8 Burst results for "Arnold zwicky"

"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

06:56 min | 2 months ago

"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

"Explanation. No point and look up one either. So part of cosmic unconsciousness feels like a companion today jabu. It's a companion to so many of these phenomenon that if you're if you're a member of a sort of woo woo like culture of of the world where you see interconnectedness and you and you you equate it with a with a sort of spiritual take on this kind of thing really mystical world view. Yeah because it feels like it's not possible by any other means and yet something like this happens to us. Pretty regularly right even. If you can't think of an example you know that this is something you see often in your life right. It does it. It happens all the time or or that someone says. Oh i was just thinking about this and you go. I was just thinking about that or someone. There's no way to account for the fact that you could sit and think of someone you'd never thought of or you hadn't thought of in nine months and they text you an hour later and and does the dance. They music if time. But it's not purely literary it happens in real life as well right right so so so where do we go from here. Can how do i explain it. Yeah have you have. You unmasked the secret. You the the gatekeeper. Yes there are explanations for what is come to be called in dictionaries but in dictionaries via the internet via blogs baader meinhof phenomenon. This is not what it's called in the oxford stationary really. Yes and the fact. Is that the bottom line phenomena actually predates the you know the more cognitive technical sounding term frequency illusion baader-meinhoff phenomenon was coined in nineteen ninety-four and the story of it's going to kind of interesting the saint paul. Pioneer press the local newspaper of saint. Paul minnesota had and i believe still has a popular feature called bulletin board which is just a lazy editors dream. Come true it's just a series of random reader suggestions ruminations and not so much a letters to the editor not a not response and complete any in. The newspaper did but just Here's something i thought about the other day. Here's something me and my friends were talking about. you know in the days before What social media or you know there really weren't that many of these virtual gathering places but a a you know a fun. Newspaper community really was. I was thinking the other day. About how even before geek culture had its newsgroups and its popular youtube destinations. Comic book had letters pages where people were encouraged to write in and just say whatever and it was because there were no other four like this i mean it was also so that they could send their stuff under the cheapest mailing rates if they had a text page but You know newspapers were a place for this kind of thing. So the saint paul. Pioneer press had this bulletin board where people could ride it and say whatever and in one thousand nine hundred four. A pseudonomas commenter called saddam. Wow great great word. I think i said that i love it. G ghetto on lincoln was how he was how he referred to himself. Lincoln e. n. l. I know on end the english. Oh the english harp position He wrote in to talk about A phenomenon that he and his friends had noticed called. Or here's a letter in its entirety many years ago. This is from the The saint paul minnesota pioneer press of october sixteenth nineteen ninety-four many years ago identified a phenomenon so startling and so broaden its application that encompasses many forms of iraq coincidence. I have dubbed it. The baader meinhof phenomenon. The phenomenon goes like this the first time you learn a new word fraser idea. You will see that word fraser idea again. In print within twenty four hours and it comes from a discussion. He had with a friend about the bone off gas something they had never heard about before and but then as soon as he learned about it suddenly it seemed to be everywhere in in news publications in the world around him just like daughters of the dust and so he and his friends started calling it that presumably some time in the eighty s or ninety and finally rolled into a paper about it and he identified a kind of a corollary to synchronicity related. Corollary which he called the comics page corollary which means if you look at the comics page daily comics page of a newspaper. You will always find two strips that have the same punchline. Oh not word for word. Sure but the same related to the same gag. He says for example in last week. Saint paul pioneers press. There was a gag about a dog drinking out of the toilet in garfield and mother goose and grimm. Or something like that. So you just a guy who was interested in corelli's there. It sat on this one page of a local newspaper for well over a decade. You see this crossword puzzles are the you know like a key. A key stone of this right because you're always gonna see something in a crossword puzzle. Them only thought of or heard of yesterday. A crossword puzzle is a place just by the numbers. You're going to see. Eighty a short description of what eighty to one hundred things. Yeah some of them are going to be new. Because that's what crosswords are for right. Some of them are just going to be one more way of saying brian. Eno right any producer that worked with bowie cooking term ailey. This happened to me yesterday. I was doing a crossword and there was some six letter word without even without even any crossing letters at all. I just knew that. If i don't even know what the oh for david mamat play. It had to be liana because it's all has the right number of owls. It's you know it's a scrambler accu on a turn in so this idea of my phenomenon just sat nowhere but a local saint paul paper for well over a decade until A blogger named allan bellows mentioned this phenomenon. Frequency illusion having read about it in at the time or having researched it. Somehow it must have circulated on the internet a bit like pose law and then all of a sudden to universe. You realize you need a name for this thing. And as i'm saying as i say frequency illusion had not yet been coined by arnold zwicky of stanford so there was really nothing to call it except for whatever you and your friends. Call it whether that's blue car. Cinder and there started to be a critical mass of people calling it better meinhof phenomenon and this. This really mounted one. Alan bellows mentioned it on his popular blog. Damn interesting.

Pioneer press Lincoln e. n. l fraser Saint paul Paul minnesota The saint paul minnesota arnold zwicky allan bellows youtube Alan bellows iraq saddam editor corelli Eno david mamat brian bowie
"arnold zwicky" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

04:18 min | 4 months ago

"arnold zwicky" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Terrorists, and then they started seeing the name everywhere and but it's more commonly known in linguistics as the frequency illusion, which is an expression coined by the linguist Arnold. zwicky. And he kind of explains this and I'm going to abbreviate this but there's two parts what happens in our brains when we have the frequency illusion one is we have selective attention which means. Given day we don't notice very much. That's going on around us. Most of us are hyper aware. We're focused on the things that we need to be focused on and the things that we have to do. But when we do notice something and believe it to be important or somehow it seems significant to us often just because it's new, then we become consciously we're we're cute where primed as they say in linguistics were primed to be. Even more aware of it. So on top of that, the fact that we're now even more aware of a thing that seems to be important because it's new, we have confirmation bias which means that every time we see that thing again, we begin to feel that it's significant and this is kind of tied into the way that many of us believe the coincidences there's some how important even though they're just coincidences just. Chance Luck, and they don't have a larger significance to anything spiritual or anything at all in the world. So there's a kind of another term. Here's some psychology, a kind of synchronicity happening here, and that we're drawing a conclusion about the repeated appearance of a thing, we're assigning it an importance. It probably does not have it's not a deep state thing or anything no, it's nothing like that. Now terms do have vogue there. Is a mini do read the same authors and we read the same journalist and so if a journalist and New York Times who story is read by seven hundred thousand people uses a particular word or phrase that is unusual in this possible that some of those readers will then begin to use it but generally what's happening here is our brains are tricking into thinking that something is a newly important when it is..

Arnold. zwicky New York Times tricking
"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

10:24 min | 9 months ago

"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Welcome to invention. My name is Robert Lamb. And I'm Joe McCormack and today we're going to be discussing a linguistics subjects linguistic inventions. I thought it would be a good idea to begin with some good malapropisms. I love a good Malapropism And we're of course not above coining one here and there ourselves on the show sometimes So what's a malapropism before we get into our favorite examples? It's the usually unintentionally humorous misuse or distortion of a word or phrase. So usually it's a word or phrase that sounds like what you mean to say but is not what you mean to say for example Jesus healing the leopards often used to comedic effect. Like you like you mentioned. And sometimes you'll see the ladder this idea of it being a phrase defined as a Metaphor Metaphor also. It sounds delicious right though we have to stress. That mouth for itself is an invented word and potentially malapropism in itself. Oh I can see that like somebody who was trying to say malapropism but they got confused and said before right or Or they just intentionally did it and we'll get into some of the more intentional acts. This is we go The Sopranos is a great source of very memorable Malapropisms I like. When there's part were Christopher Multi Santi talks about creating a little dysentery in the ranks. Which that one reminds me of one about scientology? The the idea that L Ron Hubbard. Had the philosophy of diuretics. But there's another one in the Sopranos where The character little carmine. He's talking about the scene in a horror movie and he says it juxtaposes the sacred and the propane Or there's a part where Tony to describes his mom as an albacore around my neck. Oh instead of an albatross very good. This is more of a phrase but I instantly thought of the of the Big Lebowski when he points out the Jackie Tree Horn treats objects like women the code of the Coen brothers paint with sort of brush a lot in their dialogue. I was reading a little bit about this. Basically looking for some more examples of Of of malapropisms in the COEN brothers Work and I ran across this senses of Cinema Post by Paul Caughlin from several years back in he described the COEN brothers use of dialogue as the dialogue of wonderful in articulacy at. That's about right now. You'll also another place you see. A lot of Malapropism is The you'll see sometimes used as part of racial stereotypes One example that comes to mind and you see this listed on various Trope websites is Fisher Stevens role in the short circuits movies. I've never seen short-circuit well N- probably alright reason to go back to these. But these were forced movies about a about a robot he become self aware and has like a laser cannon on its shoulder and it's like a puppet does it do cute robot malapropisms. No it doesn't but Fisher. Stevens plays an Indian scientist And he's this this This this This accent and he's just bus out a number of these and ultimately it's kind of like this idea the comedic racial stereotype of someone who doesn't have a great grasp on the English language and therefore stumbles into all of these Unfortunately but the use of Malapropisms in fiction does go way way back like Shakespeare used malapropisms a lot The character of dog. Berry and much ado about nothing famously. Delivers a bunch of these in their great. So Dog Buries this incompetent night constable. And he's supposed to be a satire on the amateur. Police Forces of Elizabethan Times and a lot of the humor comes through in him giving confused. Orders like He when he's trying to get one of his deputies to apprehend all vagrant spin steady. Says you are to comprehend doll. Vague Rahmen And he tells them to be vigilant. I beseech you And then there's a great part later where he claims that a bad dude will be condemned into everlasting redemption. Well there's a there's fun to be had with With with malapropisms right. Because you can sort of you can have your character fumble into something. Something a little more articulate than they mean to it. Yes Yeah. That's interesting like the idea of everlasting. Redemption is sort of a cool metaphor. Even though he just is screwing up words but after this character actually Since sometime in the nineteenth century malapropisms have also been known as dog Barry. `ISMs there is another one. I came across that. I'd never read before. But this is from the real world so former Texas governor and US Energy Secretary. Rick Perry He. He's famous for the for saying that ups when he couldn't remember something. Oh yeah but also That's not what it was. Bring up a on August twenty fifth twenty fourteen. There was an article in the Texas Tribune by John Reynolds. That reported that Perry had been speaking to a crowd and at this event he told the crowd quote. We need to look at the states. Which are the Lavatories of innovation and Democracy? Oh Yeah so what? What would that if we were to take that literally white that even mean that I think the other thing part of it too is like even if they're not quite accidentally profound. We can't help a puzzle over it because it will inject a bizarre metaphor mental image into our head and then we're just forced to wrestle with it right there also just lots of these people making regular everyday speech. We probably do them all the time. Everybody does them aware of my favorites. I ran across. Was the idea of all the people who died in the Blue Bonnet plague that in the notes and I didn't even get it until you said it out loud now that points out an interesting thing which is that there. There are multiple different ways that people put together Malapropisms Like I was reading a paper by linguist Arnold zwicky on classical malapropisms in zwicky points out that lots of Malapropisms are just approximations that come out of our mouths due to the tip of the tongue. Effect This is something we've talked about stuff. Blow your mind before you can go back and find our episode on that if you Google it. I'm sure but the short version is you are failing to call the correct word for memory and by accident. You employ a similar sounding word. Instead you can often hear the specially in people who may have been having a bit of alcohol to drink like often words that gets swapped start with the same letters or sounds like This database is a vast suppository of information. I guess actually that wouldn't start with the same sound but you know you know what I mean. Yeah but other times malapropisms have more unique ideologies for example when somebody learns a word or phrase by mishearing it and then never correct their original misimpression. I know this has happened multiple times in my life. Blue Bonnet plague would probably be a good example. Here it suggests that somebody heard somebody talking about the bubonic plague but misheard how they pronounced it and then just never got corrected on that. Yeah I think we can all relate to that we all have examples that in our in our own life totally But while malapropisms are themselves a normal part of speech they go back into the midst of history. Everybody doesn't mean everybody's been doing them for thousands of years probably the name we used for them as a very distinct origin in history and that origin lies with an Irish satirist. Playwright and politician named Richard Brindley Sheridan. Who lived from seventeen? Fifty one to eighteen sixteen. Sheridan wrote a number of successful comedies but his seventeenth seventy five play called. The rivals introduced the world to a character named Mrs Mala Prop. Who and other character says is infamous for delivering words quote so ingeniously misapplied without being mispronounced So for example Mrs Malapropism Kohl's one other character. The very pineapple of politeness and at another point she refers to an allegory lying on the banks of the Nile which we should point out. Gets it wrong twice because the Nile has crocodiles alligators? Oh I didn't even get that one at first allegory and alligators okay. I think that joke works better on people who are less obsessed with Crocodilians than you and So it seems that most usage of the term malapropism in English dates back to this character in a late eighteenth century Irish play all usage of it but of course the name Mrs Malapropisms built out of existing words borrowed from other languages Like There's the there's this expression. Mala propo- meaning inappropriate originally from the French where it would mean something like out of place or miss but from the name of this character we now get the label that we use specifically for Malapropisms. Words used wrong in this way and so today we wanted to look at the phenomenon of invented words like the word Malapropism. There are tons of words like this. You know there. There are some words that entered the from works of fiction or mythology. There are words that through deliberate coinage where somebody is trying to create a term for a previously unnamed concept their words that inner through changes in technology and science and culture and we wanted to to talk about some of our favorite stories of these words and explore how they differ from other types of words. What what does it take to invent a successful word and are there any parallels to the invention of a successful piece of technology? Yeah it's a fascinating topic because it's you know the the the language it is a world that is invented like all word. Sir Essentially invented. Well I don't know if I agree with you there because they all do come from human brains but I would say maybe some words could be thought of more like features of the human body than maybe they just emerged from us at some point in history without us trying to find a word for something that's true the more primal roots of language which will be discussing a but but still it's it's unlike most of the other topics we've done. I don't know if we've done a linguistic episode of intervention at halfway. I don't know but there are.

Malapropisms Fisher Stevens Rick Perry Richard Brindley Sheridan Joe McCormack Robert Lamb Ron Hubbard Mrs Malapropism Kohl scientology Christopher Multi Santi Coen Mrs Malapropisms Google Texas Blue Bonnet Texas Tribune Mrs Mala Prop dysentery Arnold zwicky Tony
"arnold zwicky" Discussed on The Best of Stuff

The Best of Stuff

10:18 min | 9 months ago

"arnold zwicky" Discussed on The Best of Stuff

"Subjects linguistic inventions. I thought it would be a good idea to begin with some good malapropisms. I love a good Malapropism And we're of course not above coining one here and there ourselves on the show sometimes So what's a malapropism before we get into our favorite examples? It's the usually unintentionally humorous misuse or distortion of a word or phrase. So usually it's a word or phrase that sounds like what you mean to say but is not what you mean to say for example Jesus healing the leopards often used to comedic effect. Like you like you mentioned. And Oh sometimes you'll see the ladder this idea of it being a phrase defined as Mala for a metaphor else that sounds delicious right though we have to stress. That malfoy itself is an invented word and potentially a malapropism in an avid self. Oh I can see that like somebody who was trying to say malapropism but they got confused and said Mala four right or Or they just intentionally did it and we'll get into some of the more intentional acts this we go The Sopranos is a great source of very memorable malapropisms. I like when there's partner Christopher Multi Santi talks about creating a little dysentery in the ranks which that one reminds me of One about scientology. The the idea. That L Ron Hubbard. Had the philosophy of diuretics. But there's another one in the Sopranos where The the character little. He's talking about the scene in a horror movie and he says it juxtaposes the sacred and the propane Or there's a part where Tony to describes his mom as an albacore around my neck. Oh instead of an albatross very good. This is more of a phrase but I instantly thought of Of the Big Lebowski when he points out the Jackie Tree Horn treats objects like women. The code of the COEN brothers paint with this sort of brush a lot in their dialogue. I was reading a little bit about this as we are looking for some more examples of of of malapropisms in the COEN brothers Work and I ran across this senses of Cinema Post by Paul Caughlin from several years back and he described the Coen brothers use of dialogue as quote the dialogue of in articulacy at. That's about right now. You'll also an another place you see. A lot of Malapropism is a the. You'll see sometimes used as part of racial stereotypes. One example that comes to mind and you see this listed on various Trope websites is the Fisher Stevens role in the short circuits movies. I've never seen short-circuit well and probably right reason to go back to these. But these were forced movies about a about a robot till he become self aware and has like a laser cannon on its shoulder and it's like a puppet does it. Do Cute robot malapropisms. No it doesn't but Fisher. Stevens plays an Indian scientist And he's this this This this This accent and his just bus out a number of these and ultimately you know it's kind of like this idea the comedic racial stereotype of someone who doesn't have a great grasp on the English language and therefore stumbles into all of these. That's unfortunate yeah But the use of Malapropisms in fiction does go way way back to Shakespeare used malapropisms. A Lot The character of dog. Berry and much ado about nothing famously. Delivers a bunch of these great dog buries this incompetent night constable? And he's supposed to be. I think a satire on the Amateur Police Forces of Elizabethan Times and a lot of the humor comes through in him giving confused. Orders like He when he's trying to get one of his deputies to apprehend all vagrant spin instead he says you are to comprehend all vague. Rahmen He tells them to be vigilant. I beseech you And then there's a great part later where he claims that a bad dude will be condemned into everlasting redemption. Well there there's a there's fun to be had with With with malapropisms right. Because you can sort of you can have your character fumble into something. Something a little more articulate than they mean to at us. Yeah that's interesting like the idea of everlasting redemption. The is sort of cool metaphor even though he just is screwing up words but after this character actually Since sometime in the nineteenth century malapropisms have also been known as dog. Barry `ISMs There's another one I came across that I'd never read before. But this is the real world so former Texas governor and US Energy Secretary. Rick Perry He. He's famous for the for saying that loops when he couldn't remember something. Oh yeah but also That's not what bring up a on on August. Twenty fifth twenty fourteen. There was an article in the Texas Tribune by John Reynolds. That reported that Perry had been speaking to a crowd and at this event he told the crowd quote. We need to look at the states. Which are the lavatories of innovation and Democracy Yeah so what? What with that. If we were to take that literally wake what would that even mean that? I think that's the other thing part of it too is like even if they're not quite accidentally profound. We can't help a puzzle over because it will inject a bizarre metaphor mental image into our head and then we're just forced to wrestle with it right there. Also just lots of these people make regular everyday speech. We'd probably do them all the time. Everybody doesn't a one of my favorites. I ran across. Was the idea of all the people who died in the Blue Bonnet plague that in the notes and I didn't even get it until you said it out loud now that points out an interesting thing which is that there. There are multiple different ways that people put together Malapropisms Like I was reading a paper by the linguist Arnold zwicky on classical malapropisms in zwicky points out that lots of malapropisms are just approximations that. Come out of our mouths due to the tip of the tongue effect This is something we've talked about stuff to your mind before you can go back and find our episode on that if you Google it. I'm sure but the short version is you are failing to call the correct word for memory and by accident you employ similar sounding word instead. You can often hear the specially in people who may have been having a bit of alcohol to drink like often words the gets swapped start with the same letters or sounds like This database is a vast suppository of information. I guess actually that wouldn't start with the same sound but you know you know what I mean. Yeah but other times malapropisms have more unique ideologies for example when somebody learns a word or phrase by mishearing it and the never corrects their original misimpression. I know this happened multiple times in my life. Blue Bonnet plague would probably be a good example. Here it suggests that somebody heard somebody talking about the bubonic plague but misheard how they pronounced it and then just never got corrected on that. Yeah I think we can all relate to that we all have examples that in our in our own life totally But while malapropisms are themselves a normal part of speech they go back into the midst of history. Everybody doesn't and everybody's been doing them for thousands of years probably the name we use for them as a very distinct origin in history and that origin lies with an Irish satirist. Playwright and politician named Richard Brindley Sheridan. Who lived from seventeen? Fifty one to eighteen sixteen. Sheridan wrote a number of successful comedies. But his seventeen seventy five play called. The rivals introduced the world to a character named Mrs Malapropism whom another character says is infamous for delivering words quotes so ingeniously misapplied without being mispronounced us. So for example Mrs Malapropism Kohl's one other character the very pineapple nece and at another point. She refers to an allegory lying on the banks of the Nile. Which we should point out gets it wrong twice because the Nile has crocodiles alligators. Oh I didn't even get that one at first allegory and alligators okay. I think that joke works better on people who are less obsessed with Crocodilians than you and I So it seems that most usage of the term malapropism in English actually dates back to this character in a late eighteenth century Irish play maybe all usage of it but of course the name Mrs Malapropism built out of existing words borrowed from other languages like There's there's this expression Mala propo- inappropriate originally from the French where it would mean something like out of place or miss but from the name of this character we now get the label that we use specifically for Malapropisms. Words used wrong in this way and so today we wanted to look at the phenomenon of invented words like the word Malapropism. There are tons of words like this. You know there. There are some words that entered the lexicon from works of fiction or mythology. There are words that enter through deliberate coinage where somebody is trying to create a term for a previously unnamed concept their words that inner through changes in technology and science and culture and we wanted to to talk about some of our favorite stories of these words and explore how they differ from other types of words. What what does it take to invent a successful word and there any parallels To the invention of a successful piece of technology. Yeah it's a fascinating topic because it's you know the the world of language it is a world that is invented like all words. Her essentially invented Well I don't know if I agree with you there because they all do come from human brains but I would say maybe some words could be thought of more like features of the human body than maybe they just emerged from us at some point in history without us trying to find a word for something. That's true the more primal roots of language which will be discussing But but still it's. It's unlike most of the other topics we've done. I don't know if we've done a linguistic episode of intervention at halfway. I don't know we say but there are obviously.

Malapropisms Fisher Stevens Mrs Malapropism Mala Mrs Malapropism Kohl Ron Hubbard scientology Rick Perry dysentery Christopher Multi Santi Google partner Texas Blue Bonnet Texas Tribune US Richard Brindley Sheridan Tony Arnold zwicky Berry
"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:32 min | 9 months ago

"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Famously delivers a bunch of these in their great, so dog buries this incompetent night constable, and he's supposed to be a satire on the Amateur Police Forces of Elizabethan Times, and a lot of the humor comes through in him, giving confused orders like he when he's trying to get one of his deputies to apprehend all vagrant spin steady says you are to comprehend doll, vague Rahmen and he tells them to be vigilant I beseech you. and then there's a great part later where he claims that a bad dude will be condemned into everlasting redemption. Well there's a there's fun to be had with with with malapropisms right because you can sort of you can have your character fumble into something something a little more articulate than they mean to. It s yeah that's interesting like the idea of everlasting redemption is sort of a cool metaphor, even though he just is screwing up words, but after this character actually since the nineteenth century malapropisms have also been known as dog. Barry `ISMs. There is another one I came across. That I'd never read before, but this is from the real world so former Texas governor and US Energy Secretary Rick, Perry, he he's famous for the for saying that UK's when he couldn't remember something Oh. Yeah, but also That's not what it was bringing up a on August. Twenty fifth, twenty fourteen, there was an article in the Texas Tribune by John, Reynolds that reported that Perry had been speaking to a crowd and at this event he told the crowd quote. We need to look at the states which are the lavatories of innovation and democracy. Oh yeah so. What what would that if we were to take that literally white that even mean? That I think the other thing. Part of it too, is like even if they're not quite accidentally profound, we can't help a puzzle over it because it will inject a bizarre metaphor mental image into our head, and then we're just forced to wrestle with it right there also just lots of these people making regular everyday speech. We probably do them all the time. Everybody does them aware of my favorites I ran across was the idea of all the people who died in the Blue Bonnet plague. That in the notes and I didn't even get it until you said it out loud. Now that points out an interesting thing, which is that there? There are multiple different ways that people put together Malapropisms like I was reading a paper by linguist Arnold zwicky, on classical malapropisms in Zwicky, points out that lots of Malapropisms are just approximations that come out of our mouths due to the tip of the tongue effect This is something we've talked about stuff. Blow your mind before you can go back and find our episode on that if you Google it I'm sure, but the short version is, you are failing to call the correct word for memory and by accident. You employees a similar. Similar sounding word instead you can often hear the specially in people who may have been having a bit of alcohol to drink like often words the get swapped start with the same letters or sounds like This database is a vast suppository of Information I..

Perry Amateur Police Forces of Eliza Arnold zwicky Rahmen Texas Tribune Google Zwicky Texas Barry US Rick Secretary UK John Reynolds
"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

08:17 min | 9 months ago

"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Welcome to invention. My name is Robert Lamb and I'm Joe McCormack and today. We're going to be discussing a linguistics subjects, linguistic inventions I thought it would be a good idea to begin with some good malapropisms. I love a good Malapropism and we're of course not above coining one here and there ourselves on the show sometimes So, what's a Malapropism? Before we get into our favorite examples, it's the usually unintentionally humorous misuse or distortion of a word or phrase so usually it's a word or phrase that sounds like what you mean to say, but is not what you mean to say for example, Jesus healing the leopards. One often used to comedic effect like you like you mentioned, and sometimes you'll see the ladder this idea of it being a phrase defined as a metaphor. Metaphor. Also. It sounds delicious right though we have to stress that malfoy itself is an invented word and potentially. Malapropism in itself Oh I can see that like somebody who was trying to say Malapropism, but they got confused, and said before right or or they just intentionally did it, and we'll get into some of the more intentional acts. This is we go the Sopranos is a great source of very memorable malapropisms I like when there's part. Were Christopher multi? Santi talks about creating a little dysentery in the ranks. which that one reminds me of one about scientology, the the idea that l Ron Hubbard had the philosophy of diabetics. But, there's another one in the Sopranos. Where the character little carmine. He's talking about the scene in a horror movie. And he says it juxtaposes the sacred and the propane. or there's a part where Tony to describes his mom as an albacore around my neck. Oh, INSTEAD OF AN ALBATROSS! Very good. This is more of a phrase, but I instantly thought of. The of the Big Lebowski, when he points out the Jackie, tree. Horn, treats objects like women. The code of the COEN brothers paint with sort of brushes a lot in their dialogue. I was reading a little bit about this, basically looking for some more examples of of of malapropisms in the COEN brothers. Work and I ran across this. Of Cinema Post by Paul Caughlin, from several years back in he described the COEN brothers use of dialogue as the dialogue of wonderful in articulacy. At, that's about right now. You'll also another place. You see a lot of Malapropism. Is The you'll see? Sometimes used as part of racial stereotypes one example that comes to mind, and you see this listed on various trope websites. Is Fisher Stevens role in the short circuits movies I've never seen short-circuit well. N- probably all right. To go back to these, but these were forced movies about a about a robot become self aware, and has like a laser cannon on its shoulder, and it's like a puppet. Does it do cute robot malapropisms? No, it doesn't but Fisher Stevens plays. An Indian scientist, and He's this this this this this accent and he's just bus out a number of these, and ultimately it's kind of like this idea. The comedic racial stereotype of someone who doesn't have a great grasp on the English language, and therefore stumbles into all of these unfortunately but the use of Malapropisms in fiction does go way way back like Shakespeare used malapropisms a lot the character of dog, Berry and much ado about nothing famously. Famously delivers a bunch of these in their great, so dog buries this incompetent night constable, and he's supposed to be a satire on the Amateur Police Forces of Elizabethan Times, and a lot of the humor comes through in him, giving confused orders like he when he's trying to get one of his deputies to apprehend all vagrant spin steady says you are to comprehend doll, vague Rahmen and he tells them to be vigilant I beseech you. and then there's a great part later where he claims that a bad dude will be condemned into everlasting redemption. Well there's a there's fun to be had with with with malapropisms right because you can sort of you can have your character fumble into something something a little more articulate than they mean to. It s yeah that's interesting like the idea of everlasting redemption is sort of a cool metaphor, even though he just is screwing up words, but after this character actually since the nineteenth century malapropisms have also been known as dog. Barry `ISMs. There is another one I came across. That I'd never read before, but this is from the real world so former Texas governor and US Energy Secretary Rick, Perry, he he's famous for the for saying that UK's when he couldn't remember something Oh. Yeah, but also That's not what it was bringing up a on August. Twenty fifth, twenty fourteen, there was an article in the Texas Tribune by John, Reynolds that reported that Perry had been speaking to a crowd and at this event he told the crowd quote. We need to look at the states which are the lavatories of innovation and democracy. Oh yeah so. What what would that if we were to take that literally white that even mean? That I think the other thing. Part of it too, is like even if they're not quite accidentally profound, we can't help a puzzle over it because it will inject a bizarre metaphor mental image into our head, and then we're just forced to wrestle with it right there also just lots of these people making regular everyday speech. We probably do them all the time. Everybody does them aware of my favorites I ran across was the idea of all the people who died in the Blue Bonnet plague. That in the notes and I didn't even get it until you said it out loud. Now that points out an interesting thing, which is that there? There are multiple different ways that people put together Malapropisms like I was reading a paper by linguist Arnold zwicky, on classical malapropisms in Zwicky, points out that lots of Malapropisms are just approximations that come out of our mouths due to the tip of the tongue effect This is something we've talked about stuff. Blow your mind before you can go back and find our episode on that if you Google it I'm sure, but the short version is, you are failing to call the correct word for memory and by accident. You employees a similar. Similar sounding word instead you can often hear the specially in people who may have been having a bit of alcohol to drink like often words the get swapped start with the same letters or sounds like This database is a vast suppository of Information I. Guess actually that wouldn't start with the same sound, but you know you know what I mean. Yeah, but other times malapropisms have more unique ideologies for example when somebody learns a word or phrase by mishearing it, and then never correct their original misimpression, I know this has happened multiple times in my life. Blue Bonnet plague would probably be a good. Good example here. It suggests that somebody heard somebody talking about the bubonic plague, but misheard how they pronounced it, and then just never got corrected on that. Yeah, I think we can all relate to that. We all have examples that in our in our own life, totally but while malapropisms are themselves a normal part of speech, they go back into the midst of history. Everybody doesn't mean everybody's been doing them. For thousands of years probably the name we used for them as a very distinct origin in history, and that origin lies with an Irish satirist, playwright and politician named Richard Brindley Sheridan, who lived? Lived from seventeen, fifty one to eighteen sixteen, Sheridan wrote a number of successful comedies, but his seventeenth seventy five play called the rivals introduced the world to a character named Mrs Mala Prop, who and other character says is infamous for delivering words quote so ingeniously misapplied without being mispronounced so for example Mrs Malapropism, Kohl's one other character, the very pineapple of police nece, and at another point she refers to an allegory, lying on the banks of the Nile which we should point out. Gets it wrong twice because the Nile has crocodiles, not get yours..

Malapropism Mrs Malapropism Fisher Stevens Amateur Police Forces of Eliza Richard Brindley Sheridan Robert Lamb malfoy Texas Tribune Google Ron Hubbard Christopher Joe McCormack Texas Tony scientology Horn Paul Caughlin dysentery Arnold zwicky Santi
"arnold zwicky" Discussed on The Best of Stuff

The Best of Stuff

03:21 min | 9 months ago

"arnold zwicky" Discussed on The Best of Stuff

"Comes through in him, giving confused orders like he, when he's trying to get one of his deputies to apprehend all vagrant spin instead he says you are to comprehend all vague Rahmen He tells them to be vigilant I beseech you. and then there's a great part later where he claims that a bad dude will be condemned into everlasting redemption. Well there, there's a there's fun to be had with with with malapropisms right because you can sort of you can have your character fumble into something something a little more articulate than they mean to at us. Yeah, that's interesting like the idea of everlasting redemption. The is sort of cool metaphor, even though he just is screwing up words, but after this character actually since sometime in the nineteenth century, Malapropisms have also been known as dog Barry `ISMs There's another one I came across that I'd never read before. Before, but this is the real world so former Texas governor and US Energy Secretary Rick Perry. He he's famous for the for saying that loops when he couldn't remember something Oh. Yeah, but also That's not what bring up a on on August. Twenty fifth twenty fourteen, there was an article in the Texas Tribune by John. Reynolds that reported that Perry had been speaking to a crowd and at this event he told the crowd quote. We need to look at the states which are the lavatories of innovation and democracy. yeah so. What what with that? If we were to take that literally wake. What would that even mean? That I think that's the thing part of it too, is like even if they're not quite accidentally profound, we can't help a puzzle over because it will inject a bizarre metaphor mental image into our head, and then we're just forced to wrestle with it right there. Also just lots of these people make regular everyday speech. We'd probably do them all the time. Everybody doesn't a one of my favorites. I ran across was the idea of all the people who died in the Blue Bonnet plague. I saw that in the notes and I didn't even get it until you said it out loud. Now that points out an interesting thing, which is that there? There are multiple different ways that people put together Malapropisms like I was reading a paper by the linguist. Arnold zwicky on classical malapropisms in zwicky points out that lots of Malapropisms are just approximations that come out of our mouths, due to the tip of the tongue effect This is something we've talked about stuff to your mind before you can go back and find our episode on that if you Google it, I'm sure, but the short version is you. You are failing to call the correct word for memory and by accident you employ similar sounding word instead you can often hear the specially in people who may have been having a bit of alcohol to drink like often words the gets swapped start with the same letters or sounds like This database is a vast suppository of Information I..

Malapropisms Rick Perry Arnold zwicky Texas Tribune US Texas Google Secretary Barry Reynolds
"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Invention

Invention

10:17 min | 11 months ago

"arnold zwicky" Discussed on Invention

"Subject some linguistic inventions. I thought it would be a good idea to begin with some good malapropisms. I love a good Malapropism And we're of course not above coining one here and there ourselves on the show sometimes So what's a malapropism before we get into our favorite examples? It's the usually unintentionally humorous misuse or distortion of a word or phrase. So usually it's a word or phrase that sounds like what you mean to say but is not what you mean to say for example Jesus healing the leopards one. Yeah they're often used to comedic effect like like you mentioned and Oh sometimes you'll see the ladder this idea of it being a phrase defined as a Mala for a Metaphor Elsa sounds delicious right though we have to stress that mouth for itself is an invented word and potentially amount appropriate them in and of itself. Oh I can see that like somebody who is trying to say malapropism but they got confused and said Mala for right or or just intentionally did it. And we'll get into some of the more intentional acts of this as we go The Sopranos is a great source of very memorable Malapropisms I like when There's part where Christopher multi talks about creating a little dysentery in the ranks Which reminds me of One about scientology. The the idea. That L Ron Hubbard. Had the philosophy of diuretics. But there's another one in the Sopranos where The character little carmine. He's talking about the scene. In a horror movie. And he says it juxtaposes the sacred and the propane or there's part Tony to describes his mom as an albacore around my neck. Oh instead of an Albatross. Very good this is more of a phrase but I instantly thought of the of the big Lebowski when the points out the Jackie Tree Horn treat objects like women the code of the Coen brothers paint with this sort of brushed a lot in their dialogue. I was reading a little bit about this live. Basically I was looking for some more examples of of of malapropisms in the COEN brothers Work and I ran across this senses of Cinema Post by Paul Callan from several years back and he described the Coen brothers use of dialogue as quote the dialogue of wonderful in articulacy at. That's about right now. You'll also another place you see. A lot of Malapropism is the sometimes used as part of racial stereotypes. One example that comes to mind and you see this listed on various Trope websites is The Fisher Stevens role in the short circuits movies. I'm never seen short-circuit. Well probably all right reason to go back to these but these were forced movies about a robot league they become self aware and has a laser cannon on its shoulder and it's like a puppet. Does it do cute robot malapropisms? No it doesn't but Fisher. Stevens plays an Indian scientist. Oh and in. He's this This this This accent and he's he's just bus out a number of these and ultimately it's kind of like this idea the comedic racial stereotype of someone who doesn't have a great grasp on the English language and therefore stumbles into all of these That's unfortunate yeah But the use of Malapropisms in fiction does go way way back like Shakespeare used malapropisms. A Lot The character of dog. Berry and much ado about nothing famously delivers a bunch of these. And they're great dog buries this incompetent night constable. And he's supposed to be. I think a satire on the Amateur Police Forces of Elizabethan Times and a lot of the humor comes through in him giving confused. Orders like He when he's trying to get one of his deputies to apprehend all vagrants but instead he says you ought comprehend all Viagra men and he tells them to be vigilant. I beseech you and then there's a great part later where he claims that a bad dude will be condemned into everlasting redemption with it. There's a there's fun to be had with With with malapropisms right. Because you can sort of you can have your character fumble into something something. A little more articulate than they mean to tell us. Yeah that's interesting. Like the idea of everlasting. Redemption is sort of a cool metaphor even though he just is screwing up words but after this character actually since sometime in the nineteenth century malapropisms have also been known as dog Berry. `ISMs there is another one. I came across that. I'd never read before. But this is the real world so former Texas governor and US Energy Secretary. Rick Perry He. He's famous for the for saying that. Luke's when he couldn't remember something. Oh yeah but also That's not what I was bringing up a on on August. Twenty fifth twenty fourteen. There was an article in the Texas Tribune by John. Reynolds reported that Perry had been speaking to a crowd and at this event he told the crowd quote. We need to look at the states. Which are the lavatories of innovation and Democracy Yeah what what with that. If we were to take that literally wake. What would that mean? I think that's the other thing that part of it too is like even if they're not quite accidentally profound. We can't help a puzzle over it because it will inject a bizarre metaphor mental image into our head and then we're just forced to wrestle with it right now there are also just lots of people making regular everyday speech. We probably do them all the time. Everybody does them one of my favorites. I ran across. Was the idea of all the people who died in the Blue Bonnet plague. Csl that in the notes. And I didn't get it until you said it out loud and that that points out an interesting thing which is there are multiple different ways that people put together Malapropisms Like I was reading a paper. By the linguist Arnold zwicky on classical malapropisms end. Zwicky points out that lots of malapropisms approximations. That come out of our mouth is due to the tip of the tongue effect. This is something we've talked about on stuff to blow your mind before You can go back and find our episode on that if you Google it. I'm sure but the short version is you are failing to call the correct word for memory and by accident. You employ a similar sounding word instead. You can often especially in people who may have been having been alcohol to drink like often words that gets swapped. Start with the same letters or sounds like This databases a vast suppository of information. I guess actually that wouldn't start with the same sound but you know what I mean. Yeah but other times malapropisms have more unique etiologies for example when somebody learns a word or phrase by mishearing yet and then never corrects their original misimpression. I know this has happened multiple times in my life. Blue Bonnet plague would probably be a good example. Here it suggests that somebody heard somebody talking about the bubonic plague but misheard how they pronounced it and then just never got corrected on that. Yeah I think we can all relate to that. We all have examples that in her own life totally But while malapropisms are themselves normal part of speech they go back into the midst of history. Everybody does them and everybody's been doing them for thousands of years probably the name we used for them as a very distinct origin and history and that origin lies with an Irish satirist. Playwright and politician named Richard Brindley Sheridan. Who lived from seventeen? Fifty one to eighteen sixteen. Sheridan wrote a number of successful comedies but his seventeenth seventy-five play called. The rivals introduced the world to a character named Mrs Mala Prop whom another character says is infamous for delivering words quote so ingeniously misapplied without being mispronounced So for example Mrs Mala Prop Kohl's one other character. The very pineapple of politeness and at another point she refers to an allegory lying on the banks of the Nile which we should point out. Gets it wrong twice because the Nile has crocodiles alligators? Oh I didn't even get that one at first allegory alligators okay. I think that joke works better on people who are less obsessed with Crocodilians than So so it seems that most usage of the term malapropism in English actually dates back to this character in a late eighteenth century Irish play maybe all usage of it but of course the name Mrs Malapropism built out of existing words borrowed from other languages like There's the there's this expression mal apropos. Meaning inappropriate originally from the French where it would mean something like out of place or amiss but from the name of this character we now get the label that we use specifically for Malapropisms. Words used wrong in this way and so today we wanted to look at the phenomenon of invented words like the word Malapropism. There are tons of words like this. You know there. There are some words that entered the lexicon from works of fiction or mythology. Their words that enter through deliberate coinage where somebody is trying to create a term for a previously unnamed concept their words that inner through changes in technology and science and culture and we wanted to talk about some of our favorite stories of these words and explore how they differ from other types of words. What does it take to invent a successful word and are there any parallels The invention of a successful piece of technology. Yeah it's a fascinating topic because it's the the world of language it is a world that is invented like all words are essentially invented Well I don't know if I agree with you there because they all do come from human brains but I would say maybe some words could be thought of more like features of the human body than maybe they just emerged from us at some point in history without us trying to find a word for something. That's true the more sort of primal roots of language which will be discussing but but still it's. It's unlike most of the other topics we've done. I don't know if we've done a linguistic episode of invention at halfway. I don't know we say that there.

Malapropisms Berry Fisher Stevens Ron Hubbard Rick Perry Mala Arnold zwicky scientology Mrs Mala Prop dysentery Coen Mrs Mala Prop Kohl Christopher Texas Tribune Mrs Malapropism Google Texas Richard Brindley Sheridan Paul Callan Viagra