with coq nineteen going on, you can't fly out, so you have to do a drive up three hundred six miles to anchorage and out of pocket you'd have to spend the night. Smith says of the sixteen billion dollars earmarked for veterans and cove relief, only one billion was given to the native health service that's left. Native communities underfunded once again besides veterans, lawmakers are also working on the coverage for urban Indian Health Providers Act. It would make it so. So individual clinics no longer have to use their own funds to purchase liability coverage at could save some clinics up to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars annually, which some officials want to go directly to patient Care Robin Sunday Allen is Vice President of the National Council of Urban Indian health. She says tribes need any extra funds they can find now. Insurance has increased fourteen percent over the past five years so becoming increasingly more burdensome for us to carve out that money. Money that we wish could go back to direct patient care. All the coronavirus pandemic brought these health issues in Indian country to the forefront. They're persistent problems. Tribal leaders are hoping we'll finally get a permanent solution for National Native News I'm Matt Lies Low in Washington a California tribe has completed purchase of twelve hundred acres of land for four and a half million dollars. The San Jose Mercury News reports. It's the first land acquisition for the excellent tribe of Monterey. County in. In nearly two hundred fifty years, Esselin chairman Tom Little. Bear Nason told the paper. He is elated by the purchase saying the land is the tribes homeland and the origin of their creation. The mercury news reports tribal leaders expect to use the land to reinvigorate tribal culture conduct, traditional ceremonies, and inform the general public about their culture and history, the tribes, traditional culture and language were nearly wiped out by Spanish missionaries backed by the military starting in the late seventeen hundreds. With national native news I'm Art Hughes.

Executive Washington Indian Health Board William Smith Bear Nason National Council Of Urban Indi Navajo Times Antonio Gonzales President Trump San Jose Mercury News Art Hughes Health Service. Acting Chairman Department Of Interior Chairman Matt Laszlo Minnesota Monterey
Noem prepares to again introduce 'riot-boosting' legislation, Wyoming high school basketball teams remember NBA legend Kobe Bryant

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Noem prepares to again introduce 'riot-boosting' legislation, Wyoming high school basketball teams remember NBA legend Kobe Bryant

"With national native news are Hughes Infra Antonio Gonzales South Dakota Governor Christie gnome is resurrecting legislation designed to squelch pipeline protests and collect money from from protests supporters. The governor's new version of the laws designed to fix legislation passed last year. That was declared unconstitutional. Victoria wicks has this report. One of the bills introduced last. Last year was dubbed the riot boosting law and it was designed to stifle protests like the one in two thousand sixteen that drew thousands of people standing rock to oppose the Dakota access says pipeline South Dakota's proposed riot boosting law made various protests related activities punishable under both criminal and civil law as a result activists activists and environmental organisations were threatened with prison fines and settlements if they donated money or other support to a protest that turned violent. The governor vendor rushed the riot boosting legislation in anticipation of two thousand nineteen construction season for the keystone. Xl pipeline criticism of the legislation was also swift gift with environmentalists and tribes angry. That they were left out of a planning process that had started months earlier and included Transcanada at the table. The bill was passed into law. But it met a quick and when federal judge found major portions unconstitutional in his injunction judge Lawrence Pearsall applied constructive criticism line-by-line he examined the law for violations of First Amendment Rights to free speech and assembly. Anti pointed out how it could be fixed now. The legislation flation has been reconstructed and resurrected as it turned out. Last year's rushed to enactment was unwarranted. Transcanada missed the two thousand nineteen construction season season because of ongoing lawsuits in Montana. This year the company has announced it intends to start preconstruction activities in February but the impasse in Montana. Federal Federal Court still has not been resolved for National Native News. I'm Victoria wickson rapid city South Dakota state champion Wyoming Indian high schools team colors are red white and blue but there was a lot of purple and gold on the court at this week's basketball practice in honor of late. NBA Legend Kobe. Bryant Wyoming Public Radio's Savannah Maher or has this audio post card. I was just at home watching. TV just the regular Sunday evening. I see on the news and I can't really imagine it on on facebook facebook. Everybody's talking about it at another like I was like all these guys are just joking. I overheard it from my grandma and my own cousin who came over to tell my grandmom all Danke really he died. I kinda start. Tearing Up Chris Practice started pretty quiet this morning. Usually the guys are upbeat. And we're ready to go and it was KINDA SAMBA. Real quiet quiet. Kobe passing ways really hurts a lot of heart because we watched him growing up and ruined a lot of our moves from him. We had an unbelievable work ethic. He was hustler his mob mentality. No everybody pretty much. Let's talk about his mom. And METALLICA. Has Effect on me like everything put in basketball at school like work watching coby on TV was like I think it was really inspiring. That's probably why I'm out for ball now because all these great players especially coby got me out on the court talk but micro growing up. Kobe was blake a really big role model. Not only for me but like for my family. I also grow in a big basketball family so I started pretty young to basketball's room important in Indian country. I mean all our babies are planned tiny ties to and They all look too good players. That piece was produced by Wyoming public. Radio's Savannah Mar with National Native News. I'm Art Hughes

National Native News South Dakota Kobe Transcanada Basketball Wyoming Federal Court Victoria Wicks Montana Bryant Wyoming Public Radio Dakota Antonio Gonzales Facebook Art Hughes Christie Gnome Lawrence Pearsall Coby Savannah Maher
"art hughes" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

08:03 min | 2 years ago

"art hughes" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Can't help account, a chuckle sometimes. But from Smiths grove, Kentucky. Policing Kentucky, arrested a man accused of driving his horse drawn buggy while under the influence. They pulled him over after he signs wiped a car with his muggy. Ruben, and the Yoder thirty four years old was in the buggy with his wife and seven children. W n k y reports Yoder at first claimed one of his children was driving, but they said he was the driver. Children ranging in age from nine months to twelve years old, Yoder failed, a sobriety test and then refused. A blood test at the hospital beliefs. Then took him to jail. Bad day for the Amish. In that horse-drawn buggy. Yes. Horse feathers. Thank you for taking me back your honor. But now now how did they suspended license or take it license away to keep driving? Another buggy. Away doesn't have a like they don't they don't pay any highway. They wear out the roads with their heels in their art Hughes and they don't pay anything for doing it. So I don't know jail fine. But anyway. Shop while down here. Bill had clear steiger's because it's starting to get the hazy hazy cloud over everything. But it wouldn't I wouldn't picture quit. What I come up with Jupiter's down. If you're looking at the moon that youth, would be a little bit. To the right point. Okay. And then Saturday was like free times as far away from the moon. Stupider was, but it was over like between nine and ten. So I don't know. It reports did you? There was supposed to be above the hoarding. What I see in the picture. I cook for you. That athlete us planet finder app that. Show, killing bitter down down below like between, like maybe probably about four o'clock if you put the moon in the center of the clock and you out on the edge. So, but anyways, I thought that was pretty cool coming up with that. And I kind of like this planet wider because you can pick which, which planet or constellation you want. You can have it kind of me, a target gives you like a scope target. He can lined up right up with that is or you're looking for a different one, and you come across wanted, what you're going when I was going by that I could see I could see that or can even see Uranus. I couldn't see. But anyway, thank you get these eighteen to twenty one year old drivers yesterday. And you know, the whole programs been in place. It's always been in place, and I took advantage of it when I turned eighteen I went down to motor vehicles, and I got my class one class one committed time because Didi L hadn't been invented yet. And then. Later, I had I had my life I had my chauffeur's license, and you know, I kind of because I have the ability to drive the time. You know, companies need to lead to support the local in-state companies. And, and bring people through them, you know, sort amount is, you know, where house. Charge them out on doing. Her six months. Dr backed up. Driving back, and I never I never did anything. I didn't back up for the first six months. so i mean you know it kind of the people i started working for what they had me do you know there's a lot of little local companies in the running steady and even small faith like maryland and i hate to say rhode island but you can even say in there you know i kind of look out i worked you know grew up in new york and i was able to i was able to run a lot of miles in state know because it's four hundred miles for men damn east to west for for new york run all the way from albany buffalo and you know and and like the good people in texas you know he made a port before guys down there teams one they're they're learning how to lay over because they go out making home because texas is so big And but, but there's a lot of what's out here. But the heart arts part, artist part at Kearney. Get a job when you're eighteen to twenty one even working in state is you gotta find a company that the insurance company that they have well allows you to dry because most most of them all inside by insurance companies. How about the about these big companies that are self insured. Well, there you go. So you see these big big bottom. Feeder companies wanted to try to get driver program set up for, you know, to help them to come in with their big, big talking being self insured and healthy little companies out that are trying to just make a living could use an extra help and get insurance for drivers and teach drivers, you know, able to younger drivers. And then you'd have that group highschool, people like I was it wasn't going onto college wanted to career and be. Able to be able to get somebody started. I mean, I, I, I had a couple of friends that went right to Brown. I mean eighteen years old they went to Browning. You know, they a lot of boxes in trucks, and trailers before, you know, the little little delivery package before they before they got can't even build anything. But they got started the same way. They started moving trucks around any Arctic backup back struck into the dock in order to get them loaded back, trailers, trailers, you know that that's how the started. And, and they, you know that's that's. Yard have everything in place and all all they have to support what they're in and go with it that way. I don't know that, that's my take on old thing. So, but I don't know just just to get him to put him into a bottom feeder company, and, you know, try to put them through driving program, and then turn them out on the road, not, not had the bringing up experience, you know, like, you know, like a lot of us that are out here now at the beginning, if kind of hold different different ways, but I don't I, I don't think it'll work work. The way that what they think that the did for us. So, but anyway, there's my sense on it. Anyways. So anyway, pictures of the plan in his enjoy your enjoy your night with the moon and Saturn and does the does the moon, look pinkish because it's supposed to be a strawberry moon. You know the Mon looks pretty white right now. It's been really quite all night, and it just got, like misty haze cloud cover over. So it's almost looking like a marshmallow at it, but it's still pretty white never never really thought anything. I know you go right? Well, thanks so much Jack back. Yeah. We'll get a quick break in here around the country. Say eight eight six zero eighty seven eighty five on.

Yoder Kentucky Smiths grove texas free times Ruben new york Hughes Didi L rhode island maryland Jack Bill Browning Brown steiger albany six months
"art hughes" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

09:22 min | 2 years ago

"art hughes" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Us and them type of thing out of the process? It'd be politics, but the intensity won't be as great as it is right now house Bill seven oh six pests the house on a vote of two teen to one Twenty-three with bipartisan support. After Wednesday's hearing the Senate election in missile affairs committee is expected to vote on it next week. Kevin bow for the public news service. Facing the possibility of fines for paperwork errors organizers of voter, registration drives and civil rights advocates are furious over a new law in Tennessee that they said discourages them from getting minorities and college students to take part in American democracy. They call the new law likely the first in the country to find groups for too many incomplete registration forms and a front one of the most basic civil rights enjoyed by Americans. Some also say they won't let us stop them from doing important work. I just can't see us saying, well, we're not going to any longer. Register people to vote said Terry Freeman who's the president of the national civil rights museum in Memphis, Tennessee, the museum which incorporates the Lorraine motel where Martin Luther King junior was assassinated into his ex exhibits will continue helping people sign up on. It's free. Tennessee residents Mondays and during events Freeman said the law signed by Tennessee governor Bill Lee yesterday threatens fines for one hundred or more incomplete registration forms than a year and criminal penalties for other infractions. A federal lawsuit filed against the state immediately. After the Bill signing said it could force four voter registration groups to scale back or shut down those services in the state, the end of Lacey, pe-, Tennessee and three others made that prediction in their federal lawsuit. Arguing the new laws so poorly spelled out that it creates an unacceptable risk that they will be subject to arbitrary and discriminatory law enforcement voting rights advocates Democrats argued the law would suppress minorities and other voters, however there outcry failed to stop the Republican dominated legislation from passing the Bill. According to that Brennan. Center for Justice at New York university's school of law since two thousand ten twenty five states of past voting restrictions experts say the pace accelerated in some states after a two thousand thirteen US supreme court decision set aside, a key provision of the federal Voting Rights Act that enabled the federal government to require certain states and counties with a history of discrimination to submit electoral changes for approval. Hiring jumped in April as US employers added two hundred sixty three thousand jobs, a strong gain. That suggests businesses have shrugged off any concerns. The economy may slow this year. The Labor Department says the unemployment rate fell to a new five decade low of three point six percent now that drop partly reflected in increase in the number of Americans who stopped looking for work average, hourly pay rose three point two percent from the previous year a healthy game though unchanged from the previous month. April figures show that hiring that solid economic growth is still encouraging robust. Hiring nearly a decade into the economy's recovery. From the great recession. The expansion is set to become the longest in history in July. Kevin McNally reports the US labor markets continues to go from strength to strength. The two hundred sixty three thousand new jobs family beats analysts expectations of a hundred nine hundred thousand unemployment jump to three point six percent. The lowest rates in forty nine years. However, the full was launch Li Ju to a large number of people leaving. The labor force in the month of April wage data showed average earnings grew. That's an annual rate of three point two percent slightly lower than expected. The retail industry continues to suffer heavy losses. Shedding thirty thousand jobs in twenty nineteen alone. Kevin Michalis, Washington an organization representing four hire drivers. In New York City says its members will go on to our strike against Uber and lift ahead of Uber's planned. Initial public stock offering the New York City tax sick taxi workers alliance. As members voted not to drive for Uber or lift between seven and nine a m next Wednesday morning. San Francisco based Uber is aiming to raise nine billion dollars in its initial public offering on Thursday drivers and other US cities are planning a work stoppage on Wednesday to demand a minute. Wage. The four native American members of congress are co sponsoring a bipartisan Bill to increase the focus on addressing the issue of missing and murdered native. American women aren't Hughes reports one of the main goals of the not invisible act of twenty nineteen is to establish an advisory committee on violent crime. It would be made up of tribal leaders, violent crimes Veivers law enforcement officials and others. The panel would make recommendations to the department of Justice on ways to fight murder sexual assault and trafficking of native Americans and Alaskan natives would also establish a new position in the bureau of Indian affairs for managing violent crime prevention efforts among various federal agencies in a written. Release Representative David's of Kansas said the Bill helps address an issue that she says has devastated native communities and has been neglected far. Too long. David's a democrat is co-sponsoring the Bill along with fellow democrat. Deborah holland. From New Mexico and Oklahoma Republican Tom Cole and Mark Mullen with national news. I'm art Hughes plan this weekend across the country to honor and raise awareness of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls China lock it reports for national native news on the plans for rapid city. South Dakota, nearly one year ago the city of rapid city proclaimed may fifth as gave awareness for missing and murdered native women and girls the red ribbon skirt society has been working to draw awareness victims, does is a co founder of the group will you're actually on our point now in our wariness campaign, but we really need to look at going beyond that and educating people in our community, the right skirt society recently opened a permanent healing center where people can pray and remember lost ones. This space is the first of its kind and recognizes more than seventy South Dakota, indigenous women, children and two spirited victims. Mendoza says people from all backgrounds are invited to recognize the day of awareness. What we're looking at is doing more outreach into far beyond our native community. And so we're welcoming in spiritual leaders clergy from all different sectors of denominations to come in and share prayer with us, KOTA spiritual leader is speaking in the healing center for the event along with crazy members from an episcopal church synagogue and person who follows Buddhism Mendoza says they will help lead a prayer for victims followed by a moment of silence. She says acknowledging the high number of victims is an ongoing process the red ribbon skit society has been working on educating the community fair projects like the why campaign that's a visual arts project that displays. Mt. Dresses, representing missing and murdered women. We were able to put up an exhibit at the city school administration building here in rapid city. And so there is a red dress exhibit out in the lobby. Their day of awareness is scheduled for Sunday. I'm trying to lock it in rapid city and executive for the company proposing the keystone excel oil pipeline from Canada's oil sands to the US says it has missed this year's contract construction season due to court delays TransCanada executive vice president Paul Miller made the statement during an earnings call today with analysts the company also announced it was changing its name to TC Energy Corporation plans to begin construction of the long delayed pipeline got blocked last November what a federal judge in Montana ordered additional environmental reviews of the project. President Trump has been trying to push through. He is you'd a new permit for keystone last month, the eight billion dollar pipeline would carry up to eight hundred thirty thousand barrels of crude. Oil daily along route stretching from Canada to Nebraska, you're listening to the evening news, KPFA, Berkeley, KPFK, Los Angeles, KFC Fresno, online at KPFA dot org..

US Tennessee Uber Bill Lee New York City Hughes Kevin bow keystone Terry Freeman South Dakota New York university Senate KPFA Kevin McNally Canada Li Ju
"art hughes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"art hughes" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Driver sped away, deputies chased car foothill farms there and then into fair oaks the car eventually crashed the driver was arrested at the intersection of Kenneth in Madison Avenue, the driver of the stolen vehicles not been named the golden went center held an all day Latino policy summit today. It was an event held by the Latino community foundation. The policy summit featured leaders and keynote speakers as they prepared the Latino population for the twenty twenty year critically important that art Hughes and our families are organized and ready for. What's coming in twenty twenty twenty twenty really important year. Not just with the senses. The presidential election is also happening juggling Martinez Garcia who was the CEO of the community foundation says that keeping the ball rolling from the historic twenty eighteen midterms is crucial not only for twenty twenty but going forward. Fan. The flames of the momentum were civic awakening in our country. That's led by young people. And we need to make sure that it continues for twenty twenty of the summit the Latino community foundation and veal the new data mapping tool on health education and employment for Latinos across the state, Jordan, Christmas, news ninety three point one B K. California's governor Gavin Newsom wants answers for why? California's current high gasoline prices are so high the governor is blaming what he calls inappropriate industry practices for the spike in gas prices taking California's average gas price well over a dollar beyond the national average amount the California energy commission to analyze the state's gas prices in report back by may fifteenth. Some of the price difference can be accounted for higher taxes and environmental regulations. But at twenty seventeen report found what analysts called an unexplained price differential compared to the rest of the nation. And we're going to get you caught up on some of our national stories now on news ninety three point one. K k. Grazing massive fines in federal regulators company. Indicating it expects a fine of up to five billion dollars from the FTC which is investigating whether this.

Latino community foundation K. California California Martinez Garcia Hughes Gavin Newsom FTC CEO Jordan five billion dollars twenty twenty year
"art hughes" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

10:43 min | 3 years ago

"art hughes" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Hells on par with men's health in this department of education protections for sexual assault survivors, allow predatory for profit colleges to get away with financially exploiting women seeking a college education. Women comprise fifty six percent of those enrolled in colleges and universities, but the state of winning is resilient. We are not shying away. We are fighting back Los Angeles Representative Karen bass spoke specifically to the state of black women while women as a whole get paid eighty percent of what men make African American women are only paid sixty one cents per dollar paid a white, man. The state of our pay the state of our health and the state of our freedom. Unfortunately, there's not much good news. The state of our voice. The state of our voice is powerful. Several other congresswoman spoke on how immigration gun. Violence and reproductive rights. Policies are hurting women, but perhaps Representative Lawrence summed it up best where women stand today to let every woman in America. No, we've got your back and that we are not backing down. And we will continue to fight for every woman in America for Pacifica radio KPFA. I'm Karen are good less than two weeks before another potential federal government shutdown in nearly two weeks after the end of the last one, which was the longest one in US history. Many federal workers are reeling financially and waiting to be made whole by government agencies. That are now struggling with payroll glitches and delays in ensuring that everyone gets paid many haven't received fullback pay while scrambling to catch up on bills all while another government shutdown is looming next week. The census bureau acknowledges about six percent of it. Its workforce has yet to receive back pay and said they would be paid by Friday. Other agencies did not provide numbers when asked how many people had yet to be paid many government contractors have also not been paid some have not yet been called back to work and are not due to receive any back pay. President Trump has touted the creation of the creation of an office to help victims of crimes committed by immigrants. But the Associated Press reports most of the people calling the Trump administration hotline aren't calling to get information. They're calling to report their neighbors colleagues or strangers who they suspect are in the country illegally. Hotline is part of US, immigration and customs enforcement, Barbara Gonzalez, leads the endeavor. She's trying to get the word out that the office is there to help victims. And that it's not a tip line hotline received more than forty six hundred calls from April twenty seventeen to September twenty seventeen. The governor of New Mexico ordered the withdrawal of the majority of the state's national guard troops from the US border with Mexico democratic governor Michelle Luhan Grisham announced their withdrawals shortly before Trump's state of the union address. In her statement. She said New Mexico will not take part in the president's charade of border fearmongering by misusing are diligent national guard troops Grisham said a small contingent. About a dozen national guard troops will remain to assist with humanitarian needs in a remote corridor for cross-border immigration. She also mobilized state police to assist local law enforcement, but you also directed twenty-five troops from other states, Arkansas Kentucky, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Wisconsin to withdraw from the New Mexico border. Democratic presidential hopeful and Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is facing further fallout from her past self identification as native American that's after the Washington Post published this week a copy of her nineteen Eighty-six Texas State bar registration card on what she listed her races. American Indian posts said, it obtained the document which was filled out by hand and signed through an open records request. And that the Massachusetts Democrat's office. Did not question that's often Tissot it's dated April of nineteen Eighty-six. According to the post, it is the first record from Warren's past where she made her claim of native American heritage in her own handwriting was proves she was directly responsible for the dubious identification. Warren had previously declined to answer if she or an assistant had filled out the forms where she made the claim or Hughes reports. Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is apologizing for identifying herself as native American in the past the Washington Post reported Warren had earlier apologized to the Cherokee nation for taking a DNA test and publicizing the results that indicate distant native ancestry. She told the post she was sorry for furthering confusion about tribal citizenship. She says the apology is meant to include the fact that she claimed native ancestry while in professor positions at Harvard University and the university of Pennsylvania Warren insists she did not use the claim of native heritage further her career, but the post reported Tuesday, Warren listed herself as American Indian on a registration card for the state bar of Texas in one thousand nine hundred eighty six the post article suggests the possibility that additional documents could surface as Warren faces scrutiny now that she has declared her candidacy for president with national native news. I'm art Hughes. Another top Virginia Democrat has admitted to wearing black face decades ago. Attorney general Mark herring issued a statement saying he wore Brown makeup and a wig in nineteen eighty to look like a black rapper during a party as an undergraduate at the university of Virginia the revelation further royals top levels of Virginia government Virginia. Governor Ralph Northam and Lieutenant governor Justin Fairfax are already facing controversies and herring would be next in line to be governor many including haring have urged north to resign. After the discovery of a photo of someone in black face on his nineteen Eighty-four medical school yearbook page Fairfax who's next in line to be governor has been accused of sexual misconduct, which he denies. Meanwhile, the AFL CIO has joined the growing call for Virginia democratic governor Ralph Northam to resign the labor labor federation voted. Unanimously the AFL CIO president Richard Trumka said that what said what he called north racist actions of the past and has behavior of the past few days cut against everything. The union stands for Trumka said northbound's refusal to step aside as only further deepening the wounds, he's inflicted north denied. He was either of two men and a racist photo in his nineteen Eighty-four medical school yearbook. But has admitted putting on black face to intimidate m Tate that is Michael Jackson at a dance contest decades ago. The House Judiciary committee today began examining ways to reduce gun violence in the first gun control hearing in the house of representatives in at least eight years when Democrats controlled the chamber. The of the House Judiciary committee said he was disappointed. The President Trump did not even mention gun violence in his state of the union address last night. Democrat Jerrold Nadler of New York said Democrats will be pushing for sensible gun safety laws at the public's demanding after a series of horrendous. Mass shootings in recent years. Never said that for far too long Republicans in congress offered moments of silence instead of action in the wake of gun. Tragedies said that Arizona Democrats have promised action on measures to address gun violence, including expanded background checks. Eastman is a senior at Florida's Marjory stoneman Douglas high school testify. Tied at the hearing. She noted that next Thursday marks the first year anniversary of the massacre at her school that killed seventeen of her classmates and teachers and injured seventeen more. She said she'll never get over there traumatic effects of the shooting that day. I was in my fourth period holocaust history class. And we were presenting our projects on hate groups. I could never have imagined. My group partner nNcholas store, but if saved my life in moments to come after our presentations, we began to hear loud pops when the gunman shot into our classroom. Nncholas store at was in front of me the gunman's bullets killed him and Helena Ramsey as nNcholas fell. I matched his every movement and hid underneath his life is body as bullets riddled my classmates, I thought I was going to die as I laid there I begged guide to please make it fast. Baseman said that minority communities bear the brunt of gun violence in the US, and that the life expectancy of African Americans in the country has been reduced for four years due to gun violence democratic Georgia congresswoman Lucy mic bath, a member. There judiciary committee lost her seventeen year old son, Jordan Davis to gun violence. She called for sensible firearm laws the pain of losing a child to gun violence, never ends. And it's in that pain that drives me to do this work to prevent gun violence. These stories are vitally important as we work to pass common sense safety legislation to keep families like ours from experiencing the horror and heartbreak brought on by gun violence. Democrats are vowing action on house resolution eight HR eight that would expand federal. Background checks on the sale and transfer of firearms. Georgia Republican Doug Collins, the ranking member on the House Judiciary committee, however questioned the effectiveness of the regulation of private firearms. And the thing is really interesting because it's been reported even under the previous job department of Justice administration. Did there's no way to actually.

Senator Elizabeth Warren president President Trump US House Judiciary committee New Mexico Virginia Massachusetts Washington Post Governor Ralph Northam Texas assault Los Angeles Karen bass judiciary committee America AFL Associated Press Representative Michelle Luhan Grisham
Number of journalists killed worldwide increases in 2018

Pacifica Evening News

01:17 min | 3 years ago

Number of journalists killed worldwide increases in 2018

"Information also died while three hundred forty eight were held in tension around the world of the people in total listed as killed the group determined forty nine were deliberately targeted quote because they're reporting threatened the interest of certain people in positions of political economic or religious power or organized crime. The report said the other thirty one died in the field while reporting. The deadliest country for reporters in two thousand eighteen was Afghantistan where fifteen died in violent attacks such as bombings followed by Syria with eleven and Mexico with nine the US made it into the top five deadliest countries for journalists this year for the first time with six dying. Most of those died in a shooting at a Maryland newspaper earlier this year a Bill that would restore press freedom for tribally funded media on the Muskogee creek nation in Oklahoma has reached the desk of principal chief James Floyd, national native news, art Hughes reports the journal record newspaper reports the Muskogee national council approved legislation over the weekend. That reverses a November decision to give tribal executives editorial power over Muskogee media. The new legislation reinstates the three member and editors and tribal officials

Muskogee National Council Muskogee Afghantistan James Floyd Art Hughes Journal Record Maryland Syria Principal Oklahoma United States Mexico