20 Episode results for "Arne Duncan"

Coronavirus: Back to School?

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

39:33 min | 6 months ago

Coronavirus: Back to School?

"You can listen to add free new episodes of science rules only on stitcher premium for a free month of stitcher premium go to stitcher premium, DOT COM and use. Promo. Code Science. there. WIN FOR THE ANCIENTS This is all American. A new series from stitcher. You realize there's no who is best in the history of Gaul. No question in my mind. And this season we're asking what if the story of Tiger Woods that the media has been telling what if it's been completely wrong. SEASON, one of all American premieres August twentieth subscribe or favorite. Now, if you WANNA listen to science rules without ads and directly support our show while you're at it. The best way to do that is by signing up for stitcher premium just go to stitcher premium dot com or tap the premium tab in your stitcher APP and sign up with the Promo Code. Science to get a free month of premium listening you'll get ad free listening to science rules along with all the shows on the stitcher, an ear wolf networks and your premium subscription helps keep our show going to that stitcher premium dot Com Promo Code Science for a free month of premium listening. Thanks. This is an historic time. Going, to be a multi year fight. Why is it taking? So long to get a screening test, it is not a hoax it Israel something that we have never experienced the four wash hands wash hands wash and I mean you're the scientists are GonNa tell me. Welcome. Welcome to Science Rules Corona Virus addition I'm your host Bill Nye and this was the series that brings you the latest analysis and the science of this pandemic to keep you informed prepared and calm. We are still all in this together, my friends almost a million more Americans have been infected with a corona virus since our last episode just two weeks ago with another fifteen thousand fatalities that's roughly one hundred and fifty five, thousand dead in the US so far globally more than eighteen million people have been infected since this pandemic began with almost seven hundred thousand death now this time last year. You're probably inundated with ads for back to school supplies and back to school deals back to school season looks a lot different this year in twenty twenty tell figure out how it looks different an even if we can send our kids back to school this fall I'm joined by Arne Duncan, he was secretary of Education under President Obama and before that C. E. O. of the Chicago Public Schools is now managing partner at the Emerson Collective and organization working for Social Change Arne Duncan Welcome to science rules may call. You Arnie that's my main man such such fantabulous ormat kids at huge fans spanked very. Zara Oxidizer bit. Your kids are like eighteen sixteen years old. You're so good. They are not to sixty. Cow Yeah so you're you work in education work in public schools for a long time. Are we going to be able to have public schools? Are we going to be able to physically open public schools? This year everybody's wondering that is just such a brutal such a difficult time, and this was a natural disaster that unfortunate manmade catastrophe. And what we haven't done to pay attention to science will be having to have disciplined will we haven't done to keep people alive? He'd say. Is absolutely endangering our chances of going back to school. So they are the three options bills start all want us to go back visit leap seconds to go back in a hybrid manner thirds to go back only virtually cleared everyone teachers, parents, kids everybody wants to go back with physical fool but unfortunately, because we have nas done what we need to do the country in March April may June July Aug- that's not going to be possible in in far too many communities. Schools aren't bubbles they're not. Exist in communities. Best thing we can do to give our kids a chance to go to school beatdown community just in case. But we have not done that. So what I'm saying is the school MEESE TO START I don't want delay start a school missed too much school due to Kobe slide in spring in soccer the star best way we know how we can talk about how open rationally or we need to continue to feature oven you take care of the social emotional needs and then. We need to educate them if we open carefully and thoughtfully, we can keep schools. Best Goal goals not to open goes to keep schools open just desks. We hope we do that in manner on the Do's castle big-league three or four weeks nine are talking getting close to hold onto schools retraumatize school to Bergen danger there answer teachers that's not about to go. So, what do we need to do kids need to sit with their arms outstretched and not touch fingertips they need to wear masks desk need to be spread what do we need to do why the foresee in most places we can't even start that way isis be have to start virtually because it is not safe to bring kids back into school yet a win we do bring kids into score. How do we do it? I would always start with youngest children bursts pre-k Hey I the second whatever might be those show now asli learning virtually it's. Very difficult, not impossible on start special needs kids I I will start with kids most vulnerable hall where they may not be getting fed orbit. Say Soviet mix very, very tough choices as educated medals about how to do that. As they go back to physical school to answer your question unfortunately, everything is different. Yes. You have to physically just inspired each other. Yes. At. PLEXIGLASS, you'll between A. tweet guests. Yes. It's after where mass? Yes. Hallway property one way. Yes. Very different. Yuck. How sanitize bathrooms of? Tears. Bank of the past and chow cafeteria is a thing of the past. Wow. Now, your be sort of Bill Bratton going your back Daska. It's just an extraordinarily difficult time that are agree just devastated lack of leadership at the federal level and the president has. Unbelievably compromise -sition off kids might solar when they have to start virtually there's rules Not Safe to have para young people in class ev you'd gotten involved in studies with how good is virtual educate. You must have in this business of the flipped classroom the yeah. It's bearing mixed I think. percent of kids is actually a better learning environment. But. For most hits, it's substandard rivalry most about bill not just your the quality of the Berkeley. But those kids don't have access to computers and the Internet what does pandemic is done as slaps in the face of the massive network. In our society dealing couple different public health crises one is that the. Senate races, and so we'd have a separate kits rea- intercity city urban. Native. Reservations who don't have access to me as a starting on school this dozen amazing banks to deliver devices to create pots in Wifi. Out, of what, what can you give me an example than you lots of examples for here tocado Ado given out over one, hundred, thousand vice his. Boston thirty thousand. Much nuts the device can ipad. Tablet I at A. SAN ANTONIO famous. The Superintendent Barry District eight or nine out students had to give out forty seven thousand devices. A buying UH spots in South Bend Indiana Action Buses in poor communities that are Wi fi enabled hostages just Rallo lack of leadership a federal. Unbelievable great tippety innovation and you'll quotation from those local leaders spending time everyday talking to that what do you say to their commercially voter? Who says well, that's the way it should be local people should be solved these problems. The federal government will blah. Blah Blah. Yeah. Well, unfortunately, this panic doesn't know city boundaries doesn't know state boundaries on nothing else spill were learning how inextricably as we are here on C. Knock on humanity. What we need to a national threat is a national response. We were really an international response because it doesn't. It doesn't seem to respect national borders either are unwilling s the scale our willingness to do contract tracing our fight about mass which proven to be still. And let the tens of thousands of juvenile gas in hums about music people a sit in a just me. So heartbreaking, we've allowed that to happen. I'm here in the United States has four percent of the world's population in almost twenty five percent of the world's deaths think about that. Oh, I think about it all the time frankly. So what is the Emerson collective doing about all this all these problems? We've been doing a couple of things and we're all trying to do everything. We can either citizens to try and fight with statins leadership board from these city. So when this hit or back in March we have done a weekly call with school districts and nonprofits around food distribution. Because there's a number things schools do with a lot more than education. Schools I'm social safety nets, and so we have an unbelievable at work of a school district not partners delivered tens of millions of meals every single day. Throughout this crisis and we have to keep kids fan not just speaking kids with being parents defeated Juniarti. Get situations where something blows up apartment steps to keep at. Flowing that's been remarkable. Remarkable to see that happen. Now, that's one thing. It's one thing in the summer spring when people can get around and it's warm and so what's going to happen is it goes into the winner and flu season starts and all these other things. Yeah. Well, sellouts. These are all the facts the years extraordinary get into. School district that a number of dance that used that outside schools distribution centers in. France they had dropped both meals homework to students love bus routes in taken back to work the next day had that kind of creativity So it's retrying go back in a hybrid situation that had kids on buses. Physically distance on buses, you don't have less kids. A twenty, five percent of your forty, seven kids you'll come down to time for all. Harbor people thinking through what they are doing. Let's say kids coming to school under just. Scenarios on Tuesdays Thursdays with do on Thursday a send that child home with food Friday Saturday Sunday pundits back. A basket of food to make it through the next couple of days. But that's the kind of creativity. Again, problem solving a couple of questions. Let's say we open a school. Are the kids going stay arm distance apart of they're going to wear masks all day I think what about the teachers here? She going to wear a mask all day? Yes I think they have to, and again we what are we seeing bill? Not Epidemiologist Dr Seen every state is open to fast what's happened cases third have had to shut again and the last thing I won't schools schools opening in have to shut down. So we have to open carefully in cautiously in doctorate on with all of the concert precautions that we know she people say and we know young children may be not as. We know they can spread me euros or slightly spread as else on. Let me just even go just a further level after. In Fill your your viewers to understand let me give you a couple of different scenarios You might have a teacher who would love to teach but can't teach in a physical violence because of their underlying health conditions, we're GONNA have to allow that power. Teaches virtual manner of you might have a child who's perfectly healthy that child is being raised by ran ran off unwind in that child might not be able to return to school on right. I'm Lazio you might have another child parents is or parents aren't essential workers in May have to be in school every single day. So we have to be they have to be at work everyday in the kid has to be in school. Last summer daughter they love to go to school were I've eighth week may not be able to do that was wondering classmates might need to be school or by tons of. My Child, we deliver school a daily to speaking of your child. What are your kids experiencing right now? What are they expect to experience? So both my kids one, thousand, one high school. This was a major decision that it is not say hat impersonal teaching severe both GonNa Start Virtual. Is Not ideal. A is where we are as a country is the right civilians May and what we do this August will determine what it can do it September, and if if we decided country is school is more important than bars. If we decided it one for played away a minute schools more important than bars. I'm being ironic everybody we have. You know we have not been willing to make the concept basic you'll sacrifice in. So interested out your sacrifices and whatever you think about it will with sense, risk their lives to war to save us. Already asking people to do is to wear a mass is to stay socially distant. That's not asking hurdle behavior. All of us now have a chance to say thirty forty, fifty, thousand lives over next. Must we do the right thing was signed me up for that and I just hope people understand like it kids a chance at. Kind of education than need in person to your point physical school have your sociable is met at the school. Did we have to make some tiny tiny satirizes created basically huge opportunities ordinations fifty million show. We'll be back right after this. Tell dock provides access to speak with board certified doctors via APP phone or video anytime from the comfort of home. Tell, it gives you twenty four seven access to doctors for nonemergency conditions like a sinus infection which has happened to me allergies, rashes which have not happened to me and more. They're board certified doctors can diagnose treat and prescribe medication when medically necessary to be delivered to the pharmacy of your choice and right now people, there's no better time than the present tell doc is available at no cost through most major health plans and many employers. So everyone download the APP today or visit Tele Doc, dot com slash science rules to register today. So you're ready when you need a doctor's care or schedule a doctor visit today. That's T., L. A. D. O. C. Dot, com slash science rules, Tele Doc dot com slash science rules a criminal scheme involving nearly fifty thousand falsified unemployment insurance claims has been discovered by Maryland State officials. The coordinated scam adds up to more than five hundred million dollars in claims while it is capitalizing upon the hardships caused by the corona virus the fraud involved identity theft from previous security breaches and Maryland isn't alone other states are experiencing similar unemployment fraud. You put your information in. So many places online unfortunately, cybercriminals around the world keep finding new ways to steal identities. 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That's K. I W ICAO DOT, com slash science rules. Do you have an opinion about the quality of virtual education I think it's very midst. It is not ideal. You see a trend on the kid as my experience Kidman, your skills and so. Ever was learning. You'll fast, how do this better I think it. Prior to our said London learners best time Martin possible great teacher couple with technology that can tell us what what do you mean by blended learning so I, think the idea that we should just Martin in a physical school five days a week, six hours a day or whatever debts obsolete I want sheldon whether it's an INNOC- Chicago or in Appalachia would have made a major reservation I want kids to learn they want lead time anywhere finer. Their genes. Do Not Ravech so we have to make access to technology access to WIFI Um we have to make that as ubiquitous is run by electricity. So having those chances keeping. Not just trying to school. David. Anytime. Couple Bat with great teachers. Great Principals at is always going to be the best bar. Now do you have any tips for parents K-? Your Kid's gotTa be home you would you do this is a really really stressful time or parents need WanNa, keep their kids safe trying to keep your job going to try to work in trying to feed their family and it's just I feel so much Paris. Now who such a heightened level of anxiety style just said things if your child is largely Barney and halt weather full-time virtual or hybrid situation on Keith talking to your child, she working through what's working, what's not staying gaze as as Google technology. In was not. You'll be still continue to have conversations where things aren't clearly have to reach out to teachers. Manhattan stations are push again want students do continue to find their own passion by their interest of the Internet is amazing way to do that and then I think we're are really worried about bill. All in behind over five, six, eight months between March in now of the cousin, all learning lost with mixture the nation I would love to have a massive to program. At virtually or in person bill students that have fallen behind some help and catch up, and you'll give me needed national investments in schools in public education on. A big piece of a piece of best. So far. Our unwillingness to do that really worries. The you point. Some kids are GONNA be flying. Some kids are probably. Because of this most kids are not going to be in reality a whole set of kit. It fallen significantly behind I don't want to have lost ignition you can't afford that. So we have to keep it. Sorry get your react to help those kids there to catch up to work with their parents stands question. To help them move to a better place. Do you see any upside all this? I. All silver mines because it is just the on ensuring. That we are we should not be it should not. Oh, man that. France friends not this people sit should not snack by kids educations not lying but give it again, a man-made catastrophe walk it'll be hope I'll say it again I hope our kids senior cotton humanity. Empathy. that it will be profound mass relies on my hope they. Are To netted. Help they come back to either headed but flexible in able to problems. On my hope, we have a lot more scientists on your shoes yung-chen one standing of science out. And if that happens, I hope you the on generous young people will always vote in understand. This is not about that, right? This is not good government. And good leadership saves lives and bad leadership unfortunately, bitterly hostile is. So if that happens, that's a big if for the next twenty, thirty, forty years. I still wish I definitely wish we hadn't gone boom this. What's the good things? Could Cabinet from? Do you have specific things? You'd recommend a schools keep the deaths apart where masks hand cleaner on every wall of dispenser and every wall and and. What about the ventilation in an old school building? That's that's all real issues. Again, federal government should shoot best two, hundred, two, hundred, fifty, billion dollars in all of these things including relation I can you the disadvantage? where there's good air conditioner anti air conditioning I bet you the ventilation very good is getting a massive at what he's country accommodated bear here. What people to understand that were asking schools and school districts to do something none of us across the country had done yet we're asking them to the public health officials do testing new contract tracy at school, Raskin them to keep building clean sanitize rates that they've never done before rasping to rethink transportation wrestling to think about mental physical health in different ways. Yes rescue also educate on top got you think about the level of complexity religious asking fifteen thousand school superintendents the process country one hundred principles big about Jin without clear National Guidance Mellon, national testing, program contact traits on they're working so hard. They're so smart that breaks. My heart were asking them to thanks that the rest of the country hasn't begun to do that level of detail. So. These are school superintendents coordinate with each other just by community they form a consortium, they get lists or I don't know what they do. They find each other. Yes. But still they under political pressure from their school boards there's governors, their practices and their state. and. So they there's a limited amount that they can do i. see that. Now let me ask you this big fundamental question. Okay it's been said that kids need to go back to school for their mental health. And that is as important. In fact, in many cases, they claim the claim is that an outweighs the danger of bringing crow virus shown. Do you have an opinion about that? That's just. Ludicrous in one point dangerous be clear we're talking to Chris. Dangerous. So tell us how you really feel. Woah this is so it's so serious I. Wish I could jump cancer going back to get off. started. On the food distribution. You had a number of districts pivot very quickly to tell the house and you had a series of kits that were already struggling with real with mental health issues as stress and trauma and I'm didn't have a whole set of kids whose families were basically okay with mom and dad are Boston job airfoil world has been upended in what you'd see people move to teachers, social workers, counselors, psychologists literally reaching out on a daily basis to kids are telling you talk to our kids are grown up. And is not ideal. They've been doing that stock com that's actually better way kids as possible. So that ten yes. maslow's hierarchy needs be. Talking about at, we have to take care of their social emotional health. We can do that virtually may not be ideal. We can't do that. Physically endanger their actual physical house in danger parents at doesn't mix. And so let's bring them back with it is safe to do so for for health standpoint but real during school districts learning tell us out in a way the. Extraordinary? Right outlet doing that all summer. So no one's giving up on that no-one underestimates the importance kid food social health fiscal health, and if bill as the foundation that ambitious wrong in the top his back to physical school back foundation, you'll better education foundation isn't strong, but we can't talk about outs with desktop. WanNa talk over the taste answer the foundation to get the academic part. So you're frustrated. Everybody's frustrated parents. Educators are frustrated. I imagine officials in the federal government or frustrated. but is there something? Are there concrete that people can do and you can say, no, it's hopeless but you might have some good ideas i. always also are the best thing we can do to allow our children to return to a physical school is to beat down this virus in our commutes we're seeing rates going down was the tests going down at opens the door to physical school. So every single. One of every single day as a series of choices tonight, do we wear a mask outside? Are Not we maintain physical discipline or not? You stay out of bars and restaurants or not? A those are choices we can make is the recent study in our John Hot John, opposite talk you don't expense having more people die over the next three or four months until we obsess over here in Toronto virus addition. About s the stay on it opportunity all of us. To save lives, we can do that together right now. So that's up I. always hopeful. I am not just frustrated on furious not done what we need to do to this point. But what if you made August the months will we actually step so that we can have a safer September sacred October better November and really get he'll be distinct down in allowed more accusers times, I always have hope. I know was possible. This isn't rocket science this discipline and commitment to making some small sacrifices and desperately hope effectively rebuilding to do that for sells for families formations job shall we say all the time if you want things to go back to normal wear a mask maintain physical distance for crying out loud you WanNa go we all WanNa get back. What would you be doing right now in a normal year Will, be real real jobs on laser focused got our bill. So that's doing for years and working on South West is for the man will. Shoot being shot, and so that's my real job. That's my day job. That's my ashes and we will not harbor. reached. Extraordinarily men working with. Like people try to step up on this issue. Of vacuuming de Sade so Much like he added trying just bring some some thoughtfulness. You know get people working together sharing ideas, sharing best practices trying to step into that leadership void. So we're all trying to do. More. Choice. Not Choice. Is there a connection between gun violence in the coronavirus? Well, I say I tell people working on three. Of three public health crises on we're dealing with systemic racism, which is not new or Carla four, hundred years old now dealing with pandemic and we're dealing with combatants is public health prices in these things all three unfortunately most intersect exactly what we were we work in segregated on, they were socially distance afford. That was a term working communities least access to good healthcare. Working the that had been red lines on whether isn't access to capital a mortgage immunities. Their doesn't not access to vote in all those saying the absence of all those. Does what are people going to eat? They're going to have a roof over their head. Either kits, and if you don't have a chance to do those things in mainstream society, you're GONNA do Fortune Street economy that too often Isis Chicago here at these the gun pilots. So the absence of our commitment to equality to equity our lack of. Lack of seriousness about investing in these communities in fact, the opposite, very disinvestment. Of We've created this problem get. This is another mandate vaster and we're working our way out of it by trying to flip all on his head at. Of guys go back to high school get the makes you train hard soft skills. We had basic clinical team were two guys. What's hard in the soft skill sell it. So we're trying to help guys move from St Army I'm to the legal economy and then skills ferber on our guys note customer servants. They know in those are chance. They don't take care of people. Serious things how you build a resume. How do? Is Shake hands on how do you handle soon needy. How do you work for somebody you basically in self employed hall her working on his feet economy, and so we've had a number guys transitioned Matt to the legally. Guys working law firms now is amazing. For Loyd Culinary hospitality manufactured you name it. Austin skills is just trying to Friday, half didn't exist before let's say also rate you give them a second chance I really project cases. The first first chance I can tell you're going with that. Wow Speaking of Education and skepticism of the man or a government directives. Is there resistance to wearing masks in those communities there's resistance to social distancing mass unfortunately, virtually every community across country and that I were are no different on it is a challenge are what we do. We ask You keep outreach teams ever come health educators, absurd help strain cross, train them so yes. The started this. There was real skepticism was this they hopes was this could whack people. You'll catch this or not, and we still battling those those those. would. Come a long way. Across the whether it's your white also latte or to whoever tate. Far Too many people today you want senseless thing I still don't understand how quickly important status kings which we work on our immune to that essence. So. You know I sell a time if you want people to recycle water bottles, for example, you get their kids excited about recycling and then they just hassled their parents. Parents Recycle, and so is the same true of wearing can we get kids excited about wearing masks? If you look again when he's wild work, you see lots of three or four five year olds running around mass. It's a little bit who has a little bit fun and obviously parents have to start with that but our kids enjoy it again just this is his total anecdotes, the street our kids are doing this as well better than we as adults. So yes, our is absolutely continue to lead us onto where need to go and with a huge sense of. recycling. That's not a life and death decision day as of these decisions on daily basis at huge life and death in pitched. Here you go if you king of the forest. What would you do? What I would have done in March or April was to just shut the country down for up Shut it down not two thousand that the other day we sort of semi. Down now, the day she shut down ninety five percent of were a day and hadn't even willing to absorb some Simpson Salonen, call it. Hey, just. Struggles to disappointment whatever. For Short amount. Of Time. Really walk around in a very different place today in. Our. Kids go back to school. So our unwillingness resolve salvage title away snobby come into our country. Wash Russ are well here we are. Now what would you do now? If you were in charge yeah I, I do the same thing with we shut down shut down for a month for four weeks and beat it down do school virtually, which is GonNa do most anyway we have one more cases you'll every single day and Intel's number start to go down a significant way I'm rolling risk everything's everything's jeopardy. So yeah, she got for Moscow but what if we did that for Aug what we should now what would that me? Hotted Line Timbre October So happily take a little short term pain for everybody's health and safety and a lot more freedom. Flexibility going for. Very Go. Thank you sir. Thank you so much for taking the time. Our guest today has been another than Arne Duncan. He was secretary of Education under President Obama and CEO of the Chicago public schools. He currently works at the Emerson collective working for social change. So everybody if you'd like to participate and I, hope you do leave us a voicemail with your questions. The number is two, zero, one, four, seven, two, zero, seven, eight, five. You can also right in at ask Bill Nye Dot Com please especially send us questions for upcoming episodes we've got. An Isa Ramirez on the Science of materials and how inventions have shaped humanity and Kim been stead on artificial intelligence and long duration space exploration there different topics from the pandemic. But this is a pandemic everybody. We are all in this together. And during this pandemic, perhaps now, more than ever science rules. So if you like science rules, Corona Virus Edition, please take a moment to rate and review it and apple podcast on stitcher. It helps us out and helps other people learn about the show we find out what you WANNA. Hear. So thank you science rules. Coronavirus edition is produced by Harry Huggins and S Powell or Editor Street see Samuel Center engineers lose, Fleming who also mixed this episode Josephine Martorana, our executive producer special thanks Casey Hawford and Chris. Ben and is the chief content officer stitcher and it Stitcher as I mentioned a few moments ago science rolls. Out Three more things. Wash your hands, wash your hands, wash your hands where amass where a mass wear a mask keep distance keep social distance keeps social distance. Let's beat this pandemic down. So we can get back to normal. DOC provides access to speak with board certified doctors via APP phone or video anytime from the comfort of your home. Tell the DOC gives you twenty four seven access to doctors for nonemergency conditions like a sinus infection allergies rashes are more download the APP. Today or visit Tele Doc dot com slash science rules to register today. So you're ready when you need a doctor's care or schedule a doctor visit today.

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Back to School? (with Arne Duncan, former Secretary of Education)

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

1:04:35 hr | 8 months ago

Back to School? (with Arne Duncan, former Secretary of Education)

"This episode of in the bubble sponsored by Tele Doc tell it provides round the clock access to high quality medical care from the comfort of home which we all need right now with. The opportunity to access board certified doctors and therapists anytime anywhere for non emergency conditions like sinus infections, allergies, flu rashes, stressing anxiety and more, and you get physician guidance. If you think you've been exposed to the coronavirus, which is very useful, download the APP visit dot com to register, so you're ready when you need medical care or schedule a virtual visit today. On. Versa kind we've achieved something that was at I in no way certain namely that are doctors and nurses. All those in healthcare and the hospitals are not overburdened. Must emphasize is a fragile intermediate success. Welcomed in the bubble. This is Andy side at Anzac. Welcome to the back to school episode, or should it be? Back to school question-mark episode where we are going to try to get at the question on everybody's mind. What is going to happen in the fall? The voice you just heard was voice of Chancellor Merckel from Germany. Talking about the progress that they have made which is allowing them to make decisions around opening schools much more clearly. Let's face it. We're in a situation with schools where we don't quite know the best answer. We're in a situation where we are bound to disappoint some people. We are bound to take uncomfortable risks. And let's face it. We're bound to have this feeling that we're not doing quite right by our kids. And that is a terrible feeling. We've been reminded about anything in the last few weeks. It should be. Our needs are not the only ones that matter. There are people who for all of the challenges that we're going. Through are going through an incredibly complex set of challenges, whether that's racism, whether that's being a nursing home and facing the consequences of poor planning in poor health care whether that's large amounts of unemployment, the thing that I hope people in our bubble are grappling with is how to make their bubble Baker how to include their neighborhood and the community and their needs, because school is a collective good. Our kids the whole generation is a collective good, and while we want what's right and what's best for our kids? We have a whole lot of considerations to attack. So for that reason, this episode is going to be completely focused there. And I honestly couldn't have a better guest than Arne Duncan. Who is the former secretary of education and a Barack Obama? He's also the former co Chicago public schools. He is deeply deeply deeply invested. In educational outcomes. And, the equity issues in the educational system. And the ones that are even being more deeply understood by all of us in this time where both corona virus. And the criminal justice issues are to bear. So we are going to explore head on the question, should we be starting school? How should we be making those decisions? And how should parents be thinking about them? After that I'm going to talk to a parent who will talk about her perspective on the matter and I introduce her to you. After the interview name is Social Girton. And then finally In lieu of Zack's fats, we're going to have an interview with Zach Slavic. Our Co host and Co producer about his own thoughts. As he thinks about heading off to college and the offs there so I will see what I can get out of sack at the very end if you stick around for that, but in the meantime. Here's Arnie. Hey there. It's going on Sir how you doing. You hang in there. TRY TO HAVE A. Hard time. Hard time the at is. The principal things I'd love to start with I. Want to get some of the work you do with Emerson collective actually have no choice, but we're going to have to get the basketball because in this house basketball rules everything else, but probably makes sense to start with what I think. People are starting to obsess about right now. which is our school's GonNa open and I've got. I'm going to turn over to US AC to take I got. My Co, host is A. Eighteen year old, getting ready to hope potentially go off to college, and he's say hi to Secretary Duncan. Estimate you Arnie. Are those done stuff? What's going on? You're doing a great job as a CO host boy. It's really cool to see I. got eighteen year old trying to go to college as well so seeing the same boat. So if you were still running the Chicago, school district. Would you open the schools? And how would you be processing all this? Talking to Janice Jackson who does out of school all the time and talking to superintendents around the country, and these are. Is You know better than anybody? Any of these are unprecedented times, and so it's not a matter of do we open model, but is not a light switch, the flick on and flick off I think many school districts, and we can talk about higher education where many school districts are going to try to go back. Let's go look very very different and you know. What was his change almost everything? And so I think what we need to prepare for. Is that every child? Part of their learning will continue to be virtual will continue to be on. You may have some students. Monday, Wednesday in my students Tuesday. Thursday might do afternoon ships. They'll be students because of their own health issues because of preexisting conditions of people that apparent grandparent raising that. Who literally may not be able to come back to school at all They're going to be teachers who can't come back and they're going to have to teach virtually real basic fangs. Maybe get a little bit experiencing supermarkets now. How do you manage hallways? How do you think about sanitizing back from? Multiple Times a day. I worry a lot about our younger kids. Andy. How do you think about recess and play in the sensors so fundamentally human? How do we try and do that differently? High School I think has been more adaptable none of this as the same apple virtually. I think is much harder for pre K. and kindergarten, first and second grade doing this. Folks have talked about. Maybe don't bring back. High school students, Neutrinos High School buildings to serve you mentioned your middle school students in your create more physical distance in the US term social distance I once connected more than ever before, but creative physical dissident. And in the hard question that nobody is much talking about I'm trying to sort of get people thinking about is. Okay. Let's say folks do go back at some point. If things go south of things, don't go well how? Do you back down again and that's a very very tough question. Did before we open? We need to at least have some parameters. Some guidelines of dos about what that's going. Help people who don't understand the structure of the education system here understand where those decisions even get made. Do you expect them to get made locally district by district, even more locally school by school? Do you expect there to be some national recommendations or standards that people can follow or opt in or out of? Do you think the state level? Where's the thinking? You've raised about ten or twelve? Really hard questions where those debates going on. The question of theory versus reality so in reality I'm always very honest that people can agree or disagree could push back, but I think you probably agree on this one. The lack of leadership coming from DC from those in government has been devastating as actually. Is You know better than anyone has has contributed to death, and contributed to the just the heartbreak and the devastation that so many kids engineers have have felt so in a normal time where we had leadership that had compassion and believe in science, and wanted to make a difference, and we didn't have the CDC watering down guide it's. Much more leadership coming from from DC Part, of the reason you and I have been so active. Frankly that would wanted to have a very different day job now, but because we feel compelled to. Because, there's been that lack of leadership guide itself. There's very little good honest information coming from the federal government and frankly lots of misunderstanding and miss that. Increased the death toll country nets on, there's absolutely untouchable, but that's. So having said that. We have seen strong leadership at the local level at the state level, having governors and mayors work together, and this is to vary on the school side trying to directly. Tremendously what you do in rural Montana is look very different than what happens here. You know inner city. CHICAGO. You know what happens in. Maine is going to be very different than what happens in la or DC in, so it's GonNa! Be a combination I think leadership at the state level and focus on what's going on at the mogul navigable for me before you could open. A couple of things have to be in place. You understand this. I've tried to listen to you so carefully to others who are to truly US person this anoc that you have to see declining cases in your community, you have to have the ability to test frequently, and I don't know if that's. Every day or every other day, but I don't think it's every two weeks. It's much more frequent the NAT. You have to have an ability to trace. You have to have ability to isolated quarantined. If that's necessary, you have to search capacity of your local hospitals and again thing about the last hard question as win. And at what point do you close things down? If it's not working and so I, think much of this will come down. All of this will come down starting with the state, just sorta bypassing the federal level because of the absence of leadership in their state will set some parameters and in local communities, depending on the size of the communities. Will make those decisions by see. My hometown Chicago six hundred schools and many many neighborhoods that you could see different things happening potentially in different neighborhoods on given the size of the school system new. York is obviously the largest as a second Chicago's third, but in rural communities where there may only be. One hundred kids at school. There are some schools in Montana. That open very very early very thoughtfully that they've been helping I'm watching those very carefully. The Superintendent Superintendent of two hundred chance, not one point two million and superintendent was the one doing temperature checks at the door for students walking in, so we'll just have to be thoughtful. We have to be honest. We're doing calls again every week with superintendents, everyone's sharing information seeing their creativity thoughtfulness has been so helpful this a separate question, but I just wanted to let you know. Andy Serwer town fan on food distribution, because schools aren't just places of learning schools of social safety nets, school systems are continuing to serve tens of millions of meals every single day, and we're trying to tell the shooting work through issues there and need for food continues to go up every single week. At some point, we may get closer to get in on. On the other side of Covid were not going to get on the other side of poverty in job loss in hunger and food security. That's much longer road, and so I've just been unbelievably inspired impressed by rogue efforts. Schools District nonprofit helping. We've had a crisis here in Chicago. This we can talking about it. You want you've had your living into epicenter there in the folks talk to make sure that basic needs are important, so my priority for schools, I keep kids and teachers alive in safe. That's the first thing. I Ranch Chicago. Public Schools for seven years. Never call schools for Dave. We never had a snow day. Never try. It wasn't just care about education because schools often the safest place for kids. Place got two sometimes three meals a day. So you have to keep people live and say. We headed for schools I that we ought to do those rightly to do. then. We have to think about kids. Physical and social emotional needs food, the mental health we should talk about the huge challenges and trauma bear, then after those things keeping kids in beverly alive, and say then health and safety physical emotional amusement. Then let's talk about education. What looks like what? It a physical school belly over there on. That with our guest after the break. This episode of in the bubble sponsored by. Tell it provides round the clock access to high-quality medical care from the comfort and safety of home. Is We all continue to observe social distancing guidelines are impulse can be put off our own non-emergency care needs, but we don't have to. Talk, the opportunity to talk to high-quality Ford certified doctors and therapists anytime anywhere for conditions like sinus infection allergies, flu rashes stress it anxiety in more as well as get physician guidance. 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That is a great group that if you don't know, it is run by chef Jose Andrey who's coming up on the show soon that feeds hundreds of thousands of people now. How do we do that? You might ask the question of. How do we actually get the money? In the door to send over to places like world central kitchen. We do that two ways. First as we find organizations that want sponsor program like Tele Doc does who really want to get information to you and services to you that can be valuable, and second is from those of you who joined the podcast who join Patriot on and get a whole array of services and connection points. And special episodes to listen to, and for even small donations, the Nice thing about becoming a member is that you can kill two birds with one stone. You can help support the program. Make it work and know that money is going to go to a good cause if it comes Zachariah. So that's Patriot on and the way you would join is if you went to lemonade media dot com slash in the bubble. Thank you so much for allowing us to do this show and for allowing us to make this donation. So. Parents comfortable with some uncomfortable truths, okay, one of them is that they may not be a single best answer from a science standpoint, and therefore the uncomfortable truth is, we may be going into the fall doing the best we can without a reliable answer and I know that's frustrating for parents, but that may be in fact where we are. I think it's one hundred percent where we're going to be. Even more explicitly than you did. There was not a single best answer here and your host is trying to physical college campus this fall. My daughter's trying to go to physical college campuses fall in. We don't know whether that's going to happen. It may happen. It may not if it does happen, she may have to return home. It's point things may have to close down and so we have to be to your point, which is really important one. We have to be very We have to get used to that almost a comfortable. We have to get used to a huge amount of uncertainty of trying to learn in real. Real time and again see people talk and share information. Do this work with this work is nothing if it doesn't humble you doing this great humility on being willing to admit when things aren't working a change in direction, Blarney from others, whether it's College, presidents, school, superintendents, or principles, or whatever, but that's the world will be an asset that's going to be in for I don't know. Another year another eighteen months another two years. This is not anyone who's thinking about this a fall day my goal two months ago, I wanted to have a massive summer school so that we could catch kids up. Get them going and that fairly that dream without the window. I hope we can go back in many places for the fall, but we give them what that looks like how we do that and how we help. Catch about. How do we help? Catch up those kids that are just falling further behind on spend lots of time thinking about that. We can get into that if he wants well. One thing in you alluded to it in very kind way, if some tough decisions were made to bite the bullet early and take some medicine early on your dream of having kids in summer, school could have been very possible if we'd done what they did New Zealand and other place. Now we didn't and so it's of limited value to dwell on that other than to say that. If tomorrow morning, the president woke up. Up and decided to put on a mask and tell all of his supporters to put on a mask, and we can get the transmission rate down. We can return to normal life quickly and so I know he listens to this podcast religiously. So that's my my ass for him I think one thing parents that I've talked to have learned in this whole process is how different being a teacher is than being a parent. And how much respect they have for what it takes to develop a child, physically emotionally, intellectually academically, and certainly they have had to do it many of them, while they try to keep income coming in and in less than ideal settings, but parents at this point I believe have noticed that their children. I think are behind where they would want them to be. If! You're putting yourself as a parent who doesn't know what you know. How do you make that decision? Who Do you listen to? Who Do you trust? Issues here and I appreciate it. I think I'll I'll maybe further complicated. A little bit is I. Don't think it's going to be that. Much of a bifurcated shorts I think the norm is going to be a hybrid type of situation, so the goal might be from my son or daughter that they're going to school two days a week, or maybe two mornings a week or two afternoons a week, or whatever might be in a way. Way To limit that social interaction to try to mitigate that risk and learn from home, and that situation can work in some families and his possible in some families. That isn't possible in some families where just a single mom trying to work to physical job, so she's an essential worker at Grocery store or whatever and she doesn't show up. She gets fire. There's and have to be a level of coordination and communication. That is unprecedented. And let's say you're under principal. That school of five hundred kids, who maybe it's a thousand kids some places. It's three thousand kids. You're going to have to have a conversation literary with every single family and trying to figure out what they need me. A goal is not equal to goes equality and the really. Hard on the table. The really hard call for Pencil might be the you have. It's number of kids who want to come back to school. You're going to have X. number of kids who have to come back to school, and you have X. number kids who cannot come back to school, but those that middle bucket those kids who want to come back to school you may well have to prioritize which ones you're going to allow to come back to school. School, because their home situations and others were. It'd be a nice thing, but they could still sort of manage to learn. Be Safe at home, and there's no right or wrong on this, but there's never been that conversation when I managed out schools, every August I little. Knock on doors and hang out that tax and bring everyone back to school. You wanted to everyone coming back. Kids missed. A week would be out that next week, so kids who drop down? A little bit late. Schools may literally in some places not be able to physically accommodate every single student, and they're going to have to have some uncomfortable conversations with parents is to. Yes, you're sung safe to come back for your dollar to we understand your sons out has to come back because of family situations that they're not safe at home by themselves and they might say. Say to me, we know that your son or daughter was to come back. You want them to come back, but I'm not able to take them right now. Because another family, the needs the physical school more than you do, and that's level of detail there's going to be adjustments may in situations are going to change as you know, but that's the level of detail in nuanced. Nuanced that? We're going to have to not everywhere, but I'm saying then many places right couple of things. I learned from what you said. One is how individually customizes decisions are secondly what people want, and what they get may not match in. People are rightfully their tax payers. They're going to feel for the first time like they're getting asked to do things that other kids are. Are Getting to do and we know how difficult that can be and I have a feeling. It's parent who comes to school screaming when their kid gets a B, plus and they've never had anybody that's going to not be very happy when they get told. Sorry, you can accommodate your child at home better than others cannon. Therefore, we're going to ask you to do that. So we're having whole conversations country now about privilege, and about a lack of equality and a lack of fairness and a lack of justice, and you hit the nail on the head. School systems now may have to prioritize kids who restore had less. And those of us with privilege may be asked to make some sacrifices. Do some things different? And you talked about uncomfortable conversations. That's the me some uncomfortable conversations at how that's going to play out in. Place by place, but if anything through this crisis were discovering our common humanity, and hopefully people can really allies the occasion and think about what it takes to keep everyone safe. Start we as parents. We worry about our own kids. We don't worry about our neighbors kids. We go about neighbors kids. You've got to worry about the kids down the block. Worry about the kids in our community in a that we haven't before, and that's a schooner soaking import. which you said so profound, a hits me into the theme of why we started this podcast in the bubble, which is you gotTa make your bubble as big as possible in time when people are hurting and the sense of sacrifice of stay home, so you can save other people's lives is sense of thinking of others, even if you don't personally feel at risk. That is going to be at a whole new level when you're asking me to ask my kids to sacrifice because I, know a lot of people that will buy into the theory, but let's be honest. You feel like your kids have one chance and most of us as parents want for our kids everything that we had but mostly want everything we missed, and we want them to have and we don't want to miss anything. Let me actually run another thought by now. We're thinking way out loud here, but. One of the conversations I was having with apparent was. Don't expect. That! What you get in return will be the same as what you had. Expect you lose some things. But ask yourself. Are there compensating gains? In other words, because of the fact that your child is living through a unique period of time. Can they learn something about themselves as a human? Can they learn something about this country? Can they contribute something that would be an educational opportunity? They'd never have before and yesterday may be four months behind in Mathematics But they may be two years ahead in writing essays and working in teams and communication and something else, and if you take that look as a parent, instead of saying what is mine. What do I need? What can I get but think with a little bit of creativity? That's what it's GonNa. Take to you through this period. All these challenges cove it George Floyd. Is slapping our nation in the face at the massive inequalities that have existed everywhere in every system education. Health care access to capital. In Japan and South and West sides, they'd been socially distance for decades. This is nothing new just didn't call it. Socially distance been red line. They've been marginal. Is there have been disenfranchised? So what do we do? Educationally? We have to do the best we can for every single child and again I worry most about those kids that are falling further, and further behind Chicago's give out one hundred thousand devices. Boston's give out thirty thousand devices in south, Bend Indiana. It's not just access to devices access to Wi fi. Internet South Bend Indiana Parking School. Buses in communities don't have access to their wi fi able to open that up the idea. Andy did our kids should only learn nine o'clock three o'clock in a physical. Physical building that idea has to be obsolete. Every child inner city rural remote native American reservation has to have the chance to learn anything they want anytime anywhere twenty four seven, and you'll find their passion find their genius so closing this digital divide now making access as ubiquitous as water and electricity should have happened. A long time ago hasn't happened. We have to do that now and trying to get jam, mitigate as best we can. Those kids that are falling behind cradle of access. This never existed in the history of our country. Really tough job market now. Lots of young people coming out of college, Atari, what have we had? A massive tutoring forced hundreds and hundreds of thousands of tutors, one, the most truly most research dangerous small group individuals structure again ideally face to face, but we could do that virtually and my two kids during the school year. She's still tune in online now, but could we match up? Those kids who have fallen behind who were worried about you know with tutors who can help them continue to catch up and grow, and so we have I don't want to just. Just concede that kids fall behind the truth that you're saying is real I. WanNa fight that every single day is created lease is we can kids, mental and emotional health I'm so worried about but this telehealth. We have some school systems or teachers counselors. Social workers and psychologists are checking kids every single day virtually and is now. Many young kids are almost I'd say more comfortable technology than the are face to face, and you'll keep that going instead of do that without the food distribution, so those things we have to try. We have to try and do. Point is. I don't want to see us. The silver lines here I hate so much that we're here as a nation. But if Your kids, my kids abyss generates. Kids have a level of awareness of their humanity of their global connectedness that none of us can be saved for free or feel good in our bubbles to use your word if others aren't doing that. This is a lesson that for me is way more important than Algebra or biology or whatever to have then lead us to places. Where can we as adults have failed whether it's this area? I talk a lot about gun violence. That's around focus now we as adults have fundamentally failed to keep our kids safe from gun violence with fail now to keep them safe from Colbert in a way that we should have failed to keep them. Free from racial prejudice and. Avert racism that defined so much of who we are as a country, if our young kids can't figure these lessons out better than we did and do it at this age, lead our country, not over the next one two years, but over the next twenty or thirty or forty years to a safer more just and more equitable society than that lessons for me a hell of a lot more important than not come she visits. From my bubble after the break stay with us. If you're enjoying the bubble. We've got another one you might like. America interrupted. A new podcast from the PBS news hour. America interrupted is about how the coronavirus is changing our communities, our jobs and the way we live and where we go from here. Sounds a lot like our podcast. I can't wait to hear it. America interrupted is available wherever you get your podcasts. There are people that cove it. has disrupted their lives, and there's people to whom covid has brought a focus on the deprivation that they already experienced and made a greater. We can all sort ourselves and I don't mean to be an anyway judgmental, because baby, you're experiencing both, but if you're someone who's primarily is experiencing disruption. An enormous opportunity. To use that disruption to reach out and create those new lessons, but more importantly to reach out and actually help someone on the other side of that equation, people who are going through something far more than having their lives disrupted missing, being in the physical campus I think our kids are more inclined to accept that lesson. Then we as parents are I think we as parents have a very protective feeling for our kids that we want them to all have everything but I think our kids have understanding of justice. At least I've experienced. That is innate I. See the way they're reacting over the last few weeks, and this is the breath of fresh air this acknowledgement this bearing witness. To where we are, they can lead us part of the way through there, but that's not to sweep away and make the justice and equity issue sound, easy. In Minnesota we have one of the highest education gaps by race and one of the highest health gaps by race. We also have the highest likelihood that a black person that's going to be murdered by police officer. Relative to white person anywhere in the country we have some real issues here that have been known by so many people and never spoken about or sell them spoken about. Let's talk about the opportunity. Here aren't because I. Listen to You I. Think about things that you're referring to to recast things for students in a way that maybe can create some leapfrog opportunity using technology using mentoring other types of things. You know there's a continuing here, but there's a huge difference between what's inconvenient for folks in what systemic oppression and to your point where we all fit in on different issues along that fame, and to see people violently protesting, because they can't get a haircut because you have to wear a mask and sudden eleven versus those who? Are Killed on by video in nine minutes by police officer with a need to enact. There's a big difference between those concerns in life and for us as a country to grapple with that reality in that continuum. All pain is not the same. And it all challenges are not equal painful conversations difficult to raise. But we have to do that. I've just having to be. Very familiar with situation and Minneapolis your couple mayors. Back Betsy Hodges have good friends been talking about a bit euro state. Commissioner Vegetation Venegas Sylvia's is a very close friend of mine. She's running schools in Boston and to be very clear whenever you have equity in educational opportunity or in health care you always going to have that same inequality in that other bucket. It's not like you have great educational equity. Inequity these things always work together. We have community seem Chicago that you're two miles to two hundred miles from downtown to go two hundred miles west. The life expectancy is sixteen years less than those who live downtown so less than fifteen minutes to drive that distance, but a sixteen year difference, life expectancy, and so these inequities are always. And getting compound impact of lack of access to education opportunity, lack of access to healthcare food, deserts, assistant capital, entrepreneurship investment community jobs. These things are all tied. Registering the RT rybeck roads said. That he didn't do is mail and what he felt about then things he knew and saw, and you know that's true for all of us. That's true for you. That's true for me. We've all tried. All worked pretty hard, but if any one of those things we've done anything close to enough. We're lying to ourselves and we are all feeling inadequate. Say Helpless Helpless I always have, but we have to rethink. And so the fact that you have one of the largest achievements gaps there in Minneapolis, will all that we notification had known that forever. The fact that you have a younger more diverse police force in a fantastic police chief, but veteran setup officers where it's very very scared the fact that I just I'm going to be real here. The fact that you have a union leader for your police. We have a union leader in Chicago for our police that are just absolutely terrifying. These are real. Thanks that we gotta think to, and what's interesting to me Andy. It's we have yet to see a mayor anywhere. Step up and challenge the police union. To just fundamentally challenge. Some of the things that that are that are in place in always be honest I. Don't think we should define the police. I don't think we can live with other police force, but we have two radically, not just a little bit of reform on the edges. This has to be radical change. We have to think about truth and reconciliation, so we'd build systems educational police justice health that take what has been for decades, not true in the past three months and not shoe in the past two weeks with George for murder, but things have been shoe for decades. Are we going to keep watching it contentedly? Or we're going to take those on, and this is going to be a hell of a lot of hard work for years. I have no interest in stuff going back to what was quote unquote? Normal I have no excuse. Normal wasn't good enough for far, too many kids normal wasn't good enough for far too many communities, so the apply January. League Prov we make some fundamental challenges. I am hopeful I desperately held. We can do that. That, sitting here right now, and I don't know if we have the courage to take that on as a nation, and it's going to be up to you and I, so many else people watch you podcasts and others fit we all in our own ways, big and small. You know locally Michael Locally Nationally. Do we have to courage to fundamentally challenge these structures that had been so unbelievably inequitable since our country's birth for hundreds of years. Yep So look I did what I've seen in health care. Is the cry out to in cities. We've started to do were every morning. If you're from a community that otherwise been ignored, you get a text asking you. How are you? Are you okay? Do you need groceries? Do you need mental health? Do you need a physical health? Do you need anything? Do you need food? And that was put together in about thirty days and in New York City I didn't. People have been talking about that for five or ten years and. They got to leave that in place. We brought free telemedicine to New Orleans. In the middle of this crisis, and we're now trying to leave it there. We had to Ray mckesson. Talking about police violence reform in the conversation so similar to the one in healthcare, listening to you about education listening Jose. Andrey's top about the food crisis and feeding people. It seems like these things are following a thread where all and asked myself is. How willing are people to be uncomfortable? Because if people are going to swim back to comfort the first chance they get then have less confidence, but if people are willing to really question why we're here. And turn some things over then I see leadership emerging around these issues I see action emerging. And I think people then this is baby. Of, this administration and this opportunity, people wanna be called to be part of the solution. I think President Obama had that I think other presidents of both parties have had that in them, but at a moment like this people being asked to do something verde community in the sacrifice. We know it's in them, and now people are seeing things. The. Commissioner of the NFL is seeing something that was right in front of him that he couldn't see before now he sees it. I still think the NFL is funded. Blind I felt they're seeing more what they did to Colin Kaepernick. Ball. They blackball so I'm not convinced you got out. Listened to where you gotTA. You GotTa show me. You can't tell me and so and tell some fundamental things changed there. I'm going to be highly highly skeptical of the NFL. To your other point, you and I happen to be Democrats. Nothing about we're talking about these conversations for me is democratic or Republican. Left divided. There will concern what we're talking about is trying to be empathetic. Trying to understand our common humanity, trying to come creative solutions, trying to innovate in a time of crisis and none of us have have a monopoly on good ideas in so we all have to do this work with with great great humility and get. Said about your tutoring at scale knows done this the best doing it now I'm not talking about it. It's my my real good friend former governor. Tennessee, the has them. He's doing this finding himself he and his wife. She's moved. We talked a lot about free community college. The Guy who actually did it for the state of Tennessee. Republican Bill has she made that happen a couple years ago and so for me. None of this has anything to do with politics. This is not about versus whatever this about what are we going to do to create opportunity and try and address injustice and getting the total lack of leadership, the evil leadership, coming out of DC that is costing lives and supporting white supremacy in Charlottesville good people on both sides. You're seeing a level of evil that was made the underground always existed here, but was slow sub Rosa just emerged and be empowered. Humza complex all the time. This is bringing out the best of us and bring out the worst of us and I see both of those every single day. This is one of the hardest weeks of my life. One of my staff is shot and killed by gunmen. Rashawn killed. We had to young people we work with were shot, but survived we have. mazing young woman is a senior high school. Just graduated has been in this anti-violence movement with Astra two years and absolute leader spoke at the NBA All star weekend with us with a panel with me and the mayor lightfoot. Her graduation ceremony last Sunday in the morning virtual. She was shot at the gas station, getting water Sunday afternoon on vied, no ambulance came. No police came. She almost let out talk about lack of resources and injustice. Mother scooped drop took an US through, wasn't trauma center likely? They gave her blood transfusion but death. That's what we're dealing with, so we'll. Some people fly back to comfort as soon as they can the. Yes I understand that I. Try not to judge I think for all of us who are trying to practice every day being uncomfortable, we have to become more uncomfortable and have to keep stretching ourselves. Not think that we've done enough. I've seen things on the streets this week. That I hope to never see again and it's like A. I'm not described as like a nightmare that it's real, and you can't quite wake up and We have to keeping out there. We have to keep seeing things. just bearing witness, but working to to fix them. Thanks to counter some of those things to lead an ounce things and we have to continue to stretch ourselves in ways that. Are Mentally uncomfortable. Fiscal Safety more scary than we my like because it's important to be out there. Let Me Talk About College. If we could for a second, so this guy right here is he have? Any hope of escaping his dad and getting the college experience. What do you think and your daughter for his sake and my guy was saying I hope so I know that. I think. Most not all colleges will go back this fall, but it will look very very different. The school year is fundamentally changing. Why is our school year based upon the Agrarian Economy? You know how many of our kids are working in the fields. It doesn't make any sense at all so some universities that are going to go back early to go through Thanksgiving and then let out early at the back Dan. They worry about the flu or second wave of Kobe coming later. Let's say you have class Monday. Wednesday Friday and college. I'll bet you go to class. Class A third of the time you'll will physical place on Monday or on Wednesday on. Friday, and the other two days you'll take class virtually. I! Think you'll see sort of build a big big classes as lectures are actually seen this in high schools. Now you think about now who teaches five dollar has broward county four teaching, one big class of Algebra in the morning, and the rest of the day is office out. More individualized instruction was important so I, think your son and my daughter. Most kids around the country will go to a physical college. But how they go to classes how they eat their meals how they're housed on how they socialize is going to be fundamentally different again as keep pushing. This is not just for this fall. This is at least for this academic year and probably go into next academic year so for me I've been thinking about getting to the end of the school year, which is basically about now from most places. Places than thinking a lot about the summer, then got to think about September. Basically August September and then we got to think about December January, and then we got thinking about the spring, so sort of two or three months increments in which everything is changing, and we have to keep naked adjustments. Get How long your son and my can stay at school. That's going to vary place by place. In a good way to something you said earlier. If we have better public health infrastructure. If every kid can take a test before they had home for Thanksgiving, so they know they're not going to be affecting their parents. Parents are gonNA feel a lot more comfortable with them at school. If we persist in a situation where we're told, we have enough, but we don't really have enough for the things that a of people live their lives, not just for people who are the sickest of the sick. We have enough tests for for them. If we have the ability to make some rules, close campuses and know how compliant these kids are I mean. If when you get told you not to socialize off campus, you can listen right Zach. You're all over that. We. He's on board I'm sure daughter is to? We can't leave the topic of college. Without talking about seventeen and a half five and three, which you may remember our your basketball stats from Harvard Actually don't remember that whatsoever I. Don't know where you got that from. The fact that I once got to play on the. Camp David, Basketball Court where you and the president played the. That's probably the only thing. My kids remember that I actually did in Washington. So first of all. Did you select the President win? Never. People don't understand you. Understand the player. If you're not playing hard, it actually ruins the game and the point of the Games to compete so when we were playing against each other I'm trying to kill him and he's trying to kill. The truth is most the time we played on seventeen, and that was fine, and he'd be smart that way. He played the win. He's not out there to try and school out of points or get a sweat. He's out there to win and I've known them for years and very early on I think people were little fool because he's such a nice guy, and so whatever, but he's an unbelievable competitor. And at the end of the day is you know as well as I do? He's amazing person, but he's a regular human being just like you and I deeply deeply loves his family, and just to have a chance to let all that. Both the trappings and the weight of their office to let go there, and so you know to play it different places including Camp David and White House FBI and some the things. We played both election days. And all twelve, and just to see him have that release. Again, I know how much it meant to me at a heads of. Ten Thousand Times more to him. Because of the weight of words Jaguars. Serving in the Obama Administration, which was one of the privileges of my life and I. Say the same thing. Having the ability afterwards for variety of reasons to continue to have the impact, you're having and to focus on the passions that you have. You were better country for it, and as a treat to hear you not just talk about what you believe that your hands are still so dirty in this, and that the issues of health racism justice food. They're all brought to a head in this crisis in. They're also connected to thank you. They are in it some. It's funny I. Guess Theoretically did done some different things, but. Chicago shaped me. Educationally athletically socially culturally I was saying where we're motivated by. Our successes were haunted by our failures, and during my time, go public schools lots proud about lots I could talk to you for an hour about but I. Watch every two weeks we had one of our students killed did a gun violence and I. Don't think I know. We failed to keep our kids safe is a city and family moved to DC in two thousand nine I thought we were rock bottom. I thought we couldn't getting worse and for host reasons. Thanks a lot worse than sending. Sending the DC so for me to come home sitting. It protected me a sitting that protective of my mother, working intercity for fifty two years, and I challenged everywhere, playing basketball all the neighborhoods, and the fact that I was never touched once she was never touched once in fact, the community protected her then protecting me for me to move some other place. Not come back and not try and help our city. Just give our kids I just WANNA kiss. They have a chance to kids to play and to be free of the fear and trauma on and. Every kid here every Simkin south and West sides knows multiple people who've been killed multiple people, not one every single kid, and it's not right, and it's not fair, and it's not. It's not their fault, and so yes, it was an amazing privilege to be in DC will do it again in a heartbeat. Thought for me to be back in community and back in the block and Xfinity time was families that deserves so much more is good for my soul, and as much as I, love DC and as much. I still WANNA. Work you policy and we're both trying to do what we can community in real community with real people I needed it more than than I can tell you. Well. I'm inspired renewed just listening to talking to you today, so thanks for coming on and talking us or keep doing what you're doing i. know nothing about health. I'm just trying to learn everything putting out every single day. I can only starts. Imagine how hard you're working in the information for those of us that aren't. You'll help vets. Don't know anything, but where our lives and our families lives, and the communes lives depend on it having someone who I trust, someone who I know, not just their intellect, their hearts. Out there working so hard on a sacrifice for US allies work I know it's a sacrifice for your family, and they have to get on some things so now you do that. I want to thank you family for doing that, but please keep doing what you're doing because we need that I need that information and we're GONNA continue to need it for a long time to. We're not going to quit either one of us. Much stock said. I hope learn as much as I did from that interview I'll be honest. I was expecting to learn about how to think about the question of whether or not. People should be heading back to school. And I found myself during the course that interview, really feeling like I hadn't thought about all the issues, right? That the issues of privilege. And equality and our own expectations are very much on display when we think about those issues and he did a great job. Me Up to what's at stake in what we're all going to be dealing with in the fall, besides just cut and dry decision of whether or not, schools are going to open. But how all of us as parents and as people in the community are going to approach very complex set of issues. And so what I want to do next is talk to Sony Garden Sono is. A. Mom of two kids and the Minneapolis Public Schools She has two boys that are younger than our boys here in our bubble, but are about the same age gap as Zachary and his older brother. She and her husband both work. and. Let's get her perspective. On the question of going back to school. Hello so high S. this is Sunol indies it. Hi, Andy I'm here with Zach from in the bubble highs Zach. How's it going good or you? Can Kid I'm good well, it's the it's the first day of summer break, so maybe ask me and. A couple more days. You have two kids and. has been both work Your kids attend. If I'm not mistaken the Minneapolis public schools correct. Yes, so tell me. How has homeschooling gone for you? homeschooling was a challenge I. think initially it was a little bit of an adventure for the boys, but I think by the end of it. It was far from an ideal situation. That's for sure. What are their names and ages, so Devon is ten years old and Asher is six, and they both turn ten and six during quarantine. Actually so how do you think about what happens next in the fall? And presumably everybody wants their kids back in school may, but what do you see? Is some of the issues concerns either way? Yeah I mean. I wish there was some consensus in terms of best practices I feel like I'm constantly searching for information every day and making decisions about how much risk to take and I feel like that's taken. A lot of mental toll on all of us were making so many more decisions now than we used to. And I just want somebody to tell me okay. Here's what we're. GonNa do in the fall. The kids need to do XYZ D to take their temperature every day. I want some consensus. From sort of an authority, person or body to kind of guide us in that process, so let's say school opens in the fall if I want to run through a couple of scenarios and see how you how you reacted most, and also you think your kids would react when if they could go back to school, but they were required to wear masks. Do you think that would work at their ages? Six and ten I think it would be hard and challenging, but I think any improvements to what we just experienced in March April and May would be welcome. So. I think just getting them in that environment of school in that routine I think I would welcome that night. Appreciate that. Do you think your kids just speaking as representatives for every six year old and ten year old in America would actually wear masks, or do you think that that's really too much to ask of kids at age? I think it's a lot to ask of my six year old I. Think my ten year old would be more likely to comply simply also because he is a rule follower, but. I think it's a hard ask for kids, but if there were grandparents are older relatives of part of going to school meant that they were advised, or you were advised that they should keep some distance from grandparents or other older relatives. Do you think people would be compliant with that? I think people would be compliant with that I. Think the hard part also with our family is I also have an autoimmune disease, and so I think that puts me in a little bit of a higher risk category, too, but I also don't want sort of my. Limitations to impact their learning experience. You know so. It's trying to find that right balance. So all things considered. If, the science was what it was today, and they said okay. You're free to send your kids back to school, but you're also free not to and have a an option where they home school through a combination of parent and technology. Do you know what you would do? Can S! I think I would likely lean towards the online option given the information that we have today. I think just the safety. Of Our family and grandparents would probably you know obviously sort of trumps? Everything else and that would be a really really hard tradeoff to make. Yeah, for sure go to Susan took to. Yeah. You Know I. Think One of the sayings I'm curious out is kind of the slide that we're seeing with kids. You know academic slide mental slide physical slide. If we continue in this online or remote modality, how do we recover some of that? You know with the kids because you know I'm seeing. My kids become a lot more moody and just the day my six year old. We tried going for a bike ride, and we were just a block away from the House and he goes my likes her tired. And, I was thinking. Oh my Gosh, you need more physical activity. So I think that's kind of a a real concern is. How long is this going to last and had a mitigate those slides? Well. I think that's a really well articulated actually. I hadn't heard that expression before. The final thing I would say is that all of us know that we should be prepared for what I will call for lack of better term, a weird year, a weird set of solutions and we're going to be creating a perfect situation either for ourselves or our kids. But we're going to figure it out as a society, and to some extent while I relate to your point that you want to just hear. What the consensus is another? I tell you I find it absolutely fascinating to be in the middle of a process that nobody knows the answer to and people are working on together to observe that process and I think there's lessons in that for everyone to see probably including kids, and so my hope is that there are compensating balances if you know what I mean, those over everything lost everything. That's slides even if we can't exactly replaced that specific thing. Is there something else that they can learn as a human being as a curious person in the world is a part of the plan that they would never be able to learn if they weren't in this moment. Yeah, that's our true. That's really well, said I I completely agree with that. That's a great perspective. Will thank you so much luck. We'll stay in touch soundscan. Thank you. Thank, you. So now finally, we have a conversation with higher education expert. Zach Slavic. So first of all congratulations on making it through high school. Thank you. I want to say for the record did an amazing job making your parents proud? Of who you are and Even the way things finish. Disappointing you've showed so much character and getting through a really difficult time. Yeah. Thank you I think everybody did a good job just stepping up and doing what they had to do. So, what are your feelings about school? In the fall to you really really hope it happens, do you hope could happens only if it can be a certain type of experience, how would you feel about kind of a? Situation, where it was less than ideal, there or staying home for part of it. What's your general thought? Well, my opinion and I would say the majority of people might ages opinion if I had to guess? Is that was want as much of the experience as possible whether that's being there and being restricted. Or being they're not being restricted. people just really don't want to. Be Online School for College. You're saying that you would have to transfer co host duties to somebody else and get to the work of being a college student again is that's what you're hoping for? That's the goal. That's the goal. I can't blame you for that goal if you are asked to wear a mask, but it's not mandatory or your asked to not socialize or keep socially distant. How realistic is that for college kids? If it's not mandatory, I think it's very unrealistic for the vast majority of kids especially since wants. Like the majority of kids don't wear them. Than those kids, even the ones who want want to wear them will get a little bit of peer pressure and they won't end up wearing them such. I don't think it's very realistic unless it's required. and. They should probably point on the fact that that's not going to do much if they don't require it. So, if they if you go back to school and they have. A second wave and people start to get sick. You think they should close it down and send kids back home or quarantine them. It really just depends more on the outcomes of the illnesses. If people aren't getting symptoms, if people aren't dying, obviously if people aren't going to the hospital. Especially teachers than people will care less about having to go home if they're not really symptoms or anything worse than a bad flu, but it really just depends. On how to the cases? I think more than just the total number. Make sense well I. Really Hope you get what you want. Hopeful that things open up with fewer restrictions as possible and I know that whatever the answer is, you'll work through it and so thanks for allowing me to interview you. So that is our education episode. I think I did a good job with the Arne Duncan interview. I think I did a pretty good job with the interview with Donald. Girton I think I did if only a fair job trying to interview my son but I think what you said. It was really smart. Next week we have two great shows the first one. Is With writer director actor Jon, appetite and we are going to talk with dot about life at home and new habits during this time in the bubble. And then on Wednesday, we have an interview with Pete Buddha judge, and that's going to be incredibly exciting I'll be listening to both of those and in the meantime. I really hope you have a great week. Thanks for listening. In the bubble is a productive lemonade Adam Media Nico- Garland is our producer and Ivan Corea is our editor Jessica Cordova Kramer and Stephanie Widows Wax Executive Producer Show. Labit is my co host and onsite producer. Music is by Dan Milad elevate. You can find out more about our show on social media at lemonade media, and you can find me at a Slavic on twitter and at Andy. Slamet. If you liked what you heard today, tell you French tell from a distance for now stay safe. Cheers from joy. We'll get through this together and. Stay!

Chicago US Andy Serwer Zach Slavic basketball TA Minneapolis President Obama High School president principal school district allergies Boston George Floyd Arne Duncan Jose Andrey Arnie
Amanpour: Ben Wedeman, Edward Lee Childress, Megan Rapinoe and Dr. Francis Collins

Amanpour

57:43 min | 6 months ago

Amanpour: Ben Wedeman, Edward Lee Childress, Megan Rapinoe and Dr. Francis Collins

"We expect a lot from our home is where we live our lives where memories are made where we rest and recharge work and play its home at home advisor committed to keeping yours up and running whether you need to repair and overloaded appliance or bill that summer backyard retreat use the homeadvisor APP to find a local pro who get the job done, right. Whatever you need big or small, they'll do everything to make sure everything download the home advisor App and get started today. Hello everyone, and welcome to. Amman. For. Coming up. More than a billion children around the world are out of school and getting them back can be a life or death decision I'll speak with the School Superintendent Mississippi facing that dilemma as infections are already rising and only Duncan. The former US secretary of education who's got furious leaders who put kids in danger than. Meghan re. Piano superstar. UNROLL, model takes on a new challenge hosting a political talk show for HBO and later seeing the suffering and death around us from this. I have not immune from wondering. Why would a loving God allow such a thing to happen? Dr? Francis. Collins. Antony FAO Cheese boss on faith science and hope for an effective corona virus vaccine. Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane Amanpour in London Lebanon, which is one of the worst hit middle, East countries. From Corona, virus teetering on the brink of economic collapse has now been hit by a massive explosion. It originated at the port of the capital. Beirut just take a look at this dramatic video. Local. Authorities are warning that many injured and buildings across the city have been damaged. Let's get straight to it with our Ben Wedeman. WHO's standing by at the bureau, which is also not escaped the aftershocks, Ben? Yes that explosion Christiaan happened to just a few minutes after six PM local time. That's about three hours ago. I was in the CNN bureau here in downtown Beirut. Initially, it felt like an earthquake, but just moments later, these windows were completely blown out the frames blown out. Our front door is gone. Now in that scene has been duplicated replicated throughout the city spoken with people all over this town by phone, and they all say, the same thing. This is an explosion, the size of which many who have been through the civil war through the two, thousand, six Lebanon is real war never have seen an explosion of this magnitude. The hospitals here in Beirut, are overwhelmed with the injured. The hotel do tells us that they accepted. At least four, hundred, injured and other hospital getting at least sixty, and that's just two hospitals are the Lebanese Red Cross called for all its ambulances in the entire country of Lebanon to come to Beirut immediately to help. With taking the injured to get treatment eyewitnesses are telling needed. They saw people being treated on the street others being a given CPR on the sidewalk. There is no part of the city where damage has not occurred. The number of dead is still not clear. This was preceded by some sort of fire in a warehouse. In Beirut's port, the national news agency, the official agency said that the warehouse was full of fireworks. But I. Best Ibrahim, the head of Lebanese General Security said, it would be naive to think that an explosion of this magnitude. was caused by mere fireworks. But at this point, it's unclear. What was the cause of that explosion? But what is? As clear as day is the this explosion has wreaked. Credible damage throughout this city, the number of casualties and fatalities. This point is unclear, but it is going to be for sure significant in number Christiaan. I mean, it really does look horrendous and just where you're standing just testimony to that. But let me ask you this because it has been really really troubled Lebanon by the recent events, the pandemic economic crisis. How does this add to the crisis in Lebanon? It's just another nail in the coffin of this country This country is in a state of economic collapse, the local currency, the leader. Has Lost about eighty percent of its value. In the last three months. Every month prices have gone up by fifty percent unemployment has skyrocketed. You see people on the streets of Beirut rummaging through the garbage looking for food, they're beggars than ever. On the streets this country is falling apart, and this is the absolute worst thing they could have happened to Lebanon. At this stage, Christiane? Ben. Thank you so much for bringing us up to date, and of course, we'll continue to watch ship but Lebanon, of course is one of the one hundred, sixty countries where schools have been disrupted by corona virus. The UN Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez says, the world faces a generational catastrophe with families forced to make impossible choices return to school and risk infection or stay home and suffered the developmental and educational consequences. Meanwhile, the crisis exacerbates existing inequities between race class and various different countries in the United States alone with Congress deadlocked over emergency aid for schools. President trump simply tweeted this open the schools now for context thirteen states. Higher infection rates per capita. Now, than the current global hotspots which are Peru and Brazil. One of those states Mississippi is on track to be the top state for Corona Virus Infections. The school district in the city of Corinth did reopen its doors last week and Dr Edward Leigh. Children's is superintendent there, and he's joining me now a children's welcome to the program. You obviously like so many officials all over the United States under quite a lot of stress trying to figure out what's best for your students. Tell me what led you to reopen the schools a week ago, and how was that panned out in Corinth? We made the decision to reopen our schools based on several factors. One of the factors was is that we factored in that, there would be a summer surge. That, we would be experiencing at the time. We were scheduled to reopen schools on a modified calendar, and that would be one of the reasons or our early reopening. We had been sharing and bringing parents in our community along. With our process of the plans to reopen schools or about ten week period through based on social media platforms in which we parents and opportunity to comment we conducted surveys, and ultimately, the administration made a recommendation to the board that we plan to reopen our schools. does children's of course with the best of intentions you did that. And then we understand that several infections happen. They'd been kids who are quaranteed several dozen kids quarantine. What have you done? Have you closed the schools onto yours jurisdiction? What are the parent saying the teachers what state you in right now? The schools currently remain open. Just as you have mentioned we've had five on positive COVID, nineteen results on students on our schools We were open for five days before we had the first positive. Then in the last couple of days, we have identified or additional ones. Will our skills are still? A teacher teaching, and I'm going to have to go back to you know last Monday. When the schools reopened, it was amazing to see the energy exhibited by the teachers and the excitement of the children for their return to school because in many cases for them, they return to a sense of normalcy that they had not experienced. Since last March. So while we have had positive cases among students while we do have students quarantine. Three schools today and learning and teaching is definitely occurring. Children's one of the sort of main issues has been for all to see that there's been a lot of different kinds of instructions from state to stay county to county from the north of the country to the south of is just a lot of different instructions. No one-size-fits-all. So what what are you doing? For instance, regarding the different ages of kids have you found that certain ages are more vulnerable, all more prone to spreading the different rules and what would it take for you kind of level of infection to close down your three schools. As. You've pointed out. You know there have been identified studies that have talked about the levels infection on at different ages. Of Children, and we have looked, and some of the measures that we have put in place do depend on where the schools are. One of the things are that we did require was that some type of face covering must be worn at all of our schools. There is a we allow. The face coverings to be taken off in pre K. through grades three If the a sufficient social distancing takes place in the classrooms, however if children are moving. From Room to room, which there's very limited movement at the Elementary School or moving within their classroom than they have to have their mass own. However for grades four through twelve a face covering is required for all children. We. Have Limited movement on throughout on our schools particularly in grades pre K. through six Those classrooms have self contained teachers in which one teacher is responsible for the primary instruction of the day. We're making sure that when classes are able to have P.. E.. And other types of activities they are having them where they do not have contact with other groups of students. Now, in grades seven through twelve we do have changing among classrooms. However, we have established one ways in our corridors and in our Commons area on in an attempt to help with the traffic fled. Another thing that you asked and finally, I. Mean. Go ahead. Sorry. Let me just ask you this. Maybe you could incorporate Immunex have you felt any political pressure at all? Obviously many people want to see schools reopened for obvious reasons. But some parents, you know Award Teachers Award. There's a lot of political pressure from the White House. Have you felt any pressure? Are you confident that in your area at least the science is being followed? We have not built any political pressure on here in our area. As I said, we made our decision based on. What we expected in what we had been planning along with. Community input. We looked at the guidelines for the Centers for Disease Control, the Mississippi State Department of help along with the American Academy of Pediatrics, and we incorporated all of those guidelines into our reopening plan to try to address anything and everything that we needed. To create a safe learning environment, I think one of the important things to be considered is that communities do need to have a voice in what takes place in whether or not their schools reopen or not. Superintendent childress. Thank you very much for joining us from Mississippi now, Arne Duncan was secretary of education under President Barack, Obama. He says lack of leadership from Washington and a proper national coordination plan is proving to be devastating, and he's now going to join US welcome to the program Arne Duncan. LemMe Lemme me my asking you just heard the superior youtube and it's going to be good to get your expertise on this. On the big picture. You just heard the superintendent. Layout. Quite a detailed plan about how different kids in different ages being you know being a being given the rules to how to behave in the in the school. What do you make of that and give also that there are some infections already there? Obviously. We have fifteen thousand school districts across country in the fact that every superintendent is now has to become public health official trying to navigate this from selves many are doing testing trying to do contact, tracing, thinking about how you deliver food thinking about transportation, how you keep your buildings clean and yes. Most importantly, how do we educate kids were asking way way way too much of superintendents and the fact that. That we have not come up with a comprehensive way to do this thoughtfully the fact that on average the past week, we're having a thousand deaths per day here in the United States, we simply have not done in March and April, in May June July, what we needed to do so that we could have an easy and smooth and clean opening to school for our children now in August and September. Well, let me just run through just a capital couple of stats and Indiana middle school closed after a positive test on day one and that absolutely sort of mind boggled the officials that how could they be positive test on Day One? They said Georgia's largest school district. Two. Hundred Sixty employees from working after they either tested positive or in fact were exposed. Now, school is just started, and as you know senior pediatrician and virologist pita hurts said, this push to open schools is guaranteed to fail. Do you think it was guaranteed to fail or was it always going to be something that had to happen warts and all and try to I'm sorry to use this word, but whack-a-mole strategy is has been going on. Right now. Well, let me ask ways. First of all, I absolutely believe schooled needs to open, but how it opens, that's the key question. So schools can open three ways. They can open all physically person. They can open all virtually online or a hybrid of those situations and students have lost way too much learning because of Covid, but Calvin, slide because of summer. So we can't delay the start of opening school needs to open. We have to be very, very thoughtful community by community that what is the safest way to bring kids you'll back into. into a learning environment on the status way to bring kids into a physical in-person at school building is where you have two weeks of decline in cases, rea- positively, positively rates below five percent in far too many communities across our country. Unfortunately, that's not the case. So it's forcing many many school districts I. This is to think about a hybrid situation or to start all virtually all online and had we done what we needed to do earlier. We would be having to make these very tough decisions, but that's where we are today. So hotels the pediatrician. The expert Virology said their forty states in the United States where schools should not open for face to face classes. You've just pointed out and Dr Sanjay Gupta of CNN said, the solution must be rapid testing. I E tested. The results are known very rapidly much more rapidly than they are right now is that for you a central aspect of it, the idea of being able to test. That's that's the starting point. But that's just a starting point sleep elaborate a little bit and his level complexity on this. Yes. You have to be able to test, but those tests have to be accurate. They have to be reliable. You have to be able to get them back quickly, and then the question is, what do you do with those? You have to be up to get a positive result. You have to be able to contact trace, you have to be able to isolate. Isolate or quarantine. So all you're doing is testing and is taking too long or you're not taking the second and third steps. Then you might as well not tested all. So a huge detail that we should be doing at scale on schools school district's school systems, not islands. They don't exist in a bubble. They reflect their communities were communities have high level of cases. Of course, rules are GONNA have high level of cases where communities are safe is seen in other countries, Norway Denmark. You don't have that kind of problem where you seen other countries struggle and we should learn from those places like Israel where they open schools too quickly to fast that had to shut back down. Australia I lived in Melbourne for two years. State of Victoria is you saw declared a state of emergency yesterday because they open schools and other things too quickly too fast, and the goal here is not to open schools. The goal is to keep schools open in. The worst thing we could do is trying to open schools too fast have to shut down after a week or two weeks further. Further. Traumatized students, endanger teachers, custodians, and bus drivers, principles, and our children's parents. We'd go slowly carefully gradually bays this in start with our most vulnerable children start youngest children, and if it's a big if we do it, right, add more kids over time. But our country has lacked the discipline do what we need to do to have a clean and easy re are reopen of schools this fall. Is Interesting viewpoint to those countries overseas, because as you mentioned, some of them really have done it in a way that they've been able to control the situation, but it comes from their original national and coordinated policies from the very beginning. So That's interesting that you point that out. I. WanNa ask you about kids whether they're American kids or kids all over the world. What are the psychological worries that you have? About keeping children out of physical school for this amount of time, what is the science experience say about that? Wants to go back to physical school. Kids want that my kids walk pet teachers what? All of us as parents want that, we can only do that if we're not endangering their lives or the teachers lives or parents or grandparents it home, and so is there more isolation in the virtual world. Yes on. But you can't endanger people's physical safety. So we're having to make very hard choices here. Wines'll, English. We shouldn't have to make these choices again. Had we done what we needed to do at scale for our country over the past couple of months, we wouldn't be putting kids in this. Really, really bad. Bad Situation. So I'm just pleading with public here. The United States that for this month of August, can we just be smart? You know wear masks socially distance wash hands, do all the things that we know. It will beat down the virus nationally and more importantly in our communities. So we don't put children in that bad situation. I'm having said that I want to say, I've been just unbelievably impressed by leadership at the local level for all the failure of leadership at the federal level, the local leadership has been extraordinary. SESA, pandemic started I've done a weekly call with school superintendents and nonprofits involved in food distribution in schools just aren't places of education. They're social safety nets in throughout this entire pandemic day of given out the distributed tens of millions of meals. Every single day to children to their families into the community. You talk about children's social emotional health. They pivoted very quickly to telehealth social workers, counselors. They are teachers checking some students literally every single day to help them deal with any past issues. Issues they had in the trauma of going through all this and parents are losing jobs, and you'll be all of a sudden, very, very insecure and scared in the world in. So to see that that local leadership thinking about students social emotional health making sure it's showing their families are fed on, has been unbelievably inspiring to me, and they're working together with urgency with empathy with real humility, making mistakes and learning from them, and that's what gives me hope at a time of tremendous darkness. And this is a time also of uprising on the streets of America and around the world for Justice Racial Justice Economic Justice. and I wonder what you think of the fact that you know many many parents who have the money might be able to hire private tutors might be able to gather together in what's known as pods and set up their own sort of so-called quasi homeschooling. But that's the parents who have the money and the ability to be able to do that and the space. Do you worry that inequity and injustice could be prolonged and exacerbated? If this is what parents are? Forced to do. Absolutely and obviously systemic racism is not a new problem here in America has been a problem for four hundred years. What this pandemic is done in the murder of George Floyd, in Minneapolis is really pulled the scab off of that gaping wound in his slapping people in the face and forcing them to deal with those inequities to so many different levels will just one obvious one at a time you have to learn virtually having access to computers to the Internet to Wi. Fi is this absolutely essential in that that access historically has been very unequal with the haves access and the have nots not having access insult districted worked very hard. Hard he in Chicago given out one, hundred, thousand devices. Boston thirty thousand San Antonio. Forty seven thousand put in putting in Wifi hotspots. But there are massive equities in always whenever there's a problem showed him the poor have a harder time than the children of the wealthy and so my goal which I've been sank assistant, he's not to go back to school as it was not to go back to quote unquote normal because normal didn't serve far too many children well enough, and we need to use this opportunity to reimagined school in come back with something that much more fair and equitable in just when you look about las learning time. Because cove in the spring, and in the summer who's GonNa fall the furthest behind. Of course, our most marginalized almost disenfranchised are most audible kids. So not only do we need to reopen school, I would love to see a massive Matt Tutoring Program with those children the furthest behind have an opportunity to try and catch up. So whether it's recent college grads, Willis retirees whether we do it physically virtually a both reeb many children who are going to come back to school. Now, this fall six, seven, eight months behind recant. Lose them. We have to catch them up best to kind of thinking. We need now to try and take a horrible situation and have some good come from. Rei Dunkin. Thank you so much. Former secretary, of education. Think about your home for a moment. It's where life happens. It's where you build that tree house or try that new recipe. It's where you rest and recharge work and play. You expect a lot out of it, and that's why homeadvisor is committed to keeping your home up and running no matter what they match you with the best pros in your area pros who can get your home projects done right from unexpected jobs. Jobs like appliance repairs, clogged gutters and leaky faucets to projects. 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A women's World Cup champion named Best Fever Women's player of the year in two thousand nineteen, and she's a leader on the soccer field and a role model for thoughtful political activism in sports and through sports, and now she joins the ranks of talk show host with her new HBO series seeing America with Meghan re Pinot the next phase in her personal campaign for women's Rights Civil Rights and racial justice. Here's a clip from the new. program. It is like the. The, what do we do now moment where in the streets were saying black lives matter. We're talking about a new sort of. Radical type society. reimagining everything, and then it's like now we have to work like now our work begins. So it's almost like what do we do? Now? What's the next thing that feels? More hopeful to me than than it has in the past I guess. I'm hoping. And Meghan Piano Welcome to the program. Let, me ask you I mean I full simply described your your activism, your your campaign for Justice and. Hitting this moment in a very visible and determined way. Is that right? I mean? Is that what you want people to know you for now? Really what I want people to know me for but. I believe that we all have a responsibility to make the world, a better place You know do what you can with what you, what you have and do as much as you can. I clearly very lucky to have a platform to get to play for the United States into be able to take on some of these issues so. I've. Just find it interesting in. This is the stuff that I like to. Do talk about, but really I think at the heart of it. I think that we can live in a more fair and equitable society I. Think we can have a better life and I think we don't have to live particularly. With what's happening now, I, don't think we have to live in this world I think it can be better and so for me. I tried to use all of the resources re platform or microphone if it's given given to me to do what I can to make the world a better place. What is it like in lockdown for you? I mean, you haven't really been able to train I mean. It's been difficult for a lot of sports, people how you coping with lockdown. It is very strange I think pretty much since I went away to college. I've been like on a yearly schedule. and. Of Thirty, five years old now. So someone could do the math on that I think very early on. I tried to just take the to the attitude like what can we do I wasn't going to stress out about not being able to train or play games that obviously wasn't possible. So you know with technology you know with the the capacity of the platform that I have, what can we do to? Make our voice heard or to help out in some way. Sometimes, it's providing comedic relief sometimes speaking up about the racial injustice and you know the protesters in the streets and supporting them and now the TV show which I'm which I'm very lucky to have. But I, think it was just like you know nobody can control this moment right now. So how do you make the best of it and just? Try to stay level headed. Throw it off. So. So That's interesting. We're GONNA play a clip in a second. You have the title is I say seeing America with Meghan No. In this at least the first episode, your joined by the congresswoman. Alexandria, Okaz Yo Cortez the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Nicole had Jones. Of course behind the sixteen. Nineteen. And Comedian has minaj. Are they. Are they regular panel for you? What do you? What did YOU WANNA get out of them? What did you get out of them? Thank you all three of those, very lucky to be able to pull such an incredible panel together. I think what I was trying to get out and what else continue to try to get out no matter who the guests are is a that. We all have a responsibility in whatever way we can, and we can be most impactful to make the world a better place to make it more fair and equitable place. Obviously, you know representative Cuza, Cortez. She's in politics. She's crafting legislature. She's looking after her district. That's going to be the way that she. She can be most effective Nicole Hannah. Jones, obviously, journalists, Hossam men hodges is a comedian. So how do we all in our own way affect the world in a better path? Think sometimes people feel as if if if they're not a politician or if they're not a fulltime activist than they feel overwhelmed as if there's nothing for them to do but I think that there's something for everyone to do. So for me talking to those three who? Send, the show they're already on the frontlines of of making change. The way that you know Hossan as a first generation immigrant would see the world is something different than the way that I would see the world and the way that Nicole Hannah Jones gave us the real history of the United. States. I. Think Makes People think okay. Well, maybe there's something here. Here that I'm not saying that can broaden my perspective and can allow me to understand people or the world in a different way because ultimately, we all need to do this together all in this together, we don't you know live on silos where a social animal and it's it's going to take everybody working together hopefully to bring us to a better place. Let me just play a clip. This is with congressman of your quotas. This is one of the kids we've been given, but to your point this, she's talking about a possible tipping point moment. But also you know. The other way, I. Think you can think about it is that we are. You know perhaps we are in the downfall of the broken way. This was not built to last inequity. Injustice is not built to last. It lasts a long time. Hundreds of years, but ultimately it. Crumbles into this. So you have been on the front line of a lot of activism recently, I just want to know right now. Obviously, taking from what Cosio Cortez says that things could change. Pay. Equality LGBTQ. Rides taking a knee, all those things that have thrust you and others. But you particularly into the spotlight, what makes you the matters where you see the opportunity for some kind of resolution or at least progress now? Who makes me the Madison? Question I. Think The you know our biggest. Then of course, as a country is shadow slavery and you know our our system of white supremacy. And racial injustice in this country. I. Think you know of course, it's going to affect black and Brown. People feel good. I. Think. It's it's the rot inside the entire country. It's the root of of all of the injustice so that to me is the thing that needs to be. Having the most attention and I think as we start hopefully to. Fold what that is into rectify. Education reformer reparations or You know housing segregation school schedule Segregation, whatever it may be it touches every part of our society. Hopefully, we can start to see that it's all sort of interconnected. I. Think we. We can't just signal out one thing and say Oh if if there's gay rights than everybody else kind of has their own rights everything, you know the idea sort of intersection analogy and that everything is connected. But I I think for our country to move forward I? Think you're seeing it with rhetoric coming out of. The administration, the trump administration, and the Republican Party is well, I don't think all the honest would be put on, just trump. The Republican Party is backing him in the exact same way. They're just flaming up these these Racial tensions in our country, and it's really not benefiting anyone, and of course, it's disproportionately affecting black and Brown people. So I think that should be the very first and foremost thing that that we focus on, but you know things are interconnected. So I think we can. Start to unravel this in a really widespread way whether that be through policies, education reform or environmental racial injustice or whatever. It may be I think that we can start sort of having a multi pronged approach to. Making our country a better place for everyone. Can I? Play a little bit of the new Nike ad that you voice. That is it's really effective. I mean it has all different personalities morphing what if and the rest we've just picked this little clip and I just want you to talk about it afterwards. We know things won't always go our way. Sporting events on postponed or canceled, but whatever it is. We'll find a way. And when things aren't fair. We'll come together for change. Responsibility to make this world a better place. No matter how bad it gets. We will always come back stronger. So. You're in a place now, Meghan that you can do all this, but it has not been that easy for you to mix the sort of politics with your sports persona. You've had a lot of pushback in the PAS. Are you are you now the place where you're just going to steam ahead? Oh. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean it's always been easy for me to mix it. Some people just don't like the cocktail, they're still having used to it. So I find it very easy. I think that you know our world is very dynamic and everybody in, it is very dynamic and so to do a number of different things at one time seemed normal You know the one thing I, love about that at your you're bringing. Obviously, you know so many different kind of undertones into whether the be the pandemic or racial injustice or the tragic murder up George Floyd and Brianna. Taylor. And so many others. But I think what I feel like it's saying I want to say that as we. If. We do this together, and if we show up in November and if we hold, you know the people who are supposed to be representing US accountable. There is a way forward. We we have chosen as a country to live in this kind of society, and we don't have to choose that anymore. We can choose to take care of each other. We can choose education, we can choose healthcare we can choose to. Make this world and make our country more fair and equitable place. Anything sports is a good analogy for that. You get people from all over the country from every different background. You know coming together for for a common goal, and obviously when the group comes together like that you get something that's more special than you could ever do on your own until. I. I hope people realize that the election coming in November and with the opportunity we have I think all of the lies that have been told. You know our politics for for a long time. Really are stripped bare, and I, hope people see that we do have a choice and we have a choice who we elected to office to hold accountable representative. Qazi Cortez said that we're not electing our Savior's. We're electing the people who we get to hold accountable who get to work with in who we think that can help us shape our country into a better place, and so I hope people feel energized and feel like they not only have a responsibility, but they can be the change maker in in the world in a really special way. Megan repeat. Thank you so much for joining us and the program is available now on HBO and HBO. Max which is part of the Warner media family. Our next guest has spent twenty years leading public health research in the United States. Dr Francis Collins is the director of the National Institutes of health and such. He's the boss of Anthony Fauci. WHO's The nation's top infectious diseases expert as you all know, here's all to. Talking to Dr Collins about which vaccine trials especially excite him right now and how he's relying on his faith during this pandemic. Thank you Christiane and Dr Francis. Collins. Thanks for all. You're doing for the country and welcome to the show. Thanks Walter. It's great to be with you. Let's talk about Russia which announced this week that it's going to roll out a vaccination that has been asked the the safety trials but hasn't gone through those phase three trials to see if it works whether it's efficient. Yet you think that's a good idea. I think that's a pretty bad idea. We do phase three trials for two important reasons once it one is to be sure that really is safe in large numbers of people that has to make sure there's not one thousand people who has a bad side effect. You wouldn't know that a small phase one and two trials. But secondly, and really importantly, you do the face retrial, the see if it really works in the real world, it's fine to say you have a vaccine that made some antibodies developed. You WanNa know whether it prevented disease was no way to do that without doing the hard work of phase three trial with tens of thousands of individuals. In, community where the viruses actively spreading and you can see whether it prevented them from getting sick. That's what we're doing right now in our vaccine trials. In the US I'm surprised Russia things. You can skip over that, but if the Oxford vaccine which you've been backing that ashes, Zana's GonNa do or the Moderna vaccine that also been proven very safe. Why if somebody like myself says, okay, it looks really safe to me I. Don't know fully whether it's GonNa work when I'm willing to try. It wouldn't that help give you more evidence of if it works and wouldn't that be something that I, shouldn't have the right to do. I would say you should sign up for the trial where I want you to know I've gone to. Corona Prevention. Network. Dot Org, and I've signed up for the trial. But I, don't get in I wanNA know, hey, can I get the vaccine in? If I were you, I'm not sure I would vote. Of the trial to learn from the circumstance, 'cause you might be getting yourself injected with something that ultimately turns out not to be very helpful. There is this also unlikely outcome, but we need to watch for in the large field trout, which is called vaccine. Enhancement of disease and Mrs Happened with RSV is happened in a couple of instances with rare conditions but it is unlikely to be the case here, but you WanNa know, is there any way that the vaccine Kinda revs your immune system down the wrong past and you encounter the virus? It actually causes more severe illness. I don't think that's GonNa, you're a we'd you know that? What do you need to make sure that clinical trials you're undergoing or effective working? Well, when we need volunteers and we need a lot of them in order to really have the appropriate power to determine if the vaccine is working, we need about thirty thousand people. Half of them will get the vaccine half, forget a dummy placebo. You won't be able to tell which one you got and. And the people administering to you won't know either because that's the way we make sure that we can really determine what the vaccine did, but it will be particularly important that the people who volunteer represent the groups who have been hardest hits out with this is and that means older people people with chronic illnesses, African, Americans Latinos X. because we really want to understand how the vaccine. In a circumstance where it's going to matter the most just to protect those vulnerable people from illness, one of the other vaccines that you're backing at the NIH is modern and uses an entirely new type of process, which is to not put it. Send in Messenger are an a that's aw totally untried new method isn't it? It has never been used to develop a vaccine that's gone all the way to FDA licensure, but it is a very appealing approach because you. You can build a vaccine. So quickly when the sequence of the viral genome from Corona virus was released by Chinese scientists in mid-january, the design of that Moderna vaccine and our own vaccine research center at the NIH took place in about a day and a half and just sixty three days. Later, that first Phillies, one trial got underway where people were being injected with that Mr, a which basically codes floor. The same thing encodes codes for these proteins but you. You sniff the RNA into muscle. The muscle goes, oh, this is renee. I know what to do this. It makes the protein for you and then the immune system sees it. So it's quick. It's elegance and we shall see whether it's actually going to be successful will find that out in a few months. By the way, I should say there is another back seen berries similar to that that's being put forward by Pfizer, which is also now inveighs three trials. Trials using the MR in a approach. So these are in phase three trials are, when do you think we're GONNA at least start to get information about whether they're efficient while a lot will depend on how quickly we can enroll because we really think we're going to need tens of thousands of people for each of these vaccines and are several of them. So you ended up, we're talking about more than one hundred, thousand people that we hope will take part. These vaccines for the most part are to dose. So you get a dose on Day One and twenty eight days. Later, you get unsexy does, and then we start watching to see what happens after that over the course of the next one or two months to see whether people. In fact, do still fall ill, if you got the vaccine and then you've got sick anyway, that's not a good sign if you got the placebo and you got sick, but the vaccine people didn't that would say looks like it's working. So this will have to play out over the course of two or three months. I think we gotta be careful not to make wild claims about how early we would actually get a signal here. There will be a group that's unbelievable to the data that we'll be looking all along the way on the chance that a, there's a safety cigna we need to know about or be. It looks like it's working even sooner than expected. But mostly I would guess that we will not have an answer until pretty near the end of this year about whether one or more of these vaccines is actually safe infected. So if this start detecting that some of these vaccines may be working well, say in October November might you'd say, okay, let's just give it emergency authorization, get it out there. I don't want to think that the FDA would do that unless that data was really compelling. The worst thing we could do would be to prematurely declare victory when we don't have the evidence to do so and seed Hana's commissioner, the FDA's made it very clear that he will not be granting any emergency use authorization unless the data is compelling that it's safe and it's at least. least, fifty percent effective, and ideally, it should be higher than that. So yeah, we'll have to wait until we reached that threshold otherwise. It's still an experiment. How optimistic are you? That would getting more treatment online. Now, we have some real progress to report and a lot of that is because of a public private partnership called active, which stands for accelerating covid nineteen therapeutic interventions vaccines. We do after all know that ramp does appear and antiviral does have benefit for people who are sick with covid nineteen. In the hospital, we know the decks methods. Sarah. A reduces death rates particularly for the sickest patients who are in icy US or on ventilators. But we have a bunch of other things that are coming along their high hopes that convalescent plasma or you get a plasma donation from somebody who has survived over nineteen and infused that into somebody who's just got the illness. You might speed up their recovery by giving them. Those antibodies have made yet upsells. Their hopes about will be beneficial. We don't quite have the evidence to be compelling about that, but we're working. Working hard on it and right the heels of that would be something that I am pretty excited about which is monoclonal antibodies or again you start with somebody who has survived nineteen, who identify very powerful antibodies. Some of them have that bind tightly the virus so-called neutralizing antibodies, and then using biotechnology you your if those and make them enlarge your quantities as a drug, and those trials are about to start for both inpatient and outpatient against one of the big questions we all have is about schools and reopening the past week, we've had seventy show disease control talked about that Georgia summer camp, we've had a few test cases of schools reopening, how optimistic are you and what? Should schools be doing? This is GonNa be so much dependent upon local conditions if I were as school board president or a principal trying to sort that out I'd WanNa look and see what is the spread of this virus in my community, and there are all kinds of metrics you could use. One of the ones it's turning out to be most useful as looking at people are getting tested and say what percentage of them are positive. You think about that get people being tested. Tested in only one percenter positive that needs who's not a lot of out there if it's fifteen percents like it is right now. Florida. That says got a really serious problem, the viruses traveling around in a pretty unabated way, and that might not be the moment of to bring people back together in a school. Particularly as you think about the teachers and the risks may be quite act and there have been suggestions that maybe younger kids don't get infected and don't pass this on. I think the data to support that optimistic view is looking a little shaky especially after as you just mentioned this report about the outbreak in Georgia camp, where kids of all ages clearly got infected and clearly transmitted it. So those things all have to be put into the decision making for a particular school district to decide what to do. Why did testing yet so bad into difficult. Now takes a week here in Louisiana and New Orleans to get results back. We do have a serious testing issue right now with the slow tournament. The good news is we're doing a lot of testing sixty, million tests. Now, you the house which. which is more than anyplace else. The problem is the turnaround is really got backed up as a central laboratories that are doing a lot of this in Maine laboratories run by companies like quest and land for have just gotten really backed up with demands and their problems with the supply chain of things like slobs reagents. So what we really need now walter is to have more diversity of testing opportunities and particularly the kinds of tests can be done what you call the point of care or you don't have to get the sample, then ship it off somewhere, but you can get the answer away in thirty minutes or less. Last Friday, we announced awards no less than seven companies, mostly small businesses. That s some very inventive approaches they're doing viral. For a big scale opportunity and we are putting two hundred fifty dollars into that to try to get those out there as early as September so that we could have more ways for testing to happen particularly in high risk situations like nursing homes are meat. Packing plants are schools, childcare centers, where you could get the answer right away. You had a nursing staff walks in and they get tested before they even goes see the first patient and of their positive biggest sent home. We find a much better place than we are right now. Why has corona virus roared back in the United States more than in Europe or elsewhere. Well. The sad truth is we never really drove the virus down to the baseline. The way many countries in Europe did after they're very serious outbreaks. Basically, we didn't really follow CDC's rules about how to open up careful and people were tired of all the things they were asked to do. Leaders of the various states and principalities. Kinda jumped over steps that were supposed to take him more carefully following the metrics, and now we are in a tough spot. Debbie Burke. Said, we are looking right now really quite a worrisome situation. This virus is kind of the monster. It's all over our country. It's in cities, but it's also in rural areas and we are going GonNa have a very tough several months ahead in our best antidote for that. Just seems so obvious also seems so frustrating and boring is to do those things that we should have been more carefully where your mask zone leave. The House don't congregate and certainly not in indoor spaces where you're crowded altogether, maintain that six foot distance wash your hands, everybody has to take responsibility if you're not worrying about yourself at least worry about those that you may, in fact, if you become the person who transmitted to the older person down the street or your grandparents, this has to be something. We all wrap our arms around and say we're GONNA. Do this like wearing seatbelts? It's good hobbling cals and we can't afford to say we're tired of it. The virus does care. Why do you think so many things about this disease, especially, the wearing of mass lieven hydrochloric queen used or whatever has become partisan and politicized that some lack of respect for science or is it just a hyper partisan nature of our society, our society, certainly as hyper partisan Tony? G. Who's my wonderful director of infectious disease at NIH and obviously a very visible spokesperson for what we all need to do together. We meet every evening by phone just to see what's going on and off commiserate about how is it that we got into such an unfortunate situation for something that should be. Completely non political, some some house become. So I think it is a reflection of the fact that in our country right now, everything is partisan. Is polarized than sort of the default and it doesn't take much of a tip of the balanced one way or the other people to decide Okay I've got to add that to my particular collection of behaviors that define who I am in terms of my politics. This never should have been there, but unfortunately, you've got there I hope we can extricate. It's and designed at this point with the president himself. Now telling people wear masks. Let's all do it, and let's not pretend that we're somehow exempt because of where we live or what? What other kind of aspect of our behavior might be protective I, gotTa say I'm person of faith in its troubled me. Also to see that in some instances, faint traditions are getting in the wrong side of this fight suggesting that it's really not appropriate for churches to worry about these things after all that God's house. Well, yeah. They are God's house, but God probably also gave us the opportunity to science learn what is good and safe and were expected. I. Think to pay attention to that if we're going to be reasonable children. Of. The gods, the Gods Creation. So. When somebody said to me as they did. A little. While ago, I'm not going to wear a mask in my church Jesus is my vaccine. I was thinking, where have we come to that? We had somehow gotten this mixed. So and the conspiracy theories, of course don't help either that's another big part. You Rode a beautiful book called language of God. About Christianity your faith. As you talk to these religious communities and people of faith. How is your ability to talk to them? Better because you are such a person of faith. Well I. Don't know if it's better, but I do feel a great relationship and works. To my brothers and sisters who are people of Faith and who are going through terrible struggles and most of them doing. So with great sense of calling to try to do what they can, I'm not necessarily focusing on why did this happen? But on what can I do and you can see that happening running food banks and making masks for people her figuring out a way to go to the grocery store for an elderly person down the street. So they don't have to take your miss, the churches often called upon in times of crisis and they are responding, but there's a fringe there that sometimes seems to have aligned itself. Fashion that's more political than spiritual, and that hasn't necessarily turned out all that. Well, I guess again as a person of faith via the chance to speak to people in that place and ask them really to think carefully about what these messages are and how we are all called upon not to put others at risk. Does like that falls particularly on the shoulders of people have faith who have always defined themselves by taking care of those who are vulnerable and less fortune. And how does your faith help you cope with the day to day? Challenges and Harz that you've face with this disease. I will be honest that seeing the suffering and death around us from this pandemic. I. Am Not Immune from wondering why would a loving God allow such a thing to happen and yet at the same time? Scientifically, I know exactly what seems to have happened here that a virus, it was previously living in a bat found its way into humans, and I can't really expect God to jump in super naturally and prevent that that's part of the nature of things. So I. Guess in that regard, I think we are called upon as believers always to look at circumstances like this on try to understand what we can do Tom Brady in a wonderful. For. Time magazine points out that we are also call just to laments and to feel this burden of sorrow for the way in which things are not perfect. But I. Lean. Upon some of those things that Bert that lifts me off a song. Forty six is a particular favorite God, is our refuge and strength and ever present helped him, shrub. Okay. Got Trouble here, and we've got an ever-present help and I'm gonNA hang onto that. After. Francis. Collins. Thank you so much for being with us. Walter. It's great conversation with you. We cover a lot of rain. Lot of ground indeed, and that's it. For now, you can always catch US online on our podcast and across social media. Thanks for watching and goodbye from London.

United States Lebanon Christiane Amanpour Beirut secretary America superintendent president Georgia HBO Dr Francis Collins CNN Arne Duncan NIH Mississippi earthquake Ben Wedeman HBO official Dr Francis
10th Anniversary: 'Benji' Revisited

30 For 30 Podcasts

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

10th Anniversary: 'Benji' Revisited

"Thirty for thirty podcasts are brought to you by onstar being safe on the road is important, and no conversation about safety out on the road is compete without onstar. For over two decades onstar has been giving their members peace of mind behind the wheel now no one likes to think about getting a crash, but it happens more than we care to admit if it happens in an onstar equipped vehicle, you have people looking out for you with automatic crash response special sensors can alert on star advisors of an impact they can connect to your vehicle, take stock at the situation and get you the help. Even if you can't ask for it yourself, and with onstar you have real humans ready to help. Specially trained advisers on, call twenty four seven because when the unexpected happens out on the road, the last thing you want to be onstar, be safe out on star is available Chevrolet Buick GMC and Cadillac automatic crash response requires onstar plan, working electrical system, cell, reception and GPS signal. Onstar links to bridge services. Limitations apply. Visit onstar dot com for details. Hello, and welcome to the thirty for thirty podcast. My name is Jody Avirgan our special summer series continues, marking the tenth anniversary of the thirty for thirty film series today. The last first run about the sewed will be back again, August with a few more head of our next season of original podcast. But today we're looking at a story that continues to haunt the city of Chicago. Go captain number twenty five Wilson Wilson is part of Chicago's mount Rushmore when it comes to basketball nineteen Eighty-four Benjamin Wilson was regarded as the top high school basketball player in the country. He had recently lead his team at Simeon career academy to a state championship and his athleticism caught the eye of scouts around the country. The ball like he's is it Thomas had a smile like Magic Johnson. You know, he had everything you have to be a superstar Benji as friends and family called him seem destined for greatness, but on November twentieth nineteen Eighty-four his promising career came to an abrupt end so street and says your boy, shot say, my boy who. Say Ben Wilson. Wilson was shot in broad daylight just down the street from his high school and died from his wounds at the hospital hours later police later prohibited. Billy more sixteen years old, and Omar Dixon, fifteen and charged them with Wilson's murder, as well as tempted robbery Wilson's death hit the city hard. It was a symbolic loss for city wracked by the high cost of drugs, and gang violence. He does represent a dream unfulfilled. You know, and that's a hard pill to swallow in two thousand twelve directors Kuti and cheek captured his story in the thirty for thirty Benji. We invited them to our studio to discuss the impact of the film, which also included the first ever interview with Benji killer, Billy more later in this episode we're going to hear from Billy Moore himself, who came by our studios to discuss his decision to participate in the film and the work he's doing today. We'll also be joined by former education secretary, Arne Duncan who grew up in Chicago played basketball against Benji Wilson, and in recent years has been working with Billy more on issues of gun violence. But for now, the directors of Benji Cudi, and Chika. Welcome to the thirty for thirty podcast. Thank you so much have Khuda. You're from Chicago. There was this story that you knew growing up, and that kind of how you guys found out about the story and decided to tell it was born and raised Chicago. And I remember like when, when this happened I was in eighth grade. So are. Member before he you know, got shot and killed Benji been Wilson man. You know, a real big deal. When Ben Wilson plan anything, you know, he was like, the, you know, of course, the best plan the nation and it was exciting to see. He was the best high school player I ever saw he can do everything that the pro players do. Roy. On the lanes. Shot down by Ben Wilson made look slow easy graceful. There was a kind of a smoothness about him. Sweet and smooth but used to go to the court at all the time, we would go, and, and I never never got to see him Plato, we got to see set besides when he played the state championship, which he did do good that gates. Oh, they've been eight all that good. But I say we he got even better that summit. And it just everybody just kept talking about it, and Ben Wilson been Wilson. So we really was hoping for man to be the next big thing. So she you're from New Orleans, did you find out about through, they know about them, and it's funny because I played basketball like I had those typical pipedreams playing on the but Benji was a story that had heard about into Cudi told me and I was like, hey, I don't want to know about this. You know what I'm saying? So I was even more intrigued. About it. But, but I relate to the concept of having like we had everybody has their player, you know, saying we had. Yeah. We have Randy Livingston was number one in the nation going to, like. So I can only imagine here in that story having to like Randy in Benji is like Randy, but like a whole another level as far as at that time period. What was going on Chicago period, too? And this is such a Chicago story. I don't wanna talk a little bit about nineteen eighty four eighty four inch called was equivalent creepy. Must like eight wasn't hip hop. It was the beginning of the goal near Michael Jordan, just drafted Chicago selects, Michael Jordan looking forward to trying to live up to expectations. Yes. Jackson, huge figure. Thank you much accused. Talk about trying to capture that larger era in Chicago. Not I was a that was a magical time because we had the first black mayor mayor Washington, like you said, Jesse Jackson running for president that was as you know, like we have a black president possible, which laid on, we had a black President Trump. You know, there was well, he wasn't born in Chicago, but he was raised in Chicago. Why does then Wilson fit in this story, then then was number one, the first to give Ellen OI? Number one, he was a number one player in the country. Been wilson. My little brother do what it takes to be successful. This was going to be, you know, quote unquote little messiah he going to take us to the promised land. So it was it was a really good time. That's why I was such a tragedy when he when he passed Cudi grew up in Chicago's said, and you remember watching many play can you remember the moment you found out that he had been shot? Yeah. And that was the reason why when you watch the movie and where we have all the, the news footage. That's what I've seen real time. The shooting took place right here at the school store about a half ago away from semi up. Young Wilson only seventeen was gunned down on tempting rocked him of spur of the moment. Robbery murder members of gang members, accused ported gang members who allegedly attempted to rob Wilson after a scuffle. And the way you felt watching docked is the way I felt, but it's real time. And I'm like in eighth grade. And then when that happened a remember hearing about it, and it was like, a, a piece came over Chicago afterwards. On a man it was like a can go anywhere because everybody was just like and shot one and anything, you know, 'cause Chicago really like a real segregated city from all size from, you know, black and white from race to gangs. You know, Chicago. So my neighborhood is a gains the disabled game then I couldn't go in his neighborhood as a black piece on ranger gang. But at the band data felt like it was, you know, they all I it was a truce after he shot, and he and he dies. I mean the funeral scene is just so remarkable. I mean thousands of people coming out. It was like going to a ball game. You know, you didn't even have time to get sentimental. You know, think about him because it was a circus opus Metairie closes at four thirty they kept it open later because the crowds were already innocent Metairie. We're talking about blocks of people. Way for with us. This. Was that outpouring about Benji himself or was there, some larger moment of, of grief, because of the level violence in Chicago in general? Have there was some above, you know what I mean definitely been you know, it was that, and, and it was definitely the fact of all the shooting and killing that was going on then with the six hundred sixty night murder that year. So as like, you know, and that, and it was time it was like it's time to stop is the time for change. And Ben was the, you know. Perfect candidate. I guess, for God, it's a to help with that change. You know, so everything happens for a reason, do you think Benji story has had at all impact of the course of you know, decades on gun violence in general in Chicago? I think it pretty much went down. Because, you know, the murder rate at the Ben died went down tremendously to the nineties thous because in Chicago, if somebody gets shot and killed when Ben died they had to take the presence of the nearest hospital, not the nearest trauma center where you can get treatment. So Ben really died in hospital three hours on a gurney. So now at his death, they made a loud, it you had to take the person to a trauma unit. When I got shot that save so many lives. And people thought before they really did certain things, but. Kids in Chicago, still killing down even understand the ramifications of, of that. So as epidemic to me, is like it's all bandaged change is band aid onto miserable bleeding wound that, like it's going to stop the bleeding for a split second. But then it's like it's not only going to hold for so long and it's like it's not until we really like stitched, these things, properly, it's like we have to look at, we almost have to personify like America in it has to deal with it. So just as this is we expect somebody else to deal with trauma as individual in pill back those layers like going for therapy, as a country, we need that. We gotta pull back those dark layers. And then until we do that we're not we're just continuing to put bandaids on things. They'll policies tear netted that just bandaids. Coming up Billy Moore, the man who shocked Ben Wilson when he was just a teenager. We will hear about his journey since his release from prison and the advocacy work, he is doing in Chicago today. Semester and begin. Let me say this to this is the first time that I'm officially telling the story of what actually took place, the dated. I. You know. Committed the crime that I committed this into the penitentiary. Thirty for thirty podcasts is brought to you by Delta Airlines. Delta flash, the three hundred cities around the world. That's three hundred cities where everyone does the same things. That's three hundred cities where the people in those three hundred cities think they're the only ones who know about that one place, three hundred cities where people miss someone in one of the other two hundred ninety nine cities, three hundred cities where people sing in the car in the shower or both poorly delta isn't flying three hundred cities merely to bring us together to show us we're not that far apart in the first place. Delta, he climbing. Thirty for thirty podcasts. Brought to you by state farm. Whether in the game of basketball, or in life, having an MVP on your side, makes all the difference in basketball multitalented, elites playmaker be called upon crunch time. Not only helps the team succeed, but makes the players around better in life, your state farm agent strives to be your MVP ready to come through in the clutch. When you need it, the most, whether it's buying a new home, coping with a car accident of building the foundation for your future. You can feel confident knowing you don't have to go alone. With the state farm agent on your team, you'll be well prepared for whatever life brings your way state farm here to help life, go right? Billy Moore, who is benjy killer is featured in the film, and I was just curious. If you could talk a little bit about how you connected with him, definitely Kuti, you know, to this day, I just remember watching him on, on a phone. I'm gonna forget because it was over several seem like conversations at that they have one in particular, like included in distance kind of patient and talk. And I'm just like, man, I wonder what they talking about, you know, say because this is like who'd he wants to have that conversation confident that he can have that conversation. Can you tell us what you were saying on that phone call for sure until Bill, like you know, I'm from Chicago? I'm from the hood as cog, also I relate so much to Bill, because we've to have guns, you know, Bank, God, I'd never shot anybody or gas shot yielded me. So, you know, going through all the situation that I went through, and I was explaining him all the things that I've seen, and went through he felt comfortable with me and cheek telling stories was it at all hard decision. For you. Did you ever think of not, including Billy? No, we want to know the one. Oh, Mark, martyr. Yeah, we try to get more and he went back to jail. Did you hear from anyone who was upset with the foam? No, not, not the film all the only thing we heard but have been from just didn't care for us having him. Tell his side like that. Billy, I mean he was one, but then they totally like as soon as they were able to come to peace, more forgiveness than than they were able to see the film in the light. A real reason why was important that he be able to have is piece in there. All of a sudden, I just get so that of the way and there was a lot of force, he kept walking, and his girlfriend, they were arguing in though. So I said, hey, man. And you say excuse me, he stopped and tying around you say, man fuck you all, you know, excuse who is you. I'm like now fuck you. She and this is his name. Come on. Then let's go, let's go then, you know, as she grabbed him I say, man, don't walk up on me, so I stepped back on my jacket. So I'm figuring, you know, he seed his gun. He don't leave his girlfriend just goes hysterical. When she seated in and he like, you got a gun which going to shoot me and I'm like. I take two steps backwards and he learns his towards me, I pulled the gun out inside him twice. And so we should sort of clarify this, because I think it's you go into it, and you try and do a lot of work to lay down in the film. But, you know, Omar and Billy are taken into custody, and, you know, there's no dispute that Billy shot Benji notice. The question is overnight after they were interrogating. The story sort of shifts a little bit from it was just a encounter to. They were. They were trying to rob, rob why distinction matter. Why did it matter to you to, to talk about that in the film? I mean what it would have been more self defense defense for for for his attorney if it would just been him shoot them. You know, but they had to put a robbery on that to make it a murder and robbery and use Omar who was fourteen at the time, fits fourteen or fifteen at the time as the scapegoat to. Oh, he tried to rob him. He says shoot 'em. He had nothing to do it, but they put it on them and which didn't happen. It really tore down Omar a think Billy probably would have gone through what he gone through. And I think because he's still made a bad decisions. It just it amplified Omar's situation. More and still wish to town with a talked to because she was there to get her perspective, high school golfing, and we learn at the end that she you made requests. And she so that's one. I mean because I feel like the way we, we there wreck things we don't like to take like, harsh point of view. We just collectively like together all the information and where that leads based upon what we have that's where it leads him. And so she could have been a part of that process to help lead to wear needed to lead to based on her truth. You can you can take everyone, but what do you feel the impact has been of, of putting this film out into the world for everybody to it was like a closure for people to actually hear what happened because it was so many rumors, but then to you got redemption. Definitely because of Billy I mean, were Billy went, you know when through it after his death. Of course, he was the most hated person Chicago at the time. And, and then he went onto, you know, do to Benji documentary was brave enough to do that. Went and met so Ben best friends was brave enough to do that. They got together and they've been going around the school, speaking, the kids and telling they story, you know, 'cause they noted is bigger than what that was. And they were kids at the time, you know. And Billy was a kid that just made a mistake. And Billy said, if he could have just reached out and grabbed that bullet at the shot at how bad he wish he could have done that. But after do some that so that's like, you know that's the thing we want to show the kid like you make a choice. You know you gotta live with it. So billions really during his thing. Yeah. I mean, do you think any of that would have happened without this film forbid? Nah, no, nothing would happen. They Billy any any thank us every day for, for everything that's happening because, you know, I it was it was closed for him. You know, he needed disclosure, you know, and then other than that he would have been. Hiding, you know he'd been hiding in Chicago though. He won't nobody really know we was, you know, of course, and a no telling what would happen, but he got to tell the story and people forgave him. My they broke in say that brother had died. That was the worst feeling in my life. And I couldn't. Come to terms with the fact that. I was responsible for human being then dead. Apologized to to miss Wilson. I, Mr. Wilson that wasn't Mantegna. And now we'll hear from Billy more. Billy spent about twenty years incarcerated as part of a forty year sentence for the killing of Ben Wilson since his release in two thousand four. He has worked as an activist to reduce recidivism rates and the cycle of violence in Chicago. It can be heartbreaking work. Billy's own son was shot and murdered in two thousand seventeen he currently works for a nonprofit Iman an organization that pairs older men who have served time with younger men who are considered at risk. More is a life coach and a case manager and his reconciliation of his own continues. It wasn't until two thousand eighteen that he finally had a chance to meet and have a conversation reconciliation with Ben Wilson's brothers. It's taken that long. Moore has teamed up with former secretary of education and fellow Chicago native Arne Duncan to continue the fight against gun violence in their city. I recently spoke to both men about their personal connections to Ben Wilson and their work together. Billy more welcome to the thirty for thirty podcasts. Thanks for. Joining us. Thanks for having me. And Mr. Duncan Duncan. Thank you, as well. You're on the phone from Chicago, but thanks for making the time doing so Bill. Can you just talk a little bit about your decision almost ten years ago now to participate in this film? Do remember what it was like when it first came out. Yeah. I was a little nervous because I didn't know how people was going to receive this. I knew that it was still relevant, because, you know, Chicago before the fan came out. It could be a kid. They get killed that happen to be, you know, a young athlete, and somebody will bring a Benji it never fail like yeah. At the at the year. So he was still his memory were still alive stuff on his comers. Benji was definitely a put a portent finish ACOG owes history. So I always had to be reminded of Mark Kram. Keep this. I have been out. Almost nine year, I had done my time, I had been working I was working for another Nuff profit organization that helped return citizens fan jobs up into that time I had helped like fifteen hundred men not go back to prison and find employment. You know, I had been basically flying under the radar. I have a large amount of ammunition, the only people that knew me was the people that knew me. But now I can walk down the street and people like man, that's Billy more, you know, basically because of the thirty for thirty but when they say, that's Billy more. What, what are they thinking? I was in Walgreens one dish Kaga police officer walked up to me. He say man he, he didn't say nothing. But man, I know us telling the truth I could fill in my heart, and I'm proud of I wanna shake your hand for having the courage to, to tell you truth. I've had a lot of, you know, situations where that happened. I'll tell you another thing when it was brought to me that some guys were planning on doing the thirty for thirty and they wanted to do it. With me. You know participating. Those would only guys ever asked me, my, you know, for my story, Arne, Duncan win where to you enter. This story is after the film comes out, and you start to work with Billy or I think there's a deeper connection here, too, in terms of your roots in Chicago, Chicago basketball, right? It's a it's a one of the most remarkable stories my life. And so I grew up playing some Benji on actually at the very start of that thirty for thirty scene at the very star the movie of people playing in the why the I tournament, and that that was that was knee on the court with Benji. Yeah. Yeah. And I remember where I wasn't my dorm room in college. And I got the call hit in killed that was two years older than him. It was beyond devastating. So I didn't know Billy but, you know it was. I watched thirty thirty and to be honest, I couldn't even really watch the interview with him at the end of it, it was too, to painful, I too much too much anger, and then a couple years ago, and it's just pretty symbolic Ahmet on, on a peace March in his old neighborhood. Did you have that anger inside you still even those years later? Oh, no. Yeah. No rush. No question. That was unresolved say the leaves. And we walked and we talked and. It was a one of those transformative moments and I didn't just get his side of the story. I got a real sense, for, for his heart and his commitment and his remorse and his desire to make a difference in into help others, and we're fortunate to work with a number of fantastic partners in the city now and reducing gun violence and Iman extraordinary partner for us in the south west Chicago. We started in two thousand sixteen which was a, a year of unfortunate there, -nificant violent with seeing a forty percent reduction in shooting the twenty three percent reduction homicide things are getting better. But we have a long long way to go. All the time is that our men are the solution. They are not the problem Arnie talked about, you know, the peace March, I worked for two minutes organization, he mind that's really dedicated to. Open these male who are most at risk being shot a shooting somebody, I had to, you know deal with my own loss mall, son getting killed. And I understood the type resentment that, you know, was felt for me. So it will it was critical for me to be able to stand up in front of these Yemen every day, and try to get them a reason to be better when in on now faced also with then with the loss of my son and understanding that the man who, you know, maybe responsible for that is just caught up in the science of cycling ignorance that I was caught up in and what Billy said is that if the young man who killed his son came in his program, he would mentor him, he would he would support him. And that just you can't ask redemption. If you can't give you can't ask forgiveness, if you can't give it and that, that Leumi away, and I. You know, I have to teenage, you know, a daughter and son. And I can't begin to say, I would have that kind of harder or humanity. If something happened to. Two to one of my kids and then in, in Vancouver. One, you know, wanna be most marketable Edens in my life where thirty four years to the day of from the, the, the murder Benji, Billy. And and benches. Brothers spent four hours together and at the end of it had has unbelievable reconciliation Billy talk a little bit about meeting veggies. Family was at the first time you'd really had a conversation with his his closest family members. Yeah. This was the first time you know, it was seeing these guys in person is so much historical context to this. So I had a four understand how they felt about me no Chicago's big. But it's small, you know, Salata people connect it. So just the streets let you know, you know, who for you not for you and I definitely knew that for a long time, those brothers was was very hurt and. Was having a hard time of healing from the pain of losing brother and I didn't understand what I put binges family through fully at tomorrow on son was killed. So understood. What I had done, and as not right. Like you can't snatch people away from people and the spec that to be okay. You can just, you know, pack it up and Leo life. No, that, that it took thirty four years for men, binges brothers to come to gutting those guys were still in tears about the loss of the breath. I felt they're paying they're paying was the same pain that I was filling in that room that night, but the difference between me improbably them. And I'm sure they will mind me speaking in these terms that because of what I went through. I was able to kinda have a more openness to forgive. And not because the young men who killed my son is seeking forgiveness, but understand the, the state of ignorance that is causing a young man to commit these crimes, and is that where the mentorship comes in no doubt, you know, understanding how, you know, generally young man, just respond. They don't think so we can get you to just slow down and think about was important, you'd think about your value system. You'd think about what you are waging. If you take a certain type of action to whatever, whatever it was a cause you to fill a certain type away and was gonna leave what type of consequences, and then other, you know, situation is that you really can't control how other people respond what thing you can only control yourself. So if you take the right appropriate. It responses than sometimes the conflicts can be resolved because you can also think for the other person, you know, Benji, push me, a whatever I could easily just let it go. You know, but as young men, not having that real sense of what it means to sometimes step back. We don't know that. That's okay. You know, learning from people's mistakes, you know, that's the true wisdom. I just wanna see these men have a better sense of purpose value for life. Billy Moore is a case manager with the inter Muslim action network, Arne Duncan is former secretary of education under Barack Obama and his now managing partner of Chicago crack earlier in the episode, we heard from Cudi and cheek directors of Benji. And here's one final word from them, real quick. We've been asking all of our directors about their favourite thirty for thirty films other than the ones that they directed. So take a quick listen. To bars. Yeah, it was like I'm when I first saw that I was blown allows odd as crazy, like it just to me. I mean I had never really been like I like Dr like watch daas, but that as a story that I felt like like me when I think about now is gonna have to remember, if it was even a movie or dot felt like a movie heroes. So, so I was inspired by what ice cube with straight out LA is cube. His name with that straight out of that. The raiders NWEA kind of. Yeah. Great is in w we wanted definitely get shout out to our producers tests jour- and a Mani Martin who ESPN put that relate gave us that relationship with those guys that really did a great job with film, but also with the film that they did for ESPN which really game so little gay. Those are really built one. So, yeah, that's one I could say that was inspiring as well. That brings us to the end of this first batch of anniversary shows a couple of things on the horizon next week. There's an episode of the latest big thirty for thirty film on Kobayashi versus chestnut. The greatest rivalry in hotdog eating we will then pick up the nursery series in early. August. Heading right into our next season of original stories can't tell you exactly what it is right now, but it's five part series about Los Angeles in basketball scandal, a good one. We'll be announcing detail real suit, I promise a reminder that every thirty for thirty film is available on our streaming service ESPN plus you can sign up for that right through the ESPN app, or by clicking on the link in the show notes, and all of our podcast, documentaries are available for free at thirty for thirty podcasts dot com or in this feed that you're listening to right now. The anniversary series was produced by Nina, earnest and Ryan Intel with help from neutral, Kabali didn't the Anton, Kathrein Sankey, Aaron light and Jennifer THORP gin. Anthony defendant, Brian the stereo, evil Samantha doubt and Jeff Arias? My name is Jody ever again. Thanks for listening and Moby back soon with more thirty thirty.

Chicago Billy Moore Benji Ben Wilson Chicago murder basketball Arne Duncan onstar Omar Dixon Wilson Wilson rob Wilson robbery secretary Benji Cudi Benjamin Wilson Benji killer Jody Avirgan Kuti Simeon career academy
Chicago's forgotten gun violence victims: 'We've normalized hopelessness'

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

32:33 min | 2 years ago

Chicago's forgotten gun violence victims: 'We've normalized hopelessness'

"The Cape up podcast is sponsored by farm where the one hundred forty thousand researchers America's bio pharmaceutical companies are finding new cures and treatments for diseases like hepatitis C HIV in diabetes. Visit go boldly dot com. I'm Jonathan Kaye. Parton? Welcome to Cape up. This week. I've got something different for you. You won't be hearing straight interview. Instead, I'd like to tell you the story of young man, I met a few months ago. In june. I went to the Aspen ideas festival. It's a week long. Incubator put on by the Aspen institute every year and people from all over the world by and large liberals and very wealthy attend. There are seminars and talks and symposia centered around ideas about how to change the world in the organizers hope people will leave Aspen feeling energized in actually act on changing the world. This year at the closing session. There was a panel featuring three young people from Chicago, Arianna Williams, Trayvon Bosley, and the Angela mcdade where they talked about gun violence and through the course of the conversation, you find out they and their families have all been victims of gun violence, and we're not talking just one time. We're talking many many many times over the first death that I ever experienced with my father at age eight lost my brother, Theriault, Bosley, April four thousand six and he was a well-known today. I have to fight for those born and unborn and those who have lost lives. Become filed. So these kids who came to Aspen talk about gun violence. They they did this in the midst of a larger to bait about gun control in our country that was sparked by the victims of of the park land shooting, the media paid attention Americans paid attention by giving them resources and time and money. So at the end of the panel, these three kids from Chicago will they let this group. No that they needed just as much attention. Not more main disappoint that you gave park monetarily spiritually. But also, mentally we need to say because the reality of one is our multiplied that one time seven hundred and what are these kids? Took it a step further. Few minutes later by just asking a simple question. But how many people in this room will actually come to Chicago? It's been a day in our neighbor. Because we can make that happen if he really wants to and my hand reflexively shot up in the air. But so there were so many other people's hands shot up in the air. It was a very inspiring moment where this young woman, this young African American woman who is unafraid to challenge this overwhelmingly white crowd. To, you know, do this. And then I want you to come visit my neighborhood and to see people actually respond. That's what was inspiring. You said it's red brick, right? I wanted to get in touch with one of the kids from the panel. So were put in touch with DeAngelis mcdade who made himself available. So we got on his schedule booked tickets and often went to Chicago. Yeah, there it is right here. We got to Angela's house. It's an a west Chicago neighborhood. Hey, dan. Nice to see you again Johnson, my producer, Carol the Angelo mcdade. He's eighteen years old. Just graduated from north Rondell college prep. How shall we? Let's get a microphone on. Yes. That's what we need to put as promised. Dangelo took us on a walk around his neighborhood. This way, you can see everything on the Angeles street. It's non like any other sort of tidy urban neighborhood in where on the northeast. Everyone knows everyone on our blocks is kind of like everyone knows everyone's business especially that how fair, hey, Mr. rove. I'm going to sell. Especially this rose, especially that house is his wife is MRs rose on MRs rose is very charismatic whether you need or not she's always there. And then we get to the corner two years ago. There was this giant building kinda replica this building and a big apartment like an apartment building with stores and the ground for their, sir. And they tore down one thing that you notice about our communities. There are a lot of lots a lot of Vanda buildings. Couple of years ago. The mayor ruled out that. We had to start tearing down abandoned buildings because girls will become a kidnapped and raped and people are getting murdered in it. With figure I hear you guys. And I mean, this is a major avenue this issue Congo avenue. We're on and that was when Dangelo started explaining what was happening and who was where and what it all meant even here. This is what they call drove. You can see that. There are people so him corner those energy drove but on. North two north corners, these individuals that utilize jobs. So we're on the north side. We just passed market you passed south side of us was the birth. Fires. So suppliers consumers, the caller that we just passed Chicago avenue Ridgway, the youngest person out there who sells jokes is you'll ever use the old man loves to play basketball. He was he academically he will sound in school. But I guess that he lacked a sense of community a sense of family. So what Dangelo told me that kids turn to gangs and drugs because they're losing their schools in their community centers at nobody cares. It seems that they turn to gangs before majority of these young individuals started to either sell drugs, stop going to the YMCA. There was a school called Galapagos charter school. And so one thing that I can say about the academic institution. The pride themselves by creating partnerships that allow students to stay involved in extra curriculum activities sending them to Northwestern University. But sadly, the school is now close, and even though there's no there are no borders. No boundaries. There's no guard stationed. There's no flags or anything like that. But he knows exactly where the boundaries are. Let's make a right here. Because if we continue walking straight tours vision on this block, right? You are run into a a massive group of drug gang members, not saying that they're bad, but things can get a little heated on a corner. Especially when you're just walking through. So walking with the Angelo's through his neighborhood. Might not seem like it would be an issue for me. I'm black. He's black. We're both black walking into black neighborhood. But DeAngelis neighborhood is in the life. He lives. There is not my lived experience. I'll make fun of myself right now, I was in a blazer in my jeans and a little pocket square. And I've got my my little bag with my notebook and everything in it. So I feel like I'm standing out like a sore thumb the also Carol stood out because you know, she's a white woman in west Chicago, and I could not help but feel like I stood out because. African American but clearly not from around here. And here I am in their neighborhood feeling as out of place. Once we get to walking and talking as as Carol did. We make our way back to Dangelo house to the front porch where a year ago to that day done violence directly impacted his life. It was actually evening is evening around six o'clock in normally when our our family does not stop talking for nothing in the world. Our laugh very loud until friend of the family. My grandfather was on suit at the bottom of the stairs. And he says a gentleman is walking with his gun drawn. And he hasn't white hoodie. In. So immediately deport silent in my mom's screamed out everybody in the house. In. My mother was the first one to run in the household, then became my twin sister. My grandfather had my little cousin in his armed or having his fallen late on his chest. My grandfather through the baby like he was a football to my sister. My sister onto the house, and well, the bullets ricochets off the bricks and then another bully ricocheted office phone lifeproof cases are lifeproof. I ended up pushing my grandfather into the household. So I'm the last one in grandfather was shot in front of his star. And after being the laugh on the and I really didn't know that I was shot onto looking at my Granddad and trying to make sure everybody else. Okay. And I feel like something with burning. Rubbed against my my back of my leg. And I was like I'm bleeding and our screamed out I'm shot. I'm shot. My momma screams out stop playing with me low. I say I'm for real. Again, the house. My mom calls. Now, one say she needs an ambulance and she screams these methods shot my baby. When we asked Angelo about who the gunman was and why the gunman shot his family that day. He told us. He was someone they recognized from around the neighborhood DeAngelis said that his family was not the intended target of the shooting that that the person the gunman was after was a family friend and the gunman decided, hey, if he couldn't get him. He would get anyone could and that happened to be the Angelo and his family and Dangelo said it took the police in an ambulance. Twenty five minutes to get to them. Once I got into the ambulance. They were fused to let my mom in there with me for a while. And to I got to kind of scream send that I wasn't going to leave. Without my mom was seventeen. I need a parrot. They took my idea. Never brought my ID back. My mom gets into the ambulance. She's crying every bump that the ambulance. Hit. It hurt. We get there. I'm handcuffed to the hospital bed when the lead detective walked into the room. And she said, oh, they said that you're your gang member. And the question rings in my mind, implicit racial bias. That is the first thing that we get for African American or students of color period, people of color. And. No one asks me anything the are made assumptions no-one talk to my mom. No one talked to my sister. Nobody talked to my grandmother. They thought they decided is the real word that he was a gang member. In all he was was as seventeen year old kids sitting on his front porch with his family on an August night. A victim of gun violence. Cape up podcast to sponsored by pharma where the one hundred forty thousand researchers with America's by pharmaceutical companies are finding new cures and treatments for diseases like hepatitis C, HIV and diabetes. So here's to the fearlessness to fail. So success can follow and the patients helping to find the breakthrough that might say their lives, and perhaps one day yours. Welcome to the new era of medicine. Together. We go boldly a message from America's by pharmaceutical companies. Visit go boldly dot com. Your hand, you you are handcuffed to to the this the stretcher, what did you think what was going through your mind? Then why why should I be a piece worry and keep fighting for Kenya? Nonviolence? This is going to be my reality. Peace warriors is an organization Dangelo founded after meeting former education secretary Arne Duncan in twenty seventeen. It was at a gun violence townhall and Daniel had an idea. The idea was to hire mentor and teach young people about non-violence or as DeAngelis calls. King Qingyan nonviolence Kenya nonviolent is a philosophy developed by Dr Martin that the king during the civil rights era. And so when Dr king led he led in a nonviolent manner, and he developed a six steps and six Kenya nonviolent principles and in which we utilize and we interpret onto the modern day. The first is non violence is a way of life where courageous people it takes a lot for individuals to not retaliate indoor not to be violent. Number two nonviolence seeks to win friendship and understanding in order for us to prosper as a community. We must work together. Number three nonviolence seeks to defeat. Injustice not people attack the force of the not the person's doing me that means if someone is coming in with a bad day, and they have not eating what what can I do? Hey, let me give you a snicker or let me give you something to you. I'm not going to take you because there's something wrong number four nonviolence holds that suffering can educate and transform. Sometimes we must step back, even if it hurts in not retaliate because the end goal is much bigger than us number five nonviolence chooses love instead of hate, sometimes individual the human nature and human characteristics. We internalize our anger, and because we internalize our anger, it sometimes is dealt with an physical manner until if we can avoid that internal anger than we can process and can live in a peaceful manner. Number six nonviolence believes that the universe is on the side of Justice. I love to analyze this one. Because before Dr king died, Dr king say, I may not be here where we get there. But we as people will make it to the promise land until his basic words are interpreted to be what is done in. The Dr comes to the light. What goes around comes? Around. God is on the side of Justice. I think the Angeles involvement in peace warriors, and his sort of adherence to nonviolence is as much a response to. His day to day living as it is a path forward. What it says to me is that he recognizes that his his life. Is more than that street in Chicago that he's got he's got bigger plans and bigger ideas in that if he could just hang on to this path stay on this path to show that I've lived through this. I'm living through this yet. Here's what's getting me through day to day. With a recognition that it's not the beyond end. All it is not the absolute solution. But it is the thing that is keeping him hopeful. The day when I was shot, and I looked into my mom's is I looked in. My mom was telling me every single day. Go to school. Don't be like your dad. Become an educator give back to your community. Most importantly survive. We have gone to this corn in our live. We we are only trying to survive. I don't survive. I don't want anyone just as bad. I want them to live with proactive purpose. Another community is in disbelief shocked by devastating violence. It's time at that Florida high school on Valentine's Day heavily armed swat teams. Armored vehicle surrounding Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland, Florida there said into say that seventeen people lost their lives. Shame on you. Let me ask you about park land. When the news a park land, hit what went through your mind when former secretary of education Arne, Duncan gave me the cost. Hey, you have you heard about the Parkinson's? No, you have to tell me about it. Because I really want to start watching the news because it became so depressing. And he says well. How about you want some peace for go down? He didn't even get to finish. His let's go let's work with apartment students there. One day of trauma is our reality until we cannot allow the park students to feel hopeless. We have for many years. So Dangelo, and and others from Chicago, go down to park land. And they go to Emma Gonzalez's house in this was after Emma gave the speech that turned her really into a household name. Gilded house and Senate seats funded by the NRA telling us nothing could have been done to prevent this. We call. The New Yorker magazine has a story about all of you. Which is when you all went down to park land. And you're all Emma Gonzalez's house in you're sitting around the pool. Yes, lord. What was that? Like she worked with open arms. We got there. More students we separated from the dotes older dotes, and we wanted to have conversation just as young people who decided to go outside and we'd go into a heavy coversation about gun violence. One of them asked. The park land kits? How many times have you been involved in gun violence, and they the way the story was told they all sort of looked at each other. It was like well just this one time. And so the question came back from the park land kids, Chicago kids, how many times have you been involved in each one went down the lion. I can't remember who said what? But it was one person said thirty five times another person's said forty times another person's said twenty times the point they were making was this isn't just a one day occurrence for us. This is a lived experience for us. And then a young lady by the name was Sarah screamed out we acknowledge our white privilege. When scream that out then tire everyone that was outside by the pool guy silent. Because we've had this conversation about white privilege because city of Chicago one shooting. Barely mixed news and for her to scream out, and we're just not having this conversation. You scream out. Hey, I knowledge my white privilege. You're sitting there we all just look around. And that's been out. That means you see me. If you are willing to knowledge something that you were born into and something that you cannot help and you're willing to work with us to help Argumenti. That that means all the world surprised by that by not just her screaming that, but by the fact that the park land kids from basically minute one were like, we this happen to us. But we are not the only ones is happened to we are reaching out to kids in Chicago and other cities who have been dealing with this whole lot longer than originally. They didn't reach out. We started them trip. Correct. Our partnership just grew stronger. Our believe our partnership grew stronger because. The felt what our everyday reality was. And I use everyday reality because we've normalized hopelessness we've normalized gun violence is more coming to hear gunshot rather than your own doorbell ring. When we were having the conversations about working together and all of this. Em. Emo was more of the person says. Yeah, ready. Let's do. Let's do it. And we're just like we see that. There is something that we could possibly do something we can possibly work together on we've already been working in the city of Chicago. But we just wanted their blessing to work with them on the national level. Because one thing that we noticed is the March for life students had momentum they still receiving financial support moral support ladders, but even their even their elected officials. Some of them were supporting them in Chicago, we didn't receive any of that at March for our lives. I watched your speech. There was a line in there that I wrote down because it spoke to the dynamic of attention between the attention given to the park land kids in attention given to you here in Chicago. And you said Chang survivors. Tell you. But I'm saying. Why do you think there's been silence? What believe because everyday thing to believe that race plays a factor in this in this sad to say racism does play a factor. The park students are. Majority car Cajun, and or wide whatever anyone wants to call it group that has worked to reform gun regulation. And so they're they're the get the tension. And because the science has a start that gun violence does not always involve our white counterpart that this is unusual. We need to stop this. Now, what about the people in the back? They have been fighting for many years. I've been fighting before March for our lives, I've been fighting since practically being a baby my mother's been fighting since she's practically been a baby. Forty seven years of fighting just going down the drain. There's frustration in in that answer. And. Is you said it's not directed at the park land students, but it's directed at. It's directed at society for what treating park land slash Chicago. As the cause of the moment and then moving onto something else. Practically. Yes. The thing. That's always been fascinating, the lack of resentment the lack of bitterness at the sort of instant notoriety of the park land kids who lived through one horrific mass shooting. Compared to your every day existence. And as you said before even your parents every day existence where does the lack of of bitterness and resentment come from you? You would have every right to be resentful. How did I not extend bitterness? William my how happy August first of two thousand seventeen. My how was migrant father Langone his hospital bed. My why was my mother not being able to sit on our front porch for several months. My why was saying my fellow Pierce down on the corner because some of them didn't even have their parents Ford, right? Some of them having to grow up at younger ages. My how. Came. If I had resentment hate myself, my how we came. Sing my friend mother scream about her child died. My how became saying immigrant Dallas give her very first speech about the parkland student. My how came me laying in my bed and having my sister to change my raps in wanting her not to go through the same thing. Those became how because if I became bit. I will forget why actually doing what I'm doing. And I don't want to forget that into them will be resisting my pants just in my pants something that I never wanted to do. It's been about five months since I first met Dangelo in three months since we visited him in Chicago. And you know, a few weeks after we left he Angelo more than sixty people were shot in one weekend, including the very neighborhood we walked in at the time. We're publishing this episode more than twenty six hundred people have been shot in Chicago in twenty eighteen which amazingly is about six hundred fewer than last year. And since our visit with Dangelo our country has seen even more mass shootings, including the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting in October and the Thousand Oaks, California mass shooting in November not to mention the mercy hospital mass shooting in Chicago also in November plus countless gun related incidents that don't even make national headlines in the frustration and powerlessness have only mounted and their best personified by. That mother in California who said her child survived the Las Vegas mass shooting, but didn't come home that night. And I don't want prayers. I don't want thoughts. I want gun control, and I hope to cut. Nobody else sends me anymore prayers. I want good control. No more. What that grieving mother is saying is something that people keep saying, and it's true. Something needs to be done about this problem, which brings us back to the Aspen ideas festival where I first met Dangelo and his fellow panelists and watched them challenge. The audience to do something to help them solve problems like gun violence. Hugh. We're part of the closing panel. And basically brought that tent down people were raving about how the conference ended which ended not on a, you know, oh, look at us. We're solving the world's problems and everything is great. And we all agree with each other the three of you sat up there and read the crowd just point blank. To the crowd. How many of you would be willing to spend a day in our neighborhood? Come the Chicago spend the day. Were you surprised by how many hands went up? Here's my one because individuals would say that they are willing to come. But in actuality, they won't come just Senate to police themselves to sometimes we feel as if individuals don't care and some individuals don't want to actually make a difference three for those individuals that rose are hand him still waiting on them to come. Still waiting. I can't hide anything on my face. Carol told me later that I had this look of disappointment. And I truly was I guess I'm still at fifty one years old this little kid who actually believes when people say they're going to do something that they're actually going to do it. And to realize that. I was the only person to actually show up. Was it was disappointing. It was hurtful. It was. It really. I don't know. I just felt so let down by the people in that tent. When I saw all of those hands up in she acts questioned in those handled up sitting there. So you want to see my reality. You want to live in my world for a little while. That's why last chuckled and then want one that walked up to me. She said, I really don't want to come. I just want to see how many people raise their hands along with me. Why? And why in she walked up right before I walked over to speak with you. She was the last one to give me a hug. I will not want to see a reality because that will make me feel bad about who. I am. I live that that lets me know that you know, that there's wrongdoing in the world. That lets me know that you see what's going on. You see what's happening that raise your hand. If you're not gonna come your hand. If you're not gonna help me save the next person's life. Then raise your hand, if you don't want to say in mind.

Chicago DeAngelis mcdade Dangelo Carol Angelo America Aspen institute Dr king Jonathan Kaye Dangelo Aspen Senate Arne Duncan Kenya Cape Parton Angelo secretary
3 million+ coronavirus cases in U.S., 132,000+ reported deaths

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

45:43 min | 7 months ago

3 million+ coronavirus cases in U.S., 132,000+ reported deaths

"Now. It's time for the last word with Lawrence, O'Donnell leaving arts Jimmy ritual, and we have. Alice Frank Ston joining US tonight. She is at the moment, the next best thing to marry trump because she is a lifetime friend of Mary trump's and knows very well and spoke to her spent a lot of time with her while Mary Trump was writing the book that was so featured on your show last night, and so she's going to tell us what she knows about how this book came about and what she knows about this This relationship that married trump has with not just her uncle, donald but the rest of the family. And how's that going now? Yeah. That's fascinating I'm so glad you've got her I. Mean we're in this unusual situation? Where Mary Trump's book is in the hands of some journalists, and it's coming out next week, but she herself is still like legally precluded from speaking about what she wrote the book about. You're going to get as close as anybody can get. Ashtray. Princeton is authorized to speak for Mary trump. This is not just a friend raising her hand and saying hey, I, know her I have something to say this is this is a kind of carefully arranged way of doing this at this stage. This is exciting I'm this is I'm I'm riveted. Already. Go Learn. Get home and watch. Thank you ritual. Okay well by. Donald Trump. Has No power to open schools in America none. Let me repeat that. Donald Trump has no power to open schools in America, but he does have the power to read the President's daily brief. And studied the intelligence reports in that brief about all of the threats to Americans and American soldiers that the intelligence community can can find anywhere in the world. Donald Trump's niece has written a book which we will discuss later on this hour. Will Lifetime friend of hers as I just mentioned. And in that book. Donald. Trump's niece explains why the current president of the United States does not care enough. About protecting American lives around the world, including American military lives or the lives of American, School Children Mary Trump's book says that Donald Trump's father was a. High functioning sociopath, and that his mother was quote emotionally and physically absent, and that left Donald Trump quote fundamentally incapable of acknowledging the suffering of others. Donald Trump does not care. That is not news, but the ways in which donald trump does not care become clear whenever new matters of presidential concern emerge in the news. The Donald Trump clearly does not care about. There is no real dispute that Donald. Trump did not care about the children that he was putting in cages at our southern border. Donald Trump wanted his voters to now. That he was putting those kids in cages, and absolutely did not care about those children, and he wanted his voters to know that he felt that way because Donald. Trump believes that that's one of the very big reasons that those voters voted for him. That, he does not care. About anyone. At our southern border. Donald Trump doesn't care about American soldiers who may face a greater threat math Ghanistan, because what Putin is paying to have them killed Donald. Trump doesn't care about anyone currently enrolled in any public school in America Donald Trump doesn't know anyone who attends a public school or works in a public school from where he sits in any one of his homes, Donald Trump has no idea which direction to go to find a public school, but Donald Trump wants all public schools to go back to normal in the coming academic year starting in August. But not private schools. Not The rich kid private schools that his kids have gone to. Donald trump is not pretending. That he will tell private schools what to do just public schools. He threatened today. His typical empty threat way to cut funding for public schools that don't open up and pretend that everything is okay in August and September. That will never happen Donald. Trump will not cut one penny of funding for schools, because of how they deal with the corona virus. I want every school in America to open and get back to normal. As soon as it is safe. Donald Trump wants every school in America to open and get back to normal period. He doesn't care if it's safe and by now Donald. Trump knows if that happened. This August millions of people would get sick very quickly. Students, teachers, parents, and anyone who lives near a student or teacher or parent, which means everyone in America would be no more than one or two degrees of separation from corona virus infection. Donald Trump knows people will die. If that happens, it's not going to happen, but if it did happen. People would die. Students would die. Children would die. Teachers would die. He knows that. Donald Trump knows that he's in the middle of a big bluff right now about being the pro schools president, this is the new Republican game of the week and the Republican governor of Florida is playing it exactly the way. You'd expect Republicans to play this game. Just lying about this news reports indicated that Florida's Governor and the State Education Commissioner have ordered. Ordered all Florida schools to open. That's the headline that ran yesterday. But the fine print in that order shows that it is not an order. It is a hope it is. A sort of suggestion at best because at the bottom of page, two of the so-called water from the state of the Florida. Department of Education. It says quote the day-to-day decision to open or close. A school must always rest locally with the board or executive, most closely associated with a school. This Republican order. Is Nothing. It orders nothing. Donald. Campaign. To corrupt the Centers for Disease Control continues. He says he doesn't like the guidelines that they've issued for reopening schools. Here's what Donald Trump doesn't like promoting social distancing wearing cloth face coverings, having children bring their own meals, discouraging sharing of items and disinfecting surfaces often. Donald trump doesn't like that. So the Mike Pence White House team is going to come up with an even softer set of guidelines for opening schools, which everyone will ignore because as NBC's Jeff Bennett? Exposed today Mike, Pence and Donald Trump have no plan. Articulated the problem myriad risks that students face if they stay out of school, come the fall, but what's the plan? What's the administration specific plan? In terms of increased testing contact tracing increase? If it's needed to support the schools as you well know schools burnt built for students to socially distance, they were built to pack in as many kids as humanly possible, which is one of the reasons why school district's like Fairfax, Virginia? The school district in New York to Texas. They have moved to this hybrid approach, some virtual learning some in person learning. So, what's what's the plan? And then I have a question productive burks about kids and covert if I may. Well the plan is to continue to do what we done for the very beginning. The peds gibberish that followed. That is not worth your time. There is no plan. There is only oppose the pros of the Republican tough guys who aren't afraid of a virus who wants to open the schools. And then there are the questions. That you only get to ask in the trump White House. People back to school safe to send report back in person. Is it safe to send Manafort back to prison Donald Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was released from prison because of the threat of corona virus. Donald. Trump issued a tweet today. Saying that of course American schools can reopen because schools have reopened in Germany Denmark Norway and Sweden. Countries whose example Donald Trump doesn't usually follow yesterday. The United. States reported a record high of fifty, four, thousand, one, hundred thirty new cases of coronavirus. Down Marquette ten. Norway had eleven. Sweden? Had Two, hundred, sixty, three, two, hundred, eighty, three Germany had three, hundred, ninety seven. And as of tonight. The United States has reported a new record high of fifty, eight, thousand, two hundred thirty eight cases. But means that as of tonight, there have been three million. Fifty Eight, thousand, two, hundred fifty, confirmed cases of corona virus in this country and that as of tonight this country has suffered one, hundred, thirty, two, thousand, eight, hundred seventy three deaths from coronavirus. Willie. Garcia knows more about schools than anyone named trump ever has or ever will. We see what happens when they let bars open prematurely. And you saw those young adults in there in that Nice Nice Little Bar, and they went home, and they infected everybody around them. This isn't a bar. We're talking about second graders I had thirty nine sixth graders when year in my class I double dog dare Donald, trump to sit in a class of thirty nine sixth-graders breathe that air without. Any preparation for how we're going to bring our kids back safely. Leading off our discussion tonight Arne Duncan. The former secretary of education during the Obama Administration Dr. Shop emergency! Room physician in Phoenix Arizona and. Arne Duncan I'd like to begin with you? the. The idea that the President United States can first of all somehow order or People to go back into schools are then also somehow penalize schools financially. If people don't go back to school the way Donald Trump wants them to. What is your reaction to all black? Is Alive and that's not. That's not news, but he's bluffing his power here, so let me just make a couple of things very very clear. The president of the United States doesn't fund public education. That's what Congress. Dawes is no ability to order schools to go back. We all definitely want our children to go back to school. Has To fiscal school on? There has to be safe to do so because this administration has done such a terrible job of keeping our our kids in our community safe. That's open question right now identified kids to go back in July this month. Catch up what we lost academically and socially odd during March and April may June, but because our country did not follow what scientists tell us to do, 'cause don trump. Wouldn't you push wearing masks? Physically distancing las that opportunity to what happens, this fall is opt to assist. Citizens are in to try and make our communities. The sages possible August to give our children a chance to go back the physical schools. A Doctor Shaw you're also a member of the House of Representatives in Arizona Arizona's house representative so I. Want to ask you first of all. From your governing position, what do you see as the schools situation just in your state just in Arizona? And what do you anticipate happening with schools? It's a topic of great concern for us. Arizona has had some issues with education funding over the years. We have had the dubious honor of being nearly last in a amount of funding. We provide her cubicle. We've had numbers of kids per classroom and that was all before the coronavirus so. Being, able to successfully open schools at the the date that we were supposed to, it was actually July. Seventeenth was supposed to be one of the days where we started to open. That's not going to happen. The governor has pushed us forward to August seventeenth, but I just don't see with Marlins as we have. I just can't see how that's going to happen. Being such a hotspot as we are some anticipating and delay there. Arne Duncan what would you recommend to schools and school districts around the country since they're gonNA get. Nothing like the kind of flow of advice, they would be getting from any other administration Democrat or Republican prior to the trump administration. They're going to be hearing nonsense from the president every day. The CDC has been corrupted in what they can say publicly about this so schools out there who don't have the resources to make their own scientific evaluation of what's going on. What advice would you give them about how to approach this? Actually actually happen today. Plan their way but Dr. Tom Friedman. Who the CDC of all microprocessor Secretary Spellings Republican who were cousin? Bush report out our own guidance today the school districts to follow in what we're seeing across country on. No one's paying any attention to John Shaw. He's actually relevant to this conversation. Usually he lost his credibility months and months ago. You have superintendents across the country talking to each other helping each other thinking this thing through most districts what end up in a hybrid type situation where some students in school some of the time. All students will be doing some virtual learning and people wanting to problem solve this EPA local level their leadership on their compassion empathy, their concern for students, preparing for staff or teachers, custodians for cafeteria workers for folks in of the school buses on your citizen, absolutely remarkable himself how what they're doing to solve these unprecedented and honestly really dark times. A doctor show what about the situation in Arizona Tonight Joe Biden talked about today about people waiting in line for hours to get tested in Arizona as the numbers skyrocket as you approach maximum capacity of your hospitals a. what is the situation there tonight? Continues to. Be Rough, as here! Know I. I work in the Emergency Department and what we're seeing is that you know in my own practice? One out of two or one out of three people I see has been or covert likes Clinton's. We're seeing a market uptick up. There are very high per capita numbers as the highest in the world is is what we've been hearing very high positively rates on the test. We're getting back and the testing is also been so delayed I. Mean we can't seem to get these tests results out because the the companies are struggling, so we're looking sometimes at a seven almost ten day. delay in getting the results back so it's it's been hard I. See us again at record capacity over ninety percent at this point so still we're in a very tough spot, and and in in the middle of a of a real uptick in our cases. And Arne Duncan the strain on testing, which is now happening nationally and once again. We're having a strain on medical supplies a nationally. How does that interact with the decision about opening schools because you would want schools apparent to open within an environment where if there was a sudden need for a rush for extra medical services that that would be possible. Is Actually worse than that. You need access to lots of tests. You need to be able to get those results back rapidly. We willing to contact trace in. If there's someone is positive, figure out WHO deputy contact when we have to be willing to to porn teen, none of those things have been in place the national level if there is any concern for kids for education or parents or teachers on the misery, talking about increasing funding for public education, now because of all the increased cost associated with dealing with this pandemic, rather than bluffing and threatening to take away funding, which as you said is not going to happen on. There's unfortunately just no, but these guys. There's no bottom. Former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan thank you very much for joining us Dr, Michel. Thank you also for starting us off tonight. Really appreciate it. Thank you thank you. And when we come back, Donald Trump's refusal to respond in any way. To intelligence reports that Russia is paying bounties to kill American troops in Afghanistan tonight. We have new reporting on what led to that situation. Own. Hey It's Chris as this week on my podcast wise is happening. I'll be talking with neuroscientist Dr Crawl Heart about the insidious ways stories of degeneracy drugs and blackness had been inter weaved in the American story, those far more crack in white communities why people always use more than black people, but the face of crack was black people, and it was a way us to dismiss the problems of that group of because we can say if it's crack well. That's their own dealing at this week on. Why is this happening search for? Why is this happening wherever you're listening right now, subscribe. We choose to go to the movies and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard. I'm chuck, Rosenberg on my podcast, the oath I speak with those who sacrificed for the common good who do things because they are hard this week, former under secretary of Defense Jim, Miller I've worked with people who were committed to doing the right thing for the country who were patriots both military civilian personnel who are willing to literally put their lives on the line for their country. Join me for season, three of the of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes every Wednesday. Today Joe Biden said this about Donald Trump's failure to do anything about intelligence reports that Russia has been paying bounties to kill American troops in Afghanistan. We've learned overwhelmingly that he is out. They're not doing a damn thing about the fact that there's overwhelming evidence that Putin has gone and he's paying significant bounties to kill American soldiers in Afghanistan. If my son were still alive after ever spent a year in Iraq I. Don't know what the Hell I would do. How all those parents feel all you who serve field? Today Ryan Goodman at just security delivered stunning new reporting about Donald, trump directing the CIA to share intelligence with the Russian government after Donald Trump had been pre briefed, but flat emery Putin was supplying arms to the Taliban journey. Discussion now is Ryan Goodman. He is the founding co editor in chief of just security is a professor of law at new. York University. Thank you very much for joining US tonight. Take us through this reporting and how it leads to the story that we've been covering for the last over week now. So the question I had was. Why would Putin think he could get away with paying bounties to the to kill American soldiers in the answer I found this, because in large part of he was doing something beforehand, which is providing weapons to the Taliban and the Pentagon up in arms about this raising it publicly having to go out and do media in US and the like to say that Russia should stop giving weapons to the Taliban of all people because it was threatening NATO. In, what did president trump do, but he sent Hooton a very direct signal. He did nothing he said. And I have a former defense department officials saying on the record, the debt undercut any effort for the Defense Department to raise the issue of the state arm, or anybody else in on the contrary Donald Trump did during that period is pushed the CIA to give intelligence to the Kremlin for counterterrorism operations, the same Kremlin. That is militarily army of the terrorist organization to Talbot This goes to a point. That Nancy Pelosi raised when the story was breaking, and it was quite striking to me because she was, she was wondering about. You know why because the White House story was you know no one told Donald Trump. No one told Donald Trump John Bolton has told people that he himself did tell Donald Trump John. Bolton won't confirm that publicly because he says it's classified, but Nancy Pelosi at that time said this were they afraid to approach him on the subject of Russia and were they concerned that if they did tell him that he would tell Putin, and that to me is the most important way to look at this question, it's one of the possibilities. I think the question has to be raised that if in fact they did alert a crump. He would just share the intelligence information. That's what was already instructing the to do as a matter of policy. Despite the analysts saying that if we do this, we get nothing in return. So why would we do this? But it was in fact, the effort by the White House president trump himself. To to send direct to share information with the Russians so I think the idea that the speaker is raising. It's almost like to push for I would imagine the intelligence community deeply concerned. What Donald Trump did with this type of information. And lose all sorts of theorizing about all you know they in the office. They never want to bring anything about Russia. That's negative about rusher to Donald Trump because he doesn't want to hear it, and it's all that from that angle of Oh. The boss doesn't WanNa hear it, which is one level of dereliction of duty. This version of it. If we bring it to him, he will tell Vladimir Putin is the version where. The dynamic is the same as having a Russian agent working in the White House. Will the concern is that he has a track record. The president didn't fact invite the Foreign Minister of Russia and the Russian ambassador into the Oval Office and a by all reports I gave them highly classified information that compromised the US. L.. So, it's not as He hasn't actually done it and. I think that's a we'll risk. And why is he not raising issues that are threatening the lives of American forces on the ground, but rather chumming it up with Putin and remember when he returned from the very first meeting that he had one of said. We're GONNA sit a joint cyber defense operation with Vladimir Putin for cybersecurity. it just shows you. The mentality of it is difficult to know why he is so the home to Putin, but those are dots connect. Ryan Goodman thank you for sharing your reporting and analysis with us. Thank you very much for joining our discussion tonight. Again. Thank you? And when we come back seventeen year, old darnell frazier recorded the video of George Floyd being killed on the street in Minneapolis by police. It is thanks to Darnell Fraser's brave holding of that camera for every minute that she held it that we know the story now of what happened to George Floyd. Today We got the transcripts. Of the police body CAM video. That's next. Seventeen year old Ella Frazier reported the last minutes George. Floyd's life on a video that lead to the arrest of the four police officers who are charged with the murder of George Floyd. We now know that George. Floyd said. I can't breathe more than twenty times as he struggled for air under police knee in the last minutes of his life that new count of how many times he said, I can't breathe comes from the transcripts of the police body. Cameras of two of the police officers who were holding George. Floyd down. Officer Thomas Lane an officer Alexander King. These transcripts were made public in court filings today in Minneapolis Minneapolis we do not have the transcript of the body cam of officer Derek Shelvin who kept his neon George Floyd's neck for eight minutes and forty six seconds. That knee was on George Floyd's neck long after. All of the witnesses present could tell. The George Floyd had stopped breathing the very first thing George Floyd says in the transcript officer lanes body. Cam Recording is. Hey Man I'm sorry. The next thing George Floyd says is I'm sorry I'm sorry. George Floyd's language is always polite. The transcript is filled with George. Floyd Floyd. Saying sorry and please. The police officers language begins very aggressively with those lines that they all learned cop. Movies offer swollen. Put Your F ING hands. Up Right now, keep your F ing hands on the wheel. To which George Floyd says yes sir. I'm sorry office. George Floyd continues to apologize. I'm sorry. I'm so sorry. God Dang Man Man I got I got shot the same way Mr. officer before I'm so sorry Mr. Officer Dang man last time I got shot like that Mr. Officer who was the same thing. It's not completely clear. George Floyd was saying he had once been shot by a police officer, or if he possibly had been shot by someone else when he was approached while sitting in a car. George Floyd, says fleas don't shoot me Mr Officer! Please don't shoot me Ma'am please. Can you not shoot me man? I'm sorry. Mr Officer I'll get on my knees whatever? Officer King says you acting a little erratic George. Floyd says I'm scared Man George. Floyd says I'll do anything. I'll do anything y'all tell me anything you all tell me to do. I'm not resisting then, I'm not I'm not stir officer. Mr Officer I'm not that kind of guy. please. I'm not that kind of Guy Mr Officer please. I won't do nothing to hurt you Mr Officer. George Floyd was afraid of getting in the police. Car in the transcript seems to reveal why. George Floyd. y'All I'M GONNA die in here. I'm going to die. Man Officer King. You need to take a seat right now. George Floyd I just had Cova Man I. Don't want to go back to that George. Floyd's autopsy showed that he had covid nineteen six weeks before he was killed. He seemed to be afraid that going in a police car and being taken to a jail would give the coronavirus another chance to kill him. George Floyd says I'm not trying to win. I'll here on the ground. Anything I'M NOT A bad guy. Man Officer Lane says get them on the ground. George. Floyd says let go me man I can't breathe. I can't breathe, please men. Please listen to me. Please listen to me. Officer Towel. Just lay on the ground. George. Floyd I can't breathe. I can't breathe I. CAN'T Breathe Officer Laying Jesus Christ George Floyd I can't breathe officer laying. Thank you. George Floyd I can't breathe. Officer King Stop Moving George Floyd Mama Mama Mama Mama. Officer, King Inaudible George, Floyd. Mama Mama Mama. Mama Mama Mama. Of chauvinist, you're under arrest guy. George Floyd aride alright. Oh my God! I can't believe this. I can't believe this officer. Show them, so you're going to jail officer lane affirm George Floyd I can't believe this man mom I love you. I love you officer lane in audible George. Floyd tell my kids I love them. I'm dead George Floyd I can't breathe or nothing man this this cold, blooded man. Then screams officers show. Vigne says you're doing a lot of talking man. George Floyd Mama I, love you I can't do nothing. Officer King Ems is on their way George Floyd. My face is gone. I can't breathe man, please please let me stand. Please man I can't breathe George Floyd. My face is getting it bad officer lane. Here should we get his legs up or is this good of so? Show them leave him. Officer King just leave him Yep. Officer show Vin. Just leave him. George Floyd please. Man Officer Towel relaxed. George, Floyd I can't breathe officer king. You're fine. You're talking fine officer lane. You're talking deep breath George Floyd I can't breathe. I can't breathe I'll probably just die. This way of Suto relaxed George. Floyd I can't breathe my face. I can't breathe, please. I can't breathe. George, Floyd my stomach hurts. My neck hurts. Everything hurts i. need some water or something. Please please. I can't breathe. Officer Officers Chauvel then stop talking. Stop Yelling George Floyd. You're GONNA kill me. Man Officer chauvinist than stop talking. Stop Yelling! It takes a heck of a lot of oxygen to talk George Floyd come on man. Oh, I cannot breathe I cannot breathe. They'll kill me. They'll kill me. I can't breathe. I can't breathe Oh and then George Floyd says. please please. Please! And he never spoke again. The last word. The George Floyd said was please. As George Floyd. Remain motionless and apparently not breathing. who had been yelling at the police officers for several minutes to stop what they were doing to George. Floyd started to yell even more in One spectator. Who could see how dangerous the police treatment of George? Floyd was kept yelling at them to check George Floyd's pulse. He kept telling the police officers that George Floyd was not resisting, and that he was no longer responsive and with George. George Floyd motionless and silent for almost two minutes that spectator then yelled at officers show van, who still had his knee on George Floyd's neck, and that spectator said he's not even breathing right now. Bro, you think that's cool. You think that's cool, right officer, Chauve and then checked how the other police officers were doing officer show Vigne. You guys all right though officer land. Yeah, I mean. My knee might be a little scratched. But I'll survive. We'll be right back. Donald Trump doesn't care. That is something he demonstrates day in and day out. That's what he demonstrates when he tries to cheerlead schools into reopening and endangering the children in those schools and the teachers in those schools in the family of of everyone associated with those schools on the neighbors of everyone who lives near those families. But it didn't begin with schools. The trump administration systematically separated at least five thousand four hundred migrant children from their families tonight. We do not know Donald Trump does not know exactly how many of those migrant children that he separated have never been reunited with their families, despite the diligent efforts of reporters like MSNBC's correspondent. Up Two years ago, Jacob Sober reported live on this program hours after being among the first group of reporters allowed inside a facility in Brownsville Texas used by the federal government to incarcerate immigrant children who were separated from their parents. It's essentially a prison, or a jail without cages or sells for these young boys. There's a mural of You know of anybody that they could possibly pick donald trump right? Jerry is the first thing you see when you go in there. And essentially what it says is if you don't always win the battle, but you're GONNA win the war. It's just a strange thing to think about that. An increasing number of these kids are being ripped apart from their parents and brought into a facility like this sleeping in a former Walmart. Because of a donald trump policy. And there's Donald Trump up on the wall for them to see every single day. Joining us now is Jacob Sober off, who is now? The author of the new book separated inside an American tragedy. Jacob thank you very much for joining us tonight. the book is as stunning as your reporting has been on this it is sometimes difficult to hold it in my hands I read of these passages and continue to think about these separations where there might never be a reunification with parents. Lawrence, thank you for saying that first of all, but but that's why. I wrote this book you know. How did we get here? I saw it myself I saw it with my own eyes of never forget what I saw, nor will I think you know nor will the people in our audience, who so passionately protested this policy and people throughout the country, but there was so much more that I didn't know at the time and particularly. How could the United States? Government torture in the words of Physicians for human, rights fifty four hundred kids and rip them away from their parents, and that's why I want to write this. Jacob I went down to the border. Exactly once during this story you basically were were living there. There's so much more that you get by being able to work with sources every day, What are the things that that even now you feel never quite got through in the way we were trying to deliver. We've been trying to deliver this story and still trying to deliver this store. Well your points such a good one. Lawrence and Matt is I met so many people at the time that prove very valuable learning more about what happened to the policy after the fact and one example that will give you that I haven't talked about before. That's in the book and has never before been previously reported. Is that Kirstin Nielsen? WHO said that she there was no separation policy denied it. It existed time and time again. Despite signing it into existence was faced with a peculiar situation after the policy supposedly ended on March third twenty, nineteen, a president trump was flying with her on the way to survey tornado damage in Alabama, the president by the way was really on his way to mar-a-lago for a weekend there, but they stopped over on the way and aboard Marine One as they. They flew over the devastation on their way to people who had basically been excited. The president was coming after people had died in this community, the president looked over at cures, the Nielsen and sent to her. We have to re-institute that speaking of family separations. That's what president trump was thinking about and interjecting a stopping. This conversation was not. Nielsen was not trump was not ben Carson. Who? Who was aboard Marine One with them, but it was Melania trump who effectively said no, no and a right, a specifically in the book about what this conversation was like and president trump. Stop there and said we'll see we'll see, but the bottom line is the United States on multiple occasions wanted to restart this policy and one of the Times. He was thinking about doing it was on his way. To meet with to console to comfort, and you're looking at the trip right there. Victims of of of Tornado damage. Jacob when you first started reporting on this, and the especially the separation of children at the border that was a kind of a new moral low of for Donald, trump publicly I. it's not something we could have said with certainty months ahead of time that. When, when faced with this choice, he will absolutely rip families apart at the border, but then we saw that, and it seems like. How all of his exhibitions of humanity that have followed that have all been ineffective, highly predictable, not surprising. Because once we saw him do this. It kind of gave us a sense of what he was capable of. I think a pattern, a pattern that's emerging merchant corona virus, epidemic, particularly and specifically some of the very same people that were involved in the family separation drama including Katie Miller. The now communications director for the vice president of the United States, but then the chief spokesperson position for the Department of Homeland. Security of people within the Department of Health and Human Services as well. They were part of the botched effort. to reunite separated families always said there was never a plan. The truth is there was a plan to reunite families. There were people who tried to do it, and they were prevented by the trump administration, and it's almost like you could tell that exact same story about preparations for and the failure to contain a corona virus right there in the book. Jacob Silver. Thank you very much for joining us. The book is separated inside an American tragedy and trying to getting in the frame there, Jacob is just an honor to work with you here and helped deliver your reporting in every way that we can't thank you very much. Jacob. Thank you, my friend thanks Lawrence. Thank you. And when we come back Mary, trump is currently prohibited from speaking out by a judge's order, and so one of her best friends lifetime friend is going to join. US Mary. Trump knows this. Mary trump has authorized her friend to speak in effect for her. At this point Mary. Trump will probably be watching what you'll be watching next. In her new book about her uncle. Donald Mary trump a clinical psychologist writes. Donald Trump today is much as he was at three years old, incapable of growing learning or evolving unable to regulate his emotions moderate has responses or take in and synthesize information. This is far beyond garden variety narcissism. Donald is not simply week. His Ego is a fragile thing that must be bolstered every moment because he knows deep down that he is nothing of what he claims to be, he knows. He has never been loved. Mary trump is currently under a court order not to speak publicly about her book, but her lifetime friend and Confidante Alice Frank. Ston has four now been authorized by Mary trump in effect to speak for her, and joining us now is. Mary trump's friend Alice. Franson Ellis thank you very much for joining us tonight. We really appreciate it. When did you first discover that Mary Trump was writing a book. Years ago we had spoken about it, and it was kind of a stop and start process, and then a little more than two years ago. She really started going gung-ho or it. and. Did she tell you when she decided to cooperate with the New York Times and supply some old tax returns trump tax returns to the times. Yes. Yeah. She told me when she I was approached by. Reporters his an I'm at her door and. And then through the process of what she was doing to go, secure the documents and I thought well. That's quite a caper. And she has. A lot of courage to do what she did, but She wanted to do the right thing. And were were you present while she was writing some of this book? But I'm in Los Angeles did come out and spend quite a few weeks with me and. We would sit down and go over things she would write all day and then I look at things in the evening and. Running through things with her it's. A process, but a really interesting one. And when when you read the book since you've known her for so long, and you surely have been hearing some things about her family for a long time. How much of this was new to you? The only thing that was really new was. It was new to her as well that things that she discovered. Through those documents other than that I I've been hearing stories about her family for years and. Especially since late two, thousand, fifteen, when? The campaign started then conversation had an uptick. Regarding alcohol. So was sort of a common family knowledge that Donald. Trump paid Joe Shapiro to take his sat's form. It's her account from speaking with her family and other sources that. that. Her uncle paid somebody to do as SAT's. There's other little anecdotes in the book as well. and. What does she? How does she feel now? With the way the book has been received at this stage as she sees what it's Don. She sees what are has said about it. She's thrilled to bits actually it would really be great if she could come and speak for herself, but she's been silenced. which is unprecedented and. Just crazy! She's very pleased. She received a tremendous amount of support and sales obviously been hugely successful, and as far as what. Anybody says out of the White House takes it with a grain of salt because you consider the source. If if the court allows it, do do you expect a merry trump to take her place publicly and get out and. Start speaking about this book. Absolutely she's been waiting Tabah voice for many years now, and it's just cruel at this point that the book is out there and and it's me. Not Her but it will be soon enough. Dance, And how much of her family now is in effect? Lost to her because of this. That's I guess to be determined. Probably a lot but This is you know. She felt that she had an obligation and a duty to. Tell the truth and to tell her story. To to let people know what we're dealing with. Alice frakes. Thank you very much for joining us tonight and please thank Mary trump for telling the story for having the bravery to write this book an we appreciate. Her allowing you to come in and speak with US tonight. Thanks for having me. Thank you.

Donald Trump George Floyd donald Trump George Mary trump US don trump President Officer trump president George Floyd Mama Vladimir Putin Arne Duncan America officer Lawrence Arizona Jacob
Education: What Our Kids Are Really Learning

Legacy-Dads Podcast

47:39 min | 1 year ago

Education: What Our Kids Are Really Learning

"It are you struggling to balance your modern life and your faith. During the right place. Welcome to the legacy dad's podcast with lance and dante offering biblical based wisdom weekly dose of what truly works men's lives the legacy dad's podcast real men authentic faith here your homes of the legacy data podcast. They're authentic transparent and not always politically correct lanson lanson dante guys welcome to legacy. Dad's a my name is lance legacy. Dad's your weekly dose of biblical manhood this podcast podcasts for men husbands and fathers. All stages of life will re promote advocate proven rybak biblical principles for leaving a lasting legacy. How's it going. How's it going down to <hes> chop liger yeah. I'm doing really good man. You know we've been salted. The you know the residents residents of the great state of michigan you know the water and the waves and if you wanna tell my employer that i'll go back up there for another two weeks. I'll be more than happy to go there and just if i if i sound crazy today so i just i just got to the dentist i and they numbed both sides like literally my bottom lip and jaw to me. It feels like it's on the floor right now so so we we may have an interesting topic here on linked to dance with me this time so anyways so great podcast last week with the jeff beth mcdaniel you know we get called out hats off to them. You know besides all the slamming that i took <hes> that was a great podcast and you know. I think it was a company that you add that just made you look so good so we'll just keep it. A bat was yeah. Honestly it was that i went back and i and i'll be honest man. I we recorded quarterback early in the morning i was i was getting bible verses wrong. I was saying that the new testament was written in hebrew like i went back and listen to it. I'm like am i was. I drunk when i did that. I was like no early in the morning and then the question jeff about his wife lucky to have him dude. You know hey i. I know jen. I know k. I haven't met your wife yet but you're way out of your league leak yeah. No beth beth was holding both of us up in that talk. Give props. I went back and listen. She was the one the handsome really some nuggets of wisdom and me and jeff or dislike geoff. Take take your wife out to dinner man clown that podcast okay so i thought so are the kids back in school yet dante with few view or no no no. They're actually there at great america today. They're having. They're having a blast bags two weeks to okay so that's what my kids are going back. <hes> <hes> we start up the twenty the week of the twentieth i think is everybody's going back to empty nester again just in time now just in time time to go to africa because i'm leaving like literally the day that they're moving them in so anyways but yeah so i wanted to do a back to school special on <hes> on education and so dante let me give i want to give the listeners here kind of a background of where this came from so dante been having this ongoing discussion and it it really started <hes> where i work we have a i was the director of a course of instruction and we kept it. <hes> a lot of what we do is we're preparing adult students to be able to deal with. Some of the realities are gonna find <hes> working around the world <hes> <hes> and so a lot of our teaching model is based on using critical thinking skills and putting them into ethical dilemmas where where there's no. There's no definite writer on answer you really have to understand the context and the culture and the situation and just because the answer may be correct one time the next time you run into that situation that might not be the same answer us and we saw this trend of <hes> adult students really struggling with the nuance of critical thinking and ethical dilemmas and i remember one of the comments the you know every time we do a class at the end students provide feedback and comments and things like that and we were seeing comments like you. You didn't give me the answers to study ahead of time and i you know i was like i was perplexed at this. I'm like so these are these are adults who think in life if they unless they get the answers ahead of time it's not fair to test them on on critical thinking skills and things like that and it blew my mind and so <hes> <hes> we have a bunch of educational <hes>. I don't know what you call them again. Instructional design educational instructional design like they like p._h._d. Dudes who a and girls i'm sorry guys and gals who get paid a lot of money to figure out how to what's the most effective way to educate people and so i brought them in for this meeting eating and and we sat down and i was like what is going on. Why do we have this. You know a bunch of adults who many of them have gone through you know upper level education either bachelor's master's degree and all that but they're not understanding critical thinking skills and an ethical dilemmas and so this lettuce into a conversation about these guys went through the history of our education and what we call used to call compulsory education in this country and explained <hes> this topic topic so <hes> what what i'm gonna do is. I wanna walk through this a little bit and we're going to discuss this in for parents listening out there and dante. I want to bring you into and this. I think it's important for us in understanding. What is the what were kids. Actually learning in the schools are going to and what is <hes>. What is our role. What is our biblical role as parents and how do we <hes> you know <hes> also we also be involved in this but then also we make up up for the deficit of what they're not learning in. The school system is at that makes sense that you don't have agreed okay so i'm going to go through this. They gave me this really really long history but i'm going to go through this really really quick so we can kind of get into the session so they talked about that really are modern education started with impression germany germany in eighteen eighteen. There is compulsory education for the first time. The state said we are going to bring in a standard is education for everybody. Everybody's going to go to school or breaking alertness but what they were using at that time was something called the called scientific management and the idea was by educating everybody. We're going to provide a more effective labor and work force so they really weren't really weren't <hes> wanting to have the ability to think in context or critical thinking. They really just wanted to convert them into a labor force. The kid could do whatever they needed to do. And what happened was a guy in the united states by the name of horace mann he was hired by the coal and railroad interests in the new england area to bring about this type of education to the u._s. So in eighteen fifty fifty two they were trying to institute this compulsory style education in massachusetts and you would think so back then a gray and culture and they say hey. We're going to provide free education for everybody. You'd think everybody be excited about this but it was greeted with resistance and even widespread riots by parents because they did not want want this and the belief back then was that if the government controlled the education it had little to do with education and more to do with control <hes> ritual actual will kind of talk about here a little bit more as well <hes> and then so we're talking. Here's eighteen fifty two. We start compulsory education in the united states <hes> in the one thousand nine hundred through nineteen twenty one or nineteen twenty. I'm sorry we had a lot of <hes> study into scientific engineering and management of schools to teach obedience in order to fill the need of commerce and government so you go back to you remember this back and we had standard oil we had <hes> <hes> <hes> you know henry ford and the and we really had this this <hes> industrial revolution of where we're moving to factory work and all that and the idea was we needed to have a a a workforce. That was a little bit better educated. They could really do what we needed him do <hes> and the idea about this the way they sold us the people they said they look at this as an investment into our indoor government and to our country so the government taxpayers your tax dollars are going to invest in the education but in the backside. We're going to get a a workforce force in the labor force. It's gonna do great things for us so it sounded great at the time well along came that now. I don't know if you've ever heard this guy before dante because he's from your neck of the woods. There's there was this guy named gary plan and he was an educational system. <hes> he worked in the educational system in one thousand nine seven gary indiana and he was part part of a larger scientific management movement that tried to tie increased efficiency in manufacturing through the increased separation of worker roles and duties ladies and this all began c._n._n. Rather than rather than having a specialist. Who could you know work on the whole engine of the car. Were just going to have a guy all he does all day long you put bolts or rivets into that one thing that was kind of the the idea and this was going to be more efficient for manufacturing so we also had a guy an american educated by the name of william wirt and he became the superintendent of gary schools in one thousand seven and he developed with mr gary something called the gary plan <hes> which which was or i'm sorry gary plan was the name of the wasn't a guy it was the name of the actual <hes> plan <hes> excuse me but but this became known as as the work study did he play plan and he actually or he called it the platoon system and it was actually like it was literally almost like a military style thing <hes> this was also so influenced by john dewey a famous dewey decimal system guy <hes> and methods from frederick taylor which were both pioneers in the fields of scientific management in factory labor so what they did is they basically organized students into what they call platoons we call them classes classrooms today and the idea they were going to split the students up and and then every hour so they would switch <hes> into different rooms and they would learn things like math science social studies and english and then they would also get other courses like art physical education and industrial arts courses like so this is back when he had shop class when you had welding or you learn machinery or what you know whatever it was basically you're getting a little bit of a i would say you know common core education but then you're also learning how to go out and work in the factory when you're done <hes> and the funny funny thing was is they rep- they wanted to replicate the factory work so what they did for students is they put a bell <hes> in the schools and when the bell rang you would go to your other class similar to the bell you here in the factory. When the bell rang it was either breaker going to whenever so <hes>. I hope you're picking this up now. There's a lot of conditioning going on here. <hes> so <hes> basically then then you get into <hes> there's there's some honored assumptions of the system that that learning and they said that basically the the way everybody learns is mental concentration so you sit down and can you read a book and you concentrate on it and that's all everybody learns and so that was the that was the basically if you tried to say anything different than that. You're you're out of your mind. They didn't look at like okay. Maybe different people learn different ways or some people learn from more contextualized vignettes or or hands on application or you know that i just wasn't a part of that and then they also got into this thing called class positioning which was key because they wanted to lump so if you're smarter if you showed aptitude and you showed showed a what they called you know a higher level of intelligence they would lump together and if you were more of a okay this is a little bit slower or you're a minority korea or whatever we're gonna love you into another group re classroom so you're not holding back the smart students okay <hes> and there is essentially some key things that came out of this so the first one is indifference cain. The first the purpose of this the purpose of this education was not to critically to think critically critically but basically absorb information provided by the instructor using a sistema positive negative reinforcement so the positive negative reinforcements here grades social recognition and affirmation so if you've got a good grade teacher say ooh dante got nay look at him. There's also recognition or you get a star up on your board with your you know that's it's an affirmation type of deal. The second thing that they were working on here was emotional dependency. <hes> this was that a the child was removed from the family lee at an early age at a vulnerable age which we're gonna talk about another podcast about core key cognitive development time and they're placed under the care of the school system and teachers. Here's okay <hes> and then you move into something called what we call intellectual dependency now from an early age the kids are taught to respect and and wait for a teacher to tell the students what to do <hes> the most the most valuable lesson they were trying to teach kids here was we must wait for other people better trained and educated needed than us to tell us what to do and that's kind of a repetitive thing so a kids are kids who are and then you see repercussions of this so if you have a child old who thinks her themselves or they questioned the teachers methods or assumptions they get punished for for for basically questioning the the teacher of the status quo. <hes> kids are taught from an early age not to question the teachers instruction and to not use the information to think independently or to make up their own assumptions but what what they're really taught to do. Is you need to memorize somebody. Else's approved assumptions that we've given to you and the thing that came and this is actually all these from got him a john taylor ghetto <hes> the last thing was what they call provisional self esteem so the teachers which are seen as an authority figure now at this point they they decide what your grades are which means you're worth your your self worth and in that educational context based on your homework test scores and adherence to the curriculum. They're teaching so again. If you're coming up you know you have a different hypothesis or or you say wait a sec. What about this this other all these other scientists that think this other way. That's not courage. That's actually <hes> you're going to be getting in trouble for that. So essentially what you have here is this initial education system really wasn't it was sent is set up to be to make more compliant workforce but the problem here dante what i see is that many of these <hes> <hes> you know many the systems that we put into place early on haven't changed and involved with the way we what we know about education today and they were doing a work differently and all these different things that the education system really hasn't caught up to those. Does that make sense i mean what do you think of this and it's an outdated model and what are you so. Let me ask you this. Because this next thing there was a a guy we had there. Were we were talking about the they call these guys. They do educational theory or whatever and they said literally they were saying like. Do you want to know how to fix this. <hes> and of course i was like yeah but so having <hes> having a child that has issues issues with learning what are some things that you've seen what are some things that you've learned how the system doesn't work. If you're if you're a non traditional thinker <unk>. How does the system not work for for your child while i ate <unk> you and i were talking about that. I mean and so my oldest and and my youngest both have a._d._d. And they have a central processing disorder were to put it in context so you put them in a room oh by himself and he does a math test in you know he's gonna. He's gonna score on that test. Two to three standard deviations above the average two to three grades ahead of his great great you put you put him on the same test with twenty five students that are necessarily not quiet and he goes two standard deviations but above and beyond all of that the issue becomes imperative because you know my middle child. She's like the valedictorian you know. She graduated grade. <hes> she pleases the teacher sure she does everything by the book and so she's compliant to the system but like for a child that needs attention or needs a way to navigate through the system that they have the intelligence. You know they have the ability to you know talk about current and modern day politics to economics comic stu. I mean i've had my boy devour wealth of nations you know i've had them go into some political books go into some fictional books and and the comprehension on the understanding and the ability to reason through that is unbelievable in the sense that you know i'm really impressed but in the same token you put him in that same format in the education system that you are. Here's a guy that could be with most of his peers and compete in any aspect outside out of the classroom but if you're going to standardize him by you know okay how he's taking a test or doing what is required of that class. He may not score that well and the reality of it is. I think you have to look at a system. You i mean what will put it in context here. <hes> there's one <hes> guy <unk> arne duncan who has one article and he said at no level early childhood k through twelve or even higher education asian. Are we being in the u._s. Even in the top ten internationally and you know we're a hundred years ago we were above komo above them all almost and the idea that you know we we excel than the idea that we rewarded people that took risk we rewarded people that thought <music> out side of the book the outside of the box we rewarded people that were willing to take what they know whether they will well learned or they just had something as far as they were inventing or creating and somehow we lost that to the point that i think we need to be in the sign of the times it. We're no longer longer. Just you know one market were were in a global market force and we have to educate our kids in a way that allows them to compete especially. I mean in in the statistic that i just read that. We're not even the top ten internationally on any of those education levels. Were the united states of america. Something is broke with this is broken yeah so let me i'm gonna. I'm gonna give you some of the research on this because <hes> some of this some of these when i first heard these i was like wait that sounds a little hello crazy but but i'm going to walk through this so these are <hes> this guy named l. <hes> alfie kohn who's an educational theorist and he basically this is when we were talking talking about this they said listen if the goal of our which which i just explain in the beginning of this the goal of our education system initially was not to develop critical article thinkers or lifelong learners who really enjoy thinking learning and exploring ideas in order to produce a productive society peaceful democracy. That's that's not what our our education system was initially set up to do. It was set up to develop a labor force. That was efficient so this guy was saying listen if you really if we we wanted to see if we want to educational system that develops critical thinkers and lifelong learners which i think in the the market economy and we're at technology these days. That's what we're saying. We need some people that'll be innovative thinkers he was saying here's here's a couple of things. He said he's like number. One we need to question the use of grades or the way we do grades <hes> the way. We agreed students now now and i i. I'll be honest when i first heard that i'm like come on to sounds like. Is everybody going to get a trophy here. I don't agree with that but already wins everybody. Wins is the sound now. I don't like it but he's like. He's like let me explain this so they've got research. Basically suggests that when students are are trying to get a good grade they're they're they get fixated on just trying to get the good grade and it no longer becomes about learning. He said one students the students. They've study that he said they begin to lose interest in learning itself the purpose now becomes just a good grade again that goes back to the provisional self esteem thing. They realized that if i get a good grade aide the teachers are going to sam smart or mama dada going to say good job so they really there's no interest in learning. It just becomes about getting a good grade. Okay the second thing he said was students. Tend to think less deeply and retain knowledge for a shorter period of time <hes> as their only working for the short-term great not for long term learning so the i did hear is that they they really don't censor not learning anymore. I'm like i'm not really ever gonna uses the for you know whatever any other time in my life so all i'm gonna do is i'm going to memorize. I'm going to work hard in the short term so i get a good grade on this and then i'm gonna flush out of my system and never remember that and i've certainly seen this with <hes> <hes> with some of the younger <hes> younger generation i've had to work with. I'm like wait a sec. You just gotta you just got out of this training course and you can't even tell me the first you know the first thing about what you learn in that training course and they'd be like no no. I memorized it for the test and then i forgot it and i'm like what are we doing so i've seen some reinforcement of this and then third the third thing he said is that when when it's about grades and when it becomes about g._p._a. And believe me. I know you know listen. My kids know this. You get in some of these as competitive schools and guess what a four point. Oh is not getting you into college anymore. You better be doing the extra stuff and you better be on the you know you better be on the weighted skill and all that we never heard of this until we moved to the east coast in my wife had a four point owner undergrad and she got turned down from colleges because they're like four point. Oh that's that's nothing and we were like this is. This is insane but this guy was saying is when it becomes about the grades students are going to pick the easiest possible tasks tasks in order to maximize the chances of getting a good grade so i'm not gonna read warren piece because that's a lot of time and effort and there's a lot of nuance in that book that would be hard. I'm gonna pick the easiest book i can get because that'll be the shortest amount of time in probably great on that or i'm not going to challenge myself on a concept or something so you know maybe forces me to get my comfort zone and learn. I'm going to take the easiest shortest path and i'm just going to go with something. I know is safe and easy. Maybe something i already already have a lot of knowledge in. I'm going to pick that one <hes> so so i know i can get a good grade on it and so that when when you put it in that context i was like wow wow that that makes a lotta sense. Really what we've done is we've. We've created this institution where it's when it becomes just about grade. There's no more learning going on. It's really just okay. I just want to get the good grade. If that gets teach off my back if that gets mom and dad off my back then i'm gonna do whatever it takes to get that good grade <hes> but the actual the the learning is not happening. It's more like i'm just going to do you know the shortest possible route to the good grade does that make any sense he yeah yeah and we we've turned the focus on development you know from development to achievement yes and i think that that is the big misnomer right there yeah and and and before we go further lance just for some of the teachers at our author of the ones that really take out of their budget because there's a school doesn't pay for the ones that really care about developing not only just what they're presenting to the to the students but are in relationship and an investing the time and being that extra mile with each one of those kids you know you're you're excluded from this conversation. I don't want you to be offended in what we're saying. Is it's not the ones that are guiding the way or being those those professors other teachers that have that ability to really connect and leave a lasting impression on that child. I mean i can go back to the second grade and tell you a teacher that i really respect to this day. I go to seventh grade and tell you a history teacher that i still am. No high regards for basically. I honestly don t. I don't think it's the teachers know teachers. The teachers are being put into a system curriculum that it's it's set up the wrong way and i think i could understand being a teacher man. I would be frustrated because i've been putting this system somewhere. I've got to get these kids to achieve learning to a certain standard but i've i'm i'm. I'm in a broken system. You know it's like i'm i'm. I'm i'm i'm racing in the indy five hundred and you know i'm a sixty-nine dodge dart and in the and to the teacher to the unfairness in the model that you are her is you. You're you're just rolled over by the the set of standards you have to get so you're in effect even to the standardized testing that we have from grade school up into junior high high school into you know kids go to college the standardized tests that we have we've changed the education system especially allow these schools to either meet the numbers for the government to require these students to continue to go and how the funds from the government are doled out to system by system along with not only that but the breakdown of his then the teachers then you know our our boxed into it has to all be about the numbers numbers has to all be about these tests in they're taking away all incentive for the teacher that has been given this god given gift to teach to mentor to report into and and to do things that would be their passion and thereby which in impacting and infecting these kids to you like you say lance use critical nicole thinking and go beyond and so a little bit of a sidebar there but you know if you're a teacher you know please by all means. We'll have his own. We'll have it in the facebook. If you wanna comment question question review of recommendations you know this is something that you know the other thing too is if you're a parent and you have kids that are just eating or taking the red pill and not not thinking outside the box you got it. You gotta be involved in your kids education. You can't just drop them off. You gotta know what's going on you. Gotta have these after school conversations and really find out. What is your your child doing it. If it's all about achievement versus development folks we've got a problem you know and that that i just wanted to go that route. You bring up a good point onto and i wanna since you brought up the standardized test things i want to actually so this is something the discussion we had <hes> with these sir instructional design educational people. They said you know this is what this is exactly what they're telling us. They said standardized testing <hes> offers. There's some of the most inconclusive evidence of actual intellect and i was like what and they were like yeah and they said so <hes> most of the standardized tests are set up for one reason in and the one guy said it's great on collecting data on your demographics of where you're like what school system you come from and what the caliber ah or the the socio economic background of the students that go to that that's what they're great at but but the guy went on to say this he said some of our deepest thinking <hes> children and students students with superior intellects do not do well on tests and kind of what you're saying with your kids dante and he said some of the kids who get the greatest the highest scores on tests. They're just they're good at test taking or they can they. They're really good at looking at the question and they can kind of what we do. We call jesting. You can figure out okay. It's not those two. It's one of these two probably this one and they're really good at being able to kind of guess the answer and they're also good at memorization but these his kids at score really well on standard and and again we're not generalizing saying this is everybody but they're saying this is kind of the research is showing but these same kids that do really well on standardized energized tests tend to struggle with abstract original thoughts and critical thinking skills so again. What are we measuring. I mean that that's the question and if you you know if if the i've i've had this because i've had to do some of these standardized test things and i've had one girl who grew up in a <hes> in a rough part of baltimore. She took one test and they were like okay. She is just normal level intellect. She took another test which is more gauged for holistic intellect and learning and she scored in the superior ranch so again you have to look at what are these tests saying what what are they doing but they're just they're not an effective means of gauging intellect and then i personally know teachers and i apologize for kinnear listening but i personally know teachers at said listen as a teacher we have to teach to. We have to teach to the test. We have to teach our kids how to pass the test because if your kids don't pass a test ask that mean losing your job or that may mean losing funding for your school district so teachers actually have to they know it's on the test and they're like all right. We gotta teach you how to pass this test <hes> again that is not education development now. We're just teaching achievement to pass his test so we don't get in trouble <hes> so again. I think it goes back to i understand what you're saying. They do not believe it's the teachers. It's the system we put in place that is not it's it's broke. It's it's broken and the whole idea and the other thing too lance you know that you talked about as far as when this system was set up in one programming controlling and getting the workers that are going to go on the line and all that you know as you talk about the industrial revolution putting things in perspective here you know all of a sudden you know and then you add a world war one world war two. You know you went from single family. Worthy dad would go off to work now. All of a sudden it became dual income a mom. Mom and dad would go off to work. You needed an education system. You need to the standard system to put these kids through and so much in the fact of being a place ace that they were like daycare but with a standardized education system and so all of that was like okay we took the father out of the house and this goes into legacy dads to we can come back around that but you took the father out of the house you left it up to the government to educate your kid and we basically took that lion does that big fat worm and took it. We swallowed it. We we took the whole fishing line and the rod and the reel and ate it all all and said the government can take better care of our kids than we can and if we haven't looked and you know left right center if we're really going to have an open conversation here. I don't care if you're fully one hundred percent flaming liberal democrat. If you're fully you know right you know. Ultra conservative altered conservative republican. You're somewhere in the middle. If you take a look at what the government tries to run other than national defense you know highways in what government was should and would intentionally be set up for like our founding fathers. We've got a problem and we look at other. You you know socialistic countries. We look at other things that try to do. Education try to healthcare try do that. Whenever government gets in the way and usurps the people's authority. We've got a problem and go without going further in the macro topics here back to education so let's agree. The systems tmz broke so dante. Let's kind of in in wrapping this thing up and stuff. Let's get what do you think so. What are some ways in what are what are some things you do with your kids and all talk about the things i do with my kids but what yeah i mean so. There's obviously you could just pull your kids out of the system or put them in a private school or homeschool. I think that's one solution but maybe that's not economically feasible for everybody everybody or or whatever but <hes> what are some things as parents we can do if our kids are in the system to <hes> to kind of counteract or order at least try try to <hes> you know <hes> work within the system if you will. What was some things you think they're well. They're to go. Let me take one step back. There's two the president's in the in the previous two administrations that addressed you know education and one of them was bush. The other one was obama and and both left and alright. I'll tell you the the general consensus in one did common core and i don't even want to go there or justify common core is abysmal and the education system is failing and so what i would tell you is some simple ways you know we can't go in and just flip the system upside down. Break it and you know put it in a whole new one. It's going to have to be a conversation all the way around but we the people you know that's you and i that's mom and dad that single mom that single dad had it starts by you know like we need to invest in in our career like we need to invest in our family like we need to invest in our spouse. Is we need to invest in aren't children and so i would tell you first and foremost how do you help. The system is to get completely involved. You need to know no well number one. What is your kid gleaning from day at school and not you know don't make it check the box to do homework you know did you turn it in the juno achieve achieve achieve achieve achieve achieve. No you know what did you learn. What are you gleaning from this. Why what what's hard about the subject. What do you love about about this. What teacher really just makes you totally embraced engulfed in that class. What teacher loses you from the moment. They open their mouth. Why am go then to the system. Not banging down the doors not making somebody feel awful not destroying but then having the conversation with the school award attending school board meetings when you have teacher parent conversation sit down the ones that are doing it right the ones that are investing in your kid's. Praise appraised them complement. Tell the system what's going on the ones that are not doing it right. Be graceful you know have salt in your conversation politely challenge challenge them in ways that doesn't tear them down but were they can lift in it and when you speak to him of your complementing the things that they are doing good and you want to impact change you can take them with relationship some things that you would really like for your kid and so when you make it were you're involved but you're in relationship and you're investing you know that becomes attracted to me if i'm sitting on the other side of it whether it be administrative or being you know a teacher somebody that is even putting my own funds and resources and to have somebody come to me right away and say i suck. I'm doing a wrong instead of sitting there saying the system system is broken. How do we fix it having real conversations but not like name game not named blame not not tearing it down so i would say first first and foremost relationship with her kids and onto. Can i bring this up to his. I just wanna you made me think of this. <hes> when you were saying that i wanna be clear that this is what i'm seeing an and i'm dealing with a twenty and thirty and sometimes mostly twenty and thirty year olds <hes> we've gone to the education system. I don't think it's we hear that oh. It's like science and math we got you know we're we're low in in science math. I don't think the issue is. I don't think we need to start teaching our second graders how to do algebra. It's not cramming more higher higher level intelligence at a younger age it's that they're not understanding the context and the nuance of when you use that <hes> and <hes> <hes> this goes back to a greater of think where <hes> you know if you look at innovation or scientific breakthroughs or technologies technological logical breakthroughs you look throughout history those were all done by people who challenged the status. Quo people who said wait a second <hes>. Is there a better underway to do this or maybe <hes> the way everybody thinks this is. It's actually it's wrong and i'm going to come up with a new way of doing it <hes> or or is there a more efficient efficient way to make this thing work or use. All of those things were done by challenging the status. Quo challenging the common. What what we're told his. That's what everybody should believe <hes> i it's it's by thinking what we like to call thinking outside the box but <hes> that's really where it comes from so it's not ah. I don't think it's it's it's <hes> you know like pushing science and math and advanced mathematics down to a younger age. It's understanding in the context of how you use it because i've talked to students where they're brilliant but they can't understand how to use that in context or in life or have critical nicole thinking skills in winded use it win did not that's the issue and i don't know what that is. It's not <hes> i what you call that and i don't have. I'm sorry i have a cabinet word for that but it's almost like i think we call it like tacit. Knowledge <hes> is really is kind of what what i'm talking about here. <hes> does that make sense. I'm sorry it but yeah as you're talking about this. This makes me think about what i'm involved. In in the education system i think is a breakdown that you know i have somebody that's on the east coast in the industry that i am very liberal very differing political opinions but we see a lot of the same agreement economics and all that and we we've got you know into a deep conversation and what's wrong even in the collegiate system and and oh you know everybody is were letting the government you know slowly boxes in more and more and more control and the reality of is like everybody becomes so risk averse. I were taking away any incentives for somebody to succeed and not by you know the achievement model that the education system has but we're taking away the incentive you saying lance to think outside the box think about a better way to build the mousetrap thinking about ways that can you know revolutionize current industry. You'll replace in next microchip. You know have the next tech stock had the next medical breakthrough. Were letting the government. You know you know squash risk ask and the reality is it's not riffs. That's bad. It's not wall street. That's bad. This is the problem that i have going back education and just to get that i said so. What is the issue you and this person you know extreme opposite ends but we had a very intelligent conversation i mean it was an hour and a half over coffee shop and it was basically the breakdown is t- lack of teaching kids ethics lack of teaching kids morals lack of teaching kids understanding of of you know what is right from wrong and what is ethical from unethical and here's somebody that you know like i said i my mouth dropped when we're agreeing agreeing one hundred percent on the same thing and the reality but is no were failing. You know these young wall street kids were failing these students. You know that cut corners corners. I mean i i think of a of a tech com. You know an energy you were. You know you go back to what was a breakdown on this per. Those one person that cost us millions of dollars. You know all these people their jobs and it was you know he decided to start cutting corners start cheating the system church eating the education in and to to get to the point that i'm trying to make is that you know we we need to rethink what are we teaching our kids and what should education be equipping them or in the world and and i think if we really have that conversation it comes down to you know we want our kids. What what is the measure that we're looking for when our child goes from you know adolescents to adult to on their own to thriving. Do we want them to be the most successful grain surgeon do we you want them to be the best teacher. Do we want them to be the highest paid hollywood actor. Do we want really what we need to have that question like what what is the purpose of the education system and what are we looking for our kids to get out of it when when i read a stat that we're not even in the top twelve of universities cities of of education of schools k. through twelve higher ed you know all of that and we're failing miserably and ah you say it's not about stuffing more more more into a program to get these kids to outperform other other countries and all that no it's about what is the basis. What what is the model that we're trying to get any look at this donte in we used to teach what we call the socratic teaching method where the teacher would would bring up a topic of discussion russian and the students would discuss among themselves and there would be opposing points of view and there'd be there'd be one kid that has the crazy idea and then there'd be you know everybody brighter wrong but he had the idea. I had the ability to think and you'd have a discussion about this and we've gone. We've gone from that model to sit down. Shut up. Here's the curriculum and that's what we're teaching today. <hes> so let me. I don't wanna go over time here but i'm gonna give you. I'm bobby really quick and i'll let you have some closing comments here dante so some things i did with my kids is exactly what you said. <hes> be involved in them so we would have discussions every night and we had dinner at night. We would just have discussions about what he goes. Talking about. What do you guys learning and then we would have a discussion around the table about that topic or about one kid and say hey. I'm reading this book and we talk about the book together and okay. What's what's the point of view and what's going on and one of the things i always did and this is something i'm just do this. All the time is i try to play the devil's advocate with any point of view to get not only myself but my kids to look at other points of view saying that okay i may agree with this point of view but uh i'm gonna play the devil's advocate here and see if i can understand where the other person is coming from because i think if i if i lack the empathy to due to really truly understand somebody else's coming from then i'm really just stuck in an echo chamber of my own. <hes> what i think is right and wrong now again. I'm not saying outside of biblical context but i'm saying things like in some of the educational system in ideas that are that are brought up. There are multiple ways. There's right now in our country. We have different you know a lot of people agree politically on certain topics but it's the the actual political process that that a to fix that problem that the disagreement happens <hes> so those are things that are all healthy and i think it's important to encourage kids to hey. Let's look at different points of view here. Let's look at what d- another way to look at this problem. Senator how how another way we can we can look at this and that goes back to that encouraging them to challenge alan some of the ideas or or even challenge their own ideas to see like maybe i could. Maybe i do have a different point of view here dante. Yes okay so let me turn over you with some closing comments here. We can probably do a couple podcasts on this one topic alone but <hes> causing comments dante. What do you think here yeah. I the we we should have a system that encourages kids to do what they love and have a passion to do. We should have a system in education that encourages the kid to now a dream but to to realize if they put the work in they take some risk even if they fail and we can get into a thing about it's okay to let your kid fail but but to to have this process by which it is giving them the momentum okay what what is what is succeeding mean in dante's vernacular what is succeeding meaning <unk> vernacular but we should have an in a national level. What what do we want. What is the end goal for our kids in the education system and i think when we put this all in perspective you know not condoning bad system. I'm sitting there saying from both sides of the al. It's gotta be fixed and so okay. How do we fix. It and i think the reality is. It's it's having conversations and in closing the gap that has been so wide open and unapproachable unchallenged for many decades and i think that's getting the parents involved getting the parents involved with the child allocated parents evolve with teachers getting the parents involved with the education system and getting the parents involved collectively nationally with their local politicians and saying enough is enough and so how do you start fixing it. You know we we look at okay. Were were the best property taxes. Taxes are is sometimes where we find the best education system. I don't think that's a system. That's right. I think that's broke system and that's a whole nother argument mm-hmm and this is just for reference point so the model by which we're trying to appreciate look we're having schools close in america were consolidating schools worshiping in busing kids all over and overcrowding schools because schools that are in areas that cannot continue to support are forced i to close and i do not think that's fair to the parents. I do not of any of neighborhood. I don't think that's fair to the children and i don't think that's fair to the system system that we have. That's failing our children. Okay great comments comments so as always we thank you so much for listening <hes> <hes> there's a really i think we could. There's a lot more ricky go into this. If you do want to have that discussion please go join us on our closed facebook group. You can also hit us up on instagram. We we really appreciate you guys. We appreciate your comments. We need guys do reach out to us. We actually listening to this podcast that <hes> you suggest to us. We really appreciate that. You guys want to say we love you guys. We bring you guys will see next time. God bless. Thanks so much for listening to this episode of the legacy. Dad's podcast blance dante real men authentic faith for more great content into santa date visit legacy legacy dad's dot o._r._g. And on facebook dot com slash legacy dads and on twitter at legacy underscore dad. If you enjoyed today's episode please review and subscribe and we'll catch you next this time on the legacy. Dad's podcast real med on vented faye.

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a16z Podcast: Collectively Driving Change

a16z

38:41 min | 1 year ago

a16z Podcast: Collectively Driving Change

"Hi, and welcome to the as sixteen z podcast. Today's episode is a special conversation with Laurien Powell jobs, founder and president of the Emerson collective firm. She founded in two thousand and four to drive social impact through investments across a broad range of areas such as education, immigration, and the environment. Laureen Powell jobs is interviewed by a sixteen z co founder, Ben Horowitz, and their discussion covers everything from Laurine childhood in mountainous, rural New Jersey, and how it shaped her to what the Emerson collective is driven by an does. And why it's a collective for that matter. For more about Laurien Powell jobs as work. See www dot Emerson collective dot com. This conversation, originally took place at our most recent summit event in November two thousand eighteen welcome everybody, I'm then this is Lorraine coming in. I was talking to learn a saying it's really hard to introduce her because she's not like our other investors like at all in a good way, but she's got a much more kind of complex kind of thing. That she does and background. So I could read the right. I could say, well, you know, she's a media moguls tech investor. She's an education, reformer and so forth. But you won't even know really who she is. If I just did it like that. So, none of them would be really honest. Right. Anybody would call me media mogul to your media mogul, like technically I'm so excited to be here to be having this conversation because there is nobody else liked us. And so you're in protrayed. Why don't we start at the beginning back in west Milford, New Jersey where you grow up even have the whole silver spoon? Solidly middle class family. Yeah. And what was that town like west Milford? New Jersey is about twenty miles west of the George Washington Bridge, and then another ten miles north, if people don't know New Jersey. There is a mountainous part of New Jersey. And in fact, one can go skiing and one can ice skate. And so we did all of those things we were just in the beginning of the mountainous parts. And so now as an adult looking back, it's lovely it's, it's wooded. It's wild. I grew up with three brothers who were very wild. So we had sort of this, this connection to nature and the natural world that, that we would all hope for our children. However, growing up. There was also gritty and it had a lot of jersey in. What is jersey really did? It was kind of hard scrap, bald people had big hearts, but also, you know, big edges and style. You learn really quickly as a child, where the boundaries are in which is one shouldn't cross. We were all of us put to work really early, which was great. We developed an extraordinary work ethic as kids. They were in the end, my mom remarried, and then we had a mix. My dad died when I was three in a plane crash. And so we ended up with six kids like Brady, bunch, three girls and boys. But in order to have controlled chaos. We all had we all had chores, and we had very set times for eating and sleeping, and I shared a room my whole life. And I shared a bathroom, there were six of us that shared one bathroom. And if you can imagine what it was like getting to school on time. It was a that was sort of my childhood. I was always trying to eke out a little bit of privacy. And so now I can empathize with those in social media, who would like to regain their privacy. Get out of my mouth room basement. Anyway, I think a lot of what shaped me from that experience in west Melbourne, New Jersey and then you know our big trip. Each year was going down the shore. We'd rent a little house and drive down there. You know, and get terribly sunburned. We were probably five blocks back from the ocean, but it was our favorite time, and then we drive back up in our station wagon back up to northern New Jersey that was circumscribed our life, chores. Vacation Bernie, we were steeped in core values of real, dedication, and I sense that there was always a way out. And that was through education, and that was communicated early on to me. And luckily I loved books and I love school. And I think I saw doubt teachers and tried to ingratiate myself and just, you know, find a little place where I could excel and where I could feel that there was a reward for the work that also gave me joy, which was cool. Right. It wasn't just a chore. It was worked with the benefit. That's right. That's great inspiration. You went to university of Penn or it's just like a super prestigious school. Been married person in my high school to go to an Ivy league school, west Milford township is massive, and stretched all the way up to New York state probably twenty percent of our graduating class went on to any further schooling certainly not all four year. A lot of on trade school. I was reading something that you said that I thought was very interesting. So when you were a kid, I guess you donated like twenty dollars to the southern poverty leadership last Law Center. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And they would send you letters. Yeah. And the thing that you are, or that you were very focused on was who got the opportunity, and who didn't. Yes, because I was folks down because they were focused on it. SPIC how to huge impact may my young life because I read about them in. I think the Reader's Digest, I think that's where I read about them. There was a profile on Morris Dees. So I saved up some newspaper money and I send them for me which was a lot of money at the time twenty dollars. I, I was either in late middle school or high school. Remember? I don't know if you remember when your kid getting mail was such an exciting. Before the only that's the only place that I ever sent me an Email at that in one of my grandma's. So they would send me male reliably probably every quarter. Of course it was beautiful form letter. But it always told a story of Justice meeting injustice, and open my eyes to things that were going on in the world in the early seventies that I otherwise wasn't privy to. So I really hung on there everywhere. I remember saving all the letters for Morris Dees than actually wouldn't way most wonderful moments. And it only happened a couple of years ago at Emerson collective, we do all of our philanthropic giving anonymously, but we had been funding as feel see and we decided that we wanted to do some teaching tolerance curriculum in partnership with them. And so one of our team members was actually talking to Morris these who still works there. And so I said, could I get on the phone more issues? I got to tell. Him that he was the one he planted that seed in me that individual people could pay attention, and engage, and maybe do something about injustices that seem intractable or far away or impenetrable. That's a great story coming from your big Bruce Springsteen fan, and it's really interesting that in his work, even though he's Bruce Springsteen, it's still about New Jersey. Do you feel that way about your work where that? A lot of inspiration still from that time a lot of inspiration. Yes. Although I don't find that the work is necessary all about New Jersey. But a lot of how I see the world and how I think about basic fairness comes from New Jersey. I think people actually want to know what's going on, and they have clearly held opinions. This is what I recall and work hard, but also are open to hearing from other people because New Jersey was certainly a melting pot in the first wave of immigrants from Europe. And so they had to comedy, it's not a glamorous place to be from. And so people were distracted by glamour, or coolness in any way, bleary of Bruce Springsteen, still echoed through my head, the oh, it's sort. It's one of the soundtracks of my life. I think so he pops up when I do not expect him to pop up deal when I'm observing a situation. But to your point, a lot of the work that I do references something that I learned a little over twenty years ago from college track, and I think it's true to say that all of the work that we do at Emerson collective now is informed, and certainly influenced and shaped by what was learned to college track. And so maybe track is my New Jersey, interesting. So tell us about college track and how what you learned what you try to do them. And what you learn how you move to be the entire Emerson collective Schorr and sort of a beautifully long and winding story because it all took place. Probably starting about twenty two years ago after graduate school, I was running a natural foods company and perchance I met the California teacher of the year. She was teaching at a local high school and I had not ever visited at high school in California because I had moved just for graduates. She asked me if I could come and talk to her students that Oliver students in this one class were from East Palo Alto and this was one high school, which is where all of the east politics running now. Fellow Alto was super dangerous, right. That's right around the time some murder capital right around that time I jumped at the opportunity because when I was at Stanford I found it really odd to have the juxtaposition of Palo Alto and East Palo Alto because I moved to Palo Alto from New York City where all the demographics I right on top of each other. And so you can have one block of rich and one block of porn people really mix, and it felt really awful and awkward to have one on one dividing, this socioeconomic group from this Osceola economic group. So I said to her, yes, I'd love to I'd love to come and talk to them. She's told me they were seniors. It was September of their senior year and they were all going to college. So I said, well, what do you want me to say? And she said, just tell them about what college is like and what it's like to graduate school. And when to start your company, so I said, easy. Okay. So when I started talking to them about college and just wondering if they were excited and where they. Had visited and who they knew and I could tell starting to get some blank. Audience. So I said, okay, guys helped me out here. How many have you visited a college maybe a few how many of, you know, somebody that's in college maybe one or two? There was thirty five students in this cost, and I said, okay, how many of you have already taken your SAT's, and it was no one? And I said, okay, how many are you are going to take your SAT's? It's ready September's. You must be studying Nolan and then, as you guys know that you have to take your SAT's and you have to do these standardized tests in order to go to college. They said, well, we heard about it. But no, then the teacher said, you know, we were going to talk about this. I thought, well, this is a bizarre lack of information to give to college bound seniors. So I said, guys, how many of you have visited with the college counselor to talk this through no one as a result of prop? Thirteen California started cutting all nonessential portions of their education system, which included arts and drama and p e. We and college counselors addition to science labs in the higher mathematics moves amazing on that proposition, thirteen was like in the late seventies. Yeah. Exactly. And we were living with that legacy today. So I told the students I would come back every Friday afternoon and I would be their college counselor. And so I did that for the next eight weeks and what I discovered was of all the students thirty five students. Only two students had actually taken the courses that they needed to take in order to apply to four year college. So thirty three students had missed a year of English or math past algebra one or no one had taken a toll. No one ever told them, what classes they needed to take. They were all graduating. So they all had sufficient credits, but they didn't have the credits that lined up to Plato for your college. So for them, we got them to ply to a two year college, but it was such colossal waste, and it was just such an awareness that I had immediately that this is actually a solvable problem. This is lack of access to the kind of information and guidance that can be provided for all these students. So I met with subsequently juniors and sophomores and freshmen, and then I talked to parents at back to school night, and I just did this as a volunteer, because I thought this is something I can do I can address this problem. I know this stuff, but then there were layers of issues that I started to become aware of with a friend of mine Carlos Watson way started visiting in community. Yeah. Exactly. He's now runs Ozzy just in the communities, the families and understanding what happens actually when you're first in your family. What happens when you're first near family to graduate high school? What does that mean for the information that you get from your family? What happens when you're first to want to go to college to apply and to thrive and to complete college? What happens when you're first in your family? If you're a college grad resent, new when you're many things, but also to have that aspiration you're, you're a leader in your family, and your problem, solver and your family. That's a wonderful thing. But it also means you get sucked back into all problems because you could problem seller. And sometimes if you're a child of immigrants, and you're the translator for the family, the family relies on you for that. So there are all sorts of really interesting issues that we're just in this one community, and that's when I decided to start college track to do a more holistic support for students and families so that. We could seriously prepare students for college and make sure that they persisted and completed college and work with their families to solve problems within the family, so that the individual didn't have to be the problem solver. And so that's how we started tracking. We started it with twenty five high school freshman at common high school. And I would go to the lunchtimes and I'd find the ringleaders because I had a sense that everyone has to come with a friend because that would be reinforcing mechanism. And some people came withhold groups of friends, and that was even better because they would hold each other accountable. So we built out a cohort, and so they were responsible for and to each other, as well as to the adult so we started in East Palo Alto this year we have grown. We have three thousand high school students. We have a thousand college students, and we have five hundred and fifty college grads. Thank you. And it's so different than normally in Silicon Valley, people go to a fancy dinner, somebody gives a presentation. They put some money on it here, you, are you go and you go, I want to go teach this class. And then from there, build it all the way out onto college track. It seems like your philosophy. It's probably how entrepreneurs work, right? You see a problem. And you actually think this is something that I can bring some energy and some problem solving and some smart. And maybe a little bit of innovation to this problem to this issue, really, really mazing. So then take us from that to Emerson collective, which is like the world like now you've really expanded your horizons. We'll start with the name because the name is so unusual like Emerson, which I know from reading about is Ralph WALDO Emerson, then tell me about that. And then also about collective. There's no other like the we work with called collectives. Brag Berkeley, there's the cheese board collective. Okay. That's like a company kind of thing that's funny. So I'll tell you what. We're not. We're not the cheese board collective a group governance organization, which actually makes it much better. Controller's we're more of a collective of leaders and innovators across different sectors. And we see the connectedness of every issue. So just in the simple college tracks story, we talked about educational inequities and access, and the need for enhanced and robust curriculum, but also good immigration laws and fair immigration practices, so that, that actually could be a foundation instead of central to the agenda. Of course. Of course. And so many of our first generation college bound students are recent immigrants to America, and certainly in California. Many of our recent immigrants are undocumented and so understanding what it means to be undocumented as a child growing up in the United States, you cannot access any state or federal funding for your education. And so you might be valedictorian of your high school and you can't get state or federal funding. And in fact, there are only a handful of states, that would allow you to pay in state tuition, but for undocumented families, even in state tuition at seventeen thousand dollars a year when you can get generally no scholarships. No loans to fund it. That's out of reach too. That's another issue that we learned about firsthand environmental, toxins city in low income neighborhoods. So the access to clean air water and soil and access to food and access to financial services and banking services. All of these things you learn about in one community, and they're all connected, because these are all systems and experiences that touch the individual's life. And so you pull one thread the whole fabric follows. We were pulling one thread, and we made it a really tough spread around this educational support in our own way. But we understood we can't just solve the education issue without Lou. Looking at the holistic issues of what actually are the what are all the touch points to an individual's life. And how do we make sure if we can help, remove obstacles in all of these different systems, or even better redesign these systems, so that an individual congest you'll have access to the opportunity that they're qualified for that will be the whole work? So that's why it's a collective, because we actually collectively wrap around problems and understand that complex problems require complex problem, solving and complex solutions really compasses. It's interesting Arne Duncan, how to quote where he said, well, you know, the rain set to me, you're trying to sell these really intractable problems. So why don't you let me help? And he said, you know, I think she was attracted to the degree of difficulty the harder. It was like. She wanted to do this. Yeah. I mean, for me, it's so exciting and invigorating to think about devoting my life to solving the problems of our day. You know, these are intractable problems, they're not problems that no one has worked on before quite the opposite. These are problems that people have worked on a now they pass the baton to us. We have the great privilege of trying to make a dent in them and trying to maybe redesigned system, a little more elegantly and make things a little more fair and more just and we'll work on them for twenty thirty years. And then someone else is to come to pass the topic. That's how we think about it, and it's joyful work. If you can at one point be part of that inflection point another person's life. If you can for one person know that for you that person has opportunity, they otherwise wouldn't have had, it's the most intoxicating feeling and you want to do it again. And again, and again, do you try to change the world but you do it for the individual. So the intractable Ness of world doesn't bother you. Yes, that's how I can think about it. And that's how I can actually. And I think for all of us we understand where we're trying to go. And then we backwards map it. So most everything we're working on, we have a ten year time, horizon, some things, we have a ten year and then we'll renew it for another ten years for Arnie. He's hoping to put a dent in gun violence, and specifically in the number of homicides that are gun related deaths in Chicago in fourteenth specific neighborhoods anymore. Wants to see impact within the next few years when you go after education, immigration gun violence, environmental issues, you end up with a pretty unusual kind of diverse team. So you've got Mark echo, Arne, Duncan. Steve McDermott, my old friend, Steve McDermott did don't you put all those I can't even that all those three of the meeting. That just seems so wild. How does that work? How do you every Monday, including today, we have all staff meetings, and because we have five different offices around the countries that we have on the screen like Hollywood squares generally three by three matrix with different teams. Populating in the nine squares, and we have different teams report out. Sometimes we have guests who come and speak who are either in the philanthropic portfolio, or the for profit portfolio, or who are policy advocates or policy writers, or just brilliant, people that happened to be passing through one of our cities, that we bring to the table to listen to learn from, and then we have follow up. So it's sort of like every single Monday. We set the stage and we know where we are. We give a report back and look forward. And then we keep a menu one everybody out in the then you want everybody out in the other. In office more than five six days in a row, that would be bad, and that's because all the knowledge is out, feel exactly. And so, when we decided to bring a big idea forward in education, for example, with x q institute rustling alley who was running our education practice at the time came out of the Obama administration. She was the assistant secretary of education. She ran the opposite civil rights. I love that we have these extraordinarily people who have a body of work and a network. And there's something big that they want to accomplish that, maybe they didn't get to do in government, or in business or in the social sector. And so we say, okay calm. Do you think we can do this in ten years? And what does it look like what kind of team do you need? And so we build out like that. So we've built our organization from these individuals who come in this extraordinary way. And then the new. Or hires. The more junior people hear about the fact that they might get to work with some of these amazing people. And so it's become kind of this really nice giant magnet for talent in that way. Really? Team. So anyways, I was telling you about wrestling, next cue. So we both had worked in the sector for over a decade, and we both had a sense of the broken Ness of the design of the system and the fact that students who come to school needing the most received the least in all educational resources, and you just have to wrap your head around that is student who come in who are already behind in word in hearing just the number of words. Let alone the quality of words at home, actually are behind in kindergarten, and they rarely catch up and the students who are slow to learn to read by the end of the third grade every school in this country ships from learning to read to reading to learn. So then when you enter the fourth grade if you're not a really good reader in the third grade, all of your learning comes from reading, text, and so used to further and further behind, and whoever came up with the idea. Idea that humans learn best by sitting still for sixty eight dollars counsel. Yeah. Especially little kids, that's not how synapses are formed. We came with all of this frustration about how we're just ruining the humans and the massive potential. That's in every single person skull, the brains that we carry around can solve any problem, any person the talent and the IQ that is randomly distributed does not meet up with opportunity opportunity is silent. So we decided, well, we wanna flip the system. We wanna flip the system from measuring learning in the high school. So we're both also fixated on the highschool is the fulcrum for what happens after high school, what happens before high school, so K, eight shifts when school shifts, and obviously access to higher Ed and rear also is influenced by what happens in high. High school. So if you change high school, you can actually change the whole system, but you get a high school degree by sitting through one hundred twenty hours of a list of subjects mathematics, and English and some history and some science, and the reason for that is because in nineteen. Oh, six. That's right. There's been no technological change since nineteen o six ninety six. And if you watch in a high school in one thousand nine hundred sixty feel few time traveled to Wendy eighteen you'd feel very much at home. Still say, say. In nineteen. Oh, six. They decided that what they wanted to do was systematize, great for rip van winkle. That's right. That would be a good movie what they wanted to do was bring the learnings of industrial revolution and productivity into the school setting. It was actually really good idea that we would standardize schools because schools at that point had only been generally for young men, and they wanted to have universal access to high school. And they also wanted to standardize the lessons across the country. So this was smart. And this was innovative for its time in one thousand nine hundred six unfortunately that this that got set up is still the system today. That's still how you get your high school diploma not to mention the fact that you actually don't need a proxy for learning. You don't need for time to be the standard. You actually need content mastery to be the standard and time should be the. Variable, and we can do that. We actually know how to measure what you know, about anything at any time in any classroom. We also know a lot more about neuroscience now. And we know how a brain develops when it's actually engaged in a task, and we also know that you don't learn things in silos isolated silos. You don't learn math and then leave my then then start to learning than Li it's actually much more robust and sticky when things are integrated and connected. And so we decided that we wanted to change high schools in America, and we started it a few years ago, and we started it with a competition across America and we wanted to put students in the center. And so we crisscrossed the United States. I think we're on our fifth trip across the United States and we visit communities and we hold student round and we hold civic leader and. Business leader and parents and teacher round. And we sit and we talked to people and we listened to them. So then by the time we issued this challenge for communities across America to redesign high schools in their own community, that mapped onto the workforce demands in their communities that repurpose assets in their communities. We had already talked to thousands and thousands of pm. They were able to pick this up and there were no who you always hear about all the mirrors so many inhibitors in terms of changing, how things are done between structure and the unions, and this, and that, but people were able to pick it up and redesign these skulls, we weren't. Sure, we weren't sure we definitely restaffing into unknown territory. We weren't sure how many people would actually take this up. We had designed the we used a design thinking, set of modules, we had thirteen modules that every team had to go through. We made these kids with posters and workbooks and cards that you. You could use the new had to have on your team students. Parents business leaders designers of any sort, and even in small communities. In the end, it was a seven month process to go through this whole thing. So communities really had to dig in, we had seven hundred full applications for brand new high schools. In all fifty states, over ten thousand people participated for what we're going to be ten schools that we funded and built. It was amazing. And after the competition. So we awarded are ten and then after our competition, we followed about one hundred and forty that we're continuing on and building their own, even though they didn't win. And since then we've awarded another nine vex Q super school, Monica, because their models are so inspiring and breakthrough. And so they're part of this cohort of super schools, and we bring them together, and so now seventeen of the nineteen or open the other two will open next August. And of course, along the way we're learning all sorts of wonderful things, and they're teaching each other, and they have professional learning communities. And of course, they have to break from the Carnegie unit, which is time as the proxy for learning. So they all have to have competency based learning. We have a standardized learner outcome. And so all of the students in all of the schools can tell you that execute. Earner outcomes, are about being a synthesizer and a collaborator and a creative problem solver. They haven't annot that for them sixty five percent of the jobs that they will hold haven't been created yet. And so they understand they have to be agile nimble thinkers. They have to be creative problem solvers. They have to understand critical thinking spills, and these are schools that are not skimming. These are schools that exist in communities and they're open enrollment public school with the kids who actually need. Yeah. They actually bring the answers they bring the answers on the teachers are heroically scrambling to catch up and design new, curriculum, and it's really exciting journey to be on because you have Arne Duncan on the team. How do you think about taking that those models and changing policy and kind of we do? In many of the sectors where we work policy is the tip of the spirit. So certainly for immigration. Reform policies at the tip of the spear, and there's work that we can do each of us can do to be welcoming to immigrants, and their individual policies that municipalities can instill around driver's licenses and not using local law enforcement to enforce immigration laws on the other hand with education. It's very, very layered. And so we do have a policy team that is mapping out specific state, and federal policies that we advocate for so part of the beauty of being an LLC or a series of LLC's is that we can be policy writers policy advocate be Philander, whatever you want. We can be investors, and we do do all those things we use every possible tool. Some tax breaks. That's, so if you don't care about tax preference. It's a whole heck of a lot more flexibility. You get ultimate flexibility. It's really great. Yeah. When we're really digging in on the work about six years ago, I was contemplating, what structure we should have. And most people start a foundation so that they migrate pretexts either any dollars or stock into that, generally, whatever asset, they're going to be using and then use that foundation construct. They use that kind of the five percent payout to do the work that they're going to do. Well, first of all, I felt that if I really care about impact, if I actually really care about solving problems, and I don't care about increasing wealth, then I would be foolish to close off any avenues by which change happens. And a lot of change happens in brilliant for profit companies. So I wouldn't want to close that off and a lot of change happens at the policy level. And so we wouldn't want to close that off. So then, so I thought, well, why doesn't everybody do this? I don't understand. But if people have taken the giving pledge, and they plan to give away all their money, why they even care about tax break. I still actually don't understand it because I'm hoping we go through as much of the wealth as we possibly can. I mean that's the purpose of it, and we're living in times of urgency and extreme crisis. I don't understand what the ninety five percent of the corpus is waiting around for cause is not going to get worse than we're in right now. So I hope people put more worked admire money to work. Let's talk a little bit about profit because you invest them tech companies and there are a lot of tech companies here, who I'm sure and a lot of them asked me, how do I get money from members? Think collective, what are you looking for the for profit side, almost all of our investments are mission align? We have an environmental practice. So within the environmental practice there's a robust portfolio. We have an Ed tech portfolio. That's obviously aligned with our. -cation practice. We have cancer companies that we've invested in, because we invest in on college research, and some policy there as well. We started in immigration incubator. There isn't a lot of technology that's migrated into them Gration sector. So we'd love to encourage that. But we would love to invest in people who are bringing differentiated thinking or new thinking to old problems in this way. And so there's a lot of wonderful opportunity for entrepreneurs to marry their passion and their purpose with their company. Those entrepreneurs that we get super excited by. So fun last question. And you've kind of answered this, but there's another answer that I'm looking for. So how do you know when you're succeeding on the micro level I definitely get it, and you're changing lives. But on these big agendas that you have, how do you know when you're kind of on the track? And getting there we collect data on everything that we do. So we can understand if we're trending in the right direction in education around just use that as an example, because I've been talking about that. In addition to the schools, we now have the district of Tulsa, and the state of Rhode Island, which want to have kind of a complete redesign of all of their high school. So in Rhode Island they have Forty-five high school, so you can do experiments in Rhode Island, or at least use it as a laboratory for other states. So all forty five of their high schools, they want to be come execute super school. So we're working with them on. Statewide competition in that way. So that's moving in the right direction in Chicago. There's, there's very good data on the both fatal and nonfatal gun violence. And so we have really good metrics there. But we also see success in smaller ways in anecdotal ways, which I think are very powerful, as well where people come back to us, and they tell us it. No one has ever talked to us before. No one's ever taken a shot on me. No one's actually ever listened to me. And then giving me the chance to try a big hairy idea. And so that to me is also success. And that's moving things forward. I think there are also other more subtle ways. We didn't even talk about your. How do you make sure that you're part of the cultural narrative, and how do you make sure that some of our most imperilled important institutions like the media like high quality journalism are suppo-? And sustained, but seeing how many people are going into those disciplines is actually another measurement of success seeing we're I q is migrating is really important measure of success. We see that in the sector we're seeing that in other sectors as well. That's great. Well, thank you, so, well, we all you being you and fixing the world. So everybody, please join me in thanking. Thank you so much.

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Back to School with Former Education Secretary John King

The Takeout

49:05 min | 6 months ago

Back to School with Former Education Secretary John King

"We've all heard the saying. It's like drinking out of a firehose surge of new infections in Florida. For named in the Ahmad Russia offered bountygate sends between the US and China be reaching a new low times. My career has felt that way nine eleven was President George W Bush in Florida to impeachments Bush v Gore presidency six presidential campaigns. Now, a pandemic all firehoses here's new evidence tonight. declared a net hospital running out of the bags. Perhaps you've had this feeling or something like it that there's so much news. So many firehoses, sensational items we are sure can't be forgotten are in the space of weeks sometimes days. We can't slow down the torrents of news bulletins, but we can go a bit deeper into their meaning their history and facts as they are known. Every new show promises something new. We are promising something enduring or anchorman. You see don't fade away they just keep coming back for more and that's the way it is I major Garrett and this is the debrief what is happening what it might mean where things may be going sound from today law and order. If we don't have it, we're not going to have a country and yesterday. The. Remember that. You're. Listening to new episode, every Tuesday morning subscribe rate and review on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. I think it the. Desperate fear. That we in this country ought to try not only to report current games. But to tell people. How we got here. Five. Or? Zero. Major Garrett. Yes CBS. Yes. Come Major Garrett from the nation's capital Major. Fantastic. It's the takeout major with CBS News chief Washington correspondent. That's nonsense major. Garrett. Welcomes rivers part of my broadcast week, Major Garrett host, and creator of this most amazing program known as the takeout where each and every week those of you watching us on CBS and listening to us on great radio stations around the country also on Sirius Xm Channel One, twenty four and of course, our earliest adopters on podcast platforms everywhere you know we are two things. What are those two things relentlessly curious steadfastly non ideological all. Points of view on politics and policy welcome and respected here. This week's conversation is going to be about the topic that I feel very strongly is on the minds of almost everyone in this country directly or indirectly for those directly involved. It's every child every parent grandparent aunt uncle friend trying to figure out how we can go to school this fall in pandemic how do we do that safely? What are the imperatives where the risks? What are the things that? We have to do cooperatively to pull this off for the betterment of the next generation of American leaders that would be our children. So our guest this week in that regard is John King he is. The was the tenth secretary of Education in our great country. He was also deputy education secretary. Mr. King Great to meet you. Thanks for joining us. Join you. And I love to stand on formality instructed otherwise Mister Secretary or John. down. It would be okay John. You're also currently president and CEO of the. Education. Trust. Correct. That is exactly right. What's that? So. It's a nonprofit that works for education equity behalf of low income students sense of dollars we try to close the. Gaps that we have in this country. There were there long before the pandemic revealed fiercely in its wake. That's exactly right exacerbated. Many of those existing inequities and what are they specifically. For Low income students and students of color, they're less likely to have access to a early childhood education. Their schools get less resources. They are less likely to have access to the SEAN, his teachers to advanced coursework to counselors, and all that translates into big gaps in achievement or low income students and students of color and less access to post secondary education. How has that been exacerbated by the pandemic? Well immediately when you had schools close, you've lost the opportunity to get meals to income students with nearly thirty million kids who rely on schools for meals. So food. Was One immediate impact of school coach in the spring But we also big gaps in Internet access. So the data suggests about seventy nine percent of families have reliable Internet access about sixty six percent of families and about sixty one percent of leading off families. So when school went online, some kids weren't even able to log in is also device gap power less likely to have the devices at home to to be able to log in. And low resource district's really struggled to provide their teachers support professional development they needed us. Unfortunate. We're going to see some of our academic. That's. As a result of this school closures. Sprang someone you know well, a whose main area of expertise is healthcare, but he had some very strong words on this very program about the from his point of view the need for children to go back to school, Zeke, Emanuel, brother of Rama manual and healthcare researcher and a healthcare policy expert. But he said we can do this we can figure. This out. Now, this conversation was about four maybe five weeks ago. So I'm not sure that's exactly where he is now, but his general sentiment was a this can be figured out there can be safety precautions taken, and there are real risks to children not returning to school not only for their education, but for their socialization in general do agree or disagree. Pre about the risks of missing school but I think unfortunately because of the disastrous response in the current administration to Hobart Nineteen, we're in a position where most of the country we're GONNA need to start online or bast with some hybrid learning. The infection rate is just too I. Spread is too high. Now it's true ackerman manuals right didn't have to be that way. Our international peers handled pope in nineteen differently they put in place comprehensive systems of testing contact, tracing help people to quarantine who were sick, and they had general compliance with the best public health signs, and as a result community spread is down and they've been able to reopen schools with safety precautions, but in much attention run on a position to do that. and. When you hear the president say as he often does infection rates for young children transmission transmissibility for young children less than ten years old, they're so resilient there. is so great. That's not a real risk, your reaction. Well. It is true that there is some evidence that the spread would be lower for young kids but young kids are in school buildings with teachers, their homes with family members, some of whom are older and or inbound herbal categories, and so we can't be cavalier and reckless about SMS with the current administration has done name Sir put out this reckless position every school should open everywhere it'll be fine and I think that's very unreal Listrik assessment of the current state, and it's more about politics than it is about policy. What's best for kids families teachers? So when you think about these risks? And you order them in magnitude. The risk is greatest for teachers and the elderly residents of the children of the homes. The children go back home back home to after school if they were to attend in person, but the the percentages of risk are higher there although there is still mixed evidence about out young kids and Cova, and there are certainly cases of young kids dying from Copen So the risk may be somewhat lower, but they're still very real risk. So you'd want to reopen schools with lots of safety procedures that will also be expensive. We haven't yet committed the resources to do that work either. I know the answer this question, but my audience doesn't what were you in New York when it comes to education as a as a member of politics and government? Yeah I was the state. Commissioner of Education here state right the reason I asked you that is to set up this question. I'm sure you had lots of conversations with parents in that role and I imagine you have a sense right now the kind of concerns parents have especially those who need to get back to work or want to get back to work and the idea of having their children from public, school for some number of weeks or possibly another semester. Is really scary to them economically and otherwise, what would you say to them? Well look I think parents are struggling with this I have two kids fourteen and sixteen. We're worried about in our family kids being able to go back to school at the same time. All parents want their kids to be safe. And they want to be safe themselves and we're not in a position again because of how we've handled the pandemic entry Assure that safety We also are in a position to do the things in schools that are necessary around personal protective equipment and proving ventilation systems restructuring transportation. Nehal, delivery within the school day so that students are physically distant on lowering class size so that the students are physically distant Congress hasn't yet, but aside, the money that's needed will districts to do that I think we look. At the point it's clear. Yes. All of us want kids back in school but went back safely and parents are worried as they should be about whether or not ever turn to school would be safe. I have heard the Education Secretary Betsy, Devos say Congress gave money in earlier variations of stimulus relief and it hasn't all been spent. So let's not spend any more money until it's all spent. That ignores the a need council chief state school officers, the Organization of State Superintendents and commissioners projects that it will cost between one, hundred, fifty and two, hundred, fifty, billion dollars for school to reopen safely and what's happened is there was some money in the cares act about thirteen and a half billion dollars or schools. Some of that has been spent some of it was slow to be distributed, and in many cases, folks are nervous about spending because they are looking down the barrel ed potential, very significant cuts to education if. Congress doesn't do more. So you really had the whole education sector paralyzed in a sense waiting for congressional action on the resources that are that is the voice of John. King. He was tenth secretary of Education, our great country, the last year and a half. Essentially if you look at the calendar of the Obama Administration, Arne Duncan was his successor as his predecessor, rather more with John King and this topic this crucially important topic of future in a pandemic public education. We get back I major Garrett segment to the takeout coming up. Birth from CBS News. This is the takeout with Major Garrett. Welcome back as you can see, those of you watching on. CBS. N still working from home and as I've often said, I think, almost every week on this program that's a privilege to be able to do the work. I do from home and to those who for whatever set of reasons you're in hospital working for a doctor in a grocery store doing delivery of your a front line first responder in any capacity where you need. To be out and doing that work. We thank you. We appreciate you staying at home in almost every way I can to not add to the problem to be respectful of you and the work you do I will let you know the show. Thanks you for all the work you do and I'm also appreciative that the work I do I mostly do from home and not get in your way and not make this problem. Any worse John King is our special guest, the Tenth Secretary of Education. Last year or so of the Obama Administration. Currently president and CEO of the Education Trust and I want to go back to where we left off at the end of segment. One. I've a pretty good sense of what you were saying Mister Secretary John but I wanNA make sure audience gets it. So there's been federal money established and send out but school districts to use your word feel paralyzed because they don't know what their future costs. are going to be one too. They know they can see at the state level state budgets are under great stress because of the economic contraction brought about by the pandemic. So they don't know what their future funding stream is going to be. Most of our education is funded the local and state level. So they're holding this money I understand you correctly, and that's why it hasn't all been spent. That bad is a large part of the Chan. Having also say that the federal government and state governments haven't always moved as quickly as school districts would like to get the money out to school districts but we really to move forward. Effectively we need congress in the next couple of weeks here to. Dedicate resources that will protect schools from cuts. L. Provide additional dollars to make the necessary safety adjustments install. The end additional dollars to address the learning loss from last spring in some of the socio emotional impact of school closures from last spring. What. Does in your opinion, John a safe school you classroom look like well, we have pretty good evidence from our international peers around I would say I need society to get the pandemic under control. Right? We need infection rates to come way down. That's a threshold issue. We've got to have testing readily available for knowledge people who are symptomatic or people who've been in contact with people have been Max. We need large scale testing access and we need quick turnaround on testing. They're still states where can be a week or more weeks before you get your results from the tests. That's unacceptable. We need to have media turnaround on testing and we have to have contact tracing. So someone gets sick at school, their staff who has their function tracking down who that person was in contact with. Making sure those people quarantine and get tested as well. We need all of that in place before we even talk about the school design issues. But then when we get to school questions on, the best advice we have is that students need to be physically distant, which means we need to bring class size down. So that students are least at six feet heart on the best advice we have is that Cova be spread through the air and so any good ventilation systems that that prevent the passage of Cova, through the airflow within building. We've gotTA, make sure that students are wearing man that teachers are wearing the masks where we can. We should add barriers. So in the think about the main office where where people are coming in throughout the day there ought to be a barrier between the administrative staff people who are coming in to lower the likelihood that covert will be half, and then we got to redesign arrival dismissal at think about transportation can have so many kids on a bus needs to have space between kids on the bus word different transportation strategy probably can't have cafeteria meal gotTA. Have Them Yeltsin classrooms where kids are physically distinct. There's a lot of work logistically to make schools safe but it is possible. But again, you can't get there until you have all those societal things in place first, let's just start with one thing. Buses. Now, when my children were young, they walk to school or I drove them to school but many American children get on a bus. I'm just trying to think through this and I'm probably missing a lot but. You have to have more buses. You have to have more bus drivers because if you have half as many children each busted and you used to have you need twice as many buses. Which means you need more bus drivers not easy to come by then you need a flu pattern in and out. So the students are not mixing and combining altogether was they walk in or as they move around. Am I missing anything? No I I think that's right and that's why you have districts either thinking about a hybrid schedule where kids half the kids would come. On Mondays and Wednesdays the other half on Tuesdays and Thursdays and maybe use Friday to clean. The buildings were hybrid schedules where you have half the kids come in the morning half the kids come in the afternoon. But again, even an hybrid schedule. Now you've introduced time where kids are at home and you've gotta do learning at home. Everyone needs device. Everyone needs Internet access. We know we have disparities and Internet access. So then this is a huge logistical challenge for districts, and if you think you're going to get ten fifteen, twenty percent cuts down the road on the state it's very hard to wrap your head around how to do those things. Well, what does the research literature tell us about rhythms and patterns for children when it comes to their education I mean I just mean Doing things the same way day in and day out this whatever it is going to be will not be a pattern will not be a rhythm. It will be up and down look at there's a lot to worry about your kids need stability and structure and the research clear about that, and that's particularly true for kids who have challenging situations at home. Now, I was a kid were school saved my life school was the only up in Brooklyn. In Brooklyn, exactly went to New York, city public schools, and my mom pass when I was eight a dad when I was twelve and in between just my dad and me and my dad had undiagnosed Alzheimer's. Home was this place that was unstable dictatorial. sterry allowed the time and the thing that saved me was having great New York City. Public. School teachers who made school a place that was nurturing supportive and consistent. And I I. I think about the kids who miss that last spring I think the the kids who this fall either will still be doing distance learning or in the schedules that are disrupted where they lack that consistent support and it my heart breaks. But again, we didn't have to be in this situation. We're in that situation because the current administration trump administration handle the pandemic is ashes and when. You hear as I have the Education Secretary Again Betsy Devos. Say there are more risks children being at home than they are at school risks of suicide risks of addiction risks of abuse. You say what? Are S and that's why we should have handled the pandemic better. But we're looking at more than we are where we are. Now that's right we've we've lost more than one hundred, fifty, thousand. American. there are kids who were getting sick if you look at Florida today, there are large numbers of his kids who are sick with their kids have died from Kovin Of course, we want kids in school, but we want them to be saved. Want 'em want their families and their teachers to be safe? A large number of kids live in homes with adults who are in vulnerable categories on. So we really can't be cavalier about this. Really got a way the. The the rest on both sides. and. Would you imagine that? It would be necessary in a classroom. Again, I'm trying to imagine what the classroom looks like. Masks on students mask on the teacher do we need to have a plexiglass thing around each desk nets probably not feasible to do but I think that the goal is to really make it possible minimize the degree to which students are breathing in potential code at from other classmates and the. Teacher has reading that. Mass get us a good way there if we get the infection rates way down. I, think we operate that way and there may be places in the country that where the infection rate is low enough that they could operate with mass and with physical distancing without you know everyone in a in a. Glass bubble. But, you gotta get the infection rates down and and in many places. In the wrong direction life in a bubble education and otherwise that is the voice of John King our special guests he was the secretary of education in our great country more with our special guest. John King. On the other side of this break I am Major Garrett. This is the takeout. From CBS News. This is the takeout with Major Garrett welcome back John King our special guest. for those who keep a roster handy of famous Obama Administration. Secretaries. Arne Duncan would probably be a little higher in the memory than John King but Arne Duncan was there for almost seven years right John that's right. and. You were his deputy for how long hours his deputy for the year before he left. Got It. And when you think about it, when our audience thinks about the federal government's role in education, it is much discussed, but it is not an Cillari but it is fractionally less important than the state and local role in terms of policy and money. True. Yeah. That's fair. If you look at funding about ninety percent of the funds for schools come from. The state and local level only ten percent from the federal government. The federal government's role is really to provide additional funding directed towards a low income students, students with disabilities, English learners, and to protect students civil rights. Those are the court t twelve functions. The department also is responsible for higher ed overseeing student loans and pell grant programs. Long students can. College. So we've talked a lot about K. through twelve, what are your thoughts about colleges and universities conversation? Probably. More than two and a half months ago is a very bullish conversation with Mitch Daniels The president of Purdue University which made it clear probably earlier than any other large. Institution of Higher Education that they were coming back full force in the fall on all these things could be figured out I'm not sure where purdue is on that continuum but lots of universities. And small colleges are struggling with this. What are your thoughts about higher education and Kobe? Well, they base the same challenge. They don't exist in a bubble they interact with society and so gotta get the infection rates down in the country in order for colleges to be able to operate successfully got a lot of safety issues to work out including dorms A stationary cruise ship right on. So you've really gotta do work to figure out how are you going to help students stay isolated half curious are GonNa make sure that students are able to stay is this When they're getting their meals you gotta think about ventilation in classrooms and classroom settings. Are they big enough so that students can be spread out a lot of institutions have faculty members who are in vulnerable categories if gotta think about that so I think you're gonNA see at the higher level, a lot of folks going online some folks trying to do some hybrid model where maybe students are on campus but they are learning online rather than going into the classroom we've gotta remember we will adult students, twenty percent or more fresh students, our parents so it's it's. Sometimes you have this conversation has that we're only talking about Strip liberal arts colleges the in on a leafy campus where everybody lives on campus. It's not a college at seventy, five percent of college students from Public Institutions, out of community college students, a lot of students who are going to regional public universities they're also working they're living at home gamma family members who may be vulnerable populations, a lot of older students. who themselves may be vulnerable populations. So this is a this is for colleges are very challenging question, and they too are concerned about resources. Public Higher Ed is very vulnerable to stay cuts. Oh absolutely, and it's also vulnerable to a smaller population of students because unlike public schools where there are there are regular allocations part of their budget models built on students attending. In some cases in some universities, a larger percentage, our foreign students who pay a very high rate for that education. So let me just ask you this. Should. The price point of online higher education be the same as in person? Well, depends on the quality is the same Ryan I think. That's one of the hardest questions it's being dealt with retin-a. Students are furious about the idea of paying the same rack rate for online education at the higher education level than they would. For being on campus that's right and so there are some universities you think about southern new? Hampshire? University. Arizona State University. They have a long history of providing online where says a high degree of quality and of course were planned to be online right? They planned out projects that could be done online planned out how to use technology in the teachers and students came into that system knowing that seeking it and embracing it. It's different. It's different when that is a change midstream exactly when you have someone who just says, well, I'm just going to teach my regular class but I'm GonNa do it on zoom and hope it works. Back that's not going to provide a quality learning experience that students I think you're GONNA see students demanding changes to tuition if they're not getting a quality learning experience philosophically, can you give us your opinion on that? Well, again, if the classes as good if the class is designed, be delivered online then yeah. The the two you could see why the tuition would stay the same. But if the class is not strong and students are not engaged then of course, if I was a student certainly on my my older daughter's senior High School Sabi, I'll be of a paying tuition pair in short order I be. Very frustrated. If I was paying the same tuition for lower quality case, accompany me on this journey. We've gone from the philosophical to the practical who gets to decide whether it's good enough. Well I think at the end of the day, colleges will set their tuition rate, but they're going to get pressure from their students and people will walk with their feet. We'll. We'll with their feet. And folks and I am I am starting to see that luxury choosing saying look if I'm going to be online. I'm. Not GonNa, pay the same man I'm going to go to my local community college instead, and that's that's understandable. Is it something approaching? An exercise in insanity to continue to think about full-scale collegiate athletics this fall. It's hard to imagine that now there may be places where they can put extraordinary resources towards the way you know Major League Baseball. In the NBA are but the idea that we're going to have a regular college sports season. Yes. That's crazy. When you look at the data on the rate of community spread and you look at the campuses that already are having students who are sick just from there or preseason practice right my alma mater the University of Missouri is a member of the southeastern conference and the southeastern conference you might be aware of this derives a fraction of its revenue from college. Football. Occasionally television. Network known as CBS. They're still holding onto a ten game schedule conference schedule starting in late September and it feels like to your point about this infrastructure that you would need to sustain that that has support resources away from other parts of our society that need them as much if not more I think I think that's right and here's the challenge we're in this situation because of bad decisions that were made by the current administration early in this pandemic and we haven't changed strategy we still don't have testing. We still don't have contacts and we still don't have a national strategy in response to Kobe our international peers. Not only have they reopen schools in many cases. In many cases, they are playing sports get. But they got the pandemic under control and missing ministration has failed in that task. We've got a minute before we go to break and I know if someone from the administration were part of this conversation, I don't speak for them but I've heard them say this enough hey, we're testing more than any country on the planet earth and testing capacity is grown demonstrably week in and week out don't say that we don't have testing program we do. That's what they were testing programs in inadequate to that need what you need to be able to do have immediate testing for people who are symptomatic and we need to her you mean immediate results. And you need immediate results and then you need to be able to do the contact tracing figure out all the people they've been interacting with and get those people tested as well. We're very far from that and I'll tell you before the change of administrations, the trump administration cabinet, and the Obama Administration Cabinet we met jointly to to prepare for natural disasters, other kinds of crises we talk specifically about a pandemic and the steps that were necessary and the importance of moving quickly to address things like. Staying in personal protective equipment, they just didn't follow A. Blueprint and ain't chose to wait too long they chose to deny. The existence of the disease to pretend like it would just disappear. That's how I ended up here and schools are now bearing the brunt. John King is our special guests, the Tenth Secretary of Education Curly President CEO of the education. Trust. Back in just a second. This episode of the takeout with Major Garrett is brought to you in part by Kansas City. Stinks visit, Kansas City stakes, DOT com today. From CBS News, this is the takeout with Major Garrett. Major Garrett John King. The Tenth Secretary of Education is our special guest John. I. Want to pick up where you just left off. Because I think it's important. Transitions are important in American government of the trump administration transition for a lot of reasons some of which I outlined in my book Mr Trump's wild ride was uneven to say the best say that at its best most charitable. Because of decisions, people inside that transition made people who got thrown out of that transition process. It was very, very uneven but the meetings nevertheless occurred between the outgoing administration and the incoming administration give us more context and specificity about this conversation with the incoming trump administration about a pandemic. Well the the idea was this was something that the Bush administration did with the incoming Obama administration president aggressive effort to do. That's right. That's right. Because continuity of government is important and you want to make sure the incoming administration is prepared to deal with any eventuality. And President Obama's very clear from the very from the day after the election that we're going to make sure to have a smooth transition as possible and we began preparing for that even before the election, and then once the election happened our our task was have a very smooth transition. Unfortunately, the trump administration was slow to assemble they. Transition teams were slow to get people to the agencies. This meeting of the joint cabinet meeting happened just a few days before the not gration and the idea was at that point to make sure that cabinet members were briefing each other on how to deal with these potential crises and what some of the issues are that come up. We covered a wide range of subjects is multiple hours were sitting in pairs each with our cabinet counterpart. In. One of the topics of discussion was, how do you deal with pandemic and? What implications would have pandemic have for every agency and? During, that time Secretary Devos and I talked about how we dealt with Ebola and and wine and some of the implications for schools of pandemic But the idea was that they would be ready to put those plans into action if they were faced with. These kinds of disasters and it back the discussion was about a respiratory illness that that was a pandemic that started overseas and how you prepare for that, and we talked about the urgency of getting personal protective equipment the urgency of getting testing in place the need to have clear science-based communication with the public a they just didn't do that. Any sense why? It's hard to get inside of Heads of the prime will observe that a large share. The people who were in that meeting are no longer in the administration. Right, but you can also get a sense in a meeting like that whether or not people are interested or following or devoted to that particular. Task like it didn't it didn't feel then like there was a ton of urgency in the rim about these issues. but this look, ultimately the the prisoners responsible for this and current president sat atone from the very beginning that was dismissive of the pandemic I mean you now he said Oh this is just GonNa go away. They're very few cases. It's all under control and missed a crucial period of time to get in place the structures necessary for personal protective equipment for ventilators for the testing and contact tracing system we need. But the tragedy is. Even after those mistakes and seeing the cost in human lives, they still aren't addressing those fundamental choose. We are still behind virtue Oliver, international peers in dealing with this and. One of the things that the president has said he hasn't said it much lately but there was a couple of weeks period about three one three weeks ago where he said you know. If school districts don't reopen I'm going to withhold funding from them or alternatively if children parents want to go to another school, let's say it's a charter school or a private school I will let the money from the federal government follow them. Is there any legal basis that the White House or this administration could do either of those things? Under current law no empty bluster I think the question now is, as Congress considered stepping aside additional money for schools there are some in Congress who wanted tie that money to forcing schools recklessly to reopen But I I'm quite confident that certainly the house of, representatives, will prevent that we'll never go for that. Now I can't I can't imagine that scenario because it's so obviously reckless and against the public good and to be clear under federal law no administration not this one or one comes after that can deny or. Trace federal dollars to a student that goes to a different place. Not. Not as connected to covid reopening ranked round. Now, what one of the things that secretary has tried to do is to steer some of cares act dollars to private schools. And there's been a lot of pushback on that and be litigation on that But as a general manner, the federal government is the one that's GonNa decide whether or not schools reopened. That's going to be a made by Boca on state officials. So people can get a sense of your perspective on this Charter schools good bad mixed depends mixed depends and there are some charters around the country. They're doing an excellent job There's some states that have very careful oversight of their charter sector like Massachusetts like in the on where there's a willingness to close low performing schools a high bar to get a charter. Careful oversight of academic and financial performance, and then there are states like. That have charter law. That's terrible where you've got lots of for profit charters who are getting terrible academic outcomes without any accountability It's unfortunate. Charter means different very different things state to state some places they've been a positive force in public education in other states. Unfortunately their charter sectors very poor. Fan of home schooling or a skeptic. Now I believe in public schools as the foundation of our democracy. Every family has to do what's right for them but. I own certainly as a parent educator is. we're best served by having kids in public schools that prepare them a live in a diverse world with. People and to engage with their peers and ready to participate in civic life. And Yet We're kind of in a more homeschool environment right now deed we are and unfortunately with with real equity disparities as we talked about some folks who can get on the Internet some folks who have devices others don't some folks who have the as you said, the privilege to be able to work firm home, support their kids and only about one in. Five African Americans. The workforce to work from home only about one in six Latinos in the workforce work from home. So there are a lot of kids who are either on their own or maybe there were the older sibling or another family member This is a really challenging period. Again, it didn't have to be this way. This is where we are. That's of John King. This whole conversation has been about something that is as topical as any issue in our country household to household nothing I think is more topical than the pandemic and most related to that right behind it. How do we educate our Children Higher Education K. through twelve John It's been a pleasure for radio audience. We have to say farewell but for those on podcast platforms and CBS and make sure you stick around for the takeout outtake ESPEC- on. From CBS News. This is the takeout with Major Garrett. Welcome to your takeout out take special I. Major Garrett John King is our special guests. He was the tenth secretary of Education. And proceeded by Arne Duncan and the Obama Administration and succeeded by Betsy Devos in the administration. John this is the fun and Games. It's slightly less intense on the policy side portion of our conversation and I wanna ask you a little bit about something you said during the main show which is I remember correctly. Your mother passed when you were eight and your father when you were twelve. That's a lot. Can you give my audience a sense of the difficulties, the challenges, the heart life you lead in those years. Yeah minute. It's hard to describe I mean a my mother was the center of my world and She had a heart attack. So October. Fourth. Grade Year. Father is much older he. As I mentioned had Alzheimer's and so over the from when I was eight to hundred twelve, his condition diminished alive. No one knew just the two of us and I didn't know why he acted the way he did. But if Hamas was hot, just crazy from one night to the next, I can recall one night my father woke me up to in the morning. told me it was time to go to school. I remember being on that staircase in our house holding onto the banister as my father told me on the stairs and I kept saying Daddy's not time to go to school in the middle of the night and he was pulling you I just didn't understand why he was doing that. In every day was like. As he got more sick I to figure out how to get the house had just keep our household going. And was just incredibly lonely and the thing as I said that saved me was that I had these great teachers. I had a teacher who looped with us in fourth fifth sixth. Grade. Alla Nostra while still in touch. Amazing teacher. And I remember the stuff we did this class like it was yesterday we read The New York Times every day productions a midsummer night's dream Allison Wonderland we went to the museum in the La and and that gave me a chance to have a sense of hope and optimism. When my father passed as twelve. And then moved around different family members, different schools. Like many young people who have trauma. I was very angry teenager she got kicked out of high school south on first US Secretary of education out of highschool. A badge of honor to certain way. And I hope I'm not the last night because prior my story is is one of second chances where people were willing to see me as more than the sum of my mistakes and we're willing to give me a second chance even after I got kicked out of Highschool and mentors teachers the school counselor helped me get my life back on track, and so you know I became a teacher and the principal tried to do for other kids educators do for meet my whole life. Well. I can only imagine what that period of time was between twelve and How scary it must have been You. My mother passed away in two thousand, fourteen Of A. Symptom of a disease similar to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's vascular brain disorders essentially what it was. But mental dismissed diminishment is something that you have to deal with in either one of those three cases. Dealing with that as an adult is far different than dealing with as a child and when you're an adult and when you're like me and you're in a world where there's a lot of information at your fingertips and a lot of people you can call and associated with WHO can. Provide some backup to you intellectually and spiritually. You have some resources. It's still difficult. Is Really hard. I can't imagine what what nine, ten and eleven you didn't even know what you were dealing with. No I didn't understand I mean some days my father would yell and yell and I didn't know why and some days. We sad and name talk and I just didn't know what I didn't know what was going on I didn't. But I just tried to just go on and it was school. It was thinking about the next day at school I gave me a reason to go on. And I was I. was very fortunate that teachers. They didn't give up on me I didn't say to themselves. Well, here's a black Latino male student family in crisis but chances he had but instead they tried to make school a place where I could be a kid when I get. A great So the three threshold questions for all of our guests I will post them to you now take them in whichever order you prefer. Most influential book in Your Life all time favorite movie or one of your favorite movies and if you're going to indulge yourself musically. What artist or genre are you most likely to listen to? Oh? Wow. All right Most impactful book was probably. spoke down these mean streets beat Thomas who was A. Dark skinned Puerto Rican and so in New, York and side it was the first book where I really could fully relate to that the character Favorite movie this. Sort of Corny but. Probably when Harry met Sally. A. Shame to say. Looks Good. It's A. Great way for it's a very sweet movie. And Music. You have broad interests, hip hop barn be But in our house, we listened to a lot of Hamilton. As the the Hamilton Remax, which were just like a hip hop rb version of of Hamilton with popular artists during the song. And as it as an edge as an educator, what does the phenomenon around Hamilton, tell you About, the possibilities of this kind of civics music. On a particular gene RAV HIP hop. We know as a high school social says teacher so I love it but it shows me that kids can get really interested in history and understanding heart country came to be. The way of is if we may get accessible and engaging and lin-manuel, Miranda's genius an artistic genius and when you listen to the songs of his ability to leave this pretty dense history book, the turnout buck into where Amazon is incredible and you know the. The Gilder Lehrman Institute has a whole project working with kids to expose them to Hamilton, and they have a whole process where kids make their own kind of history rap songs and kids are super into it and they're super passionate about his Trans Social Studies and Hope the every social science classroom can have that spirit and don't think Linneman will was the first to do this. Go back to the early rap artists to pack. Others there's tax policy there's government policy and they'll flick you can find it. It's right up that. That's right. That's right. That's right. There are teaching lessons right off the bat so. John It's been a great pleasure. Thank you so much for your time. And we will keep in touch on this issue because it's not going away and I wish you and your family, the best same renter tacos. Thanks so much. We'll see next week folks. The takeout is produced by Ardent Ferrari, Jamie Benson Sarah Cook Ellie Watson Zoe Poindexter, and rose on CBS production by Eric Hassanin Gray seekers, and Daniel. People's follow us on facebook twitter and Instagram at takeout podcast. That's. TAKEOUT TODD CAST and for more go to take out PODCAST DOT com the takeout is a production of CBS audio.

Major Garrett John King CBS Mister Secretary John secretary Obama Administration Secretary Devos Secretary president federal government Congress CBS News Arne Duncan president and CEO John It CBS News Tenth Secretary of Education Florida Garrett John King
The NBA in the White House

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

46:57 min | 10 months ago

The NBA in the White House

"You know it is unfortunate. He's sports illustrated's Kris Maddox podcast goal. And this is the crossover. Nba Show freaking go. Hey He's here to break down the league now he's inaccurate. That's probably true. That's fair but make a game of it. Just take a drink. Every time manic says I was dead wrong. I'm solving problems. Now here's your host. These guys are going to run into the ground. Chris Chris. Welcome back to another episode of the Crossover NBA. Podcastone quarantine edition of the crossover. Podcast hope everyone is staying healthy. Hope everyone is staying inside. Try to ride out this very tough time in this country. A little bit of a different episode this week. Dan pfeiffer is the former White House communications director under Barack Obama. He's an accomplished author. He's the CO host of pod. Save America and he is a die hard Philadelphia. Seventy sixers fan. If you follow Dan on twitter a of political tweets but a lot of seventy sixers tweets as well so he knows the game of basketball. And that's what I talked to. Dan About basketball had a pretty special place for Barack Obama during his presidency from the election. Day Game Two players visiting the White House to just drop INS. That people had at the wild sports talk to Dan about the influence that the NBA hat on Barack Obama and vice versa. The influence that Barack Obama had on a lot of NBA players during his presidency. We talk about that and much more during this podcast and is a terrific conversation. I encouraged to listen to it from start to finish. I really enjoyed the conversation with Dan. Pfeiffer quick housekeeping note if you like this podcast very easy way you can support it head over to apple podcasts. Post a comment leave a rating. It's simple it's easy it's free. It's the best way to make sure that we keep doing this podcast week after week. That's it all right to my conversation with Dan pfeiffer. I did fight for his ear former White House. Communications director the CO host of pod. Save America the author of un-trumpian America. Terrific book that's out right now and a tortured Philadelphia. Seventy sixers fan so dan which of those descriptions would you say you identify with the most well up until about three weeks ago? I would say tortured seventy sixers fan. You an interesting twitter feed where it's like ninety percent politics and then like when Ben Simmons won't shoot a three it's like I. I don't know if people like the fall you fully grasp your sixers. Fandom there's a lot of people are very confused by a lot of my best ball tweets and it was particularly confusing. Tj McConnell was a successor and I with read positive things about TJ McConnell and just like during the game. And I would say McConnell and people would yell at me thinking. I met the senator from Kentucky what I really meant the the wife of the process. Tj McConnell just just tweets. Great decision made by McConnell. They're basically yes. There are several things that happened in that very famous. Tj McConnell gave him the one six one against the Celtics a few years ago in the playoffs. There were a lot of tweets like that that had people were very very upset with me. I have no doubt I wanNA get some stuff about the sixers but we did this a few years back and I had a really thought it was really interesting. I WANNA revisit some of the things that we that talked about you know when I think it was probably four years ago five years ago maybe now I had this idea where I was going to try to write a story about how I can about trying to get into the Obama basketball game and that election day game became stuff of legend. A lot of White House staffers. Even some media members took part of it. I was gonNA write this whole story about how I tried to get into it and it never came together. It's always one that you know you. You leave on the cutting room floor that you wish you had back and I just want to ask you about that game. I like yeah. I guess it started for everybody that that new Barack Obama back in. Twenty fifteen twenty sixteen but the origins of that game. What do you remember about why Obama wanted to play basketball on election day? Well basketball always been an escape for him. Election Day is weird day for candidates where there's not a lot you can do. People are already voting. You kind of just have to make a few phone calls. You can do a couple interviews but otherwise you're just kind of sitting around just watching the clock tick until the votes are coming in. And so the for Obama's entire life going back to high school away to escape relax. Deal with stress was to play hoops and so he would. He would do that on election day and most the first time that ever happened on election day was on the daily Iowa caucus in two thousand and eight and Allama won the Iowa caucus into that became a tradition for every election. Day going forward and it is the difference between when you're a upstart candidate. Where the people he played with just the folks on his traveling team you know. He traveled famously with. Reggie love who play Basketball Duke on the two thousand and one national championship team and a couple of other guys who played recreationally and a few of his friends from Chicago. By the time we got to two thousand and twelve during the real act you had former. Nba players playing in that game so the process of getting into the game. This is something I never really got deep enough into to fully understand. How did people get into this basketball game? What the Election Day game would depend on where we were right. So a lot of two thousand and seventy thousand eight was. We were just wherever we were right. We were in Iowa. We were in New Hampshire. Obama was in Chicago in two thousand twelve. There was only one election and it was in Chicago. It would be a combination. The people most responsible for putting people brock Obama's basketball games whether on election day or when he was playing pick out more regularly were Reggie love and Arne Duncan the former education secretary and former professional basketball player from Australia would organize the teams and in the normal course of Obama basketball. It would always be the young guys I. The old guy would be a collection of Reggie's friends people who mostly former d. one guys who played in DC we were in DC or if we were in Chicago people people knew from Chicago and then Arnie would put together a team of older guys. Mostly Former D. one guys and who would play on? Obama's team I think almost always the Arne Duncan Obama teams one already. Dunkin could play good. He I mean he was phenomenal basketball player. And Reggie Reggie was at Duke Right. So he was. He had game zone he was going to be an army was such a good smart basketball player that he took a bunch of guys to the Goodman League in DC which is a free. When I would say very famous amateur outdoor Summer League Kevin Durant has played there at times at Tyler. Larsen a bunch of local. Dc folks and army took a bunch of guys you know mostly in their thirties and forties and went out and won a bunch of games. They're on a nightly basis and people took a lot of people to figure out who this six five white guy was coming out. And who is you know in his probably late forties at that time and just schooling is. He's he's he's a he's. I think he's a two time. Mvp of the NBA Celebrity All Star game. He's a here's a phenomenal player. Who was destroying REC leagues for the entire Obama Administration? Did you. Did you get hit up a lot from people asking to get into that game. Always people always wanted to play in any sort of Obama basketball game and that is you never want to be responsible for putting someone in that game because I was tangentially responsible for one of the great tragedies of the Games where a guy that I kind of knew it was from a game that I played it in. Dc ended up in that game and so he knew me. And he's the one who busted Obama's knows over Thanksgiving in two thousand and ten which was no one was pleased with and caused a minor media firestorm. How much grief did you get for putting that guy in the game? Well I I was only I was like third order responsible so I think Reggie took most of the blame but have but so but I. I walked around quietly hoping no one remembered that I also knew that guy when I went to the Oval Office in the weeks afterwards. Because I didn't want to take my share of blame for it so the as you said a lot of people wanted to get into that game. Who is like the highest profile person that was rejected from that game? Any NAMES JUMP TO MIND. The kind of went in different trying to think who the highest profile I don't know who the highest profile person who was rejected would be many many members of Congress on to play play with President Obama and I don't think anyone ever did and there was a period of time where in his sort of in the he kind of mostly retired from pickup. All in the latter half of the presidency just become as he felt he was getting older and more afraid of injury. We're we're as he described it to me once the the as you get older and you'll get slower the enjoyment of the benefits of playing Star to the risk of injury become a exceed the benefits of playing but in the early days he would Offseason they would invite some NBA players to play them Kevin Durant famously played. I think before either his rookie year before his rookie year came played in a game. This there's an infamous story that I don't know I can't swear his true but John Wall slept through his presidential basketball game. Oh that's that's always been going around the White House in DC FOR YEARS. But yeah he would lots of players. The most famous player played in a in an election day game which were always a little bit more of a ceremonial affair than sort of regular. You know a regular Saturday Ryan that the president would have was Scotty. Pippin played in the game on Election Antonio. Twelve with his son. I believe I'm going to have to ask John Wall about that story and see if he will confirm that one for me the NBA players start to get involved but did did you guys recruit these NBA guys to play that Obama ask these NBA guys to play or somewhere other was like Obama. Obviously be you know new. Some of these guys certainly. Chicago guys from when he was a senator when NBA teams would come to town. A lot of them would come toward the White House and if Obama was around he'd come say hi to them some of them would get involved through their foundations. Or their charitable work with Steph. Obama would do with the White House would do like you know mentoring programs and getting people signed up for health care and that sort of stuff and Obama will get to know them and a lot of them would get in contact with Obama through. Reggie love and so there was sort of the most famous example of people playing on his fiftieth birthday force. Fiftieth Birthday Reggie and Obama's friends put together a game with just every NBA player. You could imagine to come play so in. That game was la- Lebron Chris. Paul Derrick Rose Joking. No Shame Daddy. A Alonzo mourning came out of retirement for magic. Johnson came out of retirement for it. Like an probably like a dozen. Nba players played in the game. Kobe came but was injured at the time. So he stay he go Russell. Watch the game and it was like a mix of NBA players and Obama and his regular sort of his friends from high school. He believes high school team mostly and they went back and forth for a couple of hours on on the day of Obama's birthday basketball and then there was a big birthday barbecue afterwards. It all the players came to Alonzo Mourning. Came out of retirement for the OBAMACARE. Magic Johnson comes. Do you ever when you're watching this stuff out of how many you watched firsthand but like do you ever marble I mean. It's a pretty impressive collection of talent. Just there to play. Pick up basketball. I A bunch. They invited a bunch of staff in Obama's friends and a bunch of these DC kids who were who were reported the White House mentorship program to come watch the game and a lot of White House. Staffers brought their kids. And I remember and no one told the kids what was going to happen. I remember The Sun is probably seven or eight years old of one of my colleagues in the White House shooting he was on the court before everyone came out shooting baskets and he's wearing a Koby Draw Bryant Jersey and he misses the shot and it sort of roles and the door opens from century. Was the the locker room people coming out to the gym and it. Kobe walks out and picks up the ball in throws it back to in the look on the kids face to see could not believe it and that was the only game I ever saw were. Nba players play with Obama. It was fun right. It was the only people who played super competitively. Other than Obama was Chris. Paul obviously and Shane Batti decided that he needed to show Reggie love. Who's boss a couple of times since they played on that team together? But other than that. It was a pretty fun. Pre Elam Raw all-star game so that was kind of my next question. The you know the level of competition when a player is either staring down Obama or vice versa. If like on a scale of one to ten if one is like the guy's playing golf with Kim Jong UN and North Korea kicking the ball onto the fairway or ten being game seven of the NBA finals. Where would you put the competitiveness in those situations? I think it really depends on the self awareness of the person playing like a self-aware person covering Obama would cover him enough to like play real. I think you'd be sort of like you would play your Saturday pickup game with your friends right like you care if you win but not so much that you might hurt the person and sort of famously. In that first two thousand eight Iowa Game Alexi generalists who was the state treasurer of Illinois at the time and had played professional basketball in Greece and I think he played northwestern mayor. He's legitimate serious basketball player. Busted one of Obama's ribs go into the basket and that was always sort of the rule going forward was dopamine. Alexi and like winning was important but if you heard Obama that was that was going to be a bigger problem for everyone because once again to go back and be president. It's hard to do that with a broken rib broken. You guys knows he's going to potentially give a nationally televised address next day. You never know does that. I mean that might give them some street cred though like if you've knows her playing pick up a lot of people to that. Have you ever played hoops on? Someone's wedding day. Brian Lay like a lot of my friends that I grew up playing on their wedding day because they play basketball set of golf. And if you're ever covering the groom your goal is to get out of there. Without busting his lead busting his nose hit. GimMe a black eye and so I think that's a little bit that you take the wedding day basketball winning basketball game level approach to covering the president. Which is you? Don't want to get embarrassed. You WanNa give him the competition he wants but you definitely do not want to disfigure his face you you mentioned the busted rib and the busted nose like. I would imagine even worse could be like an Achilles tear or an ACL injury that that prevents a guy that gets around a lot from from getting around. How much as a communications director did you worry about stuff like that? I think I didn't. I don't know that I worried about it. A ton. It is why he the I think the killys primarily is the re is one of the main reasons why Obama started playing much. Less was just that that fear of injury like that's the injury that every weekend warrior basketball player. Fear is because it's a year in a wall in cast basically it's the hardest one and the most painful. WanNa come back from and almost anyone in by Obama included who's played a lot of basketball has been on the court when someone has popped their Achilles and it's one of the most gruesome things you will see that would be you know a a busted nose or a black. I would be painful for him and sort of for his national television interview. But it's like a story like for any other basketball player. But if he were two buses Achilles it'd be hard to travel would limit a lot of what he could do in his job and that would be very. I'm sure that's something I know. He thought about a lot which is why golf eclipse basketball. At the end of the presidency is his most frequent athletic relaxing activity. I can't imagine Kobe Bryant ever backing down from Obama even even in the situations that he knows he and I just can't imagine. It can't imagine Kobe back. That was that seemed to be the approach. Chris Paul took in the Obama presidential game to which is like. It's all fun and Games unless there's a certain set of people who can't turn it off in that moment and I am positive. Kobe would be one of those people as well was Obama. Trash talker out there. He was he was I think a good natured fun weekend. Pick up games for our trash talker but yeah for sure and I remember this lesson where the podcast but he. I remember very early when I was working for him. And we were travelling in New Hampshire together and we were waiting for an event to start. The event was outside and so we were waiting like while the program was happening and the local congressman was speaking or something we were in A. It was a gym High School Gym and there was a hoop. They're in a ball. And Reggie Eleven. I started shooting and so like I went. I had not played in and had a high ankle sprain. I hadn't played in like three months and was also wearing a suit and dress shoes and so and I was not ever particularly great shooter but like I went around like Reggie shooting rebounding each other so I basically hit like seven in a row going around the ARC and Obama's watching which made me quite nervous and but so but I was still like for reasons that I can explain making them and when it was over when I finish bombers like hey for. That's a pretty good shot kind of slow though national. You could get it off in a game. I was like did I need that? Kamal Mattis made seven threes with a suit like back off this criticizing in the mall very very competitive in that sense. Yes it's it's very clear for the people that you know that watched his presidency that his is a connection of sports was really strong but it always seemed like the connection of basketball and the NBA in particular was the strongest of the mall. Is that is that fair to say that the NBA was the League sport? That Obama gravitated towards the most hundred percent right basketball. I in Emba and he'd watch any basketball college. Nba whatever it was the NBA right. And I think part of that is living in Chicago in the ninety s for the for the entire Jordan. Run and so that's a big part of it but he he loved the NBA. It's what he watched to unwind. It was the the athletes he grew most close to and spent the most time with. I think it's where he felt the most. It was his sport. You know he didn't play football. He didn't play baseball but he played basketball his whole life and so that was his connection. Always I'm not sure if there was ever a time that we would fly home on Air Force One during NBA SEASON. Because we're always flying home at night and there wasn't an NBA game on the TV in the in the conference room where he would hang out on trips home have you. What's the most upset? You've seen Obama at an outcome of a game. I think it was probably and I don't think we want like for most of our Presidency the bulls other than that one. Derrick Rose Ron sort of mediocre team. And that's who he lives and dies with but the year that they. I guess it was the must've been two thousand and nine. The whatever there was some playoff series where the bulls or maybe two thousand and ten to ten must have meant the Bulls had a series. I can't remember this but they were like they were super underdogs. They went to overtime several times. And we all got together and watch game five which I think was the decisive game back. Then and the Bulls lost and he was quite with that the Everybody knows about the publicized visits. The White House visits by world champions but when it comes to NBA players. Were there like drop ins or things like that. Well yeah when players town. Yeah all the time when p players will come to town they you know as I mentioned they would often get a tour of the White House is like just the players would come and Obama. Usually drop in. They would every once in a while you would see there are some. He grew closer to over time. You develop friendships with you. Know he and Alonzo mourning the like the Obama family in the morning family became quite close morning golfed with Obama. Lot spent time in Florida together. you know Steph Curry and Ray Allen Golf with the president of on a fairly regular basis Gregg Popovich went in town would often have lunch with Obama like that happened a few times over the years like that was like a thing that quickly realized was as president. You can have lunch with anyone you want and there would be people like. Popovich found super interesting. Who would be if they were in town would come by and hang out for a little bit and so yeah they they will people always kind of hanging around or they had family and sometimes people wanted you know some of these athletes have their family random but want to introduce? Show him the White House. And if Obama's around he would say hi and so you saw it. We saw it a lot even beyond. Just you know. The annual visit of the champions you know thinking about it those those bulls years from like two thousand ten to twenty thirteen. Those must have been crushing for the rest of those are hard years. Yeah for the Derek Rose Injury. I mean I for a Bulls Fan. I must I imagine that was that was tough. I mean there there was a this is like Obama learned over the years that you like being president being a fan or not necessarily. You can't be a normal family president. And when he was running for president we were in New Hampshire doing an interview with a local reporter like a day or so after. This must have been the oh seven draft and the reporter at the end just asked Obama as a fan like what did he think of the bowls pick. And that was the year the bulls picked Noah and Obama as a Fan. A lot of very member bulls fans at the time. Thought it wasn't a great pick because it was duplicative of tyrus Thomas who they take in the year before and Obama said that and it made a lot of news both in Chicago in sports and I in no one had been a supporter of Obama. And I think even done it event with the somehow had some connection to the Florida gators for Obama or grassroots organization. You realize that you can't just pontificate on draft picks without some consequences when you're president in states must have been crushing jokey of the ultra competitive guy to hear Barack Obama Sega duplicity. You're a duplicate of I. Guess the right word there for that one. One thing we're seeing in have seen has been the the effectiveness of athletes as messengers. Even recently watching the instagram live thing steph curry did with Anthony Fauci on the corona virus. I mean a lot of people in different demographics watch that it seemed like during the Obama. Administration you guys benefited from that like that these athletes NBA players in particular. That Obama grew close with. They became really effective messengers with various things I mean. Was that something you think that just happened? Organically or was there kind of a mindset. Their these guys could really be be useful in delivering the kind of messages we're looking for. It was sort of emerging of two things which was sort of our understanding of how media worked in the you know Obama needed young people to win elections and so we spent so much more time than any previous politician had done. And how how do you? How do you reach people in one of the ways in which you do that is through influencers right and so that was happening and and athletes in NBA players in particular? Because they're the most famous of all American athletes. You know obviously in high on that list but it also we were in office at the same time and I think these things may be somewhat inner connected as NBA players sort of transition from the Republicans buy sneakers to mentality of Jordan in the eighties and early nineties to Lebron. Andy weighed in all these other. People who were taking public stands on important issues of race and class and and social status and there was emerging. There where you know we Obama. Had the president had a big program to Mentor. Young African American men and obviously new looking to reach that group of people. Nba players great opportunity to do that. When you're trying to get young people sign up for the affordable care act. Nba players are a great grew to do that because they break through their trusted. Listen to you know role models for a lot of people and the the combination of that desire from the players that influence that they have and Obama's relationships with them made it so they can do lots of funding interesting things that are like a gazillion videos with steph curry and the first lady promoting healthy eating and exercise that people loved and that was a big thing. And it's really excited to see Steph. Do that video without she. Because it's a great way to reach a group of people who may be the hardest to persuade to stay indoors and do social distancing and do all the things we need to do to keep everyone safe. I agree I think they reached a a demographic that may you could do one hundred press conferences and not reach that demographic in the way that they did in that QNA. There's been speculation that that Obama might one day. You want to be involved in sports and long-term like own an NBA team or become a sports commissioner. Can you see a future for him in a sports capacity? Oh I'm sure I you know I was betting I would say part. Owner of a team would probably be very interesting to him more than the day to day running of a sports league which seems like a very hard job you have to do the bidding of thirty or thirty two very self confident team owners and so I don't know that he's signing up for dealing with James Dolan on a regular basis but being the but I I would I would be. I would not be shocked to see you know. Sometimes some number of years down the Road Obama were to be part of a group that bought a team at him being a pretty public face of that team promoting team being involved in the philanthropic and community efforts of that team because it's sports is very important to him both as as entertainment but also as a connection between people in this in this very divided country. How do you think he would do as as kind of a visible owner of team because it's not been the easiest transition for visible athletes? I mean you know. Michael Jordan has struggled at times and his ownership role. I watched in a different role. Derek jeter certainly struggle in Miami and come under harsh criticism for some of the decisions. He's made do you think? Obama can handle the scrutiny. Of like you know. Why didn't you pay X. Player? An extra five million dollars. I think. Give our two guests the sort of owner he would be. It would probably be closest to Steve Bomber. Which is someone who has succeeded at incredibly high level in in a different organization and sort of took the leadership lessons from that. Which is you surround yourself with the absolutely best people you ha- you can and you go out of your way to get the best people and then kind of let them do their work and you sit above it and you will you will set strategy but I I think one of the things good presidents learn is to is to know what they don't know and so I can see Obama being involved in street like in broader picture strategy and thinking through and helping have a process whereby a team came to a good decision but not overruling the overruling analytics team to take a six seven big mammoth short arms or something. I think he would be. I think he would be an excellent owner because actually they can see would listen to his team and he would. He would have the ability to recruit the absolute best team of coaches. And you know GM's businesspeople in everything that makes it makes up against him and that's what at least from afar. It seems like bomber has done with the clippers. No I think that's exactly what he's done. I mean he fleshed out that staff with some of the best minds in all of basketball. He provided them with the resources then he sat on the sidelines and became the most demonstrative of owner. I've seen leaks so far. So if we get the Obama would be would be less demonstrative on the sidelines bomber for sure but I think they would bring a similar perch to owning a team so he wouldn't jump the trampoline and dunk at dollar. That's it seems unlikely Obama. I know at least it's fair. I WanNa ask you about the sixers. I know there are members of that organization that listen to this podcast on a regular basis. You're a a sixers. Superfan have been for as long as I've been following you on social media if the season is over. Dan If this is it there's no the NBA season. If you're the sixers and the off-season what do you do about? Ben Simmons and Joel Embiid. I think you have to keep in Simmons and Joel embiid together for at least another couple of seasons you gotta give like. They haven't actually had a chance to succeed because they've never built a full team around the two of them. They built half team around band and have a team around Joel and it has not certainly did not work this season for at least what we solve it and so I think you absolutely have to keep them both. You have them both under contract and it's the pieces around that you have to figure out and I fully understand that there are options are pretty limited. There was some of the contracts but the what we saw from Ben this season I mean here. You have someone who if you were to vote today would probably be in the top. Three of anyone's offensive player of the year voting. Who Really I think I think he really improved this year in a lot of ways obviously not in the one that people care about the most but he became a much better player in what I thought was a very difficult situation and he made even in our very frustrating shortened. Season may tremendously big plays at the biggest moments particularly defensive on the defensive end and you you. WanNa keep that and I don't think you could get real value for Simmons now. I think it's the pieces. If you WANNA have a team with Ben and Joel you have to have shooting and you have to have another primary ball handler. Which they do not have either of those right now. It's a great point because I I wondered from from a journalist perspective from afar why they broke up last year's team after a quiet Leonard. Four bounce three pointer is what knocked them out of the playoffs. And all the things you mentioned they had another ball handler and Jimmy Butler. They had a premier shooter in. Jj Wreck I mean as a fan how. How did you feel about the overhaul that took place last year? Well you know I convinced myself that I thought I could work and I. I actually understand why they made all the decisions they made but they added up at least thus far into an unsatisfying product and I understand especially after listening to Jimi Relatives Interview on Jayjay podcast. That bring him back. Wasn't really an option. I think and certainly giving him a five-year Max was not a great idea and so Butler was probably going to leave under all scenarios and I think it's fair to ask do you pay eighteen million dollars a year for. Jj Rak where you have a Ben. Simmons is cap situation kicking next year like it was easy to pay. Jj Twenty twenty two million dollars a couple of years ago because we were under the cap and and now like that's a question I under I understand the logic of the Horford signing because if you look at the numbers for Joel particularly in the playoffs. The sixers got destroyed when he was on the court. And you're sort of like it's half joking but you were sort of paying Al Horford for two things one for playing for the sixers and two for not playing against the sixers and so you understand. I understand how they made that decision. I think the the problems with it. And if you'RE GONNA lose Butler getting Josh. Richardson back on a great deal is great right like that's better than just losing. Butler for nothing and but the problem is all those pieces. Dole fit together and because of injuries they have. They played almost no time together. And so it did not they. Didn't I think the peace just did not work and so the question is what do you do? Now you know what can you you know. Is there something that can be done with either? The HORFORD or Tobias Harris Contracts. It seems very challenging. You know. Do you have assets to that. You can put put with those contracts to move them. That was sort of the problem with Tobias Harris Contract. Dry tears deal was emptied. Our wants very full cabinet of draft picks and so I think they're in a I mean some ways. They're in a tough position. The thing I always have to remind myself as a someone who went through all of those you know. Sub Twenty win seasons and all through the process is the sixers. We're GONNA win fifty games for three seasons in a row and be a legit playoff contender even if the season was frustrated. And the sixers. And so you like it's still. We're still much better than we thought we were before. It's just the frustrating is that we. It seemed like we had everything going for us. I remember you and I talking was right. After the sixers lost that series to the Celtics and and both of our both our teams were in very the Celtics is very different places back then and Kyrie and Horford. Were coming to Cairo. And Gordon Hayward coming back that Amazing Sacramento Kings and Memphis Grizzlies picks. We're going to be there for the Celtics. And the and the sixers had a bunch of picks and we enforce was still potentially something that could turn into something. Good if ninth grade and you know we're in a very very very different world now and the thing I do that I can stop ranting about the sixers. I have thought about where the sixers went wrong is. They tried to hard to win a championship too fast. And we're like you there's a world in which you could have suffered through some more bombs inland than Joel and Covington and kept. Jj around and let those Dario Saric like those. That was a really good young team. You could've you could've added some players to that like some veterans to it but without mortgaging the future for Butler than Tobias Harris. And then Horford right where you could have. You tried to build around the younger team and try to do something more akin to what some other teams that are. More are more willing to have sustainable success. Even if it doesn't produce a championship and I do think mortgaging all those assets at a time. In which you the warriors were still around as we knew them was sort of foolhardy like it's not even clear that getting Butler if we Butler and Harris and you would play the healthy warriors this that's probably not at beat them and so we sit here now and I do wonder what's going to happen if the season does not come back. We'll have some interesting decision to make. I think the Butler decision they made last summer will be one of those. What if that you have to watch? Because you're right. It would have taken a five year deal to get Jimmy Butler to stay. But if he stays in Miami and gives them like four all star Level Seasons. That could just be one of those head. Scratchers these safe. We'd done that. Maybe things would have turned out a little bit differently. But let me ask you before I leave the sixers here. Brett Brown part of the solution or part of the problem. I think I love Brett Brown. I think he is one of the best people in the NBA. I think he what he did over the many years. He's been in Philadelphia in terms of developing players holding a team together when they're when they have no talent just this like roving rotating cycle of G. League players is an end to be around to turn this team into something that is a legitimate finals. Contender over a couple year period is pretty amazing. And I the thing I I think I think. Nba Twitter in NBA. Media is too hard on brown because they blame him for everything and don't ever put it in the context of the like what they hand he's been dealt right like he had five different teams last year. He's got these pieces that he did not pick the don't fit together Joel. Being injured all the time like like he's like the like succeeded. He has played a very difficult hand very very well. I think the question now after this is has in watching this season and I've watched some of if not all of every game this season is has his. There's always a time when coaches time runs out right where they no longer have the influence on the team that they had before sort of you know it's just like they've worked together to log and that may be the case here and I think that's probably best manifested itself in the fact. That Brett Brown has asked Ben Simmons to shoot a couple of threes. A game and Ben. Simmons has not shot a three and a game in denial. When months after after that at without doing it and that to me says that there's a chance he may be has lost the locker room. And if that's the case then I think they have to move on. I just for everyone who's always like fire Brett Brown firebrand. My argument always is who is the Co. Who are you going to hire right? You're not getting like I think. He is in the upper tier of coaches. I don't think he is. You know spoelstra or Carlisle or Popovich or for any of the people. We generally think our Stevens who think of the best coaches in the league. But he's much better than the worst coaches and so who are you getting right? Who is the person who is not obvious that there is a nick? There's not a NICK NURSE ON THAT STAFF. Who's waiting to step in there? Maybe only pierce was still there. We might feel differently but so if he has to go the question will be who you gonNA replace him with. Isn't going to be someone who is enough of an innovative progressive offensive. Mind that you can do something with these somewhat. Ill-fitting pieces to make make the offensive production team more consistent particularly in the fourth quarter. Now I don't I don't think that Brett Brown is i. Don't look at him as an elite gay manager. One of the Better Exit knows coaching. The leading but there has been incredible roster toner over there at some point. You can only succeed with the ingredients that you have and there's not a coach in the league that could take team to a championship. That doesn't have shooting and they don't have shooting so ultimately it comes down comes down to that with with Brett Brown Before I let you go. You're obviously much more plugged into what's going on in the political sphere that most of my listeners are at this point. I know a lot of people. Listening are just hoping and praying that there's some way the NBA can come back and that sports can can ultimately come back. And I'm sure they're confused a lot of them watching on TV. Hearing the president. Say You know I? It was come back at Easter. But then he's backed off that we've got to get things back going again. You know. Wh where do you see the line being? How how does sports come back safely in this country in? Is there any way to determine when that should be? I think there may be a time to determine where games could resume without fans in the audience. I think that is something that could be. Potential possible over. The summer require a massive amount of logistics from the NBA. I've I've heard report. I'm not a huge fan. For reports about the Premier League. This where you would quarantine all the players together for fourteen day period so to ensure that everyone involved was was not carrying the virus. And you could theoretically do that in the NBA. I think are a long way away from anyone thinking. It's a good idea to put eighteen. Thousand Twenty five thousand eighty thousand people in one space together and so. I think we could get sports on TV. I think you can figure it out particularly in basketball where you're talking about. You know. Twenty four twenty six players. You know another dozen or so coaches trainers and staffs and then some referees. There's probably a way to do that. I mean watching these guys play in empty arena without fans would be such a weird situation like they play music the whole time like it just seems so it'll be like all those. Chris brickley videos. I guess but uniforms so but I think you could see that happening but I like I keep thinking about the fall where they think where they think. This could come. This virus could come back in the idea that you know hundred thousand college students are going to go to. The Big House at Michigan just seems impossible for me to imagine just the the legal risk for putting that event on in what could possibly happen from that is. I think we're all I think I'm not sure we will have sports as a in-person viewing experience as we have we as as we commonly understood it until there's a vaccine for the krona virus in weather that could be eight months from now a year from now or longer than that. It seems unduly risky to undo all the work we've done by having people get together. There was this story in the New York Times last week about they call it game zero but it was a soccer game in Italy. Where just letting eighty thousand Italian and Spanish fans all got together and they believe is they've gone back and trace where a lot of the spread of the disease in those countries came from that game because these people were in the same place for a long time so you worry about that happening in the US. And so. I think we could see sports again. And I for my own personal sanity. Hope that it comes back In some way shape or form but in the way in which understood. I think we're always from that. We still we still can't get people to stop congregating the US right now. I mean it's it's wild. You know scrolling through twitter and reading about the church in Florida or Liberty University and all these people. That just don't seem to don't seem to get it that that there has to be a sacrifice everywhere for this to dwelt and really stop you you you experience. Dan. A bunch of things from the inside whether it's the economic crash in nine and The the global pandemic of the Ebola virus. How bad is this compared to everything you've experienced? Where does this how? What kind of context can you give me about? Just how bad this is. This is the worst. This is worse than anything we experienced in two thousand between two thousand eight and two thousand sixteen and they'll want White House and it's not even close. I mean we're going to be like I don't WanNa be overly dark about this but the death toll of Americans is going up exponentially and so the it is likely that by the middle of this week by the middle of this week we will have surpassed the number of dead on nine eleven and if it follows the models people talk about we will be having you know a a nine eleven level of casualties every day for potentially weeks or months on end and the like. There's nothing like I was there for the h one n one flu. I was there for dealing with a bullet in Africa. And you're right. The economic the economic crash of two thousand eight and this is far beyond anything that has happened. I think in American history since World War Two in terms of its impact on day to day American life like the economy has stopped right like there were three three million people who filed for unemployment last week that is four times bigger than the biggest week of people filing for unemployment number since they started recording so like almost one hundred years and so like we. In fact people aren't leaving like there. Yes there are. People aren't doing the right thing but I think the majority of Americans are have been sheltered in place for weeks now and this is a fundamental change American life and the scale of the challenge. The both getting out of it immediately together economic thinker far exceed anything that we ever confronted in the Obama Administration. Yeah hopefully hope for the best I guess and people keep doing the things that are doing to try to flat curve as everybody talks about. Hopefully we can get back to to watching sports at one point and Dan. I can see your twitter feed getting angry at things non-political and more like angry at some sort of pick and roll plan that Brett Brown called out during game six of the playoffs. Or something says I would like to get to the point where I could continue to watch the sixers who score on a pick and roll for the first time in five years which I think is never actually happened so I like that is what I look forward to. I want to go back to screaming at the TV in the fourth quarter sixers games. That'll be my return to normal safe loving. Hey Dan it's always fun talking to you man. I appreciate taking some time to do this. Absolutely you stay safe out there.

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Chicago's forgotten gun violence victims: 'We've normalized hopelessness'

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

32:28 min | 2 years ago

Chicago's forgotten gun violence victims: 'We've normalized hopelessness'

"Tape up is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Wow. Hi, I'm Jonathan Kaye part and welcome to Cape up. At the start of twenty nineteen. Let's revisit our best episode of twenty eighteen our visit to the Angela mcdade and his Chicago neighborhood year to the day. He and his family were shot at on their front porch. In june. I went to the Aspen ideas festival. It's a week long. Incubator put on by the Aspen institute every year and people from all over the world by and large liberals and very wealthy ten. There are seminars and talks and symposia centered around ideas about how to change the world in the organizers hope people will leave Aspen feeling energized in actually act on changing the world. This year at the closing session. There was a panel featuring three young people from Chicago, Arianna Williams, Trayvon Bosley, and the Angela mcdade where they talked about gun violence and through the course of the conversation, you find out they and their families have all been victims of gun violence, and we're not talking just one time. We're talking many many many times over the first death that I ever experienced with my father at age eight lost my brother, Terrell Bosley, April four two thousand six and he was well known gospel today have to fight for those who are born in on born and those who have lost their lives to come vialed. So these kids who came to Aspen talk about gun violence. They they did this in the midst of a larger to bait about gun control in our country that was sparked by the victims of of the park land shooting, the media paid attention Americans paid attention by giving them resources and time and money. So at the end of the panel, these three kids from Chicago will they let this group. No that they needed just as much attention. She's not more dismay disappoint that you gave partly monetarily spiritually. But also, mentally we need to say because the reality of one is our multiplied that one time seven hundred and what are these kids? Took it a step further a few minutes later by just asking a simple question. But how many people in this room will actually come to Chicago? It's been a day in our neighborhoods because we can make that happen if he really wants to and my hand reflexively shot up in the air. But so there were so many other people's hands shot up in the air. I mean, it was a very inspiring moment where this young woman, this young African American woman who is unafraid to challenge this overwhelmingly white crowd. To, you know, do this. And then I want you to come visit my neighborhood and to see people actually respond. That's what was inspiring. You said it's redbrick, right? I wanted to get in touch with one of the kids from the panel. So were put in touch with DeAngelis mcdade who made himself available. So we got on his schedule. Book our tickets and often went to Chicago there this find here. We got to the Angelo's house. It's a west Chicago. Neighbors aid. Angela nice to see you again. Johnson might produce a Carol diangelo mcdade. He's eighteen years old just graduated from north von Dale college. Prep house, shall we? Let's get a microphone. Oh, yes. That's what we need to put as promised. Dangelo took us on a walk around this neighborhood. This way, you can see everything on Dangelo street. It's non like any other sort of tidy urban neighborhood anywhere on the northeast. Everyone knows everyone on our blocks is kind of like everyone knows everyone's business especially that how fair, hey, Mr. rove. I'm going to sell. Why especially this rose? Specially that house is his wife is MRs rose. Mrs rose is very charismatic. Whether you need her not she's always there. And then we get to the corner two years ago. There was this giant building here kinda replica this building and apartment like an apartment building with stores and the ground floor. Yes, sir. And they tore down one thing that you'll notice about our communities. There are a lot of lots a lot of Vanda buildings. Couple of years ago. The mayor ruled out that. We had to start tearing down the van buildings because girls will become a kidnapped and raped and people were getting murdered in it. Let's take a right here you guys and visit this I mean, this is a major avenue. This is Chicago avenue where on and that was when Dangelo started explaining what was happening and who was where and what it all meant even here. This is what they call drove. You can see that. There are people still stunned on corner. Those entities jokes. The north to the bill's corners. These are the individuals that utilize the drugs. So we're on the north side. We just passed market you outside of us was the support worth fires. So suppliers consumers the corner that we just passed Chicago avenue Ridgway, the youngest person out there who sells drugs is Glenn us old. The man loves to play basketball. He was he academically. He will sound in school. But I guess that he lacked a sense of community a sense of family. So what Dangelo told me that kids turn to gangs into drugs because they're losing their schools in their community centers at nobody cares. It seems that they turn to gangs before majority of these young individuals started to either fill droves stop going to the YMCA that was a school called Galapagos charter school. And so one thing that I can't say about. The academic institution the pride themselves by creating partnerships that allow students to stay involved an extra curriculum activities sending them to north western university. But sadly, the school is now close, and even though there's no there are no borders. No, no boundaries. There's no guard stationed there's no flags or anything like that. But he knows exactly where the boundaries are. Let's make it right here. Because if we continue walking straight towards vision on this block, right? You are will run into a a massive group of drug that was gang members not saying that they're bad, but things can get a little heated on a corner, especially when you're just walking through. So walking with DeAngelis through his neighborhood. Might not seem like it would be an issue for me. I'm black. He's black. We're both black walking in a black neighborhood. But DeAngelis neighborhood is in the life. He lives. There is not my lived experience. I'll make fun of myself right now, I was in a blazer in my jeans and a little pocket square. And I've got my my little bag with my notebook and everything in it. So I feel like I'm standing out like a sore. Thumb also Carol stood out because you know, she's a white woman in west Chicago, and I could not help but feel like I stood out because. African American but clearly not from around here. And here I am in their neighborhood feeling as out of place. Once we get to walking and talking as as Carol did. We make our way back to de Angelis house to the front porch where a year ago to that day gun violence directly impacted his life. It was actually evening is evening Tonks around six o'clock in the evening. Normally when our our family does not stop talking for nothing in the world. Because our laughs very loud. And so a friend of the family my grandfather's godson sued at the bottom of the stairs. And he says a gentleman is walking with his gun drawn. And he hasn't the white hoodie. And so immediately the porch silent in my mom's screamed down everybody in the house. In. My mother was the first one to run in the household, then became my twin sister. My grandfather had my little cousin in his arms while having his phone lead on his chest. In my grandfather through the baby like he was a football to my system. Our sister onto the house, and well one of the bullets ricochets off the bricks and then another bullet ricocheted office phone lifeproof cases are lifeproof. I ended up pushing my grandfather into the household. So I'm the last one in my grandfather was shot in front of his guy. And after being the last one, and I really didn't know that I was shot onto looking at my Granddad and trying to make sure everybody else. Okay. And I feel like something was burning. I rubbed against my my back of my leg. And I was like I'm bleeding and our screamed out I'm shot. I'm shot. My momma screams out stop playing with me low. I see my I'm for real. Again, the house and my mom calls. Now, one says she needs to ambulance and she screams these methods and shot my baby. When we asked to Angelo about who the gunman was and why the gunman shot his family that day. He told us. He was someone they recognized from around the neighborhood DeAngelis said that his family was not the intended target of the shooting. But that the person the gunman was after was a family friend and the gunman decided, hey, if he couldn't get him. He would get anyone he could and that happened to be Dangelo and his family and Dangelo said it took the police and an ambulance. Twenty five minutes to get to them. Got into the ambulance. They refused to let my mom in there with me for a while. And to I got to kind of screaming send that I wasn't going to leave. Without my mom was seventeen. I need a pair it they took my idea. Never brought my ID back. My mom gets into the ambulance. She's crying every bump that the ambulance. Hit. It hurt. We get there. I'm handcuffed to the hospital bed dot wouldn't win the lead detective walked into the room. And she said, oh, they said that your your gang member? And the question remains in my mind, implicit racial bias. That is the first thing that we get for African American or students of color period, people of color. And. No, one asked me anything the ARL made assumptions no-one talk to my mom. No one talked to my sister. Nobody talked to my grandmother. They thought they decided is the real word that he was a gang member. In all he was was a seventeen year old kids sitting on his front porch with his family on an August night. A victim of gun violence. Cape up is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price in the Washington Post brain studio, find it wherever you get your podcasts. Your hand, you you were handcuffed to to the this the stretcher, what did you think what was going through your mind? Then why why should I be a piece worry and keep fighting for Kenya? Nonviolence? This is going to be my reality. Peace warriors is an organization Dangelo founded after meeting former education secretary Arne Duncan in 2017. It was at a gun violence townhall and Daniel had an idea. The idea was to hire mentor and teach young people about non-violence, whereas Dangelo calls king. Ian nonviolence? So Kenya nonviolence is a philosophy developed by Dr Martin Luther King during the civil rights era. And so when Dr king led he led in a nonviolent manner, and he developed a six steps and six Kenya nonviolent principles and in which we utilized and we interpret to the modern day. The first is non violence is a way of life were courageous people. It takes a lot for individuals to not retaliate indoor not to be violent. Number two nonviolence seeks to win friendship and understanding in order for us to prosper as a community. We must work together. Number three nonviolence seeks to defeat. Injustice not people attack the force of evil. Not the person's doing me that means if someone is coming in with a bad day, and they have not eat in. What what can I do? Hey, let me give you a snicker or let me give you something to eat. I'm not gonna attack you because there's something wrong number four nonviolence holds that suffering can educate and transform. Sometimes we must step back. Even if it hurts and not retaliate because the end goal is much bigger than us number five nonviolence chooses love instead of hate sometimes as individual, this is a human nature and human characteristics. We internalize our anger because we internalize our anger. It's sometimes is dealt with an physical manner until if we can avoid that internal anger than we can process them can live in a peaceful manner. Number six nonviolence believes that the universe is on the side of Justice. I love to analyze this one because. Before Dr king died. Dr king stated I may not be here. What we get there? But we as a people will make it to the promise land until his basic words are interpreted to be what is done in. The Dr comes to the light one goal was around comes around. God is on the side of Justice. I mean, I think the Angelo's involvement in peace warriors and his sort of adherence to nonviolence is as much a response to. His day to day living as it is a path forward. What it says to me is that he recognizes that his his life. Is more than that street in Chicago that he's got he's got bigger plans and bigger ideas. And that if he could just hang on to this path staying on this path to show that I've lived through this. I'm living through this yet. Here's what's getting me through day to day. With the recognition that it's not the beyond end. All it is not the absolute solution. But it is the thing that is keeping him hopeful. The day when I was shot in our looked into my mom's is I looked in our cell with my mom was telling me every single day. Go to school. Don't be lack your dad. Become an educator. Back to your community. Most importantly survive. We have gotten to this cone in our lives. We we are only trying to survive. I don't know survive. I don't want anyone Justice alive. I want them to live with proactive purpose. Challenging difficult morning. Georgia's seen Florida were another community is disbelief shocked by devastating violence. This time at that Florida high school on Valentine's Day heavily armed swat teams. Armored vehicles surrounding Marjory stoneman Douglas high school in parkland, Florida there said into say that seventeen people lost their lives. Digging donations on. Let me ask you about park land. When the news park land, hit what went through your mind when former secretary of education Arne, Duncan gave you the costs. And hey, you have you heard about the Parkinson's? I was like no you have to tell me about it because I really want to start watching the news because it became so depressing. And he says well. How about do you want some peace whereas go down he didn't even get to finish his state. And I said, let's go let's work with a partner students there one day of trauma is our reality. And so we cannot allow the park from students to feel hopeless like we have for many years. So Dangelo and others from Chicago, go down to park land. And they go to Emma Gonzalez's house. And this was after Emma gave the speech that turned her really into a household name. Gilded house and Senate seats funded by the NRA telling us nothing could have been done to prevent this. We call. The the New Yorker magazine has a story about all of you. Which is when you all went down to park land. And you're all Emma Gonzalez's house, and you're sitting around the pool. Yes. Lord. What was that? Like she worked with open arms. We get. There was more students we separated from the dotes older dotes, and we wanted to have conversation just as young people who decided to go outside we go into a heavy conversation about gun violence. One of them asked. The park land is how many times have you been involved in gun violence, and they the way the story was told they all sort of looked at each other. And it was like, well, you had just this one time. And so the question came back from the park land kids, the Chicago kids won't how many times have you been involved and each one went down the lion. I can't remember who said what? But it was one person said thirty five times another person said forty times and other persons said twenty times the point they were making was this isn't just a one day occurrence for us. This is a live experience for us. And then a one young lady by the name was Sarah screened out. We acknowledge our white privilege. When see screamed that out then tire. Everyone was outside by the pool their side. Because we've had this conversation about white privilege because in the city of Chicago once shooting. Barely mixed news and for her to scream out, and we're just not having this conversation. You scream out. Hey, I knowledge my white privilege. We we were sitting there we all just looked around. And that's out. That means you see me. If you are willing to acknowledge something that you were born into and something that you cannot help and you're willing to work with us to help our community. That that means the world we used to prized by that by not just her screaming that, but by the fact that the park land kids from basically minute one were like we this happened to us. But we are not the only ones this has happened to we are reaching out to kids in Chicago and other cities who have been dealing with this a whole lot longer than we originally. They didn't reach out. We started them true. Correct. Our partnership just grew stronger. Our believe our partnership grew stronger because. The felt what our everyday reality was. And I use everyday reality because we've normalized hopelessness we've normalized gun violence is more coming to hear a gunshot rather than your own doorbell to ring. When we were having the conversations about working together in all of this Emma, Emba was more of the person that says, yeah, I'm ready. Let's do it. Let's do it. And we're just like we see that. There is something that we could possibly do something we can possibly work together on we've already been working in the city of Chicago. But we just wanted their blessing to work with them on the national level. Because one thing that we noticed is the March for life students do have the momentum. They still receiving financial support moral support ladders, but even their even their elected officials. Some of them were supporting them in Chicago, we didn't receive any of that and much for our lives. I watched your speech. There was a line in there that I wrote down because it spoke to the dynamic in terms of attention between the attention given to the park land kids in the attention given to you here in Chicago. And you said. Virus to Mr.. Till you nothing. Then bones. Why do you think there's been silence? Why don't believe because it's a everyday thing to believe that race plays a factor in this in this sad to save racism does play a factor. The parkland students are. Majority Carcasonne into wide whatever anyone wants to call it group that has worked to reform gun regulation. And so they're they're they get the tension. And because the Saudi has a start that gun violence does not always involve are white counterpart that this is unusual. We need to stop this. Now, what about the people in the back that have been fighting for many years? I've been fighting before March our lives, I've been fighting since practically being a baby my mother's been fighting with since she's practically been a baby. Forty seven years of fighting just going down the drain this restriction in in that answer. And. Is you said it's not directed at the park land students, but it's directed at. It's directed at society for what treating park land slash icago as the cause of the moment. And then moving onto something else. Practically. Yes. The thing. That's always been fascinating the lack of. Resentment the lack of bitterness at the sort of instant notoriety of the park land kids who lived through one horrific mass shooting. Compared to your everyday existence. And as you said before even your parents everyday existence where does the lack of of bitterness and resentment come from you? You would have every right to be resentful. How did I not extend bitterness? A believe my how happened on August. First of two thousand seventeen my how was my grandfather Lang in his hospital bed. My why was my mother not being able to sit on our front porch for several months. My why was seeing my fellow Pierce down on the corner. Because some of them didn't even have the parents could afford. Some of them having to grow up at younger ages. Mike how? Came. If I had resentment I would hate myself. My how we came. Sing my friend's mother screaming by her child died. My how became seeing immigrants Alice give her very first speech about the park. My how came meeting laying in my bed and having my sister to change my raps and wanting her not to go through the same thing those became a how because if I became bit. I will forget why I'm actually doing what I'm doing. And I don't want to forget that resenting them will be resisting my past resistant, my pants something that never wanted to do. It's been about five months since I first met Dangelo in three months since we visited him in Chicago. And you know, a few weeks after we left the Angelo more than sixty people were shot in one weekend, including the very neighborhood we walked in at the time. We're publishing this episode more than twenty six hundred people have been shot in Chicago in twenty eighteen which amazingly is about six hundred fewer than last year. And since our visit with Dangelo our country has seen even more mass shootings, including the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting in October and the Thousand Oaks, California mass shooting in November not to mention the mercy hospital mass shooting in Chicago also in November plus countless gun related incidents that don't even make national headlines and the frustration and powerlessness have only mounted and their best personified by. That mother in California who said her child survived the Las Vegas mass shooting, but didn't come home that night. And I don't want Breyer's. I don't want thoughts. I want gun control, and I hope to cut nobody else sends me anymore. Breyer's I want good control. No, more guns. Thank you. What that grieving mother is saying is something that people keep saying, and it's true. Something needs to be done about this problem, which brings us back to the Aspen ideas festival where I first met Dangelo and his fellow panelists and watch them challenge. The audience to do something to help them solve problems like gun violence. You. We're part of the closing panel. And basically brought that tent down people were raving about how the conference ended which ended not on a, you know, oh, look at us. We're solving the world's problems and everything is great. And we all agree with each other the three of you sat up there and read the crowd just point blank. Center the crowd. How many of you would be willing to spend a day in our neighborhood? Come to Chicago spend the day. We're used surprised by how many hands went up. Yes. Why one because individuals would say that they are willing to come. But in actuality, they won't come the just send it to police themselves to sometimes we feel as individuals don't care and some individuals don't want to actually make a difference three for those individuals that rose our hands. I'm still waiting on them to come. Still waiting. I can't hide anything on my face. Carol told me later that I had this look of disappointment. And I truly was I guess I am still at fifty one years old this little kid who actually believes when people say they're going to do something that they're actually going to do it. And to realize that. I was the only person to actually show up. Was it was disappointing. It was hurtful. It was. It really. I don't know. I just felt so let down by the people in that tent. When I saw all of those hands go up, and when she acts a question those hands went up sitting there. So you want to see my reality you want to live in mar world for a little while. That's why last and chuckled. And then one woman walked up to me. She said, I really don't want to come. I just wanted to see how many people raise their hand along with me. Why? And why in she walked up right before I walked over to speak with you. She was last one to give me a hug. I will not want to see a reality because that will make me feel bad about who. I am. And where I live that that lets me know that you know, that there's wrongdoing in the world that lets me know that you see what's going on you see what's happening. But raise your hand if you're not gonna come. They'll raise your hand. If you're not going to help me save the next person's life. Then raise your hand. If you don't wanna help save mind. This winter joined the Washington Post in its fight against hunger, homelessness and poverty with the contribution to post helping hand to learn more and donate visit post helping hand dot com.

Chicago Dangelo Angelo DeAngelis mcdade Carol diangelo mcdade Washington Post Dr Martin Luther King T. Rowe Aspen institute Jonathan Kaye Aspen Arne Duncan Kenya Chicago avenue Ridgway secretary basketball Trayvon Bosley Cape
Mayor Lightfoot Lays Out Hard Realities For 2021 Budget

Reset with Jenn White

19:02 min | 3 months ago

Mayor Lightfoot Lays Out Hard Realities For 2021 Budget

"I'm Justin Kauffman in. This is reset. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot gave her budget address day and she made no bones about the fiscal realities. The city is facing this year twenty twenty not only challenge our workforce it devastated parts of our economy. What has this meant to our city government revenues? Will you know the Answer Ladies and Gentlemen? It has been devastating today in the podcast we're going to help you unpack and understand the mayor's proposed budget. We'll talk with Alderman Scott walks back and Alderman Anthony Beale but first let's bring in WBZ. City. Hall reporter Becky. Becky. What was your first reaction to the mayor speech? Well. There was a lot to unpack I. Think you know before she began her speech they sent out. The budget itself and I've been sort of digging through a lot of it and my initial reaction really was the overall number of this budget. The size of it is twelve point eight billion dollars, which is big it's bigger. It's about a billion point to bigger than the then last year even. Most of that one point, two billion is due to grants so whether that's you know cares act funding federal grants and other grants but when you actually look at the budget itself as it relates to city services heart. That went down. So we do see some of those cuts reflected in there and as you heard from the mayor trying to even get that. Was a difficult task that is gonNA come with some cuts to positions, cuts to people, and like we heard property tax increase an increase to the gas tax as well as an increase on a cloud computing. So those are sort of the big high level highlights that are sticking out to me at this point in time and she mentioned in the speech and she seemed to drill home. The idea of recovery in sacrifice and and the main takeaways here we're talking about a property tax hike some of the other taxes you mentioned, but also layoffs and furloughs and service cuts. So so let's walk through that because when we talk about layoffs and Furloughs we knew that was coming, but that's something that spreads across cross city services from the city workers, police and fire. Correct so it looks like that's only about three hundred fifty layoffs as you heard her say. So it's a mix of closing positions that are vacant that were budgeted for and maybe previous budgets and also lay offs, and then you heard her talk about furloughs it wasn't specifically outlined in the budget materials at least not that I'm seeing but you heard her say five day furlough for any union city employees starting with herself. She sent herself be taking five days on paid this year in twenty twenty one. So IS GOING TO BE WE'RE GONNA watch how they can wear those positions land look like about a third of the positions are gonNA come out of the police department. Again, I, don't know how many actual officers that's going to be because it could be a lot of vacant positions that then they won't hire for essentially think about retirements people leave they just won't replace them and so. We'll see how that all well. Is through other spots here on talk about too because talk about the the the property tax increase of ninety, three, million dollars. She made sure to stress that number to save for households. Average two, hundred, fifty, thousand it's fifty, six bucks a year and she said the line again to sort of downplay the property taxes impacts going to have on Chicago families, but waited an hour to mention it exactly that was. Exactly. What I was GONNA say she. She seemed to kind of shove that in right towards the end but people here, property tax in you know obviously live in the city Chicago that's a it's a sticky subject because it's not just the city Chicago with Cook County as well. I'm when he talked about a ninety three, point, nine, million dollar property tax increase will that have a significant impact on the budget and is that something that you think that city council right now is looking at saying, hey, that's sacrifice we got pushed us through. It's not a huge amount obviously, if you're talking about the twelve point, eight, billion dollars it overall. But it compounds over time and increasing the the LEVEE. To get you know, let's ninety, three, ninety, almost ninety, four, million It looks like also that they are counting on an additional about sixteen million that will just come from new property coming online. So that's not necessarily an increase that you homeowners might see, but it's just new properties coming online I'm again, I'm sorting through all this in real time, but I do think when it came down to it, the gap was so big that if pull up all of the levers, just a little bit not one single lever. Too much if that makes sense. So they're also dipping into reserves thirty million dollars in reserves. Some might argue that they should take more out of reserves, but it's a little bit of that a little bit across the board to search spread out the pain if you will across a number of different. Levers when when we talk about this budget would details in it do you think would would likely get pushback from City Council at the end? The mayor made a big strong statement toward City Council essentially paraphrasing saying we did a ton of work on this so you should pass it but but the idea being, what do you think would likely get push back from city council? Well I think that obviously property taxes because they're going to just be generally unpopular you know not going after a bigger increase hopefully is a way for them to sort of get Alderman on board, but that's going to be the thing that constituents are going to complain to them about. So I think that's a big part of it. There's also I. Think going to be a huge discussion around public safety funding police funding, fire funding. You know the departments that deal with public safety. You've got a group of Alderman very progressive on the of democratic socialist side of things that really have been pushing for the you know the idea of defunding the police or shifting that spending toward different public safety practices and. Then, you also have a lot of men who want more public safety spending and in certain communities targeted violence prevention, and you know the mayor you hurt her in her speech I'm not I'm not I've never been for the defunding of the police, but I think that that is going to be an area of the budget where there's going to be a lot of discussion and potentially it's going to be you know when you think about an election year there single issue voters there's going to be like, Alderman who you know their vote is going to hinge on. That becky bb Willis wbz city politics reporter on the line with us. Now all Scott Walks back in the thirty second ward, he is the chair of the Finance Committee over city, Council and he joins us now Aldermen welcome to the program packs for having me. Yeah. So so your reaction to the speech I, think a lot of us realized the you know the damage that Kobe has done to not to star city budget, but across the US and Watching what other cities are doing, and then what we see in this speech in terms of the budget I, feel like it's a pretty good budget to take a look at and you know there's a couple of areas of concern but I think the mayor and her staff have listened to Alderman. Listen to constituents and in many of these aspects and are going to try to put a good budget on the table. Well, that's just that's my next question. All what are the areas of concern? Well the property tax you know and I think that the issue here is we're not seeing a massive property tax increase like we have in the past and a lot of the property tax issues obviously stemmed from the changes on the assessors office Fritz, KS come in made a lot of changes where unpredictability was the way of Joe Berrios and you know all the tapping in by lawyers trying to make those changes it's really done damage to the property tax system the mayor offering up a CPI I think you know in my area gives people predictability so that a tax payer knows what they're going to get over the next four or five years you know incremental. Now you know nobody likes property tax increases, but. I would prefer it that way instead of getting hit hard every other year one of the issues in the budget is about. Refinancing and restructuring debt. This has been something that the city of Chicago has done well, not just the city Chicago, but I would think most municipalities have have really been part of all budgeting processes for for for the recent times something you've been against an and passed a previous administrations. What do you think about the idea of balancing the budget by refinancing and? Restructuring debt you know in the past, the reason I was against it was because it was scoop and tossed it was very damaging to debt service at it was done during periods of high rates and I think somewhat to the detriment of our our well, actually very much to the detriment of our ratings and the ratings really dictate how are debt-service service plays out. Sweeping these ageing accounts that have money on them going after these. Tens of millions in contracts this year alone that have been consistently just reapplied every year I think we're GONNA see a lot of savings there that the agencies are looking for us to to fix all walks back with us here from thirty second ward also chairs the Finance Committee for City Council. The one thing that's that is questionable for me is basing any budgets moving forward revenue streams and that's A. Big Part of this as well. One, hundred, eighty, five, million dollars. How do you do that? In the middle of pandemic? We've seen how much estimating in the budget and thousand twenty about revenue stringent at I mean obviously the the budget decimated by in Nineteen I. Don't know if you're gonNA see anything different in two thousand, twenty one. So how how fiscally responsible is it to be talking about revenue? In the middle of a pandemic. I. Think you have to talk about him because when you're talking about him over the last several years, we were looking at issues like A. Or payment in lieu of taxes that's essentially asking nonprofits around the city like academic institutions or hospitals to negotiate with the city to find a better way to add to the property tax coffers to the revenue coffers in a fair way. But what we're looking at here is looking at a tax for cloud tax increase. Tapping into the rainy day fund that's thirty million and I I would be very. Careful in tapping into the rainy day on which many aldermen and and people that we talked to outside of government say, Hey, just tap into the rainy day fund that's typically kept for. Government operations to continue in the event of a disaster. For instance, you know New Orleans gets hit by a hurricane without a rainy day fund your government shutdown So you have to have that rainy day fund maintained. It also hurts your ratings and you pay more in debt service if you just swoop and take it all. So we can't really do that increasing the tip surplus has been something I've been happy. To see that they're really tapping into that. So that's kind of where the revenues are coming from but we would like to see the state really step up to the plate as well. We haven't been able to expand the service taxes. We haven't been able to see any other action at the state level to give the city, the authority that they preempt us on for some additional revenue options. So we're working with The mayor's office on that but it's it's important to continue to expand it in a way that doesn't hurt taxpayers that doesn't hurt businesses. That are already struggling. Now, my last question for you quickly is this a plan that city council is going to get behind them and we're reading the tea leaves is this something that your colleagues at City Council or going to pass this approach right now is managing through a pandemic I think it's a good approach Some things that we discuss and argue over and we have to be good fiscal stewards at this time with all taxpayer dollars, we can't hit any. Industry or tax payer in particular, and we've we've got to be cognizant of of the the moment that we're in. All of them it's got walks back thirty second ward also chairing the Finance Committee and City Council. Alderman always a pleasure. Thanks for coming on the program. Thank you. Have a great day. Let's now turn to ninth Ward Alderman Anthony Beale. Alderman your reaction to the mayor's proposals. You know we are in tough times and this is a very tough but. But. At the same time now is not the time to basically eliminate six hundred and fifty positions out of the police department. When we have the highest crime that we've had in recent history you know we're not solving murders. We know that the city still in unrest and I think now is not the time to cut back on policing. Cutting six, hundred, fifty positions there would we're going to look at three hundred fifty positions from non exempt exempt employees, and refinancing over a billion dollars and so basically, our kids and grandkids are going to be the ones footing the bill for right now physical responsibility. Let's do this. I WANNA play a clip. 'cause talked a lot about the Chicago Police Department in and some of the issues that are facing policing in Chicago over the summer praising the work of police officers I also reject A. False narrative that is either fund. The police are fun communities literal defunding means cutting officer position in a department were close to ninety percent of the budget is allocated to personnel are police. Officers are not our enemies and she went on to talk about officer. Walker she showed emotion when she was talking about a Chicago child who was shot and killed a but she spent a Lotta time humanizing police officers in the speech rather than talking about why people are protesting to police your reaction to them. Again that goes to the trying to repair the relationship. You know because right now there's a very tension through relationship between the administration and the Police Department and the Apple TV and I think that was just a a way of trying to repair the relationship But again, you know anybody can give a great speech but the proof is in the pudding you know you have to get out here and show the actions that You know we're out here trying to support the police and and really lift him up for the job that they're doing and cutting six hundred fifty. Positions in my opinion is SORTA defunding police because you you're eliminating those to come in and fifty positions that were in the budget that should have been field, and it just goes to show that we we have not been hiring police over the past year year and a half, and so you know when you look at the crime, a lot of that has to do with some of that You know before the mayor gave her speech I sent the press release out dating we need to put in fifty million dollars for violence prevention and you know. She says she's she's adding to violence prevention to the tune of total twenty, five million. But. When you look at the work that like Chicago created doing out here under. Arne Duncan's group they're spending fifty million dollars a year, a private money to violence prevention and the fifteen madonna communities and I do have one of them out of the fifteen. The roseland community is the only at the showed a reduction of thirty, three percent in violent crime overall in the city of Chicago. Nobody's asking us what are we doing out here? How is it that your community is the only? One that has a thirty three percent reduction in crime. Well, it's because we have a partnership Arne Duncan and his group they're spending over ten million dollars a year in Roseland. We've been able to create jobs and opportunity but nobody is calling saying, Hey, what are you guys doing different out there come in and talk to if let's see what we can do to mimic what you all are doing but. We hear. Cricket. Wonder. You know when you talk about the investment because this budget to speeches, obviously making a positive speech and trying to spend the positive that property tax came in at the end of the speech but but really talking about the investments and she did talk about violence prevention and then it's understood in this pandemic. Time that we live in when it comes to fiscal budgets that the commitment to what was supposed to be for violence prevention money is much less and obviously that goes to again that not unexpected because we live in a world right now where there is sacrificing some of these services aren't going to be there. But what do you say to the fact that early on in when she was elected she said, I'm Gonna I'm GonNa Start, this office we're gonNA take melon and we're nowhere near that. Well. Again, it just goes to show you know campaigning is different from governing You know once you get into seat and you look at the reality of what's going on you know that reality check is something else and so That's why you have to be very careful when people campaigning that they. You know you don't get caught up in being sold a bill of goods and sometimes that's what happens. Once a person gets an office and they see the reality of what they're dealing with. You know you can't do everything that you think you may WanNa do but at the same time, if you work with others on creative avenues and different Approaches you can obtain some of that You know you all know I've been trying to find what we call a cop house. I have a corporate donor that's committing two, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars a year towards a pilot program called the it's called a cop house and it has shown is reduce crime and other areas in the country over fifty five percent. I've been trying to push this at no cost to the city Chicago and I can't get the city in the mayor's office to sign off on it because it's not their idea. So there are innovative ways that we can start doing things, but you know we have to really be serious about inclusion. Regardless of how you feel about a person. If we're serious about saving lives. You have to look beyond yourself and your personal feelings and do the right thing. Okay. Automobile money question if the if the vote was tomorrow, would you would you vote? Yes. On this budget absolutely, not absolutely not because when you look at it again, you know we're looking at mortgaging our future when you look at borrowing, that's not making tough decision that's taking the easy road anybody can go and say we're GONNA, borrow. To keep people from having to make those tough decisions, and that's what's happening and and most of my colleagues if they look at it from that standpoint that you know what we're not making the tough decision, we're taking the easy road and we're borrow our kids future way, and that's that's what got the city into the problem that we're in. Now we're in this problem because we're kicking the can down the road and right now we just kick a barrel down the road. Ninth Ward Alderman automonbile. Thank you so much for joining us today and reset. Appreciate it. No problem. Thanks for having me. And that's Today's reese. If you Miss Mayor Lightfoot budget address earlier today and want to hear the whole thing, we're making it a bonus podcast today just check your feed and it'll be in there and of course, make sure to watch this podcast for more conversations about the budget as it gets debated among the entire city council. I'm Justin contacts for listening and we'll catch you right back here tomorrow for more reset from WBZ Chicago.

Chicago City Council Police Department Alderman Anthony Beale Alderman Scott becky bb Willis Arne Duncan Finance Committee for City Cou reporter Chicago Police Department Finance Committee Justin Kauffman Lori Lightfoot WBZ US New Orleans
Wyatt Cenac on Americas Problem Areas

At Liberty

30:27 min | 1 year ago

Wyatt Cenac on Americas Problem Areas

"From the ACLU. This is at liberty. I'm Emerson Sykes a staff attorney here at the and your host. Today's guest is why it's an the host of Whiteson and problem areas a television series now in its second season on HBO in the show, snack mixes, monologue, sketches interviews and documentary footage to address America's persistent social issues and to explore possible solutions satirical, end informative problem. Areas. Takes a wide-ranging look at policing in season one season two which is airing now deals with education. You may also remember snack as a correspondent on the daily show from two thousand eight to two thousand twelve we'll discuss his current show in his body of work mixing, comedy and social Justice White's, and it's a great pleasure to have you with us. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you having me Braschi it. So let's start with problem areas. What compelled you to make this show? And especially why. Now, I think making a show one of the things that myself and my head writer, executive producer, Halley haggling. We talked about in our. Experience working at the daily show together was the news cycle so often you find yourself chasing it and their stories that you see and because the new cycle kind of burns through them so quickly. You find yourself saying, we'll wait I wonder if there's more to that story. And you know, when we talk about something like police reform and police accountability in the national conversation there moments where the rhetoric gets so heated that it feels like trying to even change something seems almost futile, and when you actually go into communities where people have been affected by something like police misconduct. You see that on the ground? Those people are neighbors, and they have to figure out a way to make the system work. And they may not always figure it out. It may not always be the way they hope it can be. But you see. People trying and you see people actually doing the work. And it's particularly unique I feel like for comedic show to do such deep dive on issues as you mentioned spending a whole season not just the whole show or a whole segment, but a whole season on education and on policing getting far beyond the headlines to real deep ties. How did you decide on the topics that you wanted to go so deeply on with policing? It was something that we talked about early on. I think we thought about it. And we were a little nervous on our side Halley and myself thinking, well, we're in season one of show and to try to tackle something like policing could be really challenging. Nobody knows who we are. Nobody will answer the phone when we call and say, hey, we're an untitled HBO show with why it's an act remember that guy. So we were kind of like well. We should do something that seems a little maybe a little easier to get our feet wet and HBO they were really supportive, and I think believed in us when we maybe weren't as confident that we could do it, and they were fully supportive in. I really have to give them a lot of credit for saying. No, no. We actually think it could be good. And this is the conversation that people are having right now and to spend ten weeks discussing and could be a really interesting thing, and you should go for it. Well in by season two certainly people were picking up your calls. I mean, you have an amazing roster of experts like Nicole Hannah Jones, and even Arne Duncan, the former secretary of education, you sort of explicitly bring these experts on to discuss these issues, but I'm wondering from your part as the host how much research do you have to do in order to prepare for these interviews and does the show. There's definitely a lot of research. And I think a lot of credit has to go to. Our research department and our producers and the AP's, and then the writers also do research and so the first half of the season on some level. It feels like a bunch of people in an office trying to work on a collective term paper. I think what's nice to me about some of the people that I get to talk to they know way more on these subjects than I do. And I would not try to pretend to be an expert on policing or on education. I'm just a ding Dong who happens to be telegenic enough that HBO decided to take a chance on him. And so whenever I get to sit down with someone like, Nicole Hannah Jones, Jesse Gopi piano, Arne Duncan or Diane ravage it's an opportunity for me to ask questions. And so all those interviews are honestly just. Me having curious conversations with people and trying to learn and I'll often come out of those interviews with new ideas and new questions that I'll bring to the writers researchers the producers, and those can sometimes send us off in directions that we had initially thought we were going to go down. Well, it's an interesting format as well. Because it is clear that you're sort of learning along with the audience from these imminent experts. Was there anything that you've learned that was particularly surprising noteworthy or any sort of stories that have stuck with you. I don't know about surprising. I think when you're looking at stuff and especially stuff with education. What was interesting is how much of the things that we talk about that we would like to see an education. How many of those things have existed in educ? Gatien in the past. And I think about things whether it's something like a school, providing, you know, health checkups and dental care to students, especially to students in low income in rural communities, there was a time when that was much more common. There was a time when school lunch there was a little more care put around it. There were times when we thought about learning and educating kids not just simply to have them focus on standardized tests, but to follow creative pursuits. And so I think to me what's interesting is to see that these things that we're talking about. Now that people sometimes bristle ad and say, well that sounds radical and difficult in progressive to a degree that I don't want to move in. What's interesting? Is you look in you can say, well, we'll know this thing actually existed thirty forty fifty years ago. And it's not that new of an idea, you may have even been the beneficiary of it. So why can't you extend that same basic decency to another generation? Well, it's interesting that you bring up the historical context of some of these deep problems. But when you're dealing with such complicated and troubling issues while also trying to be entertaining. And even funny, I'm interested in how you conceptualize the balance of humor information on problem areas, and in particular, whether it's different or similar to how it was done on the daily show. I'm thinking over particular example from season one where you were addressing first amendment free speech rights to protest and the importance of avoiding police brutality and excessive force when exercising the right to protest. And then from there, you cut to an ad for what you go the shoe Cousy which is for protesters whose feet, Mike, get tired. It's a shoe with a jacuzzi inside. So that juxtaposition of police brutality and the right to protest with the shoe Cousy. How did you make that type of decision to me? There's always been this relationship that exists in comedy where it is this balance of informing people and amusing people you can go back through the history of comedy. And you see that whether it was political satire as it existed in political cartoons or looking at comedians. Whether it's Lenny, Bruce or dick, Gregory, Richard Pryor Joan rivers or so many other comedians who had a unique voice, and we're basically using humor to get people to maybe better. Understand that unique voice. Joan rivers was one of the first female comedians to be playing in nightclubs. And there is a sense of humor that she has to bring to that. But also sense of informing people. These are the experiences of a woman as I stand in front of this crowd, that's predominantly men, and you need to understand that. So that you can laugh, and so I think for me with the show, we always try to be aware of how much are we informing and how much are we amusing? I think some of that roots back to the daily show and the daily show so much of what we did. And so much of John's ethos was we want to punch up rather than punch down. And so I think even if you're talking about something like protesting and thinking like well the challenges of protesting when you have to. Do it a lot? You're gonna be walking a lot and your feet are going to get tired. And I think having people on staff who have gone to their fair share of marches. We can talk about those things and sort of laugh about those things that. Yeah. After a while your feet do hurt. And there's maybe something that to an audience of people who have also shared that experience. They may find amusing, and it might give a little bit of relief to what is a growing number of reasons to be outraged in his country and reasons to take to the streets in demand change, really an interesting way of framing is that the goal of the show to both inform and then also provide relief as you're speaking. I was thinking also about if there's any downside to people getting news and information from comedians. It's obviously a very powerful tool to draw people in two. Give people relief as you said. But do you see any downside to the approach that was taken by the daily show and other shows and was any of that why you chose to structure problem areas? The way you did. There is definitely a challenge. If the idea is to simply be relieved for to simply be a panacea for people's frustrations that can create a problem if people then wind up feeling apathetic because they feel like I'm mad at the world. And then I watch this show, and I laughed about my problems. And now, I don't have to be mad anymore. I don't feel like our approach has ever been. All right. We're going to make you laugh and now you don't have to think about this anymore. The fact that we are spending ten episodes on something part of the design of that is to say, okay, we're not walking away from. This. If you come back, and you tune in next week, we're still going to be talking about this, and you should still be frustrated by this. You can be amused by two, but hopefully, you'll look for ways to move the conversation beyond simply us giving you a chuckle on a Friday at eleven PM. So as you said, the new cycle is feeding as horrible news on a daily hourly minute to minute basis, but a lot of the problems that you're talking about are also much deeper and longer term. So I'm curious how you think about the work of sort of woke comedian during the Obama era when you were at the daily show versus now with the current administration and problem areas does it feel like a different job. This idea of informing and entertaining at the same time as their different set of responsibilities in the current context. That's a good question. I don't know if I can. Consider myself, a low commission, let someone else labeled me that. I don't know. I feel engaged at least. Yes. I mean, look my background is a comedian. I would say has always been in social commentary more than the political going back to my first standup album through all of the albums I've ever done and then to the work I did on the daily show in now with problem areas. My focus has always been more on the social than the political. And I think regardless of who is sitting behind the resolute desk, social issues are the things that don't really have a party affiliation. The conversations we're having around immigration today are also the conversations that some people were having during the previous administration in many people weren't having. There are things that you wish would happen. Federally to create some kind of sweeping reform, but we've seen regardless of the administration that hasn't happened. What you do? See I think where it becomes a social issue is when you actually get into communities, and you get on the ground you see the nuance that exists outside of a place, like Washington DC and outside of the cable news networks whether it's legal defense team's going to the border to try and help migrants work on getting through their paperwork. So that they could hopefully get sanctuary here. Whether it's cities declaring themselves sanctuary cities in trying to build protections for people who work and live in those cities. Whether it's just neighbors who see what the person next door is going through and try. Trying to help and a damn in whatever ways they can or schools doing that where they're making sure that okay? We know that this student might come from a family that's documented what is it that we're going to do. I really appreciate the distinction between the social issues in the political because it's quite noticeable that you're avoiding sort of political back and forth, but digging into these longer term social issues in one of the issues that comes up again. And again in your work, not so much in problem areas yet, but in your stand up in your web series, and those sorts of things is this you have gentrification you have a web series aka wide snack. Where your character is a black gentrify in Berkeley Lynn, which resonated with me as a fellow black gesture fire in Brooklyn, but thinking back to problem areas in the deep dive on policing, one of the things that really stuck out to me is that your character in Kyiv snack is a vigilante superhero. So he's. At nighttime going out, and he's a crime stopper, wearing a very funny costume. Why did you decide to include a black crime stopper patrolling Brooklyn in your show was was it something about that character that you particularly identified with the web series as somebody who grew up reading comic books and being a fan of comic books. There was a little bit of if I were a vigilante crimefighter superhero. What would that look like what would representation look like if I was the one who put on the mask and went out and did things. And so part of the thought was yeah. The eight year old may who always thought it'd be cool to dress up like a superhero there was that part of it. And then I think the other part was really trying to play with this idea of superheroes. Rose and vigilantes and crimefighting, and what is it when you actually dig under the surface? If you read comic books, so many comic books just kind of start with a bad guy, robbing a convenience store, and then iron man or Spiderman decides to come in and stop this mugger at you don't really get into. Well, what's going on? Why is this person actually robbing this place? What's the impact of all of this? What is the human cost to all of this? And what does it actually mean to say, okay? I want to be the one to keep my neighborhood safe. Whether that's as a superhero, or whether that someone who's choosing to be a police officer. What is that actually mean? And look like because there's a part of keeping your neighborhoods. Safe that is restorative. And there's a part that's punitive, and I think to me with the web series. It felt like is there a way to comedic -ly check in with that idea of choosing the punitive approach, but using it outside of the police, and what that looks like for someone who's a person of color who's doing it. Well, now that you mentioned in it's really interesting to think about one of the unique features of the viceroy, who's your vigilante alter ego is that the the visor has a lot of conversations with the perpetrators which is something that you don't see a lot aside from the mega villains that are recurring characters just the random muggers who get apprehended don't tend to have a long conversation with the superheroes. So that was a really interesting choice as well. Yeah. I think that to me was trying to just inject a little bit of humanity into all of this. At these people aren't monsters, and they're still people whatever choices they've made are the choices they've made. But how do you then way that and balance that and recognize the humanity of that person? And also think about it with regard to okay, we'll this person's been strangling joggers in a park, and then okay? That's scary weird person. But also when you start to talk to them in. It's like, okay, they're just kind of a sad weirdo. And there is a connection point there. And perhaps maybe if we thought more about those connection points if somebody had tried to connect with that person earlier, maybe they could have helped route them into a direction where they weren't a park. Strangler humanizing, the park strangler is a very heavy lift. But there was another scene. Also, where there was a sort of young black, man. I think I can't remember. He was selling drugs or what the crime he was being stopped from was. But there's a sort of long social dialogue about the state of Brooklyn, and all that sort of thing as the two of you sit on the curb and wait for the police to arrive, but I know you've talked about your sort of familiarity with Brooklyn having grown up visiting crown heights as a kid visiting your grandmother before crown heights was cool. And I can't help it. Ask in years coal when my grandmother was sorry gremlins, pretty cool. I'm sorry. I don't mean. Uncool. I mean, it wasn't hip and all over the blogs. All right. My grandmother didn't have a block. But so in the closing credits of your special, which was entitled Brooklyn there's a shot of a place called the tip top lounge if you actually been there I have. So I want to ask you about your experience there because tip lot for those who are not familiar is a very old neighborhood bar in what was for a long time, predominantly African American and afro Caribbean and African also neighborhood in bed stuy Brooklyn, and now is heavily populated by you know, hipsters a lot of white folks have moved into the neighborhood, and I had the really strange experience of going into that bar with some of my friends who were in the white hipster category. And seeing these sort of black retirees hanging out in their bar as they have done for decades and feeling deeply uncomfortable. Have you had those types of similar experiences where you think we really sort of invading space in a way, that's problematic for. Me when I've gone into tiptop, there's another bar Franks lounge. They both feel like aunty uncle bars to me, they feel like the places where. Yeah, if I were to go in there, an aunt of mine would grab me by the ear and all of a sudden I'd be sixteen again. And she just be saying what are you doing in here? Exactly. It's not even that. I don't feel welcome. It's that I don't feel comfortable there because it feels like it's their space, and I feel of a generation that shouldn't be there. I wonder if for young for young ish white people if they feel a similar thing if they were to walk into like a DIVY Irish bar if they would share that similar this feels like an aunty uncle bar that I feel with a place like tiptop, and I wonder. If that's the case if that's perhaps why they may feel more comfortable in a place like tiptop. I can't say that whenever I've gone into DIVY Irish bar. I feel more comfortable. I feel feel uncomfortable there for another Senate Bill way, less comfortable. But yeah, I feel like that is the consciousness that people move through and is unique obviously to both the collective experience of one particular race. But also, the individual experiences people have what I also recognize is a space leg that is in a neighborhood that is struggling with rapid gentrification. And at some point it becomes this weird kind of question that you start asking yourself of is it good that they're getting this business and they're getting some cash before their landlord ultimate. Really makes the rent so expensive that they have to pack up and move out. And then the bar will be bought out by someone who can afford to be there who will perhaps keep the name and some of them memorabilia on the walls as kitsch is that better than them having that space and being able to keep the space with the small clientele that is growing ever smaller as people get pushed out, and then they get pushed out too. So. Yeah, just kind of raises all of these questions that I feel like I know I don't have the answer for and I mean, I think on one level it's maybe speaks to a larger conversation about just how resources get allocated throughout cities that perhaps if there was better resource allocation, there wouldn't be neighbor. Hoods that fall into economic blight to the degree that they do that you see gentrification come in as the only way to have any sort of urban development. It's definitely a complicated pushing pole, and as you said tiptop lives to fight another day for better for worse. But this theme of the complicated dynamics of gentrification in race that you pick up in Brooklyn was also evident in what is probably my favorite thing that you've done which is medicine for melancholy, which is a two thousand eight movie directed by Barry Jenkins who also later did moonlight. And if Beale street could talk my wife, and my first date was to medicine for melancholy. But the oh, yeah. A special welcome. I appreciate it berry. And I are the reason you're married. Thank you very much for saying that I really probably it and my two kids. Oh, it all to you as well. And I hope those children's names are berry and why. If only if only this phone, call is over conversation is over, sir. Well, I think one of the things that struck me about medicine for melancholy is that you seem to be really ahead of the curve. This was a movie about black hipsters in San Francisco. It felt very different from anything else around. And this was talking about gentrification in San Francisco in two thousand eight of course, in two thousand nineteen we're so many pages past where we were then and the things that activists were worried about have come to fruition. And then some and I'm wondering how do you consciously try to pick projects that provide this kind of alternative narrative or highlight under analyzed issues? Well, I'm in with medicine for melancholy most of the credit for that has to go to berry berry wrote that script and directed it. And I was just kind of a fortunate passenger to be on that trip. And you got to write a fix yellow over San Francisco. I did. Although I think we started on a fixed. And then I switched to. I think I was on a single speed. But a free wheel single speed. My fifty skills are not good. I get tired real fast. I don't even stop. I just kind of like jump off the bike and let it crash. But as far as the projects that I've done whether it's my fanned up, whether it's the daily show, whether it's primary areas to me, there's always been this element of using comedy in using creativity. As a way to have a conversation about something. And I don't know if I could do something without putting some sort of conversation piece in work. I've always been curious the have conversations with people about things and talk about issues. That's always gonna be. That's always been something. That's been a part of the work that I've done. I think even if I've done something that's lighter or sillier on some level. I can't help. But add something to it. You know, if I go see marvel. Movie. There's a part of me that can't help. But think about what the racial implications of it are or what the social implications of it are the unique perspective that you bring in the connections that you draw. I appreciate them. And I know a lot of other people do to and it begs the question what's next either for season three of problem areas or any other projects that you have on the horizon is there anything you're particularly interested or excited about doing next right now, we're still finishing up season two. And so my focus is really there. It's very fortunate in that I get to make show that is something I've wanted to do for a long time. And it's a lot of the things that have been kind of knocking around in my brain for a while as soon as he's in twos over I'm going to sleep for a week. And then I'll maybe start thinking about. Other stuff we'll enough. So we can all at least look forward to the rest of season two on HBO of why it's the next problem areas. Why thank you very much for coming on the podcast. It was a pleasure to talk to you. Great to talk to you as well. And thank you for naming your two children after berry. Little berry little lie. It will be so pleased to hear their names on the radio. Appreciate it really means a lot to me. I'm sure it means a lot to bury I'm assuming the wedding was a medicine for melancholy themed wedding. I assume that every aniversary you all just watch the movie twenty four hours straight. You know, you don't have to answer. 'cause I I don't want it to be weird or anything like that. But giving me some good ideas if nothing else. Okay. Yeah. Because it would hurt if you were to say, no, we don't do any of those things, and we would never name our children's berry and why. Their names. Why thank you. Appreciate it. Thank you. Thanks very much for listening. If you enjoy this conversation, please be sure to subscribe to at liberty wherever you get your podcast and rate and review the show. We really appreciate the feedback until next week piece.

Brooklyn HBO berry berry HBO ACLU Whiteson San Francisco Halley Justice White Emerson Sykes Joan rivers America staff attorney Obama writer Nicole Hannah Jones ding Dong AP Arne Duncan
8-bits and riots

Bird Road Podcast - All Points West

55:59 min | 2 months ago

8-bits and riots

"Vic i certainly hadn't thought of it in a good ten fifteen years forgotten that john cena was a rapper. Oh no. I actually did know that i that i was very aware that because i remember my dad used to always bring it up to me like you'd probably you'd probably like this new wrestler guy. He's a rapper. That was this thing. Yeah so it really stuck in my add a lot of jewish dave. This bird road is is bird road. Had an idea of. When is the next time that you think we can record together. Let's give a schedule. Let's let's look at our cal's right now and if you're right now we could probably do. I dunno sunday monday. Yeah yeah okay. let's call it sunday. let's call it a sunday a week from now. What day will that be dave. That'd be the twenty seconds. Okay so my point is that i think that One fun thing that it might be interesting to do and see if anybody actually response to this. We're going to open up the phone lights. Okay how about that. We'll say ten o'clock eastern time on sunday night if you want join us get online. Hbo doesn't have anything good on right now and even still not even hbo anymore. Hbo max so you can watch it whenever you want. Nobody i mean are people still watching things at the moment that they come out dave. I don't think so. I think that's a long gun that's long gone. That's exactly what i was thinking. I was just watching. American utopia and that came out like two months ago. Is that a movie. what does this is. The david earned thing the. Oh yeah. I wanna see that. Yeah did you. David byrne made another movie. Is that like a musical. Look what is what is it. it's actually literally musical. It's kind of like what they did with hamilton earlier this year where they film the live show but it's it's directed by spike lee the movie version even though it's just a filmed concert but Yeah it's it's really cool. I saw the talking head. Yeah actually that's the the reason i'm watching. It is spoiler alert for awesome movie year about three episodes into season six. But we're going to be doing that movie for the documentary. Pick for the nineteen eighty-four season a weird thing to think of it as a documentary. I actually recently watch that. What is it called every. Here's crazy or some shit. what was it called of. stop making sense. Stop making sense. Stop making sense was great. It's the best concert movie. I never really think of the documentaries. Because i think documentaries like have to elevate or like there has to be narrative right. Yeah i i think the reason they picked it is because we haven't done music film yet and there was really no notable documentary that you're for them to do surprisingly and that just seem like the best fit so well so look back to the point. Do this go to byrd. Wrote a borough podcast dot com. I'm gonna put up there a little sign up sheet. Okay just like a little spot where you can put your name. Put your name in you. Don't even have to say anything. I i wanna try this. This is something new. Things are weird right now and weirdly calm and i feel like people wanna talk about what's going on and maybe just need some support or just conversations that aren't prepared interviews. We've been doing a lot of great prepared interviews. I think lately Define we been doing a lot of great interviews. Dave can be enterprising just shoes interview. Somebody and put it out on on the feed like no one stopping. I might have to make one of these days. I'm gonna make it really surprised if a if a bird road up popped up on my feet and it was just like juice. Dave interviews. I don't know some community organizer mandy. Patinkin community organizers. Great to feel like you've probably end up interviewing but anyway we want know it'd be so lose it. I want to surprise you with a big celebrity interview. Like i wanna have like like like on a squad. Cast call like this just dave. Our guest is joining a pop on it. And it's like joel cohen. Or something or had this so many that i could get giovanni ra- busy. Yeah that's a good. John cena so yemen. I think that people could use a little bit of conversation Support a little bit of talk. Therapy things are weird right. Now how are you doing. Tell me about where you're i am. I mostly the usual but also like really really really expecting that that next shut down the happen here in nevada. I'm i it just you could taste it. It's so you know it's just so right there then since like just got covid on friday. Yeah so that only only helps to reinforce it but but yeah mean. It's actually been a kind of strange week for me. Because i have seen friends one at a time but twice this week after not seeing anybody since march. You actually engage in your. I like one on one contact with other people. Yeah is very strange. And it's not like i planned like fucking. I'm i'm just going to see people now. It's just so happen. Those both of these things happen in the same week but I feel weird about it. Even though you know i was. You know distanced as could be you know. But i definitely feel weird about it. I feel weird about any kind of shot one of those groups. One of those things that you did was hung out with will friend of the show former guests on the show. That's who got married. So great will for tying the knot and becomes not getting getting made into an honest man for once in a sense. Right right yeah dallas. How was the ceremony was it was it was it. Did it give you any. Was it like a harbinger of what you're worried about coming up with your belated upcoming wedding nuptials or whatever. The eventually will come one of these days. Well they they were able to do the Scaled-back twelve person wedding. We've got one hundred and fifty person guest list to try to fit in. We'll see what happens in may one and a half people will die because if your wedding love that you're laughing at that may chuckling away at if it's not over by may is. Is it ever going to be over. I mean to say that You know the week has created us with a much. Needed news The two mondays in a row now. Monday is becoming the new drop press release. Drop day for every major pharmaceutical out there today last week. Obviously we got news. That there is a Pfizer lead the program for a vaccine. That was coming online. Any you know any day. Now i guess whenever these fda approvals find their way in the mail or whatever and that one was. Have you read much about that or know a little bit. Yeah yeah and then ninety days as well that one was ninety percent effective. And they say that the drawback to it is that it requires intensely Temperatures like i think something in the order of like negative eighty degree temperatures. You can't just get in a normal freezer. You need special freezers to be able to even do that so The good news today. Is that moderna. Pharmaceutical company has another Vaccine coming online. That doesn't require. That still requires refrigeration but it can be thawed for a longer period of time so it can be thought for thirty days and still be effective right so i mean i don't wanna be the guy who's like trying it on the thirtieth day we roll the dice here. I'll take what. I could get seriously but the interesting thing i read about the first one though the pfizer one is that it uses a different science and i i didn't write notes about this or anything but it it. It doesn't use like the traditional vaccine of like putting a a weak version of the virus living carter. It doesn't use it at some different kinds of technology which you know maybe a little more People would be open to or something. I agree. Would it be. how funny would it be. If like trump lost and all this hour you know the sour Feelings or whatever like this spilt milk crying over and then it's like it turns out that it was when it goes through discovery or whatever and they pick apart the the formula it turns out that it was just bleach like yeah. It was bleached this time. Sorry he was right. I mean he turned out to be right. it was the it was bleach. I think that's a good chance it works. I think that would rule It wouldn't rule anywhere near as much as these things actually coming online. The one that i read about today will be thirty million from what i read at least thirty million doses that will that are earmarked for the us The one from last week is fifty million. But that's not. I think that's That's about the globe. So i'm sure the. Us only gets a portion of that right and then something in the order like one and a half billion in the next In the next year in twenty twenty one how do you think they should have that out. Like if you were put in charge of that first of all it would be a disaster mass. It was me they'd just be holding. You would be like shoving it into the. Don't ask me. I won't even back to the movies. You'd be giving it to animals off. Yeah definitely animals. I just in case like people would be leaving you voicemails because you somehow in a world where you're a high ranking decision maker at in the The centers for disease control. You would still have to go from eleven to three to wax trax and cover the shift just because there's no one else to do it. It's still have to do your normal job. I picture of the funniest. Like i try to think of like what the highest ranking job. That you have in your life is that you would still have to go to wax. Trax carve out time. It'd be like oh we hired this guy. He's going to be like the director of know director of new artists acquisition at sony music. But he needs every day off from eleven to three and his travel schedule is severely impacted. He can barely travel so he can't leave. He's tethered to a five mile radius of las vegas of like the west south decatur. Las vegas nevada not to derail this too much but on wednesday i have to go into extracts because my dad bought two thousand blu rays. But they're all in like one of those cd books and so. I'm going to have to match up the disks to the cases your tattoos. Just i feel like he's really banking on the next unbeatable format because he made he made. He made out so with records. He's like this is just flipping. This is flipping one hundred percent. That's obvious who's the person that's out there. That's getting flipped on blu ray collections. And who's the person that's like. I'm going to start up this particular. This particular media right now is the year of our lord. Twenty twenty and i'm going to do it with a purchase from an old desert jew. That's that's probably way more than i intended on budget budgeting like this is the way that i'm stepping my foot into the blu ray world because i've decided that you know five hundred megabytes per second streaming is just not good enough. I like it's never going to be good enough. No no i go media for the win. I imagine that being a real diminishing market i don't know i i would say so but somebody wants to leave your your inheritance so i feel like we're kind of at like this moment of acceleration and i had asked you to talk to prepare to talk a little bit about. Did you watch anything about the saturday night. million maga- march. Did you pay attention to any of that happening. There wasn't really a lot of in depth coverage. I haven't seen much about it. yeah. I haven't seen that much about i. I saw a couple of clips here and there You know some here and there but really there has not been that much coverage as far as i could tell it was a fast story. It came and went unlike charlottesville. Of course charlottesville. Somebody died as much more tragic. And i think it was also much more shocking for us in seventeen like the. All that stuff was shocking. It was like whoa. What the fuck. This is actually happening. Everything that all this trump shit is. Actually you know going on. I think i think people. Are you know they're burnt out after everything right now. So you think that like it can't cut through like it would take loss of life. Yeah yeah. I think it would take something big. I mean. it doesn't seem like unless you've got something here. It doesn't seem like there was like a big story to come out of any of that. So there were some stabbings. I mean there was some There was one beating of a of an hour if he was a proud boyer but whatever. He was trump identifying in some way he was just the first clip. Pick him out with was clipped. Short did Starting fights with people and Or i it looked like he was in the caught up in the rush of a bunch of counter protesters and he got knocked out and he came up bloodied and out of it but then a longer clip came out and it showed him being an agitator. A real asshole and you know a few high high profile. What's the word like like well. Viewed heavily viewed heavily trafficked whatever anecdotes that came out. And there's blood. There's always going to be blood. I mean these days. That's the way it's going to be exposed But i don't know. I feel like one of the things i thought would be funny as as we are in like the first full week of trump being a lame duck president and officially on the way out one of the things i was thinking about. Were different words that entered the lexicon during his time as president. At how much stupider. They made us like how much worse as people in like like. Just think about what. I try to think of is like me me and you but mostly me because i think about myself Lot sure but like think of us in two thousand fourteen listening to this podcast And how much gibberish will it would sound like just the rantings of idiots it would sound like like babies talking saying words like maga- and cunanan and like i mean like wh. What are these things we know. Now i think we're so lame for carrying so we would think first of all in twenty fourteen. If if i i would i would not know what to make of myself. I guess is my point right now. I would be like what happened to me my like my bad now. I would know it'd be like week. He doesn't like obama. Now he thinks obama's president that is that is weird. Like in retrospect part in retrospect is looking back in every thinking that obama was like a great president actively wasn't in so many ways. I knit and it fell. I'll just felt so comfortable in like kind of calm and like you were just like. Oh well things are working. You know i pick up the newspaper and it's like a story about the department of homeland security and it's just like oh everything's working fine and you're like oh well good to check in every now and then i suppose and just put the paper down and like i don't know i think it's not a it's not a corruption or corrosion of what i am today. It's more of a failing of what i was. What we were yesterday. I would say. I don't know yeah. I mean not to get like a lesser of two evils or become a centrist type. Or anything like that. But it's like how could you not be swept up in the excitement of obama back. Then you know i. I don't think we knew a single one of the criticisms. We may be now have back then. I don't think they were on our mind even a little bit. I don't think we were ignoring those things. I think we just didn't see you or know of those things yet. And the other thing was that republicans hadn't become they. Were the party at that. Point of ted cruz Which was like annoying. Sort of like obstructionist You know they were really the party of mitch mcconnell yet even though he was the i think the guy really running things but it was ted cruz at the time was like an upstart new voice on the scene. Don't forget ted cruz. The guy that pushed the government shutdown. He was the The the aggravating force on the right for many of the obama years he was the one that staked out new further to the right Positioning that re-centred what. The center was right because the center before twenty ten was i mean it was always sort of neoliberal in nature and it was always sort of clinton ian or you know whatever. The standard bearers of the democratic party were but when when ted cruz and sort of the larger tea party which has sort of that again in other words that has sort of lost meaning the tea party sort of staked out whatever position they staked out on the right. They effectively dragged everything with them to the right and that meant that obama had to or chose to. He didn't have to do anything but he chose to modulate what he had ran on and he chose to be less than what he promised he would be. He made the choice to capitulate left. And right he mostly to the right. He turned into this big soul. Subtly at least to those of us who were just kind of like floating comfortably through that world. So he did it so subtly that you didn't even really notice it until november seventh of two thousand sixteen when you started looking for all these aunt answers right. That's another thing that we we talked about that in the past before i've interviewed people and had conversations with this. You know domestic anthropology that we do now where it's like the phenomenon of like parachuting into cities and trying to figure out like what happened. Why did you vote for trump. Why did you continue to vote for republicans in two thousand eighteen in the midterms. Why did you vote for him again. Why do you continue to support him at this. Wide eyed credulous It's not just reporting. It's also like just generally like coastal liberals like just with this curiosity like barely masking disdain. You just shake your head and your eyes are wide open like how these people man these people and what you're thinking inside is like these fucking morons say that that's not okay to say I don't know like. Would you be recognizable to you. Six years ago. I mean obviously you lost like a hundred and ten pounds but yeah that was a big difference but yeah i. I don't know all of that was a setup for like little a for so two to take you down a peg. I don't know i. I don't feel like at least in the political sense. The the amount that i that i am engaged. I don't think it's changed that much over this time. You know. I feel like it's everything else that's changed a little bit. The fact that you know podcasting is such a big thing. Now whereas before i couldn't imagine doing anything but music's just music you know that that's the biggest change i think for me. Personally yeah podcasting is kind of a big thing like with you something that we wanted to do for years. Yeah and we were kind of aimless in the way that we wanted to do it right. Yeah i mean we just wanted to do something. That's all that match wanted to wanted to hang. I don't know man. Like and podcasting is having moment and who knows how long that'll last and you know i love. I love the fact that we're just you know. This thing was born this little specific. Show that we're doing was born sort of as a response to not necessarily donald trump but like all of the All of the sort of sirte that searching for answers that ha- that came after trump. Yeah like and the way that you and i were like making fun of everything at that moment like the from the year that he was running all the way up into the first year after he after he won like just what. We found to be ridiculous. And the way that i guess people were reacting to it and the way that all these people that we sort of thought we had some sort of kinship with that we were like culturally aligned with turned out to be people that we didn't really have much in common with which was a lot like kind of like our our our friendship when we were there was always these like in our larger group of friends when we were younger in our twenties. Early twenties late teens. In your case because we started. That's when we started hanging out and There was always dislike smaller subgroups within our groups. Where like we loved them. But like privately. Like you. And i would look at each other and be fucking more like you know. There were like smaller fissures within there and i felt like there was sort of like an extension of that too when when when all this happened sure. Yeah i'm that's why we ended up eventually just the two of us at the end of every given night. Now we're thinking and we're we're jewish. They're going to go up. But i don't know i feel like this is a weird moment of like of dread of free fall of like it's almost scary to be hopeful right. What if i don't like what donald trump believes the dry the hairdryer on and all of the vaccines or something like that. Like like literally anything could happen. I feel like any. I'm reading the craziest. Arne duncan who was like the former Formerly he had a few positions but he was high up in the obama administration. And the the the Believe in that like health and human services have to double check that. I forget what the fuck arne duncan did but he hit his whole family has been right now. He's like tweeting about. How no you. I'm sorry he was the secretary of education. I thought he was health and human services but he was the secretary of education under obama. And i just for some reason. I don't know why i i thought. I thought that he was health and human services which made it even more ironic. That he's tweeting about like his whole family has cove it. And if that guy that's has it and he he's about how horrible it is. He's like it fucking sucks. We're all on our ads right now. Like and we're all healthy. We're all in great shape. We're all like you know generally younger. And he's like an had our fucking or having our asset to us by this fucking disease that it makes me look around at miami. I you scared being in vegas or like i mean do you do you. You've you've already done so much like you've already changed your life to make it where you've mitigated out. All the risk committee mitigate. I stay home. I stay home as much as fuck impossible and i i. I'm fine with that. I like i will. I will continue to stay home even after things are okay. I i really want to go back to the movies. But it's like i like this. This thing that i've carved out for myself but i was just gonna say i at that wedding this past weekend. Some people were talking about how they had covid like a month or two ago and they're talking about something i'd never thought of but the whole no taste thing and they're saying that when you brush your teeth you don't taste the toothpaste and it's basically like rubbing sand on your teeth. It's just the correct. That's like that alone so it gave me shivers So i'm reading something about. Maybe you can illuminate. Although i know you don't really follow the super local news that's happening on a district level in your neighborhood in your In your city apparently one of your county commission racists has gone so badly and some asshole like former police. captain is making such a stink about it that That they have to throw out a bunch of ballots and like recount or something like that and the trump campaign and the entire conservative world is latching onto it. They're saying see see. This is a proud like apparently There's i wish. I wish i could remember the names off the top of my head. I just read it before we came into the studio to record. But yeah like what's going on there. Yeah i i hadn't heard about that. But i'm not surprised because i know that they had already been latching onto nevada as like you know a place where something was going to come out. There is gonna be all this major major voter fraud or whatever so that doesn't surprise me that they finally found something to us as their their big cat by you. So it's about plane about the crash. I think that was so loud. You hear that. no. I didn't hear it on my end. Why would just plain. It sounded like it was right over my house. But anyway yeah. That doesn't surprise me. I am curious to look that up though afterwards. Let's see what else is going on in the news. Dave what else you wanna talk about. You know what. I how chick-fil-a you guys have in town a lot. They've just started popping up over the last year's lucky solo. I've only gone like twice. Is your big fan. I'm a big fan and it was honestly one of the reasons that i packed on so much weight. And how are you doing right now. Are you haven't been mentioning. You're on autopilot right now. I'm doing fine down. Like i passed the thirty pound threshold. Okay awesome So that's thirty pounds since september. Second there you go. All two and a half months. Basically september october. Well once you get your chick-fil-a they drilled. Chicken nuggets are absolutely okay. Eat them i. I looked it up. And like what i've been doing is like i've only done this literally twice once in north carolina during that month that we were standing there in september and then one time. Since i've been back in it was more than a month ago. I just get the fried once. I just do that. Because they're not that bad they're like there's something like twenty eight grams like ed. I'll just. I'll just take that for a day and then i won't eat that much else i don't i don't eat that much else. Shows you know my move now as we as we transition into caddo talk of For the bird the bird. keto talk. what you are missing out on that. You don't have in your neighbor that you would love that you don't have in In las vegas probably maybe over in east. Las vegas are places like what we have here. the one that that's near my house is called blue sky. Blue sky is a place where you go. You buy food by the pound okay. It's it's a cafeteria a bunch of trays that make like a an l. Behind glass because only the ladies are allowed back there to serve you the food and you go there. It's fifteen different types of chick in ten different other types of meat a bunch of carbs because his latin food so it's like yuca and potatoes in its rice and it's beans and it's no pasta it's latin food and then but what you can do is you go. You get a nice big box of whatever meet you're in the mood for and then you just get a side salad and they have the side salad pre-prepared in like a little tin and you just get that i want to go. I want and and it's one of those really light iceberg lettuce side salads with like a little bit of oil vinegar on. that's it no no like I guess a creamy shit. None of the like i mean ukrainian. It's fine but But yeah that sounds great. That sounds so good. Yeah i come visit. Yeah we're giving hit it up and it's like a. It's like a whole vibe to you. Go in there and it's old school. It's like a you know it's how long did you ancelotti so super. It's caribbean latin. Cuban it's which means like incredibly clean very clean and not a speck of dirt anywhere. How long do you think it'll be before i can come visit again. I mean tickets are probably cheap right now. You can come before. I can come visit again. That makes them that. Actually a lot of a lot of things have to line up. I'll judo flip. That question back to you. How do you process when you read that. Everybody who's paying attention to this stuff in measuring this stuff says that flying is fine. How does that hit your ear. Like where it's like there's been no or there's been like to attributable cases From from the spread of a you know from airports and flying been virtually no evidence that there's like mass spreader events that That apparently broadly airline travel and flying flying is fine. To do how do you. It doesn't mean that in a little bit of sense it doesn't make any sense none. I mean if that's the case why not the movies not even fucking concerts. Like i don't know. I don't know i don't know it's fucking baffling. I've no idea. I mean that's recycled air in an airplane. And everybody's busting on an thirties. Disgusting has their feet out everybody's rubbing their wet shoulder on you everybody's food onto the plane from the shitty air airport falls. Yeah first of all like you get in there and you feel like tense because you've made decisions that have made you fat and now you have to deal with that and then you also have to deal with the decision making the other fatty that are sitting next to you and there's no way to be comfortable. If anything more than like an hour and a half flight it feels like shit and and then on top of that. You have to wear the masks and the fucking face shields and the whole nine yards summer. I'll say summer and it'll probably be me. That comes steve. That goes without saying. But i hope soon after that i could come to you so we do a live show when you come here would do a live show during the week of your wedding possibles. Maybe Would we do a live show. Are you guys leaving out of your wedding. Are you going to do the move where you jump right onto a plane. We haven't decided yet. I mean we had to cancel original honeymoon right to heed your whatever she gets going to tropical balaia. Yeah that she'll like there's rats there rats complain about the most mundane things. They're like there's going to be a faucet that takes like three minutes to turn hot and you're to be like this again gotta deal with that s just counting the minutes so you know what the perfect places for your honeymoon vegas where literally everything works perfectly and everything is like a fuck in a conveyor belt. That's one of the moment you last city in the world the world even you like would you have to deal with things that are like cute and rustic. What isn't this work talking. Thing just doesn't work me. Play with your michael out tonight. I liked that. Abc you're into it. I need to adjust playstation five and xbox are how how do you get one you can't. They're all sold out forever for wife. Seems like a bad way to make it. Look so bad though like i just i don't i don't get this generation. It's just the same exact literally the same games it's the same assassin's creed the same call of duty. The same word is their word in gaming for those the big jump once once where you went from any s to sega and it was like immediately like whoa. This is different thing. Yeah i mean like i. i don't know if there's a word for no like just a revolution though they would usually say when it's going from a big new generation to the next one is definitely revolution right now. There's like three that i remember the right. So any s when you went to sega and Like sonic the difference between sonic the first sonic and mario brothers was so big right to a little kid little ten year old me or whatever nine year old me i was like. Oh my god. This is completely different. I don't remember the jump from. I know that. I owned in atari. But i don't remember the jump from atari. It was huge. It was also huge. I think it all comes down to art was just like squares moving. Maybe you remember the this term. It's a computer turn. Is it like newton's laws or some- someone's law is it re diminishing larger concept in in in in circuit circuit capacity out like How circuits can Double every year. They should or the law states that they double in size and power. Yeah so you know the every year supposedly. There's been some debate over how true that law is because like the last ten years. Apparently it's not holding up very well. Yeah well everything is still advancing numbers wise. But it just doesn't seem to make that much of a difference and that and that goes for computing as well. He's not just hit a point of diminishing return exactly. That's what i mean like like even broadband internet and stuff like that. It's not getting that much better. Even though technically one hundred gigabytes per second is a shitload more than one gigabyte per second like less than ten years ago. You know but it's not actually getting better and you know same for storage speeds and all that kind of stuff. It's not actually getting that much better. Must be a point where that shit like bumps up against other things though chip bumps up against like when something is small and modest it exists within its own little carton Right within its own little within. Its own little container nintendo. A nintendo game was small and its boundaries were easily defined you know like you saw the edges of mario and he was like a little. Was that a bit right character. And he was very easy to define. And then you get to metal gear solid right in ninety nine whenever that came out like i'm trying to think of i didn't play a lot of games after high school so i don't really remember that. Like metal gear. Solid is a game i played. Yeah and then at that. Point solid snake is like. I don't know what you call that. What was that like polycom graduates but yeah it was like sixty four bit or whatever or something holy shit. That's so much different. Ps one was ps two. I don't remember man but You're like okay. Wow this really different. But what is the difference between like the the solid snake in that game to whatever solid snake is and whatever. The most recent medicare came out a bump. He starts to bump up against the like the limits of perception. Yeah like a a a really good-looking cartoon or a slightly uncanny valley you know digital character and then like how really different are those two things like. That's the weird thing about this generation is is i. I don't know how interesting in this kind of stuff. But like the technological aspects of our more exciting than the games themselves the games just look like rehashes of same shit over and over again but if you like sit and watch a youtube video of what actually makes playstation five different from playstation four. It's it's actually really cool and fascinating like The big thing this generation is called ray tracing and what it basically means is that instead of having like program in shadows or light reflections and stuff like that. They just happen naturally like as if it's a simulation of real life and how's that look it learned it or something i it's it's a whole bunch happening all at once. But they don't have to take the time like in the old days if a character cast a shadow is because they drew him with shadow shadow. And that's it wasn't actually making a shadow in the game world and this if a light source hits a person it's going to cancel shadow so that create a ruler lodging right there's logic behind it all and it's all acts like real life necklace reflection shadows like smoke thing that you sent me the unreal. Engine yeah yeah yeah. What was the thing you were posting today. You said something about a movie. They decided to get rid of the real people the real elements of all in the unreal ella on apparently they did some scenes of the mandalorian in that and now they're going all the way to a full movie that they're just completely shooting within this game software and in theory they can make it completely look real and like you won't miss anything about real people but when you do that are you eliminating the need for like reams and reams and reams of korean animators and are you just like you're jumping into an engine you're basically doing create a world like et like you're basically going from hewlett you can it's like going into excite bike and just building your own horse sure yeah and probably in the process killing more jobs you like i love excite by the game ruled came rule i just love i was stupid i loved like just making big jump after big jump after big jump just that's and that's why you did that because you're awesome the wrong on because you're not know something very soothing about that i would hit the big jumps and just be like look them i think everybody did probably and now they all do the same thing in mind crafts so so like but then how do you explain the movement of raw the most most popular things the biggest things the little fads that come and go are the opposite end of the detail spectrum. There's things like that among us game like that are just i guess puzzle games and i'm sure there's still probably a billion people out there still playing tetris. Let's me that's the kind of games that i mostly play. But even those games have gotten so refined and it's so weird you'll look at them side by side with the older versions of that and if you look at them they look so simple and basic but they actually are so much smoother and like even in their beta little structures. There's so much smoother and better looking and high-resolution even though it just like blocks it it's crazy what they've managed to accomplish with so i don't know again i. I don't know how we got off on topic video games. I guess you dominated the show area figured out how you judo flipped me now but like okay. What is it called the unpredictability of what When the dimensions of a thing we'll touch each other. Like sometimes a game that i loved because the tactile feel to it was going way. Back against the atari days pitfall Like i knew that if the guy's edge of his hand even scraped the rope he was going to grab it right right. And then there's the opposite another atari game frogger frogger. It felt very inconsistent. You would get run over when you thought that you did the right thing that feel that you have that that of like. Oh am i going to get out in front of the truck and have enough time to do another hop. Sometimes you didn't. Sometimes you did just didn't respond. And then sometimes you get run over and you think you already cleared the fucking thing and i don't know like i feel like that's the difference. Remember how the big joke and the documentary that they did about how bad the et game was a little. I mean you. And i were like six years old. I had that. Though i did too i had to. I thought it was. I told her the story. I thought that it was broken. Yeah i told my mom. This is broken because back. Then i don't know games. Were like fifty bucks. They are now. I assume they're probably yes there. Sixty i think but yeah but fifty bucks in the eighties. It was like oh yeah seriously. So like i told my mom i swore up. And now she's now she's looking just fucking idiotic six year old. You just don't know what you're doing here but you know. I think about the way that i almost immediately dismissed my six year old daughter these days or whatever. She comes to subserve complaint. I immediately assumed there's a dimension that she's too stupid to understand like no you have to lift it and then push or something like i but to her credit and to my discredit. I'm wrong a lot. It turns out that she's right way more often than just james had sister. J just seems like a sitcom dad thing. Underestimating yourself or address within your daughter. Yeah on the more. Yeah so could lose. Twenty pounds kevin james size So i but anyway. That's how i was right. I was like this is broken telling you this game doesn't work. It's a problem. We should get our money back. She's like you picked it stupid. Your faults play. Go play it and you couldn't get past the first board. There was no way to go. There is nothing to do. they broke the apparently. There were other boards that they programmed into the game. Nobody can you can't get to them. There's no way to get be an. Et was just a triangle with like a square on top of it. And do i don't even think you were not. You're elliott who the fuck wants to be elliott. I want to be the alien game ruled. Though on on atari twenty six hundred was spiderman. Game is freaking awesome. I do remember that that was a really good game. Yeah the spiderman game. Were you climb up the buildings. Yeah i remember that you fought green. Goblins yeah i just thought of that because spider man is supposed to be like the big game on playstation five. And so i'll give you another good one wild away hours on. Oh shit actually. Maybe this was the intendo. I don't know i was little. I don't have like remember like an easy memory for that whole arab golden axe. That is genesis knowing that was genesis. And and that was an arcade arcade. Yeah i used to pump used to pump so many quarters into that shit at the The apollo mall in monticello new york and I used to go wild on that fucking thing The golden axe was so much fun. I like being the little fat fucking elf Or no he wasn't enough. The dwarf relate being the doors. Then i was completely certain When lord of the rings came out that it was a rip off of golden asked. You're absolutely they took these characters of course definitely not from. Jr tolkien's one hundred and thirty years ago. Hey ho hey. That's that's that's a downer of note to a closing up Do you think he's got somewhere to be got really. But i do you think arcades could ever come back with in this era touching. There are kids. were done. basically were done with. Yeah they still existed but they're like a kind of a diet broke. Let me tell you something. I i don't know why just had this blind spot and i couldn't remember it but i i've been to arcades in the last six years i've been to arcades two hundred times i've spent probably over two thousand dollars in in arcades kids still fucking love arcades burn title. She's the joysticks and stuff. If our kids go out of business it will be. It will be a huge sunset place. Okay we've never been there. I've never taken there but it's probably the closest mall to bird road. It's not even really a mall anymore. It's really like a cavern. it's kind of empty. It's kinda dead. It's right nearby. My neighborhood you go up to the third. Fourth sunset malts one of those outdoor malls where everything is like cement. And you kind of go. Inside all the source. The bottom two floors are like generic shops abercrombie fitch. Type shit bed bath and beyond Stuff you go up into the third floor and this goes into a conversation that i was going to have with you by text the other day and i ended up like just not not bringing it up. There's a movie theater and amc right And a game time. Which i don't know if you guys have game time i don't think you it's basically dave and buster's think so. It's it's david busters but really cool. It's a it's a good. It's a good place. Whatever it's like a local. I've actually never been to dave and buster's we have one here but i've never been there delightful like you have a kid. It's something to do with kit now. I will go play the basketball shooting like the real basketball shooting. The little bullshit six feet away shooting rapid fire thing. The real eighteen footer. Taking eighteen jump shot basketball game. I'll play that for to the point where my wife says. Are you going to help me. Take care of this kid and honey. I'm about to set a personal best right now. You are you at least getting tickets from it or something digital tickets. So less gratifying. It's a shame but here's my point. Those two retail spaces. Let's say they both get wiped out the movie theater and the arcade. What the fuck else could you put in there. Now look what would make sense. What could you shove in there. Like you can't put anything else in those basis. They are uniquely made to be arcades and movie theaters. And i feel like around the country all the little arcades that we used to go to that were like in line arcades in the malls remember those were like the size of gap or my favorite kind. But yeah me too. But they're gone yet dead. Oh yeah go kinds where you have to go with your own quarters or you better hope that they have quarters in the machine not the kinds where you go and you get like a card or are you scan or something. Not that fancy shit. I'm talking about quarter pop right. We over here quarter poppet. Those those are gone. Those went out of business. Awhile that's the name of my solo album. My soul jewish beta choice. Those are gone right. And so all that's up to the super arcades. Dave buster's the game times likewise all of the marquee movie theaters liberty. New york where. I grew up and i'm sure they had one of these in stroudsburg to lex right and you know it's a retail space on like right on on on a street with a marquee out in front of it right with enough space for two movies. Yeah they put the two movies that are there you go in you. Pick one for a little while. Those movie theaters became like dollar theatres. And they kind of tried to stay in business for a little while but they're mostly pretty much gone now right if you're in miami. I don't even know where they are here. But like if you're in orlando for instance if you're vegas there Was the tropicana. That's not around right. That's no it's still a dollar theater but that's okay so cool there. They're still around. There used to be one of the on colonial orlando fucked. What do you do. That's base now. Like what the fuck that thing was. That space was made to be a movie theater. Yeah are you gonna do turn it into a stage play or something like a play house or something. Like what could you do with the fox quarter. Playhouses nut sucks. It's it's sad. That does remind me though of the circuit city that closed down like ten years ago. And it's still shapes like circuit city really left like an imprimatur on every space they were they. Were like y'all come up with something. Like i dunno. You'd better be selling something like like charcoal brick furnaces or i don't know what else you fit into your barbecue equipment something that looks like it would make sense with a big red smokestack. You ever drive through like Go visit like rustbelt. City's or not respite. Some of them even in the south right. There's one that i went to atlanta where they have a. It's like a five story. It used to be like a factory basically and it was like this it was. It's built like a monster. I've i wish i could remember the name of this place. But it's like a monster and they just were like a one point. I guess in the sixties they're like well. We don't manufacture things anymore. So let's just turn this into retail space. And so you go in there. And it's like an urban outfitters but it's on the like there'd be like an urban outfitters that you walk into but it's on the floor of someplace where like seven-year-olds used to make garments or something years doesn't feel your haunted by the ghost of seem very horrible labor practices and shit like that like very hipster in very very very shit in the world. All the like. They'll be like a place next to they'll be like a place next to the aforementioned urban outfitters and it'll be like call madeleine's or something and it'll be all like flower clothing like unisex i don't know how to explain it but and then there's a there's a bar on the top of it and the it's made to putt like all this hipster ship axe throwing bar and all these things all this hipster shit. That's just like baked into it like they. They just like biopsy half a block of brooklyn and just dumped it into like suburban atlanta. And they're like oh well now. This is a place to go and a place to live and it's it's super cool at cold. Drinks are like thousand dollars and the kind of place.

ted cruz obama dave John cena ten fifteen years joel cohen giovanni ra Hbo eighty degree nevada Dave Pfizer five hundred megabytes charlottesville cunanan Arne duncan ten pounds donald trump twenty seconds David byrne
Military officials decline to defend Trump after claim he called dead troops losers

All In with Chris Hayes

1:33:12 hr | 4 months ago

Military officials decline to defend Trump after claim he called dead troops losers

"A quick. Thanks to one of our sponsors helped make this podcast possible Monday dot com. When your teamwork is effective, nothing can stop you Monday dot com is a flexible teamwork platform designed to manage any size team in any sized project online plan manage and track everything your team is working on in one centralized place. You get to stay in sync with your team and never chase each other for updates. Again, Monday dot com is the easiest way to keep everyone aligned. So if you want your team to be more focused than ever visit, Monday dot Com for your free two week trial. Tonight on all in. That at talk about our veterans, you have no business being president of the United States of America Gary. New Reporting on trump's content for military service, wounded veterans and soldiers killed in action. Who would say a thing like that? Only an animal would say a thing like that. Tonight the reporter who broke it all Jeffrey. Goldberg. Is here and says, this story is just the beginning. Then another scandal surrounding the trump donor who was made postmaster general why Louis Joy could now be facing a criminal investigation plus the pandemic is not over but it's back to school anyway Arne Duncan and Randi Weingarten are here and fifty seven days from election day we'll any of this have any effect on voters. At this point we'll discuss when this live Labor Day edition of all in starts right now. Good evening from New York I'm Chris as it has been a rough Labor Day weekend and the trump. White House where officials are absolutely full out freaking out about Thursday. Night's report in the Atlantic that trump had characterized Americans who died in war losers and suckers trump has spent the past four days repeatedly nine the story marshalling all kinds of people to. Come forward to knock it down he insisted today the quote an animal would say thing that the White House trotted out figures like Sarah Sanders who we know is lied to reporters multiple times to claim the report isn't true because they were there when trump didn't say the terrible things he allegedly said take they're hoping you don't think about that formulation too much. The main problem for the White House here is that the evidence supporting the story is pretty obvious and clear and almost overwhelming to anyone not inside the trump reality distortion bubble. The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg reported that trump cancelled a visit to an American military cemetery near Paris back in two thousand eighteen partially because he worried his hair would become disheveled in the rain and partially because he did not respect the American war dead interred there. In a conversation with senior staff members on the morning of the schedule visit trump said, why should I go to that cemetery? It's filled with losers in a separate conversation on the same trip trump preferred to the more than eighteen hundred marines who lost their lives at Bellawood as suckers for getting killed. Now, the sources in the story are anonymous you know anonymous sources are not as. Good. As name sources when you're evaluating something, but it doesn't mean that the claims came in on some anonymous tip line that no one knows where they came from. It means a reporter in this case, Jeffrey Goldberg spoke to people directly interviewed them and has agreed not to identify them in the story Jeffrey. Goldberg, will be here with me to talk about that in just a moment. His initial story has now been confirmed in part or in its entirety by reporters at. All okay. Remarkably a correspondent at Fox News included in that lineup whom trump promptly called on the network to fire. Some of those corroborating stories included even more damning details about the president like this one from the Washington Post quote the president told senior advisors that he didn't understand why the US government plays such value on finding soldiers missing in action because they had performed poorly and gotten caught and deserve what they got and this from the New York Times people familiar Mr Trump's private conversations saying he has long scorned those who served in Vietnam as being too dumb to have gotten out of it as he did through medical diagnosis of bone spurs in his heels. Back in two thousand, nineteen trump's former lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen testified the trump admitted to faking those bonds first telling cone quote you think I'm stupid I wasn't going to Vietnam. There's even more evidence that trump view soldiers at stupid or suckers Mary trump the president's knees wrote in a recent book that trump and threatened to disown his eldest son if don Jr. joined the military. She also says that her own Father Fred trump junior was mocked by donald trump because he fred trump junior decided to join the US air. National. Guard quote my father was frequently ridiculed for his career choices and disparaged for serving our country by both his father and by his brother Donald. Then, there's the fact that pretty much none of trump's top military officials past and present are backing the president up. I mean you really can't find anyone who's stepping forward to defend his character save he would never say anything like that they aren't disputing the story instead that's been left talking heads and former flax and loyalists. That's maybe not a huge surprise because trump allegedly said about all US servicemembers, hues very closely to what he said back in two thousand fifteen about one particular veteran Senator John McCain. War here or euro he's a war hero years he's a war hero presumes captured. I like people that weren't captured. Okay I hate to. John. McCain was prisoner of war in Vietnam for five years host. Donald Trump avoided that war had a different experience in an interview in the nineties. He characterized his efforts to avoid transmitted diseases while sleeping with numerous women as quote, my personal Vietnam. An. Event with Union members today Joe Biden lambasted the president's comments an invoked zone Sun Beau who served in Iraq and then died from a brain tumor in two thousand fifteen. Those of served. Risk, their lives even gave their lives, our nation losers suckers. He's our heroes. Tell you something. My Bowl wasn't loser. For A sucker if that's I, talk about our veterans, you have no business being president of the United States of America. What's being entered into the record here to take a step back and look at all the evidence about Donald Trump. Shocking. Morally offensive. It's not surprising. It's about what we have come to expect. But. One big question that keeps pulling on my shoulders. Why are we learning about this now? What does it mean that we are? For more on that and the fallout from his incredible reporting joined by Jeffrey Goldberg He's the Editor in chief of the Atlantic and I jeff, maybe I start a little bit with. The reaction to this story from the White House you. There are stories that come out all the time about the president that are fairly scandalous incredibly scandalous. And one time they said it's fake news and they swatted away or the new cycle moved on, they do seem particularly freaked out. About this reporting. An particularly intent on attacking it what what is your sort of reading of the last three or four days of their reaction? Well he's a good question. First thing I would say is that. This is not an attack on these are not reports of an attack on site immigrants or black people or or something like that we expect from Donald Trump and something that his base might actually help him with his base. This could hurt him with his with his base You know the the the second thing is I. Think there's a lot of. Nervousness in the White House and again I won't I'm not commenting on anything having to do with my sourcing or other reporter's saw sourcing Fox. Washington Post whatever. I'm you know there's a there's a deep hostility and mistrust in the White House of. Current and former generals people who lead the military. We saw that today Donald Trump did something that I. I've never seen before he attacked his own a service chiefs. He attacked his own leaders of the Armed Forces on call? Them. I mean, even in the even in this sort of an Tasma, we are twenty twenty race that's still something but I think it has to do with the fact that This is the kind of accusation that sounds believable in also goes directly to. A core constituency that Donald trump obviously needs to Keep energized come November. Yeah we we should note that there's there's been polling of of active duty servicemembers in which he's he's underwater with them There's been an interesting sort of officer enlisted split, but he's been losing ground even with a enlisted members. He's gone for a net positive nine points and Net net net negative twelve points. You can see that there. That's the latest military times pulling. You just mentioned what he said today was pretty remarkable. Briefly, sort of like channeling kind of like left anti-imperialism vis-a-vis his own service chiefs although it's completely like made up and fabricated because he. In the next breath, he's constantly bragging about how big the Pentagon budget is and how Raytheon is making off like a bandit. So but I wanNA play that clip just to get your response to it take a listen to what he said. I'm not saying that military in love with me to soldiers are the top people in the Pentagon probably aren't because they want to do nothing but fight wars so that all of those wonderful companies that make the bombs and make the planes and everything else they. Happy. But we're getting out of the endless wars you know how we're doing. But here's the thing Jeff. They're not this drives me insane the where we have expanded our footprint, we've expanded bombings all the theaters, and this is an absolute con-. This idea that the Great Antiwar Donald Trump has some revolt on his hands on the generals. As, you will know the generals are usually more hesitant to go to war than not usually often more has to go to war than than civilian leaders for some obvious reasons. No, this was remarkable i. mean he sort of channeling. Start Sixty Bob Dylan lyrics here I pointed out on a show media today it's It's quite remarkable given that tomorrow there's a pretty good chance that he'll brag about how much money he's spending on military hardware, and of course, as you know, he's deeply transactional in love it when when foreign countries by our military equipment. So if you're looking for consistency in that particular clip, you're you're looking forward it in the wrong place it doesn't make sense in any kind of traditional understanding of of politics. I WanNa talk about the sourcing year and I obviously know they're anonymous sources that you're protecting and so I don't want to like say this person was this person. But but in a general sense, I had two reactions when I read the piece. Was What? Okay why didn't you tell this us this before and one on the record who whoever you are out there. I mean this. This is what you're saying here is very serious stuff. It's it's an incredible condemnation of the president's character I. Think just he's humanity. Honestly. What's your response to that? Interesting and obviously I push obviously I. I know that other reporters who cover this area are pushing various people to say what's on their minds. I think there's a couple of things. There's this idea of a of a code that you know you don't interfere I. think people are torn one hand. They don't want to interfere in electoral democratic electoral processes on the other hand there you're talking about a president who is something unlikely that experienced I think there's also fear I. Think. And and we see this across the board in in Donald Trump's Washington there's a fear on kind of superficial level of of a twitter mob There's also real fear of personal safety fear for your family a fear for what you'd put everybody around you through. If you started talking about this sort of thing and these are people just like other people. And they have this anxiety. It is a reasonable question to ask why people who've had direct exposure to Donald Trump who know donald trump has said who noah donald trump has done. won't simply come out and say it and I I share that view that it's not good enough But you know like other reporters I'm always balancing out. The. moral ambiguities in complications of anonymous sourcing with a public's right to know when the sources are not anonymous to me. Jennifer Griffin. said right from from Fox News when she was challenged and I trust these sources is people in the various rooms and But yeah, obviously be better if people would say attach their names to what they know. Final question for you you said something I think over the weekend about there being sort of you expect there will be more reporting in this vein. Obviously, there's been a lot in the aftermath of your story in the Atlantic since I said. What do you mean by that? I mean I mean just that I mean I know that there are a lot of reporters. On, this story people with excellent sources, people are excellent reporters. And one of the things that you again, there's this surprising There's this sort of shocking but not surprising quality to all of this This discourse that trump has about about soldiers about the military is no secret to anyone who's spent any time with him. It's no secret to to the military at the highest levels so. You know I I just know of reporters who are trying to figure out other aspects of this and I expect more reporting on this in everything else in the coming couple of months. All Right Jeffrey Goldberg who kicked this off with that report in the Atlantic came up Thursday night. Thanks for taking some time with us. I appreciate it. Thank you. For more on trump's view, the military and joined now by Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson who served as chief of staff to former Secretary of State Colin Powell. and. Colonel you've you've been around. The highest levels of of civilian political leadership and administration of very high levels of of the armed services what what was your? What's your reaction to what is happening now both in terms of the actual content and what it means about what's happening beneath the surface? Chris let me say one thing I yesterday the interview you just did with Jeffrey and the interview yesterday that Alerts Bernstein and Jeffrey did. Were the best modern. disquisition if you will on the need of a democracy for a media for journalists like Jeffrey and like these others. I've ever heard and I think that's important to get that point out there and their defense of anonymous sources. Especially, all Bernstein he was eloquent in his defense of the anonymous sources, for example, in Bob Woodward us when they essentially help to get rid of President Nixon. During the Watergate crisis so I think that is an important point to make. I want to emphasize that point. It's time the media stood up. It's time the media told the truth it's time the media went after the facts this. Despite the presence. Disregard for the facts but to your question. This is extremely damaging to the morale and good order and discipline of the military to have the leader of that military the commander in chief of the United States. Military to to make these kind of remarks as to whether or not he made these remarks. I think that's no surprise that actually is no surprise. This man has lied repeatedly, he will say anything to titillate his base. He will do anything to solidify his own hold on power which worries me greatly with regard to the coming elections and we've seen it. We've seen it rawal right in front of US I don't know how any American. Anywhere, who has heard about this ran about this even had hints about this can't continue to support this particular individual. It's incomprehensible to me and tells me something about my country that I don't like to face. You know the the point about. The the sort of morale effect and the plausibility of it. I mean Jeffrey Goldberg just saying essentially, this is an open secret I mean one of the ways I interpreted this is that you know. Actor service members are just a subset of a larger group people that aren't Donald Trump that he views as Marx. Those can be. Evangelical supporters they could be people that voted for him. They can people didn't vote miss political enemies anyone who isn't I mean he seems to bear tremendous amount of condescension and contempt and view everyone is sort of a mark that essentially isn't him and. That way I think that's the sort of response. So many people have of like yeah I I can see him saying. I'd certainly do in fact, I could see him inside the office was some of his closest advisors talking about Christians in that way especially fundamentalist Christians mocking them making fun of, and there's no doubt in my mind that he's probably done that before just as we now see, he's done with the military. This is a man with no conscience this a man with no decency this is a man who doesn't understand what it is to be a human and to feel for other humans I just looked at the e, the Professional Military Education Responds to this directive that out here's another these stabilizing to the military move. The Director of essentially tells them that they'll stop affirmative action type, any kind of any kind of education that's based on showing systemic racism, how to fight it and so forth and so on. Well, I picked up proceedings magazine the US navies, and probably one of the most prestigious military publications on page fourteen. There's a picture a picture on both pages of all the four star admirals and generals and sector, Vince? Mark Asper and trump in the center beaming they are all light and they are all male. So tell me again how we don't need this education and training. We're about to have a some pushback majorly from the universities and colleges within the military and well, it should be. I, I always want to make sure that the speaking speak to you about sort of bringing it back to the substance the president's record here. One of the things I found really maddening express the Jeff just a second ago is this idea of him attempting to position himself as some sort of noble dissident on behalf of ending endless wars who's now being? Stabbed in the back on grateful generals I mean the president vetoed. Something passed by both Houses of Congress with Republican support to stop arms sales to Saudi Arabia to continue this ghastly warn Yemen he vetoed it so we can keep selling them arms. He sat with Mohammed bin Salman and pointing to like he was putting to a dessert menu the various. Pieces of military recruitment that we sold the Saudis troop levels have. State of basically the same we have increased our bombing civilian areas. There is no record here of actual resistance to to to ending endless wars he talks about. I think what you're seeing is the depth of desperation that some people around him and maybe even himself or reaching this I think was quite a blow to his base. As you pointed out in your opening remarks the military time series of newspapers as shown polling. It says these falling off remarkably in the military in terms of favorability and his disfavor ability is rising just as markedly. I. Think he's desperate and I think he's looking for. Things takes pieces up here and pieces here he says oil the military industrial complex can rail against that and I'll I'll get some of them back. I'll do this. I'll do that I'll be against war and I'll get the rank and file back. Well, as you pointed out also in your opening remarks, none of this washes the military is not stupid when the military's in. Syria in Asia in Mali in Somalia in Iraq in Afghanistan. The military knows, Hey, we're here Mr. President said on Memorial Day I said General. Pal. You should have said I said to the TV screen I didn't say. You should have said if you really want to memorialize American, soldiers, bring them own from these stupid wars. Now he's picking up on that as a last desperate act to try and regain some ground with the military. Sorry Mr President you've lost that. Yeah, that's a great point. If there is anyone in this country, twenty years into the war in Afghanistan and the global war on terror who knows exactly where you members are deployed and how much we have not. Br brought them the actual members of the US military Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson is always a great pleasure to talk to you. Thank you for your time tonight. Tonight the new potentially criminal allegations criminal allegations against Republican mega donor turn Postmaster General Louis Joy. And you know it's bad when even the president will not defend you. I'll talk to the reporters who broke the story next. Hey, it's Chris as this week on my podcast wise is happening I'll be talking with historian and author Rick Perlstein about Ronald Reagan America's right turn. What is classic kind of right wing populist fantasy and it really is about restoring American masculinity after Vietnam it's basically like we have our Mojo back we can make America great again. So he does really well with that and it's an issue that alliance him very closely with the most reactionary populist elements in the Republican Party this faction felt the new right. So here he is with all this political capital and he's running for president. This week is happening search for wise's happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. Hi. I'm Chuck Rosenberg this season on my podcast the oath I spoke with ten remarkable public servants, men and women who sacrificed for the common good. Do things that are hard like former National Security Council, official Yona Hill we can have a serious discussion about where we want the relationship with Russia to go, but we have to stop using Russia as part of our. Domestic Politics Civil rights activist, Maya Wiley, when police officers are not protected when Nick tell the truth that creates a culture of silence that makes them accessories and flight fifteen, forty, nine pilot captain sully Sullen River to know that we had been in the cockpit of that airliner over Manhattan at that low in altitude when we lost thrust on both engines with so few auctions. It was just stylish catch up on season three of you with all ten episodes now, available search for the Earth wherever you are listening right now to subscribe and here all ten episodes referring. The controversial. That's putting a Mile Republican donor turned postmaster General Lewis. Joy Now stands accused of a potential crime, the Washington Post reporting but many of the employees at his former logistics company felt pressure to make political donations donations that get this joy later reimbursed. And this is not just anonymous former employees accusing joy of violating election law. There are people on the record like for instance, the company's former HR director quote Lewis was national fundraiser for the Republican Party. He asked employees for money. We gave him the money and then he reciprocated by giving us big bonuses said David. Joyce longtime director of human resources who had access to payroll records at new breed from the late nineteen ninety s two, thousand thirteen, and is now retired. Now, did was even asked about this very kind of thing just last month when he testified before the House oversight. Committe. Did you pay back several of your top executives for contributing to trump's campaign. By bonus sing or rewarding them. That's an outrageous claim. Sir I resented I'm just asking a question dancers now. So. You did not bonus or reward any of your negatives. Now, anyone new solicit for contribution to the trump camp. Sir. Outrageous funny. Because your former HR director says you did just that. Today the president responded the allegations against his postmaster general with the familiar refrain of professed ignorance. Don't know too much about it read something this morning but I don't other than that. I have to see it He's very respected man he was approved. Very much by the parties I. Guess It was sort of a an approval that took place by both parties. I don't know exactly what the story is. I'll certainly know within a short period of time I just read it for the first time I, read it this morning just like you did. Investigation for sure. Sure. Let the investigations go but. He's a very respected man. Sorry Louis here with one of the reporters in The Washington Post Investigative Story Investigative reporter John Swain John Thank. You for being with US fantastic reporting what walk us through just the basic. Lines here about what is being alleged by whom at this former firm that joy used to run? So what's being alleged five former employees of fluids the joys from new breed logistics told us that they felt pressure to give two Republican candidates. Joy hosted at his mansion, the joy raise money for. So we spoke to plant managers who would get an email from the joys saying on hosting. Giuliani my house, and then they get a follow up coal or plant visit from the supervisors saying Louis Having, this event you've got to give. And they felt this might affect. The jobs might affect sort of how well they do the company going forward. On at the same time, as you pointed out to senior employees, tell us what was going on was the with more senior executive people at the company when they were giving donations, they actually getting reimbursements via bonuses and so as you pointed out, that is illegal you cannot. Have donations. From yourself being given by other people and give them the money for it. This limits on how much people can give in donations and so. It would be a crime if if proven. Yeah It's flatly illegal. People do actually get prosecuted for this. One of the few sort of one of the rare campaign finance violations that is just sort of. Flatly illegal and people do get busted for it. Just. To give a little context here part of what what is going on here is that he was having fundraisers raising what's called hard money, which is capped at a certain amount, right? So he's he wants people to come because he's got he wants to he wanted it to be as big as possible because the event, the the dollar figure, the event is going to depend on how you will come out and write checks. Hence, the pressure is that is that sort of how you understand it. Possibly and you know there are when you look through the F., e.? C. Recognized third certainly things that stand out on one day in September twenty fourteen, ten new breed employees. Each gave identical donations to Senator Thom Tillis in North Carolina, that each twelve thousand, six, hundred dollars the maximum, his victory committee the next day, the same ten employees give ten thousand dollars to the north. Carolina Republican Party and so. You. Know it's possible that people agreed. To put these things in their name and and received bonuses to make up for. This also relates directly to join. This is not a tangential story about his past insofar as it quite clear that his fundraising prowess is part of the way in which he managed to find end up in the position he's in now. Well right, he's built a reputation I. in North Carolina, he and his wife became quite remarkable powerbrokers in the state Republican Party. Raising money for Governor Pat mccrory for the state policy and then on the national scale. President trump in two thousand, sixteen hosted him on the lawn of their nice gated Manchester opposite a country club in June two, thousand, sixteen Donald Trump's birthday, and I, think it's fair to say that they impressed trump to impress people around him with their ability to raise money not just from themselves. That give millions passing late but from their employees so. It came it seems to selecting someone to to run the postal service to the whole the postal service, the way. Donald Trump one two. It's perhaps not surprising that someone like Louis to Choi who has impressed trump with his fundraising ability was miss chosen. Final question briefly, do we know if there are any investigations? Into, this very a this set of allegations. The North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein released to quite cautious statement yesterday saying it would be illegal for this to be happening, but he couldn't much more because this will be in history diction unser. It seems he's definitely don't as I on it the democratic state. AGEE's put out statements saying that they thought he was the right person to be investigating it. There is no statute of limitations. It seems on these offenses in North Carolina that would perhaps be outside the statute of limitations federally. So the time we're looking at runs from two thousand to two thousand fourteen SA-? Five years don't you? May Be the US US attorneys don't have the ability to look at it in the state, Jostein, perhaps will. Fascinate John Swain great reporting. Thank you for coming on to share with us. Still had more students are returning to schools that have largely come up with a patchwork of policies to try to address the ongoing pandemic overseeing classrooms and campuses after this. It is back to school season. Of course, in the K. through twelve American educational system is in kind of a US. Thanks to a Patchwork of policies to address the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, which is still not suppress, and we still have forty thousand cases day places with high rates of infection like Texas began reopening last month even as they had very high rates without even tracking corona virus data inside the schools are providing the public there's now a pilot program to. Fix that underway and then there are places like here in New York where the state's positivity rate is very low and it's stayed low for a very long time and yet still schools in New York City push back reopening by more than a week and when they do open in person classrooms, we'll have about a third of the typical capacity with kids only coming a few days a week. And across the country schools reopened have been forced to close down campuses were changed their educational plans due to outbreaks of the virus, and all this is happening before it gets cold and we moved into cold and flu season. Joined now by Arne Duncan former secretary of Education President Obama, an author of housing work and Randi Weingarten President of the American Federation of Teachers. Great to have you both army. Let me start with you and maybe get your sort of top line assessment of where things stand it is. So I mean, we've been trying on the show and in various ways to get some sort of comprehensive of the basics of WHO's in school fulltime in class Susan, hybrid, whose distance what that are even that doesn't seem like it's accessible data. It's very hard to get your hands around what this fall schooling in America looks like. I just gotTa say I can't tell you how furious I am. We should not be in this situation they'll teach her no child. No parent deserves us. The truth is the vast majority of kids around the country cannot go to school because it is not say to do. So the absence of leadership at the federal level has had a devastating impact on kids education in the spring now going into the fall and that hasn't changed in. So when you have a federal leaders try and bully try and threatened but not solve problems you get the message that where now having said I didn't just. But just courageous leadership at the local level school superintendents, teachers, and principals working together trying figure out how to feed children are take care of their social emotional health and how the best educate them in this really difficult time. But if you look at international benchmarks, we've less than half the population of Europe, we have sixty percent more cases in other countries they are going back to school safely. 'cause they have done the hard work necessary to do that we have refused to do that hard work. We've refused to listen to science in Chicago I'm sorry in the nation and the consequences of devastating. My would warning just that I think is obviously the position I have on the show and that for a while and you know. That we you know the biggest problem here is the virus not suppressed and failure at a national strategy right. But but if we sort of say that is the case that is the reality I'm I want present you the argument that I've heard for in-person schooling in places like the northeast New York Maryland that have low positively rates and it basically goes like this in places where there is very low daily case count and a very low positivity rate. We should be pushing to do in person full-time schooling because the risks which are there are worth it given the value of public education, the value to children and equity problems that are going to happen from another semester of remote learning. And and that the resistance is coming from folks frankly your members who are worried about the health risks what is your response to that argument? Well let me for stuff. Let me just concur with everything that already has just said and frankly if Arnie or Margaret Spellings or or had been the. Secretary of Education. Old People together to have plans and have resources. The issue with what you just said is take the issue of full-time, which is that if we had double the amount of space and w Matt of teachers you. Probably. have. The resources to have the safeguards that even the CDC. Even after pressure still say are needed. You could probably have done that but what has happened is that people like myself? And you've heard me say this before since April have been trying to figure out how to reopen school safely and ultimately we need to make sure that we have the safeguards to do that the spacing to do that the mass to do that and none of those things actually happen this year and that's been part of the problem right now because you put all that on teachers and parents as opposed to. Looking at the science of three, hundred percent more cases look at what's happened in terms of higher education look at what's happened in terms of colleges look at what's happened in terms of Florida and Texas. So mine members when we thought we were going to get the resources and we thought that there. Before, that was that spike in July seventy, five percent of my member said they were confident going back to school because of all the reasons you just said because we know that out of school learning or in school learning is so much better. But with the recklessness and with the chaos and with the lack of resources, what happened is there's no confidence in no trust. You just mentioned Arnie a randy just mentioned the the campus situation and I say like again, there's a huge spectrum. Here's some campuses. It seems have been doing a pretty remarkable job in terms of testing in Arizona. University of Arizona state I think caught was using You know sewage samples, they caught outbreak a dorm. So there's been some really encouraging creative stuff, but also I look at these numbers University of Iowa Thousand Cases University of Alabama fourteen hundred cases they're gonNA open bars up I it just seems like madness to me to watch certain campus opening as if it's twenty nineteen in terms of student life and then announcing like Oh we have to close So get Chris. This is the total absence of federal leadership at the top is having a devastating impact. We have fifteen thousand school districts around the country trying to figure this out for themselves. We have well over five thousand universities trying to figure this out by themselves. They're talking they're working together someplace or making better decisions than others will put them in basically an untenable situation. If we had a national plan, if we had reliable fast testing at scale, if we had contact tracing readability ability to. Quarantine if we were committed to those things than universities wouldn't be in these situations. K, twelve education wouldn't be in this situation, but it was trying to do this themselves summer doing beautifully summer struggling with it and you're right people who aren't taking this seriously are paying a tremendous cost opening day the opening for week shut right back down that serves nobody well, I say all the time the goal is not to reopen schools. The goal is to keep schools open do it slowly rattling thoughtfully carefully. Randy on every every parent that I've been in contact with, and there's a lot of them It has a not in their stomach about the fall a lot of them already just sort of in a pit dread I, gotta imagine teachers are all really stressed out. Where is the Mariah the morale of of teachers heading into this already in the classroom were were doing zoom lessons. Look for everyone is agonized by this because even the you know even as situation like Florida where it was pretty clear that schools should not reopen and Miami schools did not reopen because you had. People who were courageous in are willing to defy to Santos's denials. People are agonized because we know how much this hurts kids the issue is we can't hit life versus learning, but I would say that I don't know a person I don't know a teacher. I. Don't know a parent who's not agonized about all of this, which is part of the reason why we've just really tried to focus on the science and how to do the kind of testing and I think what Michael Mobile. Really push for. New York was really aboard and had to make sure we have to save parts. We're going to have near the only really large district with kids in school at all starting in about a week and a half, and and we're going to get to see how that plays out a bit I'm fingers crossed and hopeful about that Arne Duncan and Randi Weingarten This is gonNA. Be The one of the biggest stories through the fall. So we'll have you back and thank you for coming on tonight both you. Still, ahead despite nationwide protest historic pandemic, an economic crisis. Why aren presidential poll numbers moving at all fifty seven days away from election day polling stability in the middle of incredible instability after this. The central paradox of this election. My humble opinion is that it is simultaneously the most tumultuous election year in decades and the most stable presidential race in decades. The head to head polling average from exactly six months ago when one hundred ninety thousand Americans are still alive before the full effects of this. Once a century pandemic economic contraction civil unrest when Biden didn't even have clinched the nomination yet it's not that different than where it is now. I mean, it is shocking. How stable this racist. As as reclined, put it in vox quote the stability unnerves me because it undermines the basic theory of responsive democracy if our political divisions cut so deep that even two hundred, thousand deaths in ten point, two percent unemployment and president musing about bleach injections can't shake us than what camp. I WANNA. Talk about that central question. CAN ANYTHING MOVE US he'll? He's NBC News National Political, reporter Michelle Goldberg Columnist for The New York Times and I I, guess, let's just start on that the stability here. We've got the approval rating that forty three percent approve fifty, two, point six, percent disapproved. You've got the polling looking like Biden plus eight Biden plus seven plus nine percents this are you surprised to heal at the stability so far? I am a little bit principle I'm Muslim. Not This is staggeringly consistent on the reason for this is not entirely because of trump yes. He does have a cut like element of his base. Would you know who just love the man or find a believe him over? Other things on the evidence isn't quite there but this is really a trend of negative ship that seeped into the country over the last two to three decades where the sheriff of a floating voters who swing between the two parties shrunk to about six or seven percents and there are fewer and fewer of them, and that's why you know that's why this race is. So stable on the single biggest beneficiary of that is Joe. Biden right now, he's not galvanizing inspiring movement behind a specific governing vision. He is winning this race right now because he's not donald trump and he's being sufficiently acceptable as an alternative to trump to the majority of Americans who consistently say disapprove. You Michelle, I go back and forth how I view this at one level. It's. The optimism I have or at least a sort of bright side is like look like hoover got about forty percent of the vote you know running for reelection. In one of the worst wipeouts in history in nineteen, thirty, two minutes depression. Trump gets forty two percent that's. The hoover range. So like that's about as low as you can go on the other hand I think to myself like Oh forty, two percent of the country would basically be okay with literally anything if you're. Bored. At this point. Forty two percent of the country looks around at all of this and says I approve and what can they approve of besides the misery that Donald Trump is inflicting on his enemies I mean to me that's what serving when there was a at least a good kind of surface good economy when there wasn't a pandemic, you could tell yourself that people were just voting their pocketbook or. Maybe, not following the details of trump's corruption. If you look around the country right now and you approve of what's happening again, it just means that you approve of the suffering of your enemies and when you have that big a portion of the country that that's their sort of governing political. Imperative, it's it's hard to see how that resolves itself in in a peaceful way. Also we've also got more and more time in sort of polling day this a hill on on. Both battlegrounds particularly, Wisconsin I thought you know we've been returning this topic because it was a source of such intense angst and also attention right that you had a black man shot seven times in the back by a white police officer. You had peaceful protests and also buildings being burned down and broken into and images of unrest in this idea that Donald trump going gonNA benefit from politically and the latest Wisconsin again it's like it's like nothing happened right? The latest Wisconsin Bowling has biden up by six. In the CBS News Yougov polling that's gotTa. Be If you're if you're gaming this out for for for trump, it's like if feels like they ran the experiment over the last few weeks and it didn't work. This is a real warning sign for President Trump Chris because Wisconsin is ground zero for where this message should work. If it's going to work anywhere the Kenosha a police shooting the violence and unrest that has resulted from it is fresh in people's minds on the local news constantly if that's not resonating now then when will it resonate and Wisconsin is precisely the kind of demographically friendly state where this should resonate president trump. It's got a disproportionately high share of white voters who don't have college degrees, which is precisely the. Audience for this. So again, if it doesn't work in Wisconsin, where is it going to work recent polls from CVS and you show him down the president down six points are there's a Fox News poll that showed the president down even more eight coins in Wisconsin and the biggest warning sign for the president that Cole was that on the issue of policing and criminal justice Wisconsin voters trusted Juggles Biden over president trump on five point. If you look at that, you have to think this message is probably not going to work. And it also. Back stability that again on the sort of bright sides like fifty percent of the country fifty one percent is just like done with him. They're done with them. It doesn't make it just doesn't matter what the message is what he says what adds he runs like they're just they're not this guy you don't really know what's going on in the country and you see poll UCLA. UC polls you know around fifty percent say that they wouldn't consider voting for Donald Trump and so once you sort of although, I don't think anybody should be complacent right I mean I think that we were all talking about the durability of Hillary Clinton's lead even if it was never quite this durable at this time for years ago I think things could still go sideways. I've seen people irreputable pollsters say there's a one in seven chance that Donald. Trump could still this election you know that's better than your odds of somebody tells you somebody held do you have a terrible disease and you have a one in seven chance of dying from it? You're not going to sit back and relax right I think we're still in a very perilous place. Yeah that's probably a good way of putting like six, hundred seven in their Michelle Goldberg. He'll kapoor a great great to have you both. Thank you both. So we've still got a lot to get to tonight including the president's Dangerous Vaccine Hail, Mary to save his foundering election campaign and how to protect the election. Now that voting officially underway, it started that much more still ahead on a special Labor Day to our in don't go anywhere. Hi, everyone, it's joy Reid I'm so excited to tell you about my new. MSNBC show the readout every weeknight I'm talking with the biggest newsmakers about the most pressing issues of our time like Joe Biden, the words of president matter, and so as President United States the first thing I'm GonNa do stand up and talk sense and be honest with the American people level with them Atlanta Mayor Keisha, land's bottom we need as many voices as we can have as. Possible, sounding the alarm encouraging people to wear masks and to take all precautions and to Baal science and the data Senator Comma Harris We send folks into war wearing camouflage. So what is going on here when you send camouflaged uniformed officers into a city and many more, you can listen to the readout as a podcast by searching for the readout. That's R. E. I D. O. UT ONE WORD wherever you're listening right now and subscribing for free. Thanks for listening. Welcome back on this Labor Day I'm Chris Hayes than extended edition of all in just fifty seven days until the election they're all kinds of crazy new trump can controversies down the stretch there actually hard to keep track of this point there's been a million of them just last days. There's the Atlantic report that we mentioned last hour that trump called American troops killed in action losers suckers. There's the allegations by trump's former fixer Michael Cohen that trump attacked President Obama saying tell me one country run by a black person that isn't an whole. There's a report of leaks conversations. These are actually leaked notes so there's like a document here. That were no takers taking conversations between trump and former UK. Prime Minister Theresa may where trump declined to condemn Russia for using urge nerve agent on British soil against one of their spies when Theresa may asked him to lead he said I would rather follow than lead. Now this, all feels very some familiar in the trump era every possible of horrible thing a person can say. The fundamental reality is all these scandals come in the midst of what should be the worst of them all. The one we wake up with every day the when we go to bed every night with a hundred and ninety thousand people are dead doe in no small part to the absolutely catastrophic failure of the leadership present Donald Trump. Six million Americans have contracted the corona virus. It's now swelling in parts of the Midwest and there are outbreaks popping up on college campuses across the country some looking really bad and you have kids and parents and teachers who are trying to make learning from home work with school shutdown than you've got other folks in schools where it may not be safe. The trump campaign strategy in the face of all this is is just basically pretend it doesn't exist. It's like a Cova doesn't count trump two, thousand twenty. They're going to run the economy as if it didn't crash in the last five months. In fact, the president was out today to brag about jobs numbers conveniently leaving out that any gains. Return the country where it was for years ago you see how that works like when you subtract and then you add. But what you add is less than what you subtract down thirty million he's celebrating the gaining of back of ten regained million jobs. Great now, we're just twenty million under. But while there are some polling anecdotal evidence to suggest that trump has got stable approval ratings in the economy. What's actually happening with the economy? Is Really I think two different stories. And this is a familiar theme in recent. American economic. History. So one of those stories actually looks pretty good in some ways surprisingly Gert right the stock market hitting record highs but not just the stock market New Home sales hit fourteen year highs. If you go car dealership these days and try to get a car the car's backward, they can't sell them fast enough. But when you zoom in, you see a bifurcation with a certain set of people that are recovering very quickly, and that particularly pertains to people that top trumps rich buddies who already got their tax cut the ones who owned three, hundred, thousand dollar boats that they can take out in the trump parade. The ones who stock portfolios going through the roof that trump is constantly bragging about. And then there's the other folks. Bought more than twenty, four, million unemployed. And a growing long-term recession that sort of obscured by all the economic data but it's hard ring and it's festering and is deepening. You got food scarcity and addictions and long-term layoffs that continue to mount and huge I mean enormous budget cuts that are coming to every state and municipality in the entire country absent of federal rescue. And that part. That's the real economic story of what is happening under Donald Trump watch. In some ways that is a story, this election year as much as anything else. The irony of course, the trump administration has rejected the opportunity to make that better themselves. Continued failure with even to this day involves trump braving reporter to take his mask off. The issue of what happens when you're? You'RE GONNA. Have to take. You can take it off your your health, Tommy, your wet. Well if you don't take it off your muscled, so if you would take it off with a lot easier. Cutler better. It's better. It's better. Six months into this nightmare sickness and that guy. That president. Still views the simple act a wearing a mask as some kind of personal insult to him. That exchanges good. A snapshot as any of why we are where we are. But again, without the virus under control with the economy, modern recession trump is very clearly obviously Tara graff. The whole plan now is to throw all the eggs in the vaccine basket as a reelection tool. They're not hiding this. They're very upfront about it today trump said, he will produce a vaccine in record time suggesting it could be ready early next month on a special day. They are telegraphing they will rush it out before the election. No matter what. and. It is incredibly incredibly dangerous for numbers. Joining me now for more on what we actually need to do to get the virus under control doctor told Juande surgeons at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Professor at Harvard Medical School also staff writer for New Yorker his latest pieces titled. We can solve the coronavirus test mess now. We want to. Great to have you doctor and I want to start. On the vaccine. Because it's complicated and thorny a lot of ways. They have been very clear that they want to rush it out. They want some big announcement election day. The president said it might come before a very special day. You'd have a bunch of drugmakers on. Friday saying we're going to come together and basically object to the FDA or anyone rushing ahead of the end of clinical trials. How important was that step that we got on Friday the drug makers? What's your assessment of where the stance? I. Think it's huge the. You know the reality is that you have. A drug industry that saying we will not. Produce tests produce vaccines if they are not tested and deploy them to the population, they don't want the risk and they don't want the potential of harming people instead of actually helping I think that's a really important thing there that whole industry depends on the soundness of the science and it's easy for them to come to that place. When it's been the practice, we've had a long time they're backing the integrity of the FDA and You know fealty to the president. Trump fealty to the people. So this this point is important because I myself feel conflicted about how to report on this because. We live in a world in which there's a contingent of antitax folks. And scepticism vaccines that is not scientifically based and is very dangerous to public health and achieving herd immunity for a whole lot of other things at the same time it's very hard to trust this. So like what what I guess. I saw a bunch of people say look we can trust this thing when they say it's good and ready. After Election Day is basically the lesson that I've heard is that you're sort of takeaway. No I think the bottom line is If if trials and. Here's the crazy thing. The trials are moving very fast partly because. We have so much infection running across the country. The ability to test a vaccine depends on how many people are positive, and then the quicker you have more positive cases out there the fast fuel know whether the vaccines are working. If they happen to work before the election, we should know that we should have the data we should have the information, it should be put out there. That isn't going to be. The day that all that vaccine suddenly becomes available it's going to be a there's going to be a rollout process that's going to take some time. You have to produce the vaccine and yes, they're getting millions of doses available. What we're hundreds of millions of people you need to do doses one month apart twice with the vaccines that are being tested now and more likely we will. It's highly unlikely. We'll see results before the election there's no harm in knowing the results when we know the results, the danger is. To do a Russia move and say that you're just GonNa put the vaccine out there and we have the FDA head as well as the drug companies saying they do not want to do that and that's a good thing. So. There's a question of where things stand in terms of. You said there's a lot of virus moving around the country. We we sort of plateaued at forty thousand cases a day in that neighborhood it's quite high compared to other places. and. What the fall is going to look like is whether cools and we move indoors what? What's your sense? There's a lot of very ominous warnings about what that could be. The future is hard to predict what? How do you assess where we are? I don't understand why we're worried about the ominous warnings future. It's ominous. Now you know wild have been distracted by the you trying to be distracted by the the campaign to foment foment racial strife. We have seen over the course of the summer that we tripled the known number of confirmed cases from two million to six million people. As you lead at the beginning of this broadcast when we had one hundred thousand deaths at the end of at the at the beginning of June that was an extraordinary and terrible thing and we're about to hit two hundred, thousand deaths this month, we are very likely to be exceeding three, hundred, thousand deaths. By the time we come to the new, year? So. And that is the reality we have not mounted a campaign to fight this virus. If we decide not to fight this fire, we will only have more fire running through our society. It's going to shift in its places. It was you know New England and the West Coast. Then it became the south. Now it's rising in the Midwest and in college towns and and this is a this is ominous now. I saw this chart the other day about how much people's behavior in reopening because this relates to this question of like what how we're living our lives now. They sort of looked at states it opened early and then states that didn't and they kind of tried to sort of track that economic activity. What they found was wasn't actually that big a difference because the the obstacle isn't the state the state policy it's people don't want to get the virus, right? So. There you can see control states from the states that open you don't get a huge benefit. From opening early because people don't WanNa go out and like that continues to be the kind of weird. ATTORNAL now we're stuck in this country six months into this thing. I think the important thing to understand. One thing is I I one of my colleagues at the Harvard School of Public Health really put it. Well in saying that we've been fooled by the metaphor of talking about are we in the first waiver we in the second wave and it's not a wave. This is this is a fire that's burning. The fire is spreading and you can do well in part of the country I'm in Massachusetts where the the the virus count rate rates are low, but we have lots of. College students now who've come to the state and we're trying to make sure that everybody's tested when they come across the border but but you can't just put a wall up and prevent the fire from coming in. Right. You know we're we're nowhere near being able to say, hey, everybody can just hang out and and and go to the bars hang out in dorms you know people are being expelled for having party in their dorms. That's the nature of the World War in in one of the best performing states here because it's a national outbreak, it's a national. Crisis and it you're you're not gonNA be able to make it. So you've got an isolated bubble at a statewide level. Great Great Point Dr Togo on Day always great talk to you Sir Thank you very much. Thank you. For. More. The economic devastation of trump's failure to stem the virus former Labor Secretary Robert Reich whose latest book is the system who rid how fix it and former secretary of Housing and Urban Development Development Julio. Castro now co chair of the housing. Playbook Project reimagined the federal response, Tornado current and future housing challenges. A Robert. Let me start with you I. I'm sort of an amateur like macroeconomic data consumer. And and it has been funny because in some ways all over the place, you can find real data points out there in the economy that suggest things are coming back or that things are actually doing quite well. You don't have to invent a story like there are data points you can talk to that that show that. then. There's data points about food insecurity were. You know people who have not paid their rent or their mortgage that looks like we're in the midst of. Something truly horrible. Maybe even worse in the great recession, what is how do you think about this sort of con- conflicting stories about where the economy is at right now? I largely Chris it's because there are three separate economies. There's economy the billionaires they're doing better than ever. In fact, there was one day a couple of weeks ago when Jeff bezos actually made thirteen billion dollars in a single day. And then you have the economy of the top ten percent these are managerial and professional workers. They are working remotely most of them and they are doing reasonably well The stock market has caught up with where it was just about caught up with where it was in February a and they own a lot of the stock market and generally speaking they're not wanting. But. Then you have a third economy that is very different from the first two. The third economy is comprised to the bottom ninety percents. Many of these people are either without jobs or they are on the verge of losing jobs. Many of these people are working at very, very, very low rates of income of money of they you have you have many of these people are essential worker. So called they are at risk of getting certain kinds of diseases particularly covid nineteen. They ll exist in a completely separate economy, but they are the vast majority of Americans. You've you've been talking a lot about the sort of housing crisis happening are missed the date on this has been crazy in noticed that we we haven't seen in mass the number of victims you might have anticipated by this point just in terms of people who are behind on their rent, how do you interpret that and what the housing situation of the country looks like right now how insecure is it? Well, we're still potentially facing eviction crisis by one estimate up to thirty million people in this country could face eviction through the end of October but Chris, you're writing a lot of places. We have not seen that wave that idol wave fictions that some folks forecast and I think that we have to give credit here to of those everyday. Americans, that work hard and are doing the responsible thing. They understand their priorities you I think back to the caricature of the Reagan years. And arguments that too. Often Republicans may about out irresponsible. Folks with their money Oh white. You know that that they're gonNA go spend it on X. Y. and Z., and why did they have a fifteen hundred dollar television now it's the. People have been in tough times, even desperate times but what do they do? They understand what they're going to provide for their family. They're gonNA pay their rent I. They do everything they can to take care of that. It really is I, think a powerful demonstration. that. We should have confidence in everyday Americans. We also saw this in in. A different context the housing context. which was the housing first approach to ending homelessness. Housing. First approach set the first thing that you want to do. is to get somebody else in and they were conservative critics and said, what what are you talking about You know they should have to jump through hoops to demonstrate that there's they're clean and sober they gotta go get a job. They gotta jump through these hoops before they get permanent housing and it turns out that the better approach was to trust in to believe in. the responsibility of these everyday Americans and they're showing it again. Well. So so what you just said there about the way that people have used, what money they do have coming in relates to meet the big story here, which is that both. Fiscal level right the the money passed by Congress and signed by the President and the cares act and then subsequent supplementaries and at the the the the level of monetary policy the Fed Robert we have had the largest injection of money economy. Probably ever seen and that has really paid dividends like it has helped people weather the storm and kind of trick a bunch of analysts and members Republican, party into thinking were good now, and my worry is it's running out now and you've duped yourself into thinking that once was enough. I share that worry. Chris Because you know after July thirty first though six hundred dollars a week extra unemployment benefits vanished. A lot of people were relying on those payments to keep them not only in house and home, but also food on their table and what we are seeing from anecdotal evidence although we don't have very clear surveys at this point, it's still too. Early in September. But what we're seeing is a lot of food insecurity, a lot more people who are homeless or on the verge of being evicted I think that secretary castaways exactly right Americans are extraordinarily good and clever and diligent, and they do find ways to take care of themselves but only up to a point if they don't have jobs so many people still don't. They are going to be in trouble. Is that your is that your view on this secretary? Castro. Oh absolutely. I also agree that you know the initial investment if stimulus. It of support for folks that was that was I think a powerful example of the kind of thing that we should be doing supporting families and individuals and but it is it is running out and you combine the fact that the eviction twenty right now and the stimulus many folks is in the rear view mirror. And that Mitch McConnell and his buddies in the Senate have not taken up Heroes Act. That would infuse more stimulus that's needed and include an victims war-torn him with one hundred, billion dollars of direct rental assistance for folks. and. This is where we're at where we're added a president who Instead. Of Getting. Mitch McConnell, the past the heroes actor at least negotiate in good faith. You know he says that there's this temporary evictions moratorium that is a band-aid approach that is allowing back rap pile off allowing late fees and penalties, and truly is going to create a bigger avalanche of potential fictions when it does run out conveniently right after Donald Trump's election. The. Other thing. been. Is We've got state local governments that are running out of money at a very, very rapid clip at a lot of these state and local governments are responsible for everything from healthcare to education social services, and they will not be able to go on I mean, we're seeing the beginning potentially of a real disaster. I don't want to be alarmist about it, but it could be that if nothing is done if there is no additional funding, a lot of people are going to be very, very difficult straits. Yeah. That's my concern as well former Labor Secretary Robert Reich former Hud, Secretary Hulu, and Kostroma thank you both. Thank you Chris. Coming up the voting has already begun in an election year unlike any other Ellen Weintraub Commissioner on the Federal Election Commission she is raising awareness and how you conduct your vote. She joins me right here next. Voting in the twenty twenty presidential election has already begun in some places if you believe it North Carolina last. Friday. Becoming the first state to send out balanced voters and as we now enter the actual voting there are two big things to what was the polls and the politics. You know in the state of the race, the other which might become more determinative and important as we go forward is how the election is administered and how the process of voting goes how fair and equitable it is a for mail in ballots to possible foreign interference. It is a whole bunch of novel territory rendering one of the people whose job it is to help, oversee and Enforce Election Law Ellen Weintraub. She's a commissioner the Federal Election Commission has been very outspoken about protecting the integrity of the election and she joins me now. Commissioner. I know that the FCC has a certain sort of portfolio largely in the regulation of money in politics. You, spend your time thinking a lot about the sort of American election system on. So in a broad sense, like how prepared ready do you think the system is right now? Well. I've got my fingers crossed I. Know that people across the country in the election administration business, which of course, happens at the state and local level are all working very hard night and day to try and get as prepared. It would be really good if they had more resources I was estimated earlier this year by the Brennan Center that States and localities could use an extra four billion dollars in order to. Run this election properly with the ramped up mail in as well as all the extra protections they're going to need for the in person voting and Congress has only allocated ten percent of that amount four, hundred, billion the suck Burg's the decided to throw in another three, hundred million. So that was nice of them they are based sorry basketball stadiums that are donating their space. There are employers who are offering to pay their employees to be poll workers. So the entire country trying to pull together, but it's starting to feel a little bit of a gofundme before the election, which is really not the way we ought to be running our election. Having said that. had. It's gets a little bit. It's a little like Kobe response. Haphazard jurisdiction only balkanized underfunded not really coordinated. SORT, of plucky civil society actors trying to plug in the holes, it seems a little like are covered response but but I agree with you, there is a tremendous amount of a various folks trying to come together to make this election work. And I think that if people vote early, that's my biggest advice to everybody that it that you'll be. Okay. So if you're voting voting absentee, make sure that you are a registered and that you request your cente- ballot early as you pointed out, north, Carolina's already started to send those out. Other states are going to be following along soon. So get your absentee ballot at the soon as possible opportunity, and then get it back at the soon as possible opportunity if you don't want. To put it in the mail most jurisdictions have drop boxes, secured drop boxes at least at the board of elections itself, and often at other places throughout the community get your information from your board of elections from Secretary of State's go to vote that gove and you can follow the links to your own state and locality. Make sure you're getting the liable information and if you've decided to vote in person, do that early to it will take strain off the system on. Election Day. That's a great point. Go to NBC News Dot Com Slash Plan your vote where we've been a running that you see that on your screen there I want to ask you some questions about the law and I know that as a commissioner you can't comment on individual cases. So I want to ask you they are related to things in the news, but they are broad sort of questions of what the law is. There was Washington Post article about Louis de joy the postmaster general in which people named people in the record say two things one that they feel pressured to make donations and the other that after the donations they were reimbursed. Now putting aside whether those allegations are true or not in the specifics here just in terms of the law, is it lawful to have your employees or people that you work for? You say go write a check for this fundraiser, and then later you give them Matt amount new bonus is is that law is a legal Again talking just generally about the state of the law the law protects our right to know who is giving as well as making sure that contribution limits are observed. Therefore, reimbursements are not allowed. So it's illegal to provide a bonus after the fact that would reimburse an employee and if that bonus is coming from a corporate account that could present an issue of illegal corporate contribution. So that's The general framework of the law Another question about the general framework of the law. And this has to do with what campaigns can can't spend money on. There's a article New York Times just today about the some of the filings of expenses for the trump campaign and obviously campaigns have lots of expenses and there's a sort of political question. About like well, are you using your resources? Well, they burn through a lot of cash, but it just as a as a sort of legal matter like. Kenna campaign just spend money on anything. Can you just decide like I'm running for President and? I'm going to buy my family a bunch of properties and call it a campaign there. Basically, what are one of the lanes of like what what is lawful and unlawful in terms of what campaign expenses can be Well the basic limit on campaign spending money is that you can spend it on anything that you think is going to benefit your campaign. What you can't do is use it for personal use, put it in your pocket, use it to pay expenses like gym memberships or a country club dues or buying yourself new clothing paying your mortgage on your on your home going on vacation because you know you really are exhausted from all that campaigning all of those things would be personal use and they would not be allowed. And I imagine there's like a pretty good line of like law. There's been a lot of prosecutions there'd been a lot of cases that have been rulings about which side of the line campaign expenses on. There is a great body of law on this, but you know we still get questions about things that haven't arisen in quite the exact factual predicate that shows up one day and then. We have to answer questions of course, one problem is that one way people can get those questions addressed is to request an advisory opinion from the VC, and as you know, takes four commissioners to issue in advisory opinion on right now, and for most of the last year we've only had three. Yes that's because the president has not appointed anyone rendering the FCC essentially A. full-strength body. Let's put it that way. The Ellen Weintraub is there and working very hard on our behalf. Thank you so much for making the time. I, appreciate it. I pledged. Still Ahead we're in for the fourth month of sustained black lives matter protests in cities across the country and a new study tracking the movements disproves one of the president's talking points the findings after this. Protesters are in the streets of Rochester new for the six straight night tonight, and that's after video was released showing officers holding forty one year old Daniel prude on the ground after placing a spit hood over his head back in March prude died days. Later, a medical examiner ruled his death, a homicide caused by quote complications of a fixture in the setting of physical restraint medical examiner. Well, there've been violent encounters between activists in Rochester police officers, filing pepper balls at protesters. Protest last night so far nights to be very peaceful. Few days ago. The first major survey from the last several months of protests was released by Princeton University's bridging the divide initiative and its examination demonstrations and political violence. In America, the survey found quote in more than ninety three percent of all demonstrations conducted black lives matter movement demonstrators have not engaged in violence or destructive activity while authorities have used force in over fifty four percent of the demonstrations in which they have engage. Joining me now is also. System professor of politics at Princeton University who studies protests and unrest, and it's great to have you a professor and I know this was done. Colleagues at Princeton who did this study and you've done studies of some of the things that happened nine, hundred, sixty s I guess the first question is like these terms. Themselves are very difficult and loaded about what counts as destruction or violence, and what you count as police use of force and those deficits themselves seemed to be at the heart over the sort of political and cultural battle over what the protests themselves me. That's absolutely right and sociologists. Social scientists are generally have had to come up with criteria where a protests that is coated as violent as one in which their significant injury or death or you know a arson. But that's got to cross the threshold and as you mentioned, ninety, three percent of these events have been peaceful and that really has allowed the black lives matter movement to capture kind of moral high ground in the country in the larger debate as people tried to make sense of this. How how how? These reactions happened in the past I. I'm thinking of the nineteen sixties which you've studied particularly, and I know in Ferguson. There was because they were both on the streets in Ferguson and there were stores that were burned down there. Restore that were broken into There were there were gunshots in the street, the not necessarily directed police, but there was violence on the streets. There was also a huge largely peaceful protests. How common I guess is that mix of elements in the setting of street protests. It's quite common in the nineteen sixty s we had hundreds of these events I. mean this was part of what drew me to this research is I was aware of events like the watts uprising or Newark Detroit but turns out that we're more than seven hundred, fifty protests in which protesters engaged in a more aggressive, more violent resistance to state violence, white supremacy, and so I was interested in trying to understand the that period and what we see is that people and as you noted earlier, one of the most common patterns is there's a kind of a esscalation that happens the police. There's some incident maybe you know young man is shot by the police that leads to protest. Then there's a kind of crackdown. That intern escalates things. So that pattern is actually quite common both in the US and internationally and I think what the things that's interesting about that study is I really helped put the US case in a global context where the kinds of things we're seeing here are actually really common around the world and speak to some of the challenges that America faces as polarized society with high degrees of inequality and that kind of mobilizes as calls for justice on the street and also non trivial amounts of state repression. The the map shows. This is sort of scope. Of these protests that that did happen you know sort of almost unprecedented fashion. And sort of divides between riots and protests again, there's sort of a initial question there but there's another sort of lesson from some your research and from others about the perception in the media about the nature of the protests and the battle over which element of that, right. So if a thousand people marched peacefully, also stores or broken into a building lit on fire and people throw rocks police the question of which of those two stories about the night is the story about what happened. Yeah. That's that's I think one of the most important things that I took away from my own researchers, right? These are these are contentious events complicated. There are incidents of people throwing water bottles, cops, and cops retaliating in some kind of aggressive way, and that can escalate or it can de escalate and how do you how do you describe something where there is some? Moderate or a small percent of a protester initiated violence and what? What happens often is the media then is set to interpret these events and as as there's an old saying in the TV business. If it bleeds, it leads right into violence is inherently newsworthy. You could from from from the media's perspective or a hover a plane that lands piece that it doesn't crash right? So violence and conflict are inherently more dramatic in the nineteen sixties protests organizers really began. To understand the violence help to draw the media and so they made themselves the target, the objects violence to draw national media and have it be sympathetic coverage But that's not always what happens and in some cases, we've seen a lot of front page coverage of, Hey look at these images of police engaging in violence against protesters. But there's also been you know attended attention to the incidents of. Buildings going up in flames, and that's led in part to. Softening of support for black lives matter even as overall. Sixty percent of the country's still supports police reform as the main message they're taking away. That's a really really good point and that sort of the way in which this is all mediated. So sort of central to the story Omar Wasser. Thanks so much for making fun tonight. Thank you for having me. With an administration marked with a prison sentences, scandals, peach mint. Is there anything that could change a? person's mind about President trump before the election what that means the next fifty seven days after this. Two months till election we are at the start of what I suspect will be extended period of bombshell revelations about Donald, trump. Jeffrey Atlantic peace with the president calling Americans, who died and we're losers and suckers. That's the latest piece of damning reporting there already been to books by member of the trump family and a former national security advisor. Then this month three more books come out from former trump trump's former fix Michael Cohen from former FBI agent Peter Struck, and from Watergate Journalists Bob Woodward. With devastating inside information on trump has two, thousand, sixteen campaign and his presidency. All of it would make for a major cancer controversy for another candidate. The question about trump is would anything out there about his personality change anyone's mind anymore. Discuss the implications that may have for the next fifty seven days. I want to bring in on ungeared dossiers, Time magazine editor at large and author of winners take all enjoys fans for us attorney for the northern district of Alabama Joyce. Let me start with you. Alabama a born and raised and they're right now you've got a competitive. We think Senate seat for Doug Jones there and I just wonder like. The degree to which any of this about trump personally about the kind of person is or the things he says penetrates in the ecosystem that you exist in down there in the state and local media just like or if it matters anyone. Chalked it up one way or the other. So I have to confess a California girl, he moved to the south, but that's said. Is the topic of the day. Yeah. Politics is the topic of the day in Alabama like every place else and I. Think something that it can be difficult for folks to focus on particularly for me I'm guilty of this as we get caught up in the doings of this administration because we're interested in these issues that's not what life is like for most Americans were in the middle of the pandemic and a financial crisis. I think these revelations even if there's just something extraordinary in, them will not have a lot of impact. We've seen frankly extraordinary revelations from the start of trump's first campaign on what impact with people right now, our kitchen table issues will they be able to pay the rent hand they provide their family with food how are they going to get through this pandemic and so those are the issues. That, my sense is that this election will turn on. Yeah. I. Think there's always this sort of temptation with trump that because he's so anomalous and so odious in so many ways because he. Does and says things that are genuinely outrageous. To sort of be lured into running against him on that, and I think you know that happened in two thousand sixteen. I don't think it was like a crazy idea that she would run on that. But I also do think that like some of the most boring things about him like. He's trying to take your healthcare away and suing the over the ACA are sort of the more salient but the hardest kind of penetrate from a campaign perspective. Well. I think it's. As much as there are these revelations every few hours for the last few years. I. Think it's important to remember that his resilience to them is not a property of him so much as property of where our country is right now. I think we are in a cold civil war as I've described it where we have these two mutually impermeable societies that have their own temples of reality, their own tribal rituals. Their own media, their own sense of what is true and false and Very few things crossed the line, and so I think a revelation on its own and Atlantic story on its own, which exists completely within one of those tribal world and not within the other those things on their own do very little but I think there is a temptation to fatalism about that. That is also wrong. It is not the case that nothing crosses over from one kingdom to. The other if that were the case, trump's approval rating and electoral odds would have been the same every day for the last few years and we all know that's not true. They go up and down. So things get through but it's important to understand what gets through and I think often Democrats continue to speak in a tribal language that doesn't quite get true or or have too much faith. In these scandals doing the work on their own and I think what's important now in these last fifty, whatever days is to really find deep guttural values based language that speak to ninety nine percent of Americans. That tell a story about this corruption that has gone on for years tell a story about this heartlessness about this cruelty that ties it to kitchen table issues. That explains that the reason you don't have healthcare is because of men like this, but doesn't simply rest on the laurels of this being a bad dude. Yeah Yeah I think that's well said I think it's interesting when you think about the different universes that people get their news from and stuff right the pandemic is sort of the ultimate test that in so many ways this is what's so Fascinating and in some ways, hope also sort of depressing about it because at one level, it does cut through you know different. Realities it does cut through different sort of markets. For information you have seen lots of poll showing like large majorities of American across political divides are worried about the virus are wearing masks for instance, right? So there is a kind of silent majority of Americans Joyce that is like the silent of people who are still worried about the pandemic in the midst of and I do think the kind of silent majority campaign is sort of what Biden's running joyce like that is in some ways ironically, the sort of value proposition here is it like I'm speaking to the non shouters who are like worried about the state we're in. This is one of the most interesting facets of this election Chris. The notion that a public health crisis could have been politicized to a point where wearing a mask is a sign that you're a Democrat in refusing to wear. One is way of showing support for president trump I think that something bits virtually unparalleled in our history and the question as we get closer to November is. Whether people will synthesize all the different aspects of what that means. For instance, if we watch increasing rates of infection as children go back to school with poor plans for for bringing them back into the classroom as universities continue to have soaring infection rates will have to see whether that issue crosses the barrier between the two different tribes and helps people make their selection in this election. And then the other thing I think about on is I, think the Cold War framework powerful one is. The cut like whoever is president next, right? Let's say it is not Donald Trump and it is Joe Biden is then going to have to attempt to govern a country in the midst of both the sort of ruined of the pandemic and also the colts were won't get better sound like I mean in some ways, it's sort of the promises like maybe we can make it a little better. It's not Donald Trump and I'm just not that. Hopeful that from. Yeah I mean I. I have maintained for the last few years while being very focused on Donald trump and his depredations that he is a kind of hunting boil on a very badly disease body politic. That is. Has, has problems on a scale that dwarf even his presidency and that made him possible and so the question then becomes if you're joe, biden in you inherit this. What are you going to do to create a kind of super majority for a restoration of some kind of decency and frankly the advancement to level of decency we've never had in many ways and it's going to require something that frankly Joe Biden has a lot of headroom on which is really having passion among his followers and stirring that in this home stretch. Yeah, it's GonNa. Be Interesting to see that onto dos and enjoys fans. Have you both this Labor Day thank you for taking some time with us that does it for our very special edition of all. Thank you for joining us. We'll be back at eight PM Eastern tomorrow, Night Goodnight. Tremaine Lee host of into America a podcast from MSNBC join me as we go into the roots of inequality and economic injustice racial injustice, and then when you add health is a house injustice into what's at stake people are going to be voting not for person but forced to bill and into what comes next into America a podcast about who we are as Americans and who we to become new episodes, every Monday Wednesday and Thursday subscribe now.

donald trump president President Trump Chris reporter United States Jeffrey Goldberg Mary trump President Fred trump Washington Post General Louis Joy Atlantic America Vietnam Joe Biden New York trump camp Arne Duncan White House Randi Weingarten
To ban a "Mockingbird"

Retropod

04:18 min | 2 years ago

To ban a "Mockingbird"

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. It's a controversy that comes around like clockwork every few years the school district in Virginia has made national news after pulling copies of the books to kill a Mockingbird to kill a Mockingbird are banned from economic county public schools. Classic novel is on the chopping block. The beloved Mississippi school district removing to kill a Mockingbird from junior high reading list. Most recently it happened in the public school district of Beloit, Mississippi, which removed the Pulitzer prize winning book from eighth grade reading list because quote, there was some language in the book that makes people uncomfortable. That's what school board vice president Kenny Holloway told the sun herald, he didn't specify which passengers but the history of schools having a problem with the book over its language goes back decades. In fact, Harper Lee's classic novel has inspired strong feelings for as long as it's been in print. It was sex that caused the first big uproar in nineteen sixty six just a few years after the book was published the school board of Hanover county Virginia, Dan, the book as immoral literature. Because the plot centers on an accusation of rape Lee did not respond kindly. She said the Richmond times dispatch. A letter included a ten dollar donation to enroll the Hanover county school board in first grade. She said their critiques, quote makes me wonder if any of its members can breed. Later controversies tended to focus on a different element of the book. It's language on race. Specifically, the N word, which appears nearly fifty times throughout the book almost always in dialogue. Harper Lee, pointedly did not censor the word in a book, and the novel is widely celebrated as a condemnation of the racist, language and employs. But not everyone has seen it that way in one thousand nine hundred one the book was hit with accusations that it did psychological damage to the racial integration movement in Warrenton ship, Illinois in two thousand and four a thirteen year old in Hillsborough, North Carolina found the language uncomfortable. So he made a shirt covered in the N word in war to English class to make a point. Of course, he was promptly sent to the principal's office where he declared that he wanted the book out of the school system in two thousand sixteen the mother of a biracial student went before the school board in academic county Virginia saying that she recognized Mockingbird is great literature, but quote, very so much racial slurs in their offensive wording that you can't get past it. According to James the rue of the American Library association. Most books that get challenged get challenged once or twice, but Mockingbird is one of the few that has been challenged time. And again over decades, the rue says, quote, I think because it does such a deaf job of capturing a moment in history. And while Harper Lee isn't around anymore to chide school districts who try to ban her book, plenty of taken up, the torch Arne Duncan the secretary of education under President Barack Obama encouraged his Twitter followers to buy copies of the classic for other US classrooms in the wake of the latest decision in Biloxi. He wrote quote when school district's removed to kill a mocking from the reading list. We know we have real problems. That perhaps the most astonishing thing at least to Lee is the fact that we are still talking about the book at all. Just listen to what she told a w q x report in one of her only interviews way back in nineteen sixty four. I never expected that the book would sell in the first place. I was hoping for quick in most death at the hands of the reviewers. Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening special. Thanks to AVI. Silk for reporting the story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Harper Lee Dan Richmond times Mike Rosen Washington Post Mississippi school district Hanover county school Virginia Richard pod Hanover county Virginia T. Rowe Pulitzer prize Barack Obama Washington Kenny Holloway vice president sun herald Warrenton rape
Talking to Our Kids about Covid-19

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

10:22 min | 10 months ago

Talking to Our Kids about Covid-19

"Corona virus fact versus fiction is sponsored by US studio guys. Are you having fun? Not being in school or is it. It's only five yes at at Sidley. Might not be in the WESTMIS- year. So your mom works with Andre. Gupta if you're a parent like me. You've probably gotten at least some questions from your kids about the outbreak. Maybe they've been asking. Just what is an outbreak? How serious isn't or maybe just simply? Why are they not going to school? You don't WanNa scare your kids but you also want them to be careful and understand why they can't play with their friends. That's why in today's episode. I invited my Collie. Cnn anchor. Kate Baldwin. Who's also a mother herself to talk about how we as parents can get through this together with our kids. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. You have two daughters. I have three daughters. Your daughters are five and two five and two five and I can't believe Kate that you have is still remember before you had any kids. Oh Yeah Yeah. Kids are young but did you talk to them about it and I. I did what I always do. Which is I typically. Try to protect them from the news. Which isn't easy. Obviously because of my job. But that's how I approach it when I'm dealing with a stressful situation that strategy speaking to kind of the unprecedented nature of this completely failed on me here then my daughter came running out of school and she said mom there is something called Corona and everybody is getting sick says my five year old and I did not handle it. Well I said Oh. It's nothing to worry about Cecilia. We just need to wash our hands more but then that failed because her imagination was running she heard about this thing and so we're walking down the street New York. She points at Amanpour Man. Does he have the sickness? Oh no no okay. Come on Sweetie does he have this sickness mom and it continued and continued and it was that moment rows like Kate. It is time to call on the experts because this is a new situation. So Kate asked. Her daughter's pediatrician and other experts. For advice on how best to talk to her kids about the outbreak first and foremost through all my conversations hours with them. The most important thing that children of all ages need is reassurance. While we don't have all the answers. They need reassurance in this time of uncertainty that they are going to be okay and that. Mommy and daddy are likely going to be okay for older kids. In terms of not avoiding the subject that may come in the form of misinformation that they are going to hear from their friends or they're going to see on social media just having an open dialogue with them asking them. What questions do you have? What are you concerned about for younger kids? They suggested and I thought this was really fantastic to start with just demystifying terms. I love that's great. It's it's educational and yet reassuring at the same time. Yeah and they universally said check yourself. I check your own stress levels. I because just as important as what you were saying to them is how you're acting in how you're saying into them so if you're behaving in a highly stressed manner your children may simply be picking up on an emulating this behavior and also then to my obvious faulty start. Do not avoid the subject because their lives are being interrupted just like our lives are being interrupted and they have questions and then their imaginations run wild school closures can be a nightmare situation for some parents. Especially if you're also working at the same time like many parents out there last week C. N. N.'s senior health producer. Nadia conveying found out. Her children schools were closing in a way. It wasn't surprising because obviously we were reporting that schools were closing. But it's still not quite the same when it happens to you like it's just a lot. I mean we have two kids. We've a four year old almost five year old and seven year old and they go to school. That's the childcare. And that's what rely on so that we can actually go to work and so it's a lot of hoops that also that you're thinking about like how do I work and make sure for taking care of our kids. Nadia is like many of you juggling multiple jobs right now. She's reporting on the corona virus while also taking care of two young children at home. Our team visited Nadia and her family at home last week to see how they've been doing. It's challenging. It's been hard to manage obviously working at C. N. N. covering this has been really intense on our family. My kids have whenever there's like. Oh are you working again? They're like Mike. Yeah they're like because of corona virus. Like yeah so that's tough. I mean so. That's already hard enough but this this definitely adds a whole other level of pressure. Fortunately for Nadia a former Teacher Nora. School reached out to families in the neighborhood offering childcare. Help I think that's the only way I would have worked for us. I mean we're fortunate. We were able to do that when we have the fines to. We're lucky because there was someone available that we had already been vetted and we knew and I felt comfortable with so that helped even with the extra help. It's been challenging to manage her son Max's homeschooling. I don't know if we didn't realize what we were supposed to expect but like Max's teachers Max's in first grade. She this giant schedule. It's like from eight fifteen. I'll read it to you. I'll pull it up on Google classroom but it's crazy it's like goes from eight fifteen to three forty five day. Yeah I mean this is a lot of work. We haven't done it that way. We just can't like one not even here. I've had to have someone else helping with that. Nadia says her kids know that school is out because of the corona virus. I mean we've talked about it. It's interesting I think they've had like little lessons at school. They've been much more like where about washing their hands. They're like we have to wash for twenty seconds. They know about like sing. Happy Birthday twice. I wouldn't say they're always remember too but You know they're aware of it. I think we've been watching a video about germs. That's what they said not. Everyone has been able to make it work like Nadia's family but there's still a large population of kids. I think who really rely on the school for their services and their parents there who I mean they work shift jobs you know and they either they have to go into work or maybe they don't have work now or they don't have the things like they may not have a computer like the work that we have to do for school lies on us having both the computer or device of some sort and internet. Like what. If you don't have that stuff right and frankly you have a digital divide between wealthy and on wealthy. Here's Randi Weingarten President of the American Federation of Teachers. So why would you actually think that you're going to replace schooling with online when so many kids at home don't have wi fi so we're gonNA have to just figure out how to help create engagement and how to help create calm and how to get the facts out to help kids as much as possible put schools and communities are doing what they can to lift? Some of the childcare and financial load schools aren't just schools. They're amazing social safety. Nets and over. Thirty million students rely on schools for their meals. Cnn spoke to. Arne Duncan the former education secretary under President Obama and so we have places like Chicago giving out one hundred thousand meals. You have in la distribution centers around the city with their feeding kids. Were now working on the learning part. And you're seeing some very different things. You're seeing high tech and LOW TECH IN PLACES LIKE CLEVELAND. You're seeing on bus routes People dropping off food and homework. He says he's been seeing a lot of great leadership and creativity on the local and state level. You're seeing in places like Miami where every child has a device in there a little bit further ahead. Some very good blended learning going on there. You're seeing school districts from Indiana to Utah where there isn't access. Wifi WIFI enabled buses being parked in those neighborhoods to close the digital divide. So you're seeing amazing. Creativity people working really hard again. I want to be really careful. Because there's people who are legitimately suffering out there for sure but the reality is that these things are unfolding in front of US real time and for my girls. You know it's going to be one of the most significant events in their lives. My eleven year old's birthday. Was this past Monday. She was upset because we cancelled her party. But we still spend time together as a family. We went for a walk outside and while she didn't get her party I reminded her. It was a birthday. She'll never forget we'll be back tomorrow. Thanks for listening. Aw Fast and effective. Communication is crucial as business. Transitions to a remote world with you studio. Your enterprise can easily communicate with employees partners and customers remotely through private audio and video. Podcasts used studio will host manage and distribute your company's podcast working seamlessly with your existing production software so you can send personalized communications swiftly and securely. That's why you studio is trusted by top. Companies like Nike Dell facebook. Request Your Free Thirty Day trial today at the letter. You Studio Dot Com.

Nadia Kate Baldwin Cnn Dr Sanjay Gupta US Corona WESTMIS Max Andre facebook Amanpour Man Google Cecilia Randi Weingarten Sweetie New York CLEVELAND Miami
Al Talks with one of his Heroes, Harlem Children's Zone Founder Geoffrey Canada

The Al Franken Podcast

53:02 min | 1 year ago

Al Talks with one of his Heroes, Harlem Children's Zone Founder Geoffrey Canada

"Hey everybody it's the Al Franken podcast we've got a great show today we're chain and this is one that I'm especially excited about because my guest is Geoffrey Canada Eduation that's the rate ninety percent go to college now President Obama was a huge fan of the and this is going to be a change let's see what can I say about Jeffrey. I admire him tremendously nothing now he is the founder exceeded beyond anyone's wildest expectations Geoffrey Canada is the founder of the Harlem Children Surrounded by crime and drugs and violence and extreme poverty broken families abuse use neglect addiction. You name it and he did this by pretty much throwing everything at these problems from training childhood education creating the expectation that every child will go to college and graduate from College President every new program then has to be paid for so I am pleased to have Geoffrey Canada here all the candidates developed in Harlem I was a big supporter of the promise neighborhood program and I fought in the Senate on with food and food after school and the results have been astounding ninety seven percent high school and so and he has changed the lives of the children in Harlem who when he got there they were growing up in a war zone the Harlem Children's zone and he and Education Secretary Arne Duncan created promise neighborhoods which would replicate the MOM Gli turned around education in Harlem Four Zero two prospective parents during pregnancy You know to read to your baby to your to your toddler to your your kids providing early providing healthcare in school including mental health both for the kids and their families continuous in I did not vote for the level funding that Obama had asked for and by the way if you if you care about deficits elected Democratic president we have very very wide disparities here in the twin cities a lot of people don't know that after two thousand ten Congress you're in Minneapolis and the north side in a very poor primarily African American neighborhood here in Minneapolis Vollmann of of parents after school programs sports the Arts Summer Programs Fun Fun Summer Programs Uh of the Harlem Children's Zone which is per t. well-known among education circles and basically because if we have a republican president Republicans in Congress suddenly don't care about deficits but when we have a democratic the help committee in Health Education Labor and Pensions Education Committee and was able to get funding for the north side achievement zone he college would that fair correct us what you did there is this movie waiting for Superman and basically he's super man in the movie President Obama wanted to adopt kind of exactly what you did in Harlem and are these promise neighborhoods and I was a big advocate for those and we have one here in Minneapolis we we've where in Minneapolis just arrived we both came from from New York today and thank you for joining owns and I'm just thrilled to be here thrilled to be back thrilled to be with you what the genesis was not got back to Harlem in one thousand nine hundred eighty three coming from Boston Honam was a complete disaster open but you couldn't watch the slaughter I was seeing on the streets of Harlem weakened in week out and think Oh went wrong how did I miss that the kids don't look so good after all it was hard to deal with because when you give your life in your soul powerful in it so the genesis was your realization that what you're doing was not just not sufficient the history of the Harlem Children's zone twenty years ago you started this thing you know a little more than twenty years ago and I'll tell you in drug dealing on the streets graffiti everywhere fill all over and from there it actually got worse by eighty five eighty religion less likely to go to prison I mean we knew that about we we knew that head start is a great program we run a head start program we think it's terrific L. and happy you invited me to be on your podcast mature I'm just thrilled okay let's just go in to communities like Harlem were literally falling down around the children and I was running some programs Alan I it's coming apart the social fabric of our community was literally being shredded right in front of our eyes and I realized that they were pretty good but I looked at some of the data of what was happening to our kids and I realized that we weren't doing enough we weren't reaching enough standing that said you know what we got to give prospective parents some training on that that's your baby academy our is it after school program it's a great we were working with kids from five to twelve and we thought that was really terrific and providing some social services running a single program for young people so you develop something cradle to career what was the inspiration or the under when you're teenagers and the truth of the matter is every parent knows this it is every single year they're alive the most important fix you hit the crack epidemic going on young people murdering one another the city felt totally out of control and the advocate I'm five and by twelve will be on the right project but it hadn't had scarred headstart was around what sixty four and there is he graduated from high school more the girls get pregnant less and kids who went ahead starter more likely to go to college and complete calm and slavery we were talking about cradle to prison pipeline that time and I was regional coordinator for it and we started bringing in black intellectuals antic and you really think you're doing good and later you find out wasn't so good it made me really have to step back and think we've got to do something more baby college college college well we'll look it was interesting because while this was going on Marian Wright Edelman the founder also you look at the kids and it looked great and they look like they were having fun but I would run into these kids four or five years later and realize hey something happened something communities what middle class families take for granted and we're not doing anything in zone today that a solidly middle upper middle class from all different disciplines medicine social work ought after school and we were trying to figure out what's the right combination between zero to three trying to make sure that that child into a high quality pre K. program headstart or of the pre K. program and then aww wasn't about a good program which head start is and these kinds of places you had to do something more substantial than just just wasn't working it just wasn't working wasn't working this was a time before people had the concept of cradle to career right entire childhood to get them into college and then get them through college that's hard to do if you talk about a middle class children's Defense Fund had launched something called the black community crusade for children the Tagline for the crusade was that black children faced the worst crisis kids it was good what we were doing people were excited about it but the truth of the matter was we really weren't making much of a difference doing that we were doing one of things if you were really going to change the trajectory for our children and it's through that process that I realized this wasn't about doing any one been ample evidence that head start works kids who are in head start don't get left back a grade as much as the kids who don't and that the hey people kept asking me out what's the most important time in the child's life right I mean is it like when they're four is it like when the aid is it like environment because all of these conditions that kids live under have a dramatic impact on the life and their ability to be successful enters headstart this is what's GonNa do it see that fifteen year old with a gun over here we could have got him in head start it would have all been fine the whole thing often talking about a single parent and we're figuring out one of the obstacles in his parent's life if it's substance abuse we want to get them into treatment Neapolis north side of cheapen zone is in one such neighborhood and has become a promise neighborhood so you're you're talking social workers so you're are you visiting the home are you bringing parents in and very often we're talking about a single parent what does zone does and we're doing it not just focusing on academics with looking at social services we WANNA make sure their families are doing well we're looking at sports and recreation in art in other words we're trying to give our kids a well rounded comprehensive set of support in their life for the don't that's something happens and you can't find fifty dollars to pay that extra bill to fix the only mode of Transportation Dan how Seoul killing it is to honestly not have fifteen dollars on that you just it's mental health problems we WANNA get them into see mill health specialist if it's domestic violence we want to get them into a safe ask family that Mo- maybe both parents are working as hard it's not easy for them either but if you're talking about the I see and in the country that we see in neighborhoods like Harlem was Yup and here in in nation you have and the anxiety that so many poor people live with every single day kid comes in and just says we were working with kids we thought at the most important time in their life from five to twelve but we really we thought that's it if you get a men they're going to be fine if you can get them ah now I'm just going to ignore them well I think that all of us who had kids going few realized Oh yeah which which mad at a lot but it was through this work with the crusade that I began to really say we had to recreate and it's attention and so much focus they don't have the psychic energy to give to that child at the level that child needs that support the population that you're you're working with you did have drug use you did have violent did have growing up just being really is not doing for their kids we're trying to get parents good a prenatal healthcare we're trying to make sure they know all about brain development child's life is today right now they're twelve it's right now if they're four is right now can I gave my kids during double issues and poverty and itself and just this issue my my wife and I were talking about this today people don't under- opponent of this is especially if you're piling one upon another that's what happens in these communities right you don't have just one issue you end up having dangerous neighborhood you had all these adverse childhood experiences that Paul tough wrote about how children succeed that we I need to buy a notebook and you honestly just don't have money for the notebook for the child it is demoralizing it is depressing all of us wish we could just sort of you know have a grandparent or something take those kids for a few years I was actually my grandfather did take what so you know Paul name the book he wrote after US Paul tough whatever it takes because that's what we figured out we've got to figure out what the I'm trying to make sure every year starting in elementary school every year that child is on a path leading them towards college that all the fun out of their life and the one thing you have these sort of role models for kids people called coaches who you know the the people live like this day in day out and wears you down and part of the issue with poverty is it's not a temporary condition at college and then we're going to do whatever it takes us to make sure that kid gets to you if it's home visits we're going to visit to home if it's making sure the kid makes they have to have a minimum of seventy five or they can't play and also you develop these things called friends yes remember them and here's the thing you out I am so frustrated because when when it comes time to cutting budgets educated often say we're going to have to keep the essential things right which is the sort of reading how many in our elementary program middle school programs high school programs college programs and those who are graduating so we feel like right now we've got well let's we loved the arts I know probably fifteen or twenty percent of the kids in my school end up graduating because they're involved in a sports team does it take to get this child from where they ought to where we want them to be and where do we want him to be we want them to be on a trajectory heading into college and completed but Roland Fryer the economist from Harvard did a study on our schools and he actually demonstrated our kids you have fun to that too yeah won the won why kids turn so quickly drugs and alcohol is that we've removed other data in our school there is no achievement gap our kids outperform white kids in New York state in reading and math on the common core so this is you just woke up and say boy I want more Algebra today and I can't wait to go to school that wasn't how was me and my friends growing up read loved the sea are actually more disadvantage than the average kids in Harlem so we intentionally that's hard to court he he's one it does and getting involved with drugs with GonNa do often what keeps a kid interested in school are those after school they are and I will tell you how to accept winning and how to accept losing and at the same time how to work as a team which skills that are so critical when you get ways we do it we have two schools one of our schools we built a brand new school right in the middle of the largest housing project in sixty of our kids who are in college and we've got our pipeline set I know how many children come into the early part of the pipe line and baby college eating in rhythmic right we're going to keep those and these other than luxury things have to go that tallest sport that's all the arts and I tell folks maybe they knew kids one major mistake that I made when we started this project twenty years ago it was that we did not by a proper enter the labour market oh man employers that's what they want they want people working teams people were creative that's right gee that's maybe we should do some creative eighty in Harlem when no one wanted twenty years ago Alice hard to believe but they actually giving away the real estate in Holland because nobody wanted to live the how is it is it turned out okay we've been at this now for twenty years and it's one of the things I tell folk this stuff doesn't happen overnight now we've got about nine hundred was zone and those kids get to come to our school they have top priority over anybody else coming in our school so we want the kid from the projects to be in our schools of stuff you know and okay so we kind of been leading up to this it sounds like we're this is what your theory is and as it might be and the city owned about a third of all the buildings and they no one wanted to live in the buildings they couldn't make the rent rolls and at that time Giuliani was mayor a week and then you're out of it or two months out of a deer people who are growing up struggling every single day to make it and this child who needs so much medical appointments we're going to do that getting their parents and the drug treatment we're going to do that it's making sure that they have after school programs or they're not hanging on the street with the gang that we didn't anticipate how quickly Harlem was GonNa gentrify are you a part of the reason is gentrifying yeah we we absolutely in places Going for a million dollars in some of the rest of the stuff I the band pot of our work was community if I could have raised a bunch of money to have bought buildings in Harlem I would have allowed those we were trying to make this thing work and it took us a while to actually figure it all out and get it to work but I feel like it's working well right now we still by no means perfect is still stuff we have to get better at does any of this now get complicated by the fact that Harlem is gentrified Oh yeah made it very complicated if folks who have brought those million dollar apartments on sending those kids to public schools they're sending their kids to private schools so we still have plenty of work to do there they're in the traditional public schools if you look at public schools in Harlem other all filled with kids of color who are poor were part of the reason Harlem gentrified and I thought it would happen I just thought it would happen five years leading in it actually happened it happened so quickly these kids were at the bottom they're the ones who getting out of school quick and easiest that's why we can make the statement in the facts bear out that our kids and he just said look we city these buildings if you want one raise your hand I and nobody wanted him because they thought Harlem with never come back now those more so than they did now a bunch of folks at our suggestion actually Organiz created co-ops and bought their apartment you could buy your own anything about coaches not just the teaching you set of Skills Outta dribble a basketball but they actually teaching you how to go through life how to work hard and if you look at the data on kids in the projects they have the worst outcomes of any of the Kitchen Harlem so these two kids at even in Harlem where kids were struggled apartment for two hundred and fifty dollars and we had hundreds of people who did that and when Harlem changed they were able to settle department and they may before we know it it was like Oh my goodness look what's going on the rents have gotten so high and so expensive it's almost impossible for working class people to live in buildings to become places where our return and college graduates could get their first starter augments efficiency apartment so now we're getting these WANNA interrupt you for a second because what we're talking about is a tremendous success if you talk about graduation rates you can give me some of the stats but the premise ah Obama and Arne Duncan we're doing right so a lot of them say well you had the Harlem Children's zone had yeah that Hong them and the kids are you cherry picking kids one of the Issues that people have raised about our schools and other schools fighting is very very well respected writer on education was he wrote about our struggles and how thirty years of hard work trying to get this thing right and I will tell you this we didn't have it right at the beginning and is one of the things that pull tough wrote about We were even though our Harlem kids kids in our school in slightly not tremendously but slightly more disadvantaged than the kids in haul them this is not cherry picking live in a place that has this reputation Holum I live in Harlem I used to be something that drove people away now it's something that people sort of you know it Jeff Re Canada and I just don't want you to just get modest somehow right now now I see that you weren't going to is graduating every year from college is so expensive that's going to be very hard for kids even with a college degree to be able to afford the two of the big factors people point to and now we've had these promise neighborhoods for four five six years the conditions can't be replicated when President Obama has said he was going to replicate I'll work if you hear his original announcement he talked about at least a billion dollars breath and what success looks like a lot of places its folk from the outside the siding to come in because it's really a cool thing now of money a lot of move to the south and that was great for them so you could sell your place in Harlem for two hundred fifty thousand dollars and moved back to Georgia and so what does that mean for the cohort of Kizer entering school now and people often wonder well Jeff Still Poor kids in Harlem their whole bunch of them this this is the sequence I when I first begin this work people said it couldn't be done you just couldn't turn around a place like hall and create a safe who is famous in education circles as the man who created incredibly ambitious social experiment in Harlem and of what I'm GonNa ask here is there are some folks that say this is hard to replicate and that's what the promise neighborhoods role about that's what but I think the lesson that we have learned and what I tell people around the country who was interested in this work his that you have to plan on six a number of advantages if you want to say the Harlem when you started ahead a certain but one was you they say that you can't replicate still all places and one of the reasons as you know I'm here is that the No side achievement zone was the most them without a sufficient timeframe for them to really work and I think from the very beginning the effort was handicapped yet we're GONNA have to spend at least a billion he never got anything close to that so the promise neighborhoods that were started started without sufficient capital behind probably I bought me a place in Harlem now we should have just made sure that the residents benefited closely replicated effort that we had seen from promise neighborhood so when people ask me around the country who else has something on the ground clean wholesome environment for folk so then after we did it they said well you only one who could do it and I was like well and then they will the cost of living is much lower and you can just you mental down South Down South the modest okay so anyway but they also say that that Wall Street you've had some benefactors those seem to be this and they're pointing them saying a war not getting the same kind of results but it took you longer than four or five or six years great questions found that you would say gold look at There were three places that I would mention the first place I would mention with the Minneapolis northside achievement zone aw what Sondra Samuels is doing here in Minneapolis I think put to rest that idea that no one else could do this one of the challenges being a Dick it's funny because folks don't quite understand how seductive the life of hustling and crime is led to so many of our kids are destroying their lives and the gang scene in our communities kids who are going to college they don't get involved in that supporting this state this is something that we don't ever really talk about how I know one how kids who's in jail thirteen that we spend a fortune on the tax revenues from Harlem were all weighed negative meaning we will always paying more and special Ed and mental he said those kids are trying to figure out and they figured out a way to cheat on their timesheets I said Oh so instead of selling drugs I'll kids doing white collar dollars for this and fought for federal yes you did and quite successfully here's the other thing though people thought well yeah you got all of that they've realized by disinvesting in these communities you are actually are hurting your city any city that has these real pockets of Poverty Wall Street money and I would say to folks this is about a vision and about a group of folk who care enough about their community that aalto and emergency rooms in jails and prisons and probation then people were paying in taxes because we didn't have enough people working the benefit of the house or car and interested Sucker for not doing I'm GonNa Hustle I've got courage I've got some skills this is gonNa make them some money and that has workers you actually turn that around go to Harlem today we are a whole bunch of folks who are paying taxes supporting the community supporting so what percentage your kids graduate what percentage of kids go to college we have about ninety seven ninety eight percent of our kids who graduate high school and the people who was a critic of our came to me one day would live it they were like Jeff you think your program so great up at County Colin which is one of the toughest areas we're working in out of that graduating group about ninety percent headed to college and it's unusual for one of our kids not to go to college and it's almost unheard of for them not to actually graduate high school we don't even count graduating high school as an outcome because we assume all gonna graduate and if they haven't then all of those kinds of negative trajectories kids are on when they don't have hope they don't feel like is in for securities fraud crime he didn't think it was funny I was just trying to point so they had no sense of humor in addition is to kids who believe they have no future when they look at if they just don't see anyway I'm never going to make a living working I'm never going to get a decent job and they're going to be able to afford minimum threshold for us and not the ceiling where we're trying to get all kids through college that's obviously extraordinary book in in two thousand kids I know one if you look at just the date of you look at the kids between seventeen and twenty five and the numbers you'd I'm trying to replicate that here in the north side achievement zone elsewhere with these promise neighbor and by the way remember fighting in this is a cradle to career you know we're all in our careers so that means really cradle probably figure there with maybe two hundred kids two hundred and fifty this is absolutely the antidote to the Health Education Labor Pension Committee for promise neighborhoods and we had a center I won't say his name who had an amendment to the bill to get a person is probably whoever's mentoring that child and supporting probably not going to have a job with us the next year if their kids on graduating high school that's a every city is different Minneapolis and Saint Paul have some of the greatest disparities and I think the part of the reason I think it's Minneapolis Saint Paul a great metropolitan area but this is an actual bad spot rid of that to get rid of promise neighborhoods and he said he really stupid thing which is so rare in the Senate and he said kind of good but not all that great it took US twelve to fourteen years to really master this and get that cohort far enough go and Detroit and Cleveland got a critical mass of African Americans come from South Minneapolis Saint Paul not so much blemish on our community it's interesting because when I've traveled to some places that actually are I would say worse I mean you mention Chicago area some places in Eh is that there just hasn't been a sufficiently sophisticated plan that deals with scale it's one of the reasons that we decide right twenty years ago college was what's so abnormal right that no one knew anybody who was going to college from Harlem owns unheard of it's not GonNa Change that community it's not GonNa Change that culture when you start talking about are just our country our nation and in high hustling shooting guns having sex all of that that becomes the dominant theme where education and career your education is paid for by the property tax yes if you're on the north shore of Chicago they're going to have an to retirement I went and then no they meant starting your career your career I just Oh my God donald at just really horrible for people of color particularly African American men and boys what's happening here in my opinion Dan the wealth disparities and education if you're in certain neighborhoods you know a beautiful school they're going to be one of the most beautiful well-equipped schools in the country if you're the big deal you have places with a culture that kids are growing up in just totally toxic right it's all about we've wanted to do ten thousand in walked into thirteen thousand kids in Harlem kids do what their friends do right in the country between whites and African Americans this is a theory I have and I say it and it sounds pretty pretty good income and wealth gap in quality it is it's too much about zip code and what Zip Code you're born into the did I just I haven't run this by you ever is that in the great migration north that cities like Chicago that really predicts pretty dramatically you'll future outcomes your future earnings that is to me a shame in this country acting on we've got to change cultures and you can only do it by getting the scale and if you have a small group of kids who were doing something great that's going to be good for them but no if you deal with twenty kids and they leave your school and they go in the neighborhood guess what they're going to be doing they're going to be going whatever anybody else is doing for an a poor neighborhood that's not the case not isn't that a basic part of perpetuating the In fact I was a kid who went to the Ivy League and ended up on the front of the Times magazine Hey kid from Harlem leaves one of Those Ivy League school they thought that was so terribly three because certain people get trapped in the ZIP codes they kind of become almost a self fulfilling prophecy if you're an edge zip code you don't think you're gonNA make it you don't and other things are really way way way down on sort of your list of things that you're thinking about talking about there it is predictive of how a kid will do so I'm I'm a teacher I've got twenty seven kids in my class six of them opponent of the anti-doping in the schools by themselves not sufficient in these kind of communities to get this job done I'm a big believer in holdings pace This other person growing up in one of these other ZIP codes we everybody comes in on grade level they've not faced any of these ed versus science of what's happening to these young brains starting at birth is really really clear and kids who've experienced these really negative yeah I will it's a it's a good line I'll tell you though but but it reminds me this is a true story one of reading on grade level half the classes two years behind and I'm giving the same curriculum that I'm supposed to teach at the same you wouldn't necessarily make it and when adult start feeling that way I could transfer it onto their children and it just goes on and on schools heard a shot or killed or jumped after school on their parents provide support after school they're not left alone in the summer and along so that we could begin to reap some of those benefits and one of the things I have told folks is this is a generational strategy this is not going to work with variances in their life they have no problem finding safe places to study into play they're not thinking about getting it was so rare you know we sent just four of our kids this year off the Ivy League schools and other folks doing similar things we it's no longer you to reach enough kids so that everybody's talking about going to college if you're seventeen and you're in our zone you're talking about going to college between that kid who's poor versus that kid who's growing up in the middle class neighborhood by thirty million words it isn't just words like portfolio in June one place lower in September has been something we've known awful since I was in graduate school back in the seventies yeah we we've got these we've got these issues and I think you've you've pointed out one of the challenges if you looked at AL results ten years in December going on and yet our system right education system ignores that right it doesn't say do you have a the have they go to camp they go to space camp they go do a coating camp I I mean that's an advanced world explained to them right so I would tell my parents anyone who's ever had a two year old knows that I can look at you at some point in ask if they're going to catch up and that's what we're trying to do there's no way you're going to get a kid who comes from a poor background where their parents haven't had could for five years and it's all going to be good you've got to be prepared to put in twenty years to really get the kind of residual also about and I would say that commission or I'm going to yell at you right so you've got this whole different sort of serving response going between parent and child in some areas and aw and toxic experiences in life it impact adverse childhood experiences that really have an impact on Ken and you pile one upon another gate all of that is just science we're trying to teach our parents right and baby college that this is really understand that their parents take kids lose over the summer yes kids kid melt for kids where they actually end up an academic component because our kids need additional time to catch up right there behind if the kids behind you've got to give them more time Leo and equestrian it could be I mean is it is communicating with kids right so that they get used to having didn't do that with them and so this is a `rational there's no science to this how but I'm GonNa say this I think are you a good strategy for getting that kid job later on in life because African Americans were so I think discriminated against that anyone who seemed the Americans had with the economy so getting your kid to ask no questions to shut up to sit there and do what they were told seemed working hard you kind of look you know I don't know any way on it is staying you don't know anybody who's gotten out of it and so would lead you to believe there's no way for you accountable right Teachers have to be served principles have to be served people have to do John to have to make sure that this high quality learning going on but the the unbelievable cruelty and savagery of slavery and I mean we're acknowledging the was the four hundredth anniversary of slavery in this country and look what you've done now we've gotta go and get some we've got to clean it up because you know you've made a mess and we can't have mess so you're going to help daddy we're going to go right so you're grows up in a in a home where they aren't high school graduates or just is it thirty million dollars is the number thirty million words a difference only this explaining but more importantly you're not shutting that brain down you're not sending that kid into a shock state you're not telling them ever do anything again there is no question that there's a legacy and there's no question that was so harsh in its judgment on that they wouldn't allow you to be intellectual smart to talk back the question now times have changed you need kids way you gotta job was by being quiet subservient listening questioning nobody because that was the relationship the reason if you're African American in my mother's time right my mother's ninety I'm sixty seven you were African American raising a child right nine dump that glass of water on the floor and poor parents often take that as an affront what are you doing glass do that okay you talk with your friends you're talking with their parents talking about what we do you think about going to college is GonNa come so the culture becomes one with colleges norm who can have that set of skills but for generations people were raising their kids differently these generations upon generation generations there is a legacy some people have transcended it tremendously but were a country has to face this and the the worst thing we can do and so you're going to go to a shitty school and the teachers aren't going to be at your shitty school aren't kids go to school in summer all summer all summer all some fullness and then we have what we call some can't which is all the sports and the fun but all of it has around ability to get loans around the ability to own property all of these things intern intern ships ever there are these legacy deficiencies around a wealth around opportunity around college access Emma American history I mean I mean I think I think that there is this belief that the playing field is level now right well either you're crying right because you don't want to work hard and you don't want to do like everybody else did or you're blaming somebody I think that who is say well I'm sorry but your education is funded by property taxes and you just happen to be poor really poor other era you just have parents who believe a good kid is a quiet kid can you sixty and watches TV and unbothered view that's what a good kid looks like an old are you paying and then there's GonNa be no after school programs and you'll go home to nobody because they gotta work out of work uppity or anything else you just got no shot at a job at all so what turned out to be a fairly successful strategy and raising a kid to fit into a society which on that became a daily part of the instill is part of everyone's fear I remind folk on my wife and I have it if we know this is not just what is about a kid growing up in a home like a professional home of their parents are professionals and a kid who get the history of African Americans in this country you mentioned the brutality to slavery torture that actual terrorism we're just like happy no he's come back and everything's fine just can't help it is an African American kid he then Whoa look all that stuff over with everybody's good you know let's go on and you know that's the furthest thing from the truth a twenty-one we have grown kids who are in their late forties and we have twenty one year old every time he takes Alcala route it's constantly question you ask you stuff how come I have to do now that's a bad kid and you have to shut that down okay what all the sciences that's that this could be the last moment this kid lives now what a crazy world it is my son's going out to a club we all worried what kind of club absolutely wrong those brains need to be encouraged to question and yes question us as adults and parents and we need to explain to them in have them negoti that's just the way it has to be we have to as a nation go no no that I thank my family came from Russia in the eighteen nineties I think a lot of folks feel like we where I think you look in this country you see vestiges sometimes you see the actual things still existing of it has been barriers to equal opportunity in this country and you know what I think people feel like Oh you're blaming me I didn't do it this is not blaming anybody and he tell you you can then you to open it with one hand slowly and bring it out and raise it up so they can see what you have because there's this fear there was no reason right now that in this country we can't confront those kind of things and say look we can do better than this we can fix this and I think that's that is just an African American thing I don't know a parent who's raised boy who's African American who hasn't had compensation that's from hundreds of formal education the other parents to compete when these one kids you know what it's like you've got kids and grandkids the way we talked to allow kids how we shared oh stinks it's just part of the legacy of this country and it's something that we've got to grapple with we've got to deal with Because you know what we can I was trying to send a message to America this thing is not gonna stay in the hood this thing is totally out of control and I was there's no one who can look at the plight of native Americans in this country and say Oh yeah you know they got a fair deal I don't know why they would be any problems there against the NRA this is back in the mid nineties and I was saying that this organization which most Americans don't support what they're most radical positions is going to push this to the point where our kids are going to be murdered on a regular yeah that genocide wasn't complete come on why haven't they sort of fix this thing I think it's been in many ways as difficult for folks to look well he's twenty one and we were and we've gone over the whole police drill what Israel it is you know not to reach for win the head these school shootings today we've created a culture in this country that every single community that I know has the symbol for this country and we've amount this salt weapons issue to so dominate our children growing up that we forgot `toxic stress over this issue of going to school worrying about being killed and it's time for this country to stand up and say no he's drills where they teach kids what to do when someone from your community is coming in to murder you this should be unconscious had enough of this we're gonNA protect our children that's what you have been doing with your

Harlem Geoffrey Canada Harlem Children President President Obama Al Franken founder Minneapolis Congress Jeffrey Education Secretary Arne Dunca Senate president Pensions Education Committee twenty years five years ninety percent fifty dollars two hundred fifty thousand dol ninety seven ninety eight perc
Universal Basic Income Pilot Program; Former Education Secretary Arne Duncan

Here & Now

41:47 min | 6 months ago

Universal Basic Income Pilot Program; Former Education Secretary Arne Duncan

"From NPR and Wbz I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Peter Oh down. This is here and now a desperate plea from the director general of the World Health Organization today make no mistake. The greatest threat we face now is not the virus itself. Rather it's lack of leadership. And Solidarity. At the global in national levels that warning was seemingly directed at the United. States after President Trump's announcement this week that he's officially withdrawing from the organization he did that. Even as the US sets new records yesterday sixty thousand new cove, nineteen cases were reported in the US. It's sixth daily record in ten days, and when you compare that to other countries, Italy had a two hundred and fourteen new cases yesterday Mexico about seven, thousand, Pakistan thirty, three hundred. Hundred Japan one hundred and ninety seven now. One of the states in this country that is especially concerning is Louisiana where covert nineteen cases seem to be under control back in May on the tenth of May. There were only one hundred ten new cases reported, but since July first Louisiana's daily new cases have numbered between one, thousand, nine, hundred and two thousand. Let's turn to Dr Suzanne Strafe Bourgeois who is a professor of epidemiology at Louisiana, State University Professor! Why do you think this new spike is occurring in Louisiana? So what we have seen in Luciana is that it all started in New Orleans and in it's very slowly for the different parts of Louisiana, and what now actually? Is the second P I think the reason is we start at mid-off me to reopen to face to the open businesses, movie, theatres, casinos, and then little by little. We saw the number of cases who in up in, but you think that the initial spike that was centered more on cities like New Orleans that there was just a low level of infection that remained and then when other parts of the state started to open up that the infection came from New Orleans. It quick have come from. Any parts could have come from Texas Florida. Because when be entered in face to you know people are more likely to travel to go to places and other things, but in the first bike you also had a total lockdown as Good and now you don't. Expect it, so it worked. So, what do you do now about the spikes? You're seeing today. So, one of the warden is really to make sure that people keep `social distancing the mask is very important, because we see more and more outbreaks occurring in you know wedding parties, especially boss so concerned restaurants and other wants to still believe if everyone would wear amass, that actually would prevent the transmission. Is there a lesson? Do you think for other states? Were numbers are currently relatively low like new. York New Jersey. Massachusetts where cases seem like they're well contained at the moment. Well I think just to keep you up. Don't think it's over at on make sure that people still comply to social distancing wearing masks and washing the hands. Let me ask you about a couple of other things late yesterday. The World Health Organization expanded its Corona virus guidance to include airborne transmission, saying the virus can be spread by tiny droplets in the air which would explain some outbreaks, restaurants, nightclubs places where people are singing. Is this something new or did we already know this? So we didn't know it for with nineteen, but there was mounting evidence that it's not only triplet transmission, which out the Biko triplets, and therefore be really set you know if you keep six feet apart, these trumpets would fall on the Brown, and therefore you could not infect anyone, but what there seems to be more evidence is that there is the possibility as you said this tiny tiny trumpets, stay in the much longer, and that's the problem especially in. In very congregate settings like boss very crowded, and then you put on top of it a very pool ventilation, and then you have the potential that can infect people Dr Surf Bourgeois I. Just WanNa bring you back to where we started with this. which is when you look at the cases in the United States setting records tens of thousands of people every day, and then you look at a place like Italy, which had such terrible outbreak early on, and just had two hundred fourteen new cases yesterday. When are we going to be able to get to that point where we've really got the virus under control in your view, so my concern is at my take us quite a while. We have a couple of other issues going on. We have testing delays that people actually don't get. The test results time enough to self isolate. The other big problem is an has just read to study, which was conducted in Spain which goes back to the herd. Herd immunity the always talked about that? You need to hurt unity about sixty to seventy percent, but even like in hot spots seems like people have a very low prevalence of this antibody, so might never make a herd immunity without having a vaccine so i. really think that important is that people are aware of that. Don't go to parties thrown. Congregate and just think about July falls. We still don't see what kind of impact it has on our number. Number of cases, so I'm very concerned about that. That is Dr. Suzanne Strafe Bourgeois. Who is a professor of epidemiology at Louisiana? State University thank you so much for joining us, Ain't you? When world leaders to combat climate change in Paris back in two thousand fifteen, they agreed to cap global warming at one and a half. Degrees Celsius over pre industrial levels to avoid the disastrous effects of a hotter planet. Well now, the United Nations says we crossed that. That threshold in the next five years, let's bring in Kim. Cobb climate, scientist and professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology Kim Welcome. Thanks for having me. Yesterday's forecast is from the UN's World Meteorological Organization. It says there's a twenty percent chance that we'll see a temperature increase of at least one and a half degrees Celsius in one of the next five years. How significant is that information? Well, it's very significant of course, and this is just part of. Growing warming that has been occurring for decades now, and there's no reason for us to expect it to stop, but of course that one point five degrees Celsius marker is a line that was drawn in the sand at the United Nations level in two, thousand, fifteen, marking what was plausible at the time avoiding future warming rates, but also noting that beyond one point five, embracing a fairly large pile of risk, some of which we don't understand very well, so kind of bumping up against that threshold is really alarming, and of course expect across that in the very near future. What do you mean by large risk that we don't understand well well? Well we know that continued warming will bring some certain ts to us. rising seas, drier regions like California getting drier, more, wildfire, prone, and some of those wetter areas, being more susceptible to extreme precipitation, none of which is welcome, but some of the most scary kind of impacts longer term have to do with potential accelerations in the kind of climate impacts that we could be bringing to our doorstep. Things that are kind of the surprises we might see including real acceleration in a system that we of course would be unprepared for one and a half degrees Celsius was the threshold as we said that Paris, said in two thousand fifteen. Does. This data suggests that the pact just isn't working well. Obviously, we are letting one point five degrees. Celsius slip through our fingers. Despite the fact that as part of the one point five degree target, there was an entire report that provides a roadmap to bring that into reality, fantastic detail and also outlining. What's at risk if we set a new target for? For two degrees. Let's say the next round number if you will be on one point five, and that is what is most alarming is from a scientific perspective. We have the data. We have the knowledge and yes. We have not acted upon it. So what would we have to do in order to make sure that it doesn't slip through our fingers any further? Well we still have time and I think that's the most important thing for people to understand about these kinds of scary reports that come out, and unfortunately it's just one scare report after another, we still have time and what we have to do is get to net zero emissions by twenty fifty, and we still have a couple of decades to figure that out, but we have to get going on that pathway, because it is quite a tall order we need to grow. The Carbon Sinks on our planet. Stop deforesting the tropics and start moving in earnest to a low carbon. Carbon energy infrastructure. There's another crisis that we're in the middle of now in its acute is the covid nineteen pandemic that's racing across the globe. Do you see any parallels between the reluctance in this country to sacrifice economically to slow the pandemic down and are apparent reluctance to make the changes that fighting climate change would require enforcing the parallels for me are very stark climate scientists in watching this train wreck happened for several decades now and this pandemic trainwreck is very similar. You're sacrificing what you think is public health and wellbeing for short term economic gain, but what you are. Doing is baking in long-term economic damage, and that is exactly what's happening with climate change. People are looking down the road, their next election or their next quarterly report, and we are basically piling on a huge tab. It's growing by the year called climate change impacts that will have long-term in sustained damage to our economy. The pandemic of course will have its. Its own impacts economically for quite some time, and there's no real escaping that, but with climate change if we move purposefully in a data driven fashion, be can actually have progress growing our economy, and their many different pulse instruments to reach for to let that happen. Kim Cobb is a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Thank you very much for having. President trump today repeated his threat to withhold federal education funding. If schools remained closed at the start of the coming school year, tweeting schools must be open in the fall. Meanwhile, teachers and administrators are planning for how to start the school year as the nation breaks records for new daily cases of Corona virus for more. We're joined now by Arne Duncan. Former secretary of education under President Obama Welcome back. Thanks so much for having me well. You've said it is too early to tell if school should reopen in the fall where you are in Chicago. Do you disagree generally with President Trump that schools should reopen in the fall. Or just how he's trying to force them to do so by threatening to withhold federal funding if they don't. Well, we all want schools to real. Says Appear, and I want that. Our kids wanted. Our teachers want to go back to school. The question for the country is. Is it safe for them to do so? And you know trump trying to bully people trying to threaten. He has no authority here. He can't withhold funds. It's a lot of continued. You know bluff and bluster and dishonesty and. We'll be obviously need to do to make our school. SAFE is to make our communities safer, and it's actually his. Tremendous lack of leadership, just horrific leadership over the past several months. That's the only reason why whether or not we can go back to school. Safe and fall is in question now. Had we done as a country what we needed to do? Earlier testing tracing. Quarantine. We need to We would not be having these really really difficult conversations now. Well, what is the benchmark that you would look for to determine that it is safe to open? Schools is anywhere in the country that you look at right now and say you know if things stay as they are right now. That place could open safely. He had no. Every situation is different. I'm know to be very clear. I'm not the scientists and epidemiologists, but what is I talked to? Those guys feel consistent basis. What they're saying is the biggest indicated. Looking for is places where we're seeing declining rates. Of Covid, and actually as you know right now as we speak, we're seeing record numbers of cases every single day. Unfortunately in the vast majority of states Cases in those individuals, states in those things are going in the wrong direction now. And what what? We do now in the month of July. Will determine whether our kids and our teachers have a chance to go back to physical schools. is go into into August. July will will shave August, and that's up to all of us. We can't look for help and the federal government is not gonNA. Come can't look for you. Know honest advice. That's not gonNA come. We have to do it ourselves. But even if we had a perfect July all across the country, would it really be? Safe to say that schools could reopen at the end of August as we remember you know the beginning of the pandemic, really in the United States in mid March it wasn't until late. April that we started seeing deaths spike the way that they did. Correct and again I think what it means to reopen is going to vary tremendously. Sell my short answers. I think everything will be different. Almost nothing will be the same We might have kids on Monday Wednesday Friday schedule. We might have other students on Tuesday Thursday. Saturday possibly we might do morning shifts. We might do afternoon shifts. Cafeterias unfortunately may be a thing of the past for a while. Choir might be a thing of the past how we walk in hallways. How we clean bathrooms. We ride buses. Everything's going to be different and again. That's going to vary case by case in place by place of how we try, and keep not just students safe, but obviously teachers, staff and principals, custodians and. Bus Drivers. You know everybody as well as the parents and grandparents back home some as a tremendous amount of thoughtfulness, superintendents are working across the country to figure out what's the best way to try and do this? My my best guess now is that will end up in a hybrid situation where you'll have some students in physical school some of the time, but all students will be spending a significant part time majority of their time virtually, and that's not ideal I desperately wanted almost like a mandatory summer school to start this. In July to make up for the learning loss because of the lack of federal leadership because of the tremendous dishonesty, because as a country haven't done what we needed to do. We lost that opportunity to get kids back into school now to help. Get them caught up. I've just desperately hope our children don't continue to lose out because of our our inability to make some small small sacrifices on their behalf as that. Let me drill down with you on the idea of either a staggered schedule or a hybrid model. What does that mean for the parents? If the kids have to spend, you know Tuesdays and Thursdays home from school. It's a real challenge. Let me let me make it. Even more complicated for you want unfortunately, because the nuance here is. Extraordinarily important in China understand. Let me give you a couple of scenarios. You may have certain teachers who, because of their own pre existing conditions. Won't be safe to teach it all in a physical billions. They'll have to do all of their teaching. Virtually I'm there may be certain students, maybe not because of their own health issues, but maybe because they're raised by their grandmother, the grandfather living with them who they won't be able to go to school a physically at all. There may be other children who will need to be in school every day because their parents are essential workers and we're going to have to accommodate that and so this is going to be a school by school grade by grade classroom by classroom. You'll calculation and we're going to have to look out for each other and understand our shared humanity in ways. Maybe we. We haven't how he's done that, and there may be a child who would like to go to school more, but may have to go to school little less because another another child. In his in his class has to be at school every day and I. Don't know if we'll get to that point, but I'm just trying to get people thinking about those are the kinds of real decisions that teachers and principals are going to have to make in the very near future. Let's talk about masks to. It's one thing to ask a class of twelve year olds to wear their masks. It is another thing to try to require that a class of six year olds where their masks all the time and wear them in the right way, and don't take them off and touch their face, and then touch their friends or whatever the case might be. How do you deal with that? Yet none of this is easy and I. That Part Actually I. Think is frankly a little bit easier and I've seen you know lots of kids on the streets. Little guys three, four, five six. We're in their their mass, and some of them looked pretty cool, and I think that's been okay to. And the parts breaks. My heart is that kids have a natural ill. They WANNA hug. They WANNA touch. They WANNA play. Play Tag, and we as human beings need and desire that physical inaction. That's a really hard thing to say can do none of that. How do we try and do that? How do you do pe do recess and that is honesty really heartbreaking for me that you know at least for a little while. It seems like we're going to have to try and. Restrict some of that. That's a the mask. Part isn't easy, but I do -able. This other part is such an innately human desire is just a really sad thing to me, but it's just unfortunately where we are country right now, but is not fair. You know to teachers and what I always say, is it? Schools are not bubbles could show this virus best thing we've done not at the school. Level schools are playing important role, but that's going to be done at the community level in. In all of us, who live in communities have to be willing to do the things now. In July they will put teachers and students in a better position. Come August. We have to wear masks. We have to stay off the beaches. We have to stay out of bars. We have to stay away from indoor dining and if we as adults can't make those small sacrifices to give children, amazing, learning and social opportunities going into the fall, then really shame on US shame on us. A lot of school districts are looking to the CDC for guidelines about what they should do, and as you know this week, vice president pence after a lot of criticism from president trump that the CDC guidelines were too restrictive, said will they're GONNA? Come out with new guidelines next week. Do you trust the CDC guidelines? Do you think they're being politicized? It's just so heartbreaking to me that everybody's scared of of this. Trump is a bully and in a couple of things so one that makes no sense to his ability to order schools opened three. He has no ability to withhold funds from schools unless he does something absolutely illegally actually yesterday coincidentally. Me By predecessor secretary spellings who happens to be Republican and worked for President Bush, and Tom Friedman who adopted Fredin. Who ran the CDC we put out guidance yesterday. That is bipartisan that is thoughtful is based on science and scientists, and their best thinking has no hint of politics partisanship so I would encourage district's to school leaders to take a look at that guidance. I want to just turn to higher education because several universities are now suing the trump administration over its decision to revoke visas for some international students. If they're not taking in person classes, and there are many universities that are saying all the classes are going to be online this coming fall for safety. What do you think the university should do in this situation? Or of course they should sue and trump hates imigrants until he needs as leverage and then somehow. He acts like their import. This is not about their learning opportunities. This is about trying to bend universities to his will, and when it is not safe to do so when I was GONNA cost lives. It's unconscionable to do that, so universities have to sue. I assume they'll be successful in court. It is just you know infuriating that they have to go to those lengths that we're spending time on Bat, rather than planning for actually dealing with the epidemic. You know trump is hoping you can just tweet away. The desk tweet wacked like everything is normal in, so it's just a just a catastrophic. Of, leadership at the federal level that is costing lives, and you know hurting our our our kids. Of Twelve or higher education, and and you know this play around. You know students who who live overseas. They're just the latest ponds and a very. Very sick game playing. Dunkin former secretary of education under President Obama now managing partner for the Emerson collective. Are you talking? Thank you so much for joining us. Opportunity A. For weeks, experts who predict bankruptcies have been warning that US companies are veering toward a covid nineteen cliff well this week. More retailers have fallen over the edge, Brooks, brothers, Sorel table, and the Japanese retail chain mucci joined the hundred plus companies that have filed for bankruptcy since the pandemic began Mike. Regan is a senior editor at Bloomberg. News Mike Welcome back. Thanks peer. Another tough week for retail. What's your takeaway? Well so two main things I mean obviously the closure of the sort of physical brick and mortar retail stores is a major hit for companies that still rely on them more than say they're online operation. But, also the while the pandemic is causing a big drop in overall consumer spending, it's also obviously causing a massive shift in how it's spent so for say a company like Brooks brothers. How many office workers were inclined to say? Freshen up their business and business casual wardrobes this spring so it's really a tough environment for for that type of chain. The list is long. Let me just tick through a few more JC Penney. Neiman Marcus J. crew pure one. GNC Aldo the parent company of an Taylor. A lot of these companies plan to restructure, but all told the research group core site is predicting that more than twenty thousand retail stores will close this year. That is a lot of stores. First question is where all those workers go, and how's that GONNA change the landscape of retail. Down the road right well, the big question in many economists mind is exactly that how many of the jobs lost during the pandemic will sort of be permanently lost or at least lost for the next few years. Even if you reopen the economy. There are some miraculous cure for the virus overnight I'm the question is how much damage has been done to make those job losses permanent. And I've seen a variety of estimates. But it's hard to say exactly which ones right, but certainly many lost jobs will be more than sages to furlough. We're a temporary layoff. They'll be lost for a longer period of time. A lot of those companies also have a lot of debt. That's going to be restructured. What kind of strain does that? Put on the banking system? So when you think of that debt, it's important. Remember some of it's actually held by investors in the form of corporate bonds were syndicated loans, but a lot is held by banks, so it certainly is a strain. On the good side there's been so many regulations to sort of make banks more sturdy for this type of thing since the last crisis in two thousand and eight that it's unlikely to cause a crisis on that scale, but I'll tell you if you look at indexes of bank stocks in the US all down almost forty percent for the years. That gives you an idea of how bad this is for the banking system. Mike got just about forty five seconds here, but some companies are thriving Tesla's stock is up five hundred percent in the past year, and it is on the cusp of being added to the S. and P. Five hundred. Right the remarkable story, and a surrounding that they're still this tremendous amount of skepticism about Tesla stock, but in a way that can be actually good for the stock, because if people are shorting it, they're borrowing the stock. Then hoping to repay the loan later with cheaper stock kind of forces, the stock higher in what's known as a short squeeze, so that's at least part of the story of this rally, but probably not all. All Right Mike Regan senior editor at Bloomberg News. Thanks for your time as always have a good weekend. Thanks Peter! The idea of. Giving people cash payments every month was gaining momentum even before the pandemic hit, but now the trend is growing faster last week. Mayors from cities like Atlanta, Oakland Saint Paul and others came together to form a group called mayors for a guaranteed income and yesterday twitter's CEO, Jack Dorsey committed three million dollars to the 'cause Stockton California Mary Michael. TUBS is the group's founder, and he's been piloting a universal basic income program in his city since two thousand nineteen mayor. Welcome thanks so much for having me. So more than a dozen mayors joining your effort to offer people a guaranteed income now this week news of Jack Dorsey gift. Why do you think this effort is growing? The effort is growing because at times the mandate we're living in a unprecedented global health crisis, the worst nineteen eighteen in our country. We have folks taking to the streets protesting, not just police violence, but I would argue the violence of racism in the volunteer poverty into real new deal moment. On especially considering the fact that are biggest pandemic response as far has been unemployment insurance, which was created in nineteen, thirty, five as part of new deal, understanding that we have to update our Social Safety Net to reflect twenty twenty realities. You never could have predicted when this started. In two thousand nineteen pandemic was going to unravel the economy. Though how has this moment that we're in changed your thinking about the whole project I'm? This moment has changed my thinking in seeing a guaranteed income as actually a pandemic resilience tool. That we live in time pandemic, so this year is cove in nineteen zero be a fire, the your after be a flood or a hurricane, and that income floor and guaranteed cash that people could count on allows our folks to build the economic resilience needed to persist during pandemics, and that's not something that I was in my frame when we start the pilot in Stockton. All right, so let's talk a little bit about that program. One hundred twenty five people randomly selected in Stockton. They've received five hundred dollars a month. A looks like you recently extended the program until two thousand twenty one. What have you learned D-, have you? Have you seen that it's helping? People build wealth for the long-term. Well smart five hundred dollars. A month is not enough to build a lot of wealth, but what we've seen in do is be enough to be a lifeline to stabilize so their stories of individuals like Thomas, who was able to take the five hundred dollars? Take time off from his old job to interview for a new job because he retail and if he had if he just took time off, he will lose money, but a five hundred dollars give him the security to take a risk on himself, and he was able to cause a better job with benefits. Stable hours is not able. Able to afford to during for his children, or there's another young Reagan the program. WHO said if I was allowed to buy dentures because she would without smiling for too much because you couldn't afford dentures, there's others who've talked about how they've used it to pay off debt, so we're seeing that something. As small as five hundred dollars is enough to replace work is enough to change the nature of this country, but it is enough to allow people who are working hard to contributing just a floor. Stand on, they seek to build them better calm their lives in the lives of their communities. How you gonNA find on a larger scale, especially now that city and state budgets are stretched very very thin. What would have to be federal response and again I would argue wearing a new deal moment we spent trillions of dollars, so there's bills right now in the Senate that speak. COM senator, Harrison, senator, marking Senator Sanders that speaks to a two thousand dollars a month on for everyone during cove in Nineteen I. think that's a great first step. There's a talk now about looking at the Pentagon budget. Legalize marijuana use some taxation from that, so the issue isn't a an resource issue. The issues really WanNa political will and understanding that we can trust everyday folks like you and me the same way we trust billionaires and trustee eos to make good decisions, and we've tried trickle down economics for my entire life, or at least the past thirty plus years. It just doesn't work. A won't work can't work so maybe it's time to rethink how we think of our economy. Innocent Economy is actually rooted in the people who drive it and investing in them smart investment we. We can make. It looks like right now. You've kind of depended on private philanthropy to help fund this. You're saying that you think the federal government needs to pick up the bill. But how realistic is that? Really because even though we're talking more about U. B. I universal basic income, it isn't mainstream, and you have a lot of skeptics out there who say cash payments won't solve other court issues, things like addiction or poor health care, and then if you give money to everyone, what you're actually doing is taking money away from programs that help poor people. What do you say to that? I disagree I I I reject scarcely mindset because we only seem to have that mindset when it comes to helping. Normal everyday Americans I think that we have to be additive in a country that has the resources to provide an income floor for everyone, so we don't have to have poverty I. think is immoral, so we have a lot of work to do in the guarantee. Income isn't a panacea of every issue, but as Dr. King says it does solve the cash issues associated with Tara Economic Insecurity, and that's probably the most pressing issue on during Kobe nineteen. Stockton, Mayor Michael Tubs, also the founder of mayors for guaranteed income group that is growing mayor. Thank you, thank you. Well, the northwest region of the United States has never elected an African American to the House of Representatives, but that could change this year in Washington state to black women are running for the open house seat, being vacated by Democrat Denny Heck, David Hide, from member station K. U. O. W. Seattle reports. Marilyn Strickland served as mayor of Tacoma Washington for nearly a decade, she was the first African American woman to hold that office. This is a moment in history where we have the opportunity to make change I will say that when I see young people, teenagers of all races and backgrounds protesting day in and day out talking about why these things are important. That's very hopeful now. Strickland is one of two black women running in Washington's tenth. Tenth Congressional district south of Seattle where about fifteen percent of residents or people of Color, she says the protests against police brutality point to deeper problems with structural racism in American Society, and I remind folks at some of the kids who are teenagers now. The only president they've known was Barack Obama when they were little. And now they have Donald Trump, and they're probably wondering to themselves. What happened and I said yes, I would run. I would run realizing all of the controversies. That would about my head. That's Shirley Chisholm. From New York, who in nineteen, sixty eight became the first black woman elected to Congress in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, two, she was the first woman and African American to run in the presidential primary, but Chisholm later said, neither I was how she wanted to be remembered I walked to remember. As a Catholic. For Change in America half a century later, the northwest is still waiting for that change. There's never been a black member of Congress elected from the states of Washington Idaho, Montana Wyoming Alaska Oregon for now Christine. Reeves is also running in the tent here. In Washington state in two thousand sixteen, she became the first black woman elected to the State House. In Nearly Twenty Years Reeve says the protests this year against racial equity political change is in the air. People are tired of asking nicely for. For the change that we need to see in a government that should reflect all Americans. Folks are saying we're now demanding that change and recess when it's time to write new laws, representation matters because experience matters, even a candidate for the seat House I got called the N. Word six blocks from my house i. had the police called on me at least six times depending on the neighborhoods? That I would doorbell in wasn't their neighbor. This is a culture that needs to be overhauled. In Society quite frankly, that is using police as a weapon against its own citizens. The race for the tenth in Washington State is getting national attention. Strickland and Reeves received a dual endorsement this year from higher. Heights for America a nonprofit, which supports black women running for office all over the US. Glenda car is the head and co-founder. The twenty three million black woman in this country are. are still under-represented, an underserved, but what we've seen over the last several election cycles is a steady increase in the number of black woman running in a number of black women, winning courses today, black women, or around eight percent of the total US population, but only four point six percent of Congress and more black women are running and winning in places. They've been shut out before in twenty. Twenty eighteen black women candidates one in three states for the first time for example Massachusetts Connecticut and Minnesota, and so you look at this race in Washington state with two prominent African American women who were previously elected. They're poised given the way. Obviously, the elections happened in Washington, to potentially be you know. The top two candidates set come out of that that primary and courses more black. Black women are winning and districts that don't have majority minority populations like Washington's tenth, but adds that there's still a long way to go. Only nineteen states have ever elected a black woman to Congress that means if strict or reeves our elected. That number would move to twenty and the north. West would have its first black member of Congress for here and now I'm David Hyde in Seattle? The latest Tom Hanks, movie comes out today. It's called Greyhound. It's the story of a US commander that defended in Atlantic convoy from U boat attacks during World War Two. The film's theatrical release was sunk by the pandemic, so apple TV plus picked it up. NPR TV critic Eric. Duggan's joins us now. Hi, Eric Hi and Tom Hanks in this film. Actually he wrote it, and he stars in the film. He plays the captain of the ship. The Greyhound here. He is leading a chase for a Nazi submarine. Zero nine two range fifteen miles. Started! EUPOL serve on a battery charge. Get ready to come. What is surprised to hear? Tom Hanks in a world. War Two film Eye Eric. More about this summer. Well, this, this is one that he wrote himself. And supposedly he took ten years figuring out how to do this, so people may not remember or know about world. War Two that there were convoyed ships that were going through the Atlantic. These convoys of ships would reach a point. We're planes that could sink. Submarines had to peel off. They did not have enough fuel to make the entire trip with them. And so then they would have to count on these worships that are escorting them to try and take out any of the German u boats that we try to sink them, so we've got a one scene for example where you know hanks. Sort of explains a little bit what they're doing and trying to find these you boats. The name of his ship is Greyhound. The name of one of the British shifts that he's escorting called Harry and they're trying to figure out why. The U boat's aren't just coming out and attacking them when they know that they're in the water. Let's let's check out this clip out having nine miles to one zero nine zero. Zero nine two range any. Other angels closing hanging around I think. maintained, you stations attack within range. Good luck. A wolfpack Shannon's. They'll attack is. Waiting for nightfall. We can see nothing. Yes, so there's constantly exchanges like that where you get a sense of the strategy, and so it is a really interesting story and I see why Tom Hanks wanted to try and make it into a movie, and would it be interesting? Do you think for people who are not already interested in movies about World War Two well. Here's the thing you know. It's Tom Hanks. And so what it really is and. What it really is. It's a showcase for Tom Hanks playing in yet another in a long string of men virtue, and I. Don't want to downplay that or trivialized that because you know he's written the script I feel like he did a pretty good job with it, but that said at a time like this you know when we're constantly going back and sort of re interrogating all the movies in media that make us e-, certain people as heroes and certain. People has villains. Awfully convenient that he stars in a movie that set in World War Two where he's on the side of right, but the only two people color that we see in the movie are the guys from the Galley bringing him his dinner so You know, compare that to spike Lee's defy bloods where it's about five black Vietnam vets. That's a movie that's all about confronting America's hypocrisy, and all about confronting what it asa people of Color, even while it's oppressing them, and by going back to World War Two. You get to skip over all of that stuff and you know as much as I'd like to. To See Tom Hanks in a movie Maybe I'd like to see him trying to interrogate some of that stuff. Sometimes are well. Let's talk about the other aspect of this. That's very interesting, which is that it is going straight to TV now in the old days that would have been kind of like a not a great thing for movie, but right now that's the only choice they have because there are really no way to put the movies into theaters and make the money that they want. So, what do you think about that? Is this going to cement a new trend of things going straight to streaming? Will do is i. think that a better class of movie will be considered to make this transition from theater to television because people will grow used to seeing this kind of material on their TV screens. Disney plus decided to abandon plans to put the Hamilton film in theaters, and they've put it on Disney plus a lot of people watched it I have a feeling. A lot of people are gonNA. Watch Greyhound I would bet that more people watch greyhound on Apple. TV plus than would have watched it if it would been in a movie theater, because frankly I don't know that I would be willing to pay nine or ten bucks. To Watch this compartmentalized movie, but on television it's wonderful and I. Think Hollywood needs to rethink what kinds of these projects can play in people's homes and really do well. I have a feeling that even when we get to the point where movie theaters are open, there are going to be people who rather stay at home where they know it's safe. I have a lot of sinophile friends who look at this with horror. I predicted this years ago and I, just think it's the consequence of streaming culture of our media culture, and it's been accelerated by this pandemic. That is NPR TV critic Eric Maybe soon NPR film critic, too, because it's all going to be on TV Eric Automatic Just Review Greyhound. Good job. Bob Mondello I'm. Job Buddy. We love the thank you. Thank you. And here now is a production of NPR IN WB. You are in association with the BBC. World Service I'm Jeremy Hobson I'm Peter o'dowd. This is here now.

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WH Press Secretary: There has been no change in Trumps tone on coronavirus

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41:12 min | 6 months ago

WH Press Secretary: There has been no change in Trumps tone on coronavirus

"So for all the talk of the president's change of attitude about the pandemic, more than one hundred and forty five thousand American lives into it. The president's spokesperson now says change what change? He's totally consistent. John Berman here in for Anderson there's a lot to get tonight. After a week. That saw the four millionth confirmed corona virus infection. We start off with spin that would be comical except to anyone grieving the loss of a loved one except a frontline doctors that overburden hospitals making agonizing decisions about who even gets treated except for parents worried and confused about sending their kids to school, except for millions of laid off workers in other one point four million this week about to see their unemployment checks shrink to them. What you're about to hear must sound far different than spin closer, perhaps, too contempt for the reality were all now facing. There has been no change. He hasn't changed dom in fact, and just speaking on Cova, generally the way I've heard him talk privately in the oval. Office is the way he's talking out here. The only thing that changed is the president taking dozens and dozens and dozens of your questions each and every day because he felt the best way to get information to the American people was for him to be out here on answering your questions and providing this directly. No change she says in fairness. Perhaps she's right just on how she intended. You can make a case. The president has consistently failed to take the pandemic seriously and the only thing that's changed is he's now saying words out loud from a prepared script at the podium, these wars now conveniently in deliberately ignore everything else. He said, and done month after month and death after death. For example, here's the president last night talking about cancelling the Republican convention in Jacksonville We have to be vigilant. We have to be careful and we also have to set an example I think setting the example is very important It's hard for us to say. We're going to have a lot of people packed in a room and then other people shouldn't do well. There's nothing more crowded than a convention convention. You've seen. Them And even though you try to keep people away from each other, it's just not that kind of thing they probably. Can't do that. It just doesn't work for them, so it's very hard, so I think we're setting an example by doing. It is very important. The president also said and I'm quoting here. I have to protect the American people. That is what I have always done. That is what I will always do. That is what I am about. Mr President. If that's in fact, so there's someone I'd like you to meet. I've been watching. I've been watching the fake. For weeks now and everything is negative. Don't go, don't come, don't do anything. We saved hundreds of thousands of lives. And All we do is get hit on like we're terrible. They test they test. We had tested. People don't know what's going on. It's a disease without question has more names than any disease initiative. I can name. Comes Lou. We got. We got another one over here. Many call it a virus, which it is many. Call it a flu, so I said to my people. Slow the testing down, please. The president indoors with thousands of people at a rally in Tulsa no social, distancing only a few covered faces that was about four weeks in nearly two million cases ago for weeks in about twenty, five thousand lost American lives ago in now, the President says that the very same type of event just isn't safe and it's press. Secretary suggests he has always thought that, even though he moved the convention in Jacksonville in the first place, because officials in north. Carolina would not permit the kind of no mask, non socially distance event that he was demanding, which he now says just isn't safe, which raises the obvious question? Why is it not say to whole repel conventional, but it is said to reopen. Schools are a different situation when you have children, who, on as the CDC guidelines clearly not are not affected in the same way as adults. Those guidelines you'll recall. We're loosened on orders of the president. We'll talk more about them in a moment, but in a nutshell they leaned strongly toward returning kids to the classroom. Even though the science on the safety of it is unclear, notably, the CDC makes no mention of a large study recently out of South Korea, which found the kids, ages ten and up spread the virus just as easily as adults this morning on the Today Show Task Force member Dr. Deborah alluded to it even as she admitted that evidence on younger children is thin. What I can't tell you for sure. Despite the South Korea study is whether children under ten in the United States don't spread. The virus is same as children over ten, I think that is still an open question that needs to be studied in the United States. We certainly know from other studies that children under ten do get infected. It's just unclear how rapidly they spread the virus. It's unclear. She says the evidence is mixed the new CDC guidelines to sum that up and played English. Yikes, especially since the loudest voice in the room with no scientific training. Keep saying things like this. But when you look at the statistics I, just read having to do with children and and safety, and they're very impressive. They're very strong immune systems. Children go to school. Go back to home there with some live with their grandparents. There's there's a real risk. Would you understand if so google saying that? They don't transmit variously and a lot of people are saying they don't transmit, and we're looking at that studying John Very hard that particular subject that they don't bring it home with them now. They don't catch it easily. They don't bring it home easily, and if they do catch it, they get better fast. We're looking at that fact. That is a factor and we're looking at that very strongly. We'll be reporting about that. True. The president also says the administration is quote in the process of developing a strategy that's going to be very very powerful unquote for addressing the pandemic. He said by the way on Tuesday more than three thousand lost American lives ago. We should also mention that at no point. This week to the president mentioned the four million case milestone or the number of Americans who died perspective now on the public health and political size of this joining us Dr Selene. Counter Infectious Disease, specialist epidemiologists and CNN medical analyst, also CNN political commentator and former senior adviser to President Obama, David, axelrod and CNN chief political analyst. Gloria Borger. David look the bottom line here this key question. Why does the White House? Think it's not safe to hold. The Republican National Convention in Florida yet it is safe to reopen schools. Young I'm not sure that there I mean there is some logic to it in the sense that There is a a desperation I on the part. A lot of parents to get their kids back in school. Kids are suffering. There is a a really a strong impetus to get them back, but you WanNa, do it safely and public health experts are of one mind that particularly in these hotspot areas. It's very hard to guarantee that and it's hard to guarantee that they won't be spreading spreading the virus, but you know I'm also. I can't help but remember that just Sunday. The president was. Literally whining in his interview with Chris Wallace about how the means democratic. Governors were keeping him from holding public rallies, so he's had a very rapid epiphany on this. Of of of what is safe and what is not look at a confused message at best when you're trying to say, the boasts both things at once from both sides your mouth and Gloria I one who happens to think this idea that there's a change tone is a bit of how ever I do think it's clear that the White House is trying to present a different image of the president. They are trying to the question on that is why what do they want to get out of it in, are they? Well they WANNA stop the bleeding of their poll numbers. They haven't election. They want to win in November. They want to show that Donald. Trump is the leader and what they're also trying to show is that he hasn't become completely irrelevant which I believe, he almost has in the in the managing of the pandemic. If you if you take a step back, this is a president who? Who was late to the game cancelling the Jacksonville Convention has been a saying. We don't need more test. We need fewer tests. Suddenly seemed to change his mind on that, and then went back and forth now after demanding that all schools open A, we'll wait a minute. Maybe there are some school districts in some of those hot spots. That shouldn't open that quickly so he's. On the mask of course suddenly we see him donning a mask, so he's trying to appear as if he knows what he's doing. He's out front. He's leading and he's not a relevant and the American. Public's sixty percent of whom says done a lousy job. Managing the pandemic are scratching their heads and saying. Where were you for months ago? Dr Gander Deborah Vora Vouch Dr Brooks Doctor Fauci have not been allowed to speak at these briefings and I think we know why, because I think the most surprising thing said out loud today was from Dr Burks in this today. Show view. where she made clear, the science on opening schools is unclear. The science on children transmitting the disease she says is unclear. So how much do we really know? At this point about how rapidly children, Can Spread Corona virus. Look I. Think the number. One message here is reopening schools in the middle of widespread community. Transmission is dangerous. That should be a non-starter now. Is it possible based on some of the science that we have laboratory science clinical science with patients as well as what we've seen in other countries like? Denmark Norway, that have reopen schools, just for the youngest kids based on those experiences. If you have suppressed community transmission in a place like New, York City you could look at a phased in approach to reopening school starting with the youngest kids under ten. See how that goes. Assess as you go and. And then maybe see if you wanNA open more widely, but that's really how that information should be used not as a justification for throwing school doors wide open when you still have widespread community transmission daughter gathers sticking with for a second. There's the South Korea study which we've been talking about Dr. CI Today spoke about a study being done here in the US by the National Institutes of Health, but the results aren't expected to be available until December, and that's halfway through the school year, so in the absence of that information right now. How should parents navigate sending their children back to school? Well I think he really needs to look at what makes sense for you and your family, and I think for a lot of families, there are parents of and extended family who do have underlying risk factors. That would put them at increased risk for severe Cova disease and I think that really does need to factor into the decision making here, I. Do think another important point here though is that this is why. Trump is so important because it helps to inform some of these decisions while we're waiting for that big study to come through. A New York City, for example contact tracing Dato would indicate that children are more likely to be infected by adults rather than. Adults infecting children. Excuse me. Children are more likely to be infected by adults as opposed to children infecting the adult, so it's less likely that the children would be responsible for bringing disease home, but again this is still preliminary data, and really should not be turned to policy, except for where you have suppressed community transmission so David one of the things that the president has not done in recent days clearly doesn't like to talk. About is the one hundred and forty five thousand lives lost in this country to corona arrived. She would think those would be on top of mind of any president of the United States who calls himself a wartime president. What's the calculation? Do you think? Look from the beginning. There's been this attitude of denial that you can somehow spin a pandemic, and you can't. Even at the press briefing yesterday. He made the case that we're doing fine. We're doing well. And he said, but even one death is too much one death. How about one hundred and forty five thousand deaths? And you know to Gloria's point about him. Being almost irrelevant, he chose that. Because, he punted the hard decisions to the governor's instead of leading the country as one and we've had this peculiar paradox where you have a president leading a government that is trying to fight the pandemic while he's also leading the resistance to the guidance, said his own government is offering, and that's one of the reasons why we are in such worse shape. Than other countries around the world so Gloria today Dr Chee praised the president for his quote, Short and Crisp Corona virus briefings, which is a compliment. If you could ever hear one what's great about them is they're short Dr Phil. She says do. You think the president will be able to continue down this path hundred days to go until the election. It's hard for me to predict anything DONALD TRUMP, but if I had to guess I'd say the odds are that he can't. Because he loves the stage too much, and he changes his mind all the time. We just saw this week. He came out and said well. You know maybe we do need more testing. And then he changed his mind in another interview with journalists. Saying well, you know, I'm not for a lot of testing. Some people are some people. Aren't so I think the president is of course likely to say what comes to mind and I don't think he's changed his mind and I? Do think he was Kinda. Pay No attention to this. This and just move beyond it, but he can't. And this is what's so frustrating for him, so it's hard to answer your question, but I talked to somebody who is in touch with some high up. People in the White House and they're nervous about it because they don't know what's going to come out of his mouth the next time he speaks one of the things you have is you have a lot of Republicans patting him on the head for at this week? Intentionally I, think to give him the positive reinforcement to keep on doing doctor Gander very quickly. dodger foudy says vaccine mostly likely be widely available till mid twenty, twenty, one that realistic timeline. Well even if that's realistic John, the other problem is will people accept the vaccine and polls of Americans right now would indicate that some a third of Americans would refuse to get vaccinated, so that has me and many other public health officials really concern right? Dr David EXE Gloria, borger have a terrific weekend. Thanks so much to. Next Secretary of education goes even further than the president on the power. She claims that kids have against the virus. Her predecessor in the Obama Administration joins US along with the doctor who wants over Star Student Health in Baltimore City schools, and later how baseball and other sports are adapting to a new world of social activism. At the top of the program you hear. The president used one of his new corona virus briefings to stray from the script return to what is apparently a deep seated belief about children and the corona virus. He also said he would be comfortable with sending his son Barron back to the classroom, but according to New York Times. A School of baronets attends is still deciding whether to open for in person instruction at all, so it's far less gung-ho in this respect, then the president or his Education Secretary Betsy Devos who recently said this about the role? Children play the pandemic. More and more studies show that kids are actually stoppers of the disease, and they don't get it and transmit it themselves, so we should be in a posture of the the default should be getting back to school. Kids in person in the classroom. Stoppers the disease again that is from the secretary of Education and no, there's no evidence zero to support what you just heard her say. Joining us now is Arne Duncan who has secretary Devos job in the Obama Administration also Emergency Room Physician Med school professor and a former Baltimore. Health Commissioner Dr Liana Win Surcharge Dunkin. I to you when you hear Secretary Voss with the authority of your former office. Say things like that. What goes through your mind? Will, it's unbelievably disturbing infuriating. Obviously, she's lying. Obviously, there's no signs they are in not only. Is She fundamentally dishonest? Dangerous and fortunately. Parents teachers superintendents. Children are paying any attention to what she's saying. She's made herself irrelevant. The presence made himself irrelevant We're going to be let out of this by amazing local leadership, living communities who live around real people are GonNa make the right decisions for children educationally. Yes, but also for their health and safety I'm best going to happen at the local level. Level or grassroots level so Dr Wen secretary. Devos President Trump. They don't seem to be living in the same universe as Dr Burke, so we heard earlier in Dr found you echo the same sentiments today about how little we actually know about how this virus affects children. So, how much does this add to the confusion for parents not to mention administrators over schools? I think everyone is struggling with these questions, and at the end of the day we need to be humble, and I would've loved for president, trump and devos to be honest about here. The things that we know a here's what we don't know. We do know that children tend to get much less severely ill than adults do. Although remembering that children don't live in a bubble that we're also talking about their parents and grandparents and teachers and staff and their families to we also do have unclear research about the information about the transmission of virus by. And was the South Korea study that was done that found that children under the age of ten are, maybe about half is likely to transmit the virus as adults, but half of a lot is a lot and the single most important thing we can still need to focus on is reducing that level virus, the community which is something that doctor. Dr Brookes focus on, but that we have not heard nearly as much from the president so secretary donkey in the new CDC guideline. CDC guidelines came out last night, and they're really a shell of the previous guidelines. The ones the president said were to tough so. These guidelines are they more political or medical at this point. Will. They're trying to have it both ways, so they're bending to pressure the political pressure that they're feeling from him, but if you actually read into it, they say in the fine print it you. Will you having an increase? In cases, those decisions should be made at the local level Lexus. Look at the numbers if you go back to like March. Twenty Third March twenty four, th. When schools are shutting down. We had about ten thousand cases a day a month ago. June twenty third. We had thirty five cases thirty five thousand cases a day to they were having seventy thousand cases, day. A month ago, we had eleven twelve states where with declining numbers today we only have a single state with declining number so as a country. We're going the wrong way. It's just infuriating. Had we done what we needed to do? In March and April May and June? We wouldn't be talking about. Can we open schools? This was a natural disaster. It became a man-made catastrophe. Had We lock things down? Had We social distance? Have we wore masks? Have we had a White House to lead had a national plan A. A we wouldn't be jeopardized our children's chance to go back to school in the next couple of weeks, so Dr Win here Secretary Duncan said that local leaders are GonNa have to step up and make the right decisions responsible decisions. Would they be better off just using the leaked internal CDC document that was obtained by The New York Times a couple of weeks ago that it had and his very first page a warning the fully reopening schools remain one of the highest risk for the spread of the virus. Compared that document John to the document that was released today about the guidance, and they are night and day difference. The document today was basically a justification of why in per schooling is important, which I think we can all agree that it's important. We got it, but we need is the guidance on how to do so safely and actually that leaked document provided that guidance they actually looked at many different examples of of school protocols from around the country in critiqued them and highlighted some innovative best practices. That's what we need the CDC to do. We need the recommendations to be based on science, not have political pressure determine the content and what local leaders need more. More than anything is federal resources. They need the resources now in order to do right thing for their communities, they need local flexibility, and those resources need to targeted to the communities that are the most disadvantage where there are the most vulnerable students who are facing educational as well as profound health disparities lead to know how to do it and have the resources to do it right Secretary Dunkin. It's interesting because the new guidelines do have this back door. Suggesting if the virus is out of control in your county or district, then maybe you should reconsider reopening in the CDC Director Robert Redfield clarify that today he say communities with positivity rate higher than five percent. Perhaps should consider not reopening well. That's a lot of places. That's California Texas. It's Arizona, it's Mississippi. It's Florida it's a lot of places. When nationally nationally worried about eight point, eight percent, who were significantly higher than that it just puts you'll superintendents and principals who are so thoughtful in an unbelievably difficult position in folks who are trying to open totally physically are now having to go hybrid other folks that were in a hybrid mode, or now having to go only remote online, because far too many communities. Communities across the country rate of cases, the number of cases are going up every single day. Schools aren't bubbles. They're not islands. The best way we can get kids back into a physical school is to beat down this virus in our local communities I. Just want to quickly say the goal here is not to reopen schools. The goal is to stay open so. So we the move thoughtfully carefully start with those children most at risk is doctor win? Talked about start with our babies see if that works in slowly trying to ask students if we do the right thing, see in other countries Israel open too fast, and had to shut everything down South South Africa just open to fast and had to shut everything down we. We do not want to do that here and we should not be in this situation in the first flex look, there are places that can do it. The question is how to help them. Do it safely in the confusion just gets in the way former Secretary Arne Duncan doctoral and a one. Thank you both so much for being with US I appreciate it. Thank you just had a close look of the pandemic toll in Texas with the frontline worker who has seen the worst of what this disease can do. That's when three sixty returns. Hey there here's a show. We think you'll love axios today, start your mornings with the news that matters in just ten minutes. I'm NYLA Boudou host of axios today every weekday at. A team of award, winning journalist to bring you scoops from the White House, analysis on the economy and insights into the trends shaping our world, axios known for our Smart Brevity reporting in our newsletters and HBO show now we've teamed up with Pushkin Industries to bring ethos podcast. It's like taking a seat at the smartest breakfast table in the world. Listen wherever you get your favorite podcasts. who to focus down with the state of Texas, which today recorded second highest discount from the virus today, one hundred and ninety six, just one shy of the high, said on Wednesday in Stark County, in the southern tip of the state, a county health board is having to make a truly awful decision. According to multiple reports from local media, the county's sole hospital has formed an ethics committee beds are in such demand. That committee is considering guidelines that could force those close to death to go home rather than spend their final hours with medical professionals. Just reminder president trump said yesterday that states have quote everything. They could possibly need what a canvas applies. That's why we like to keep the focus on the people who are seeing these events firsthand, because they are eyes and ears about the true toll. This virus is taking joining us now. A frontline medical worker who has seen the pandemic in Texas up-close both in mcallen in the south in El Paso in the West Dr Joseph Donnelly Dr Donnelly. You just came from Callan. You were there during the peak of the surge? What was that like? It was devastated It's hard to describe in words. The medical infrastructure there is. A major metropolis. New York. City or Chicago or Los. Angeles the resources are already stretched thin and. It didn't take long to reach the breaking point down there. I understand you had to try and resuscitate a woman in the parking lot. How did that unfold? An eighteen better when I was working at him, they had thirty two cova patients. In the department, so you can imagine they're lined up in the hallways. They're literally nowhere to go. and so we had to make the decision to go out and meet the ambulance in resuscitate the person there. What happened to her? Woman expired. Forty old she have been. Treated a week prior Kobe. We can't admit everyone with covert. Most. People are able to go home but to. Some people are going to return and not do well. Just forty years old and I know how difficult it must be to be surrounded by that all day, and to work as hard as you are all day. You said that you have to use the hallways for the overflow. How else are you accommodating? The patients who don't have pets? Route we Reuse beds upstairs the. Price. You is now an adult. I see they're. Literally everywhere you can put a patient you'll belong. Assuming you'd have a physician to staff that area. And as I said, the resources are stretched very thin. And there's no way to to pre-position enough people to accommodate to surge as has occurred down there. Do, you think there are people who have died or could have been saved if you had had more resources. Absolutely. The people who don't seek care right now because they're afraid to even come to the hospital. and. They're also people in the hospital who are receiving the best care we can give, but sometimes it's not enough. You've got some nurses taking care of six or eight people. ICU type patients, which would normally be staff. To patients to one nurse. There is a positive side to this which I think you've learned a less than a lot of doctors in New York learned as well which is at after weeks of treating patients like this. You learn how to do it better. Tell us about that. Well we learned. To, treat aggressive and early when they come in sick and we don't want that oxygen to draw low for too long. Others? No. FDA approved treatment for Kogo Nineteen, but there are treatments available that are being used the communists of plasma around de Severe. Pruning those sorts of things are helping as so. We're not reinventing the wheel. But this is a disease, unlike any other that I've seen in my twenty years the where it can affect one person who will have no symptoms when they have another person who literally suffocate in a matter of days, Dr Donnelly a have to say. First of all. Thank you for the work you're doing, but you look like so many. The doctors that I've had a chance to speak you spent. You look tired. You look like this is taking a toll on. You. Talk to me about that. It wears you out. How so? You kinda feel now. And then at the end of your shift, you're just you're done. Look. We're lucky to have you and the people of Texas or lucky to have you. What's your message? To people who still may not be taking this seriously, who still may look at this and say is just something like the flu. It's nothing like the flu. Realize that you can make a difference. Stay on user masks where it right. Realized that maybe if you feel invincible. Humanity, the person that is choking on something and can't get an ambulance to come at you because they're all occupied for the surge. So you can make a difference. Dr Donnelly. You're making a difference I. We're very grateful that you are. Thank you for telling us what you are seeing. It makes such a difference for people around the country to know what's happening on the ground there in how hard people are working to try to turn this thing around, so thank you. More breaking news ahead. The Center for Disease Control Today reports Kobe. A prolonged illness, even among those recovering from the disease weeks after they were discharged just ahead. I'm going to speak with a British professor who got back in March in it lingered and lingered and lingered until now. Are you thinking of flying, deciding if you should bring your family on a plane, just how safe visit to fly right now in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic I'm poppy harlow and in a special bonus episode of CNN's boss Files Delta, airlines CEO and bastion joins me to talk about the state of the airline industry. In a remarkably candid conversation, he calls for a federal mass mandate, and he tells me why he's refusing to sell middle seats and talk a lot about race and diversity. and. He says he needs to do much more to help. Advanced Black employees at Delta I hope you'll listen subscribed boss files and listen to the episode today. Breaking news from the Centers for Disease Control, scientists there reported today that even among patients recovering from the pandemic. The after effects can linger for weeks. Even the study suggests for relatively young people Paul Garner is a case in point in extreme case in point to so-called long Holler, he got covid in mid March, and he still can't shake it. He's a professor of Tropical Diseases at the School of Tropical Medicine in Liverpool England before he was diagnosed, he was healthy and fit. I spoke to him earlier. Professor Gardner you call yourself a covert long hauler. You I became sick in mid March. That's a long time ago Harry doing now. So I'm beginning to feel a little bit better I have less sweaty or the the attacks that lasts for three or four days and have receded I have a considerable, the t I'm exhausted the whole time it's. Quite, debilitating so I I can't do much. During the day I'll have to go back to bed two or three times just to keep my energy up your in the unique position of being someone who studies infectious diseases, but also has covid. Have you had a chance to step back and analyze why this is happening with coronavirus is is a mystery to me I some days. I feel as though this is a post. Farrell Syndrome and that's what it looks like, but. There are so many new things happening all the time, so a but I do think on balance. This is the long tile you see in some viral infections, but it's the fatigue. Comes back in in very different ways about three or four weeks ago I had difficulty speaking I had difficulty string words together and adopt that apparently is recognize does. With people with fatigue, so it is really quite frightening, and it's taken me away from old things. I enjoy which running and being outside and and. I can't do any of those things if I do. Makes me feel quite on well well. You're an athlete and you have tried to exercise some. Can you tell people I mean a real athlete like someone who does near extreme sports? What happens when you try to do anything? I Don I walked six kilometers on Sunday under ten minutes, Yoga and a Tuesday Monday and Tuesday already been quiet on. Well I went a little bit too far, so it's really. Disabled. May might my my friend in Australia said Polo. You are trying to dominate this disease. You a trying to beat it. Go back to your levels of exercise. What you should do is trying to accommodate the virus. You need to accommodate. The virus is still in charge. You know people should know. You also had malaria and dengue your shrinking violet here. You wrote recently quote. This stuff is real. People are ill. Doctors need to stop diagnosing this as We've messed up before. Let's not do it again with long-term cove in nineteen illness. What you fear will happen if experts continue to misdiagnose long-term Cova. Illnesses such as yours. I think the doctors on not yet familiar with a huge great spectrum of different condense conditions. I have fatigue. Some of the people I know are very rapid heart rates com, a woman a news box. CanNot woke up a flight of stairs without getting a very fast heart rate is a very different syndrome, so people are going to the doctors and the doctors don't recognize it, and if they're not confident, they will be dismissed, so it's really important. Medics and people at high on all believe was happening to them because it is a very strange illness, and it causes many very strange unexpected symptoms, but they are real. Strange Real, and in some cases just terrible professor Garner. You've been living with this from more than four months. We. Wish you the best. Thanks so much for being with us. New CNN reporting tonight centered around President Trump's anger and the confederate flag, what he's upset about in who he's mad at just ahead when three sixty continues. New report from, CNN tonight according to people familiar with his reaction President trump is fuming at his own. Defense Secretary Mark. Espera Reason Espera issued a military y directive last week that in effect banned the display of confederate flags at military bases. As you know, the president has defended people displaying the flag, saying it's a freedom of speech issue a freedom he does not embrace by the way when it comes to kneeling during the national anthem as senior white. White House official tells CNN quote. Your story is inaccurate so with all that as a backdrop today before their first game of the twenty twenty season, the Boston Red Sox unveiled a huge sign painted on the tarp, covering the seats in the center-field stands. As you can see, it reads. Black lives matter significant, not only in the current atmosphere of social awareness among athletes in all sports, especially in light of the troubled history of race relations in that city. And that wasn't by any means the only visible sign of change in baseball this season I and it's happening in all professional sports. Three six K. has the details. First of all. Share Light. On. You know justice for Briana Taylor. and. Her family, that was Lebron James. Moments after returning to the court for the first time in more than four months. The Lakers star is making it clear basketball and Brianna Taylor our top priorities back in March Taylor was killed in a barrage of gunfire after police used a no knock warrant to storm into her home so far, none of the officers have been charged. In his league. Her family didn't know and I want. You, to know. That we feel for and we weren't justice. Several teams made statements on the field at the L.. A. Dodgers opener against the San. Francisco Giants Dodgers Coaching Staff, and the whole giant squad wore black lives matter t shirts for the pre game warm be Blm, was also emblazoned on the Pitcher's mound, and before the game both teams took a knee and held a black ribbon, encircling the field all with the same goal. To level the playing field. To change the injustices perform in Washington, DC the nationals also used their pitcher's mound to support black lives matter and took a knee along with the new. York Yankees before the opening pitch. Some players wore league approved patches that red black lives, matter and united for Change. All while a black lives matter video produced by the players. Alliance played onscreen. Away no longer will make our voices louder for all of us. Who Can? For All of those who could not major league baseball's. Account also highlighted players in black lives matter t-shirts. Equality is not just a word. It's our right. and today the Tampa Bay rays baseball team also showed support for Briana Taylor tweeting today is opening day, which means it's a great day to arrest the killers of Brianna Taylor all of this support for social injustice, a far cry from two thousand sixteen, when players in the WNBA were initially find five hundred dollars for wearing black lives matter t shirts to protest. Protest police brutality. The teams were fined five thousand dollars. All of those fines were later dropped soon after that NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, famously took a knee leading to the derailment of his football career, and now in the wake of George Floyd and Briana Taylor's deaths. It's not just player supporting the cause, but teams as a whole are examining best to move forward. The Washington, Redskins, changing their name for now to the Washington football team tweeting simply it begins here. And the Cleveland Indians Baseball team also possibly considering a name change is promising to engage native American leaders to better understand their perspectives. Randy K. CNN west Palm Beach Florida. Just ahead we remember those who lost their lives to the virus, including a man who helped secure much needed. Kuroda virus supplies for his community forty past. Tonight with the death toll, topping one hundred and forty, five thousand remember. Some of the lives lost during this pandemic David. PACIFICA wasn't emergency management coordinator of Addis goes a county in Texas. He took his job seriously was even known as the radar because he was always on the lookout for how he could help community before he was appointed as the emergency management coordinator, he served as a volunteer firefighter and fire chief for more than twenty five years. He was known as a person who would jump into problems feet first and confront situations head on. So in the pandemic hit David worked tirelessly to secure personal protective equipment for the first responders and hospital workers in his county. Sometimes he drive hundreds of miles to personally pick up the P and bring it back to the front line workers who needed it? During the crisis, David was diagnosed with leukemia. He was undergoing aggressive treatment, but then then he came down with the virus that he was fighting so hard to contain his county. David. PACIFICA was fifty eight years old. In our heart goes out to him in all those loss to this pandemic, the news continues or handed over to Chris Cuomo Primetime.

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