20 Episode results for "Arlon"

President Trump In London For D-Day Commemoration; Plus, Is Assisted Suicide Humane?

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

08:35 min | 1 year ago

President Trump In London For D-Day Commemoration; Plus, Is Assisted Suicide Humane?

"He's welcome to the no spin news. Wednesday June a bit two thousand nineteen take your country back. So President Trump continuing his trip to the British Isles. He is an Arlon right now this morning. He was in Portsmouth, which is a coastal city in England. And I hope you saw ninety two year old Queen Elizabeth, give a magnificent speech. You know, I it's interesting. And I'm gonna do this in my final thought and steer you to interview idea with Sean Hannity today. But the Queen of England will understands because she saw it with your own eyes, how the United States saved Great Britain from Hitler. She gets set 'cause she saw that she was a teenager when it happened EBay. All right. Many, many younger Britons and Americans have no blanket clue. It went down on D day today, we're going to get into that pretty heavy here. But the nobility of American courage of America's save the world and Queen appreciates inches care, who's president. And that's why Donald Trump was treated so well, by the Royal family, because he went over there, specifically to honor the people who lost their lives, and were maimed and the brave people who emerged victorious on day seventy five years ago tomorrow. That's why he went and he was insulted, by the mayor of London and some of the American press, British press treat him. Okay. But the American press nit picky about Megan Markle, this and a balloon and all this garbage Amman make gives it a point where, you know, human beings can be forgiven a certain amount of stupidity but you gotta draw the lawn San Francisco. I quick break. Here's an exciting announcement, the first ever cruise through history will be held next spring is the opportunity to share your values beliefs and things you hold dear with the ones you hold here. Now, the ship will sell the Mediterranean out of this, then the eastern Mediterranean, coast visiting Croatia Greece, and finally, Israel, all with Glenn Beck as cruise director will take a guided tour the holy land looking forward to that beckon. I'll do a couple of shows. Together long David Barton rabbi Layton and Beck's buddy stoop, please visit the website come sell way dot com. Come sell away dot com for details. As we reported earlier this week cities overrun by addicted homeless people who are going to the bathroom, in public panhandling, creating public, health menaces and doing things to ruin the entire city. So last night, the board of supervisors, which are so far left. You can't even imagine voted, ten to one to develop a pilot program that would force the worst of the homeless. I mean, the most out of control of them forced them into some kind of program, take them off the street forcibly and put them in some kind of facility, ten to one now. Not many numbers, involved yet, but just the fact that San Francisco's doing this, you can expect the ACLU's, sue on behalf of the homeless, people are causing trouble. You can expect that, but as a fairly interesting situation may death and dignity act has passed now. I did not know this, but my research came up with act that, California, Colorado, DC why you're in, Vermont Washington, state, and Montana all have laws that you can commit suicide if you turn. Terminally of the doctor will help you commit suicide, so main is pondering that now I don't make any judgments on this kinds of things. All right. I just don't make any judgments on in Holland, a younger, who was traumatizes child asked the government to put her to death because she doesn't wanna live anymore because of our trauma. Nothing physically wrong with her, and they did, or they will NAT I would not support. That where? Quick break. Right back with my final thoughts on whether younger Americans could pull off d day it recently, I had a great conversation with the CEO of the Hartford gold group Sanford man is a true entrepreneur, I like those kind of guys looking to provide customers with the best possible experience when they invest in physical gold and silver. So right now, the Hartford goal group, is giving you a free silver coin to viewers of the no spin news exclusively, you just go to WWW dot Hartford. Gold group dot com forward slash no spin. Or you can give them a call at eight six six four eight four zero five one seven eight six six four eight four zero five one seven. Tell them all Riley sent you to get the free gift. Okay. It's my final photo. The day I was on Hannity's radio program, and we discussed whether America. Eighteen to thirty five and there are thirty seven million men, I know women would be in combat to. But most of them would be men could storm the beaches of Normandy. And the Germany today, they had to what if he will rush or even a raw. Could they do it? Would they have the courage and the medal to do it? Now back in World War, Two ten million drafted. Vietnam. Lot of millions of soldiers drafted. And I'm contrary on, I'll be at Phnom. I think our forces our military degrade there it was a politician screwed all up, but you can debate settled law. So I said to Hannity, and I want you to listen to it. We got posted on Bill O'Reilly dot com. It's more subtle than just this. I said, I don't think so too. My father was in World War, Two, he was a depression kit, who's raising the depression in an era of deprivation. My father was tough, the tough guy wasn't always easy being a son. Okay. And it wasn't all about him. He had higher as we talked about earlier aspirants. He believed in God, he believed in his country. Now that were bad things back then was segregation of military there. Wes, America's always had bad things, but overall noble country free, billions. Okay. And young men back in nineteen forty four they knew that a lot of them were going to be killed, and maimed. It. It everybody knew it. Saving private Ryan best DJ day flick. But they did it wasn't any dissent. I mean there are few deserters a few people got crazy, but not many today when it's all about you. Everything's about you. You, you, you, you. Me me me me me. This is your life right here. Live right here. Sure. And I give an example of Colin Kaepernick, Hannity. I'm not gonna do it now, wants to list that was very interesting. And instructive is the young man Colin capital. And his supporters are basically young. So I hope you listen. But my verdict is great. Greatest generation is aptly named. They were the greatest generation. Now, we may be the whitest generation. Thanks premium. It cost us members. Let me know what you're saying. And was do you get a more?

Sean Hannity America President Trump San Francisco Queen Elizabeth Hartford EBay Portsmouth Arlon England British Isles London England Megan Markle Glenn Beck Bill O'Reilly British press United States
Celtic Bayou Festivals Tony and Sheila Davoren Share Love of All Things Irish/Celtic

Discover Lafayette

57:36 min | 1 year ago

Celtic Bayou Festivals Tony and Sheila Davoren Share Love of All Things Irish/Celtic

"The. This is John swift. And you're listening to discover Lafayette podcast, dedicated to the people and rich culture of Lafayette, the gateway to southeast Yana today's podcast is being recorded in the offices of writer solutions raider creates and maintains technical strategies for businesses of all sizes across the country as well as right here in Lafayette functioning is their complete IT department. Raiders motto is you just want it to work. We understand if you're wondering if writer can help your business, please visit Reiter solutions dot com. I'm very proud to welcome IB Bank. As discover Lafayette's premier sponsor founded in eighteen eighty seven Iberia Bank is the largest Bank based in Louisiana and is headquartered here in Lafayette with three hundred twenty nine combined locations throughout the south. They offer the resources of national Bank with the personal touch of a community. Bank Iberia banks supports educational, cultural and business development efforts. The make a difference in the many communities they serve including sponsoring this podcast. For more information, please visit Iberia Bank dot com. Our guest today are Sheila and Tony Davin. Organizers of the fourth annual Celtic by you festival coming March fifteenth and sixteenth warehouse. Five three five in Lafayette. The festival is a family friendly event. Celebrating the Celtic culture in its held around Saint Patrick's Day every year. Let's give a little background Sheila is first generation arch American and began ours dancing at the age of four she enjoyed a competitive career at the world championship level in dance, professionally with the chief don's a Grammy award winning our group at the age of twenty five Sheila was one of the first Americans to be invited to perform with river dance at the attributes show consisting mainly of traditional are music and dance Sheila, directed and produced dancing at the crossroads and instructional videos, starring fellow river dance performers. The video has since become a staple study guide for those dancers wishing to be certified in our stance Sheila directs. Camp rinca Kayole held each summer in California, New York and she teaches ours stance. Classes in memory inherited Lafayette, Tony is from Wicklow our land. He began his singing career with the Celtic Irish coral group, a new no and also toured with river dance. He's appeared at the Radio City Music hall and performed for the principal Wales at the Albert Hall in London Tony has recorded with sting, the chieftains and Sinead O'Connor. He's also featured on two Grammy award winning recordings the long black veil and river dance the show Tony directed. The music for dancing at the crossroads in has produced recordings for Irish soloist, Katie McMahon, and Dave Donahue, and the best part of the story is toning. And Sheila I met while performing in river dance, the Lee company, their mutual love of music dance and enjoying their Irish culture, drew them together. And they were married in two thousand two they live today and sons. Set with their three children. I want to welcome you both to discover Lafayette's. Thank you for being here. Thank you so much great. So the main, you know, the impetus for getting you on now is to talk about the the festival coming up in March. But if we can go back, and let's talk about you living here in south, Louisiana and promoting and teaching all of us about your Arush routes. I don't know which one of you wants to begin. But this is such a beautiful story. And I know so little about the Celtic culture. When we moved down here. We were attracted to the wonderful, rich culture and the way people live down here, the people, and where we first settled the first year or two, you know for us. It was so much about, you know, learning about what was already here, we kinda left a life where we just been around Irish music and dance for the, you know, pretty hardcore for the past six or eight years or maybe longer and we'd be on tour for a lot of it. So for us the first year or so was just like vacation just learning about the area because we bought our house on the spur of the moment. You know, we we we're at festival international a friend suggested that we come and look at a few places that we might be interested in the quarter in the quick. That's a good resource. Yeah. We we actually drove out to to meet with wasiyu are doin-. He's leaving something out. We've I went for drive decker. Oh, well, yeah. Oh, well, yeah. Everybody likes that. That was part of our tradition back then and every day started off with a dry through Dachary. Sorter and drive through waiting for the police to come. But they never. So we did that took a drive out to sea Bosick doing and the people we were visiting at Dirk Powell Christine Boffa day. They would go and visit him and keep him company and his wife was alive at the time. He spoke French them. Music afternoon, and we would have a couple of drinks. And then on the way back to Lafayette that we were passing by sunset dark had the quick core. And he said there's one more place here, we should have a look at. So we drove in to what's now our house, and we met we called the guy who was listed and he came in medicine way to get this. His name was LeRoy O'Brien. A Yankee fan perhaps a distant relative, a huge music. So when of course, when this he was older gentlemen, when he saw Christine Buffa his mouth dries. Right. So we literally got a deal on the property there. And then did you now right down shayla when we drove down the driveway? I just started crying. I knew I knew it. The house is not a lot to write home about. It was it was a nineteen sixties ranch. But it was just the acreage. It was four eight hundred dollars. And it was like thirty five pecan trees five beautiful rustic read the trees everywhere back. The you don't really get. And normally flat countryside that we'd been seen down here. I think we knew we were going to make an offer the house was not being lived in. So we had to call him. He was living in Karen crow at the time. So we have to call him, and he had to come and open up the house for us. We were trying to look through the window, but the shades down. But I think we knew before we saw the inside of the house. We're we're gonna take this. We're going to do it what it change for your boat because I know you travel. Living in New York at the dial living large like really slowing down. Right. I I mean we were living. In the backyard. They didn't have an alligator thing. I'll tell you something that one of the first stories that I heard when we moved down here was and it was a true story because we had to go that night at Joel's house one of the guys there was a moccasins and his toilet. So we all went to go see it. And that was when we first moved here. I still fifteen years later look yet. Yeah. It was the real thing is people do think we have the Gators in our backyard buddy, all those little things just getting used to the mosquitos. You know, the why don't we don't. We don't have mosquitoes. We do in New York. But yeah, his his way of he was living in Ireland. But it was a little bit different for me. It was like living in the country meant no sidewalks. We live on a gravel road. So and the mall was always so much closer in New York. It was right across the street for four. I said to him I need to just every once in a while I need to just drive down to Johnston and embassador and just hang out there for a minute. I just need. But I'm over that. Now. I mean, it didn't take long after a couple of years. We were right? We were living in the country. So this was back. You had been you had met through river dance. And I want you to talk about that. But this wasn't long after you had been touring. And this was we finish. I finished dance in ninety nine and you finished in two thousand two thousand one two thousand and then we got engaged, and we got married, and so this this shortly ask we just started our business. Business, and I was still on tour tour managing and playing with the groups, and but again when she mentioned the snow after the last snowstorm was particularly bad winter in New York. And we were just like why are we doing this anybody does it? I know it's fine to have seasons. But I'm such a southern girl. Warm weather snowfall is amazing. And then it just kind of starts. A nice picture s. Right. Kristen when it turns into slush. Black. She stuff all over the place. It's not fun. We were living in Long Island, and the traffic was just terrible just to get anywhere. I mean, it was it's easier for us to get get places. Now, you know because we live down here some curious at that point you hit traveled the world. And both of you have been very successful in your careers. I do want to get into that. But were you looking ahead to we're going to maybe settle down some and transition? What were your thoughts when you were looking to move here? But actually, you mean down here. I don't think we thought about that until I got pregnant, and then it was like, okay, we're very pragmatic. We had like a one year plan. And then if we last year, let's look at three years, but it was the one year plan. Now, six months, I think that's how most of it. It was six months. And then when you realize you can't live without smoke, Sasha, sausage, and crawfish and more. You realize you can't live anywhere, right? Yeah. We're going to do can't get Buddha. You, you know, doing some research for this. I saw you in a YouTube video you were cooking. I think it was something, you know, preparing for one of the Celtic festivals. And you were talking about the similarities between our ash and the Cajun Creole and a lot of it was people like to eat. They liked to drink like to dance singing his big do you see that? I mean is there a lot of similarity authors. I think all those those things who doesn't like those thing. Right. I think more than a lot of people though, the Irish and the people Louisiana love love a good time. You know, you hear that a lot in just regular do. You know, passing a good time is very important here. And so is hard work. It's very similar gnarled. You work hard Monday to Friday. And then the weekends is party time. And that might involve play music dancing, having a few drinks, maybe. And and just couldn't up and having a good time. We have a word in Arlon called the crack, and the crack CR a is a word, and I think we're the only country that has that. But it's a combination of good company, and maybe drinks party atmosphere. Dancing music singing, all those things is the crack are you having the crack are you having a good time on I think we realized very quickly that Cajuns in Creoles like to have the crack. I'm we were all about that. So we're in. And there's no getting rid of us know is there much of Irish community in south Louisiana, had you met many people that there's little pockets of it. And I'm I'm amazed. Because every even though this is the fourth year of Celtic by by festival and not only that. But like the dance school itself. The damn school is going on. I wanna say thirteen years now, I'm still after all that time of being here. I'm still meeting little pockets of people that are, hey, I'm actually Irish born and raised in Ireland, and I'm living here. Now, where have you been have you not known that? Because usually you hear about it, especially when like, you know, Tony's known as the Irish guy and his he has a company Irish guy. Landscaping, right. People know him as the Irish guy. So we are obviously New Orleans has more with the Irish channel Baton Rouge. It's it's small. But back new still has a massive parade, right? For Saint Patrick's Day. They get like ten thousand people you said a big deal in Arlon is at his big deal as it is here in the states. We used to have just small parades. In in the towns in the local towns, and even Dublin wasn't a big big deal that might have a March in binder to or the or the local police or the fiber gate people festivals recently in the last fifteen I again, I think since the the whole river dance in the Celtic tiger explosion. They realized. Okay. We gotta make an effort night. So now, they have a really fine parade in Dublin, and they had I think a couple of years ago, they had the shoe bind. And they really do a good job of of getting acts from all over the world. Remember, my cousins in Ireland telling me, you Americans celebrate Saint Patrick's Day way bear. No, then we do we used to laugh. We did that. I mean, you had to wear green didn't want to be caught. And without something green on here. Never Houston joy at Saint Patrick's Day because I was a musician, and I would play music and Dublin we might have five or seven or eight gigs just going from pub are. Yourself. No, you were just around a drunken mess all day, and you were trying to play music or sing a song, and those just loud and obnoxious and drunk people everywhere. So it wasn't my favorite thing at the time. But now, I I enjoy it a lot. Now, I'm one of the drunken. Representative. I mentioned to you that I hate to admit it. I'm not really familiar with the Irish culture. But of course, we all know about river dance. And would you explain what that is? I think people know about it. But is that one of the biggest representations of the Irish dancing in? Absolutely. It's so Irish dancing has been around for hundreds of years, and we have a very unique style. We don't use our arms. So it's not it tap. American. Tap dancing is is from Irish dancing, and like the style of it was taken from Irish, but they use their arms. So we have we don't use our upper body. So there's no there's no emotion. It's just the rhythm. And the tapping and the graceful saw there's two types of Irish dancing, soft shoe in their heart you, so the soft shoe is very graceful and airy, and you know, you jump high in the air. And the hard shoe is very rhythmic and a lot of percussion and tap and stuff like that. But from the waist up there's nothing and why is that she loved so no this is going back. We talked about it in mixed company or we have two different stories on this. I'm not gonna. So the say, I say, I tell my story. And then you tell your story, and then we'll see who Janelle version of done. John wayne. I didn't make it up and had to be chart story. I've done a little bit of studying on an Israeli what happened if you look at old school Irish dance. It's very much. It's a lot looser. The you've got set down some where they do use their arms in their upper body. And then you have shown no Stein's shown knows basically means old school. Stationary. No. For. Yes. And they would dance with dance with brushes, and they would dance we know was a prop and they would use our Dr their hands a lot. But what happened was after Arlen gained its independence. In nineteen twenty one after the civil war. We basically after being, you know. Been kind of owned and operated by the British empire for so long. We handed the keys to the car that we just got we handed over to the Catholic. Clergy. I'm what they did. With a lot of now the arts and the Catholic church kind of went hand in hand, and they form these little organizations. One of them is the large which is the Irish dance organization because it had such a an affiliation with the church. They took all anything down. They toned it down. They didn't want hands, touch, and they didn't want g cheek Danson, and they made short at the hands down by your side and Sheila rolling her eyes, which is one of the because I've heard two versions, and that's very similar to one that I heard, but the version the other version that I heard the right one was that. So we all know that Arslan was an oppressed country and that. Long time ago when they used to have house parties, they used to put a candle in the window to say this person is having the party that night because the English were supposed to know about it. But the houses were very small, he's laughing the audience can't see, but he is laughing at me. So the houses were very small and all these people would come in. And by the time, you have the musicians in the chairs and stuff like that. And everybody was dancing. Everything was very time that the arms down by their makes sense. See? Yeah. Jan has the vote, which maybe they both make sense. Maybe it was just an evolution. That's what I like to think. It was. Door story. What was that? Oh, I don't know that story. Shino? Heard that it was the the Catholic school Catholic priests that said, no touching right, which is make sense. And also just the small house moved all the all the partying the used to go on and people's houses, and in the pubs that literally closed down it was frowned upon by the by the Catholic religion. So what they did. Instead was they brought it all to the local parish halts. So the local parish hall, and and instead of like set dancing right now, we're gonna talk about group dancing the old school dancing. They were loud to dance cheek to cheek. They're allowed to put their hands around the waist. It's very similar to square dancing. American swear dancing is from Irish Kaley dancing, the position very much you on. It was very, you know, there's a lot of touch and a lot of close, but what the priesthood when when it was in the parish hall. They changed the dancing where you done it side by side holding hands and you went in and out that way, you weren't holding. You know, wastes anymore, and they would they would. I mean, it's it's it's funny now, but they would patrol the the dance floor. Anyone caught putting the hand in the wrong place or kissing or the moon get whipped or slapped yet? So that was not became Kaley dancing. But going back to the original question. So Irish dancing was kind of this underground thing. I mean, when I did it in New York, I was first generation all the kids in my class in my dance class who like where my best friends. I mean, more than my my grammar school friends. These were like, we we we were dancing together, we regret and together we were competing together. We were doing sleepovers and stuff like that. We spent a lot of time. It was my team. They were all first generation Irish, I didn't really know anybody that was of of a different background background. So then fast. Forward to river dance river dance comes out and must've been so excited. It was very exciting. Now, I was not part of the original. So my will have I will allow Tony. He was part of the original. I will let him explain what river dance was go ahead. Take it from there. Thanks for the. It doesn't happen. River dance was an accident. There's a big a big event happens in Europe every year, the Eurovision song contest where every country of Europe would have a little national competition, and they would select someone to represent a country and send it to the massive. You're now six hundred or eight hundred million people with Choon into watch this singing. Super Bowl music competitions people. I mean, and every country would submit a song every country submitted a song and Harland got really good at win in this thing called account. Song contest Arlen one like a couple years in a row after the second time winning it. They decided that they were going to this does always an interval lacked and has to be something culturally related to your country. So you kinda showcase into the rest of Europe. This is what we do. Now. Does this great musician composer called Bill Wayland? And he was tapped on the shoulder by the national broadcast company to put something together. So he came up with this idea of mixing Irish song Irish modern ours music, a modern Irish dance into this six seven minute piece. So it started off with Mike wire at the time, noon, we sang this gentle opener, and then the music started in the German start and soloist dancers came out and heart shoot. But here's where it all changed. They use their arms allot. So we were I was in in double. In airline and for the world championships in around Easter. So this was what when was your vision. Does a it was April ninety four we heard that. There was this buzz going on. They were very quiet about it. Very secret was it was a small dance actually a large dance school in Dublin. And and they were using their dancers, and it was Jean Butler who was actually American and she went to my dance school. And we were the same age that we competed with each other, and Michael Flatley who is actually from Chicago, but was living over in Ireland, and he was a very show dancer like he he was a performer right used his hands. Yes. Moonwalk while he was doing stunts. We aren't there's this little Baz going on. And you know, Jean had talked to myself and some other of our fellow school dancers about it. But not a lot. It was very quiet. And I'll never forget the night. We all went to her parents house, and there was about five of us from the dance school, and they we watched the video and I just bowl crying. I have never seen Irish I've been doing Irish down I'm nine no, I'm older at the time. I'm probably about twenty three twenty four saying I've been dancing twenty years. I have never seen. I mean, we never even put a hand on a hip never. We never did anything like that. So I was just blown away. And I guess everybody else was too and everyone. Was to they had a standing ovation for like it went on forever and ever and ever and ever remember when they brought us in the brought us into this big arena for the first time. So everyone was kind of compartmentalized singers. We recorded our song separately to everyone else. But we were told is going to be Irish dance. And then we heard well, it's going to be a Russian ballet dancers, and it's going to be. This is the show, but our so it went from a six minute interval act. You know, an engine mission at the Super Bowl I got together for in the Rena where they put the music for me as a young musician all the band members were all heroes of mine. Like here we were put together in this room with my heroes who had been spending hours upon years and years listening to their how they play the music they did. And here the all part of this thing we were doing and then they brought out the dancers. So once and I'd never seen. I'd seen Irish Johnson done poorly before, but it never seen a big long line of hard shoe Irish dances. All. Away. Just all the legs matching like the first time. I did the hurt the rehearsal with the actual music. I remember because I was making fun of before. I actually saw it all going to be down some this. Then once once all hit my draw job my jaw dropped. I was like, oh, we got something. Yeah. We all know each other. We did not know each other, gene. Actually, I was hanging with all her of her school for right? And so, of course, you know, huge demands everybody the next day woke up first thing everybody's talking about all of the papers all over the news. So the directors and the producers they're not stupid. They were like we need to pass on. On. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. So they decided to come out with like a Broadway show. So it was a two hour show. And it went to Hammersmith, and it was in Hammersmith in England right outside London for very very long time. And they were selling out every single Davis there for the first time it was sold t state with the the company. It was crazy. I was I was working on a building site was singing by night. Let's see I was mixing cement during the day. So your life changed overnight. And then an night, I was going to music almost every night and then come back to the building site work in the rain. It was miserable. And then all of a sudden, I got this tap on the shoulder going. Hey, we're doing the show. Do you want to be part of this? You're going to get paid. You're gonna get to go to London. And I was I did not think twice those like I'm outta here. And so that's when they kind of put an ad out. And they were like we are expanding the show. We're creating two shows one's going to travel in Europe one's going to travel North America. So we're looking for dancers. So that's when the auditions went out looking. So big they split the show. Right. So they had to troops of one hundred people one in Europe one American the rest of the world. So they I got an invitation to addition which was really rare and known from your own, right? I had been touring with the chief Dinh's I was there solo dancer for like three years. So I was pretty well known in in that professional not the competitive anymore the professional circuit. So I got an invitation to audition they flew us to Dublin which was pretty exciting. And it was two weeks of the hardest working I've ever done in my entire life. It was literally dancing from nine AM to six PM the out for the auditions. Yes. For the tryouts we were staying in BNB. And I remember we were on the third floor. No elevator. And we were crawling the end air and the woman was bringing us. She felt so bad the owner of the BNB this nice little old Irish. Lady from Dublin she felt so bad. She would bring bringing us t to the room every single night. So and then after that, it was you know, who who made it. I was back at home and my the phone rang, and because of the time difference, it's five hours time difference from New York to to Dublin. My dad had answered the phone. It was like, oh, I don't know. My goodness. It probably was like four in the morning and my dad, I was the youngest five. So I think he thought you know, one of my brothers or sisters got into trouble. And he answered the phone, and it was it was Dublin and he came into the room, and he was just tears will down you made. Yeah. He was he was so much more excited than I was excited, but he was like above and beyond because it was he's from Ireland. So his little daughter is now touring show great moment for the country nesh national rights think those never this huge pride in their own culture. You know, in our own culture at the time because ever that was kind of the old world. But to take this great genre of dancing, celebration music and singing and dusted down and give it a new kind of format and make it colourful and sexy. Yeah. That was training. It was sexy. Very sexy. This gorgeous blonde man from Chicago and this beautiful red head like model from New York, and then a bunch of young kids and singers and the best musicians in the country. I mean, they did it right on the country and the world responded like very much and just what you're saying growing up. You never told anybody that you Irish dance. Yeah. You kind of. Kind of it was I just dance. You know, you never talked about it that much especially the boys in our class. They never none of their friends knew that they were Irish dancing river dance, kind of put that all to rest we were allowed to a now it's a proud thing to say Irish, dancing and our son Irish dances. And he tells everybody he's nine and he's really good. He's like third at the regional championships in which is a mazing. And he's very like, you know. Hey, yeah. You play. So it's coal now. Right. Say we're years ago. It wasn't that kind of happened here with the Acadian culture. People weren't proud of it didn't understand the rich the richness of their history. And once they got it. It did become a source of pride. But understand that other comparison. Story behind river dance. But I can tell you for a southern girl. Like me, I probably wouldn't have known about Ari stance. If it wasn't for river dance or Michael Flatley. I also Lord of the dance. He he really made that make. So you both have that common history. And you're working today to preserve your heritage and to teach others that may not know much about Celtic tradition. So can we talk about that? I want to have some time to talk about the festival that's coming up in March. So we were living here, and I had opened up the Dan school right away. But it was not competitive. It was just for performance. And I it was very small. I didn't have a lot of students in the area. Tony was playing music, but he kind of a lot of people don't realize, but Cajun music there is a there is a background to it of of Irish music, like the reels and everything like that. And I'll let him talk more about that. But people were coming to us and saying what are you guys doing for Saint Patrick's Day, and we were like. No, we're not. We're probably gonna go to New Orleans to be honest with you or a couple of times. I did the Baton Rouge parade our students marched in it. And when I saw that when I saw, and I hope I'm not going to offend anybody. But when I'm bet say, but when I saw that Rouge have ten thousand people come out for that parade and Lafayette who are so appreciative of music and culture. And there was nothing going on here. I knew but we've got change that we need to we need to a up. Yeah. Instead of people leaving the area for Saint Patrick's Day can travel here to we need to bring it here. Yeah. So you started this for years ago four years ago? Yeah. I would always have a gig somewhere on Saint Patrick's night. You know, the we played at the blue moon regularly for Saint Patrick's night France with frame on Mark on. It was great. Just something we did for fun. We didn't make a huge amount of money. But people come out we'd cook some food, and we have a good time. We'd have all our friends that played Irish music come onstage with us. But Sheila, and I got talking and she made a good point. She said if we if we don't do something that's traditional authentic who else's down here. Like who down? Here is going to do that. You don't wanna parody? No culture you wanted to be. I mean, you know, the the thing that that gets to a sometimes this kind of you know, shamrock and leprechaun version of green beer in beer. Right right wrong time in a place for that. But why not have the authentic thing as well? If we can bring you something that's close to the authentic thing. Let's have a go at it. So the first year we said, let's let's go kinda like when we bought our house. Let's give it a shot. See how we get approached Mark Val about using the warehouse loved it. He loved it. He just built that place on get on with him and the call we get on with them really wearing. So we already had history. So when we came to him with the idea he was just like what better people to do it? Let's give it a go. And a not like we worked together on it. It was no like rent in. You know, it's not like we were renting out his vicinity is like how can we how can we build this together and make it better? We're still working that way together. It was one year the second year, we weren't there. Just with a he'd already had a wedding booked. But we've been back there the last two years. So we love that place. But yeah, we just thought well, I know a lot of people I know a lot of musicians in the area. All right. Does not so many Irish musicians in Lafayette or Baton Rouge or New Orleans. But there when you go to Austin and Nashville does a lot of good music. That's in the south. So you tracked I mean, people not only from the south but internationally when it was looking at your site. Yeah. We've. Some of my favorite musicians come from Arlen some balance, you know, this is our fourth year. So we're we're still new in the in the festival aspect, but our our goal is to continue to build build build and bring out those big bands. And we've actually we've been approached by big names, like Frankie Gavin eilly Ivers, we've been approached by these big names, but we cares from Louise we're not in that position. Can't afford them yet. Right. Especially for Saint Patrick's Day Saint Patrick's days of big earn life, you're Irish bent. It's it's your mardi gras. And you know, it's a Cajun musicians mardi gras day. But what we are doing is. I mean, it's not an Irish festival. It's a Celtic festival. What's the difference? The differences nationally are is a country. But Celtic Celtic culture is multinational. This parts of England's. Like the island is considered. Celtic Scotland is Celtic Cornwall in England is Celtic parts of Wales. Northern france. Spain Galicia in Spain is a Celtic area. And you know, if you really want to look back the part of France that the Cajun's came from which was the north northwestern tip of it that was a Celtic area too. So that's where for me. It gets really interesting drawing the line the dots can end the dots. So while we've started doing is having not just Irish music booby Scottish music this year, we got vision who are coming from Nova Scotia, and we have the support of that of the state of Quebec, I'm we're going to celebrate the fact that Louisiana and Armand have been included in the French-Speaking nations nations. So they're officially accepted into the francophone. So as as part of that celebration ca Beck is sending this great. You may have seen them at festival international. They've been there couple times just one. What was it? Just one. What was it the best album best traditional folks route album of the year? So they're going to be with us this year. So we've got our friends from Nova Scotia coming down Scotland we've had some musicians from Brittany in the past. And and we have a lot of people come from the from the southern areas. So we're we're pretty excited this year looking at the lineup there semi fun things. I mean, I'm just reading off a few here. Lenten crawfish boil he had to get an crawfish again is cook off competition Bailey's bake off competition. Jamison pub crawl which I'm sure is fun. And then a genealogy tent for people that want to trace their Celtic roots? So his grown of you like added on events he actually passed at me the first year because I had like this lists of like all. Like, this is crazy. This is too much. But it performing all my life. I danced at so many different Irish festivals. So I've I've been to them in America. I know what they're like I've been to the Milwaukee Irish festival. I've been to the one in Boston in Chicago like I've been to them. So I just started writing down everything that I experienced and Tony ni- we've been known to some fun parties. So we also kind of put into that flavor of what do we like to do? And of course, we're parents now. So we're very mindful of will we have kids, and we wanna make sure the kids are having fun too. Because if the kids are not having fun, we're not having fun. We all know that as parents. So we wanna make sure that there's things for them to do and they're enjoying themselves. But at the same time, we want the adults to have to partake and enjoy Saint Patrick's Day. Right. So we do a lot of confers. Well is how. Can we how can we make this truly like? You know original event, and we came up with the idea of well, we love we love cook offs down. Here. We all love to cook pot. One of my favorite things to do. That's how relaxes a dosed out. The black pop a make make me a gravy. Did Sankei Jin right on me? I like the big mea gravy like that. Yes. We were let's have a cooking competition. And how do we make it Irish we came up with the idea of why not make one of the ingredients Irish? So we we settled on the idea of Guinness. I always I marinate stuff in Guinness. And I throw it in the pot all the time. Excited about this idea. We were driving at the time. We were driving Ville Platte at the time. We started talking about it. And we when I got home. I'm mmediately went onto the computer, and I was like, Guinness cooking, competitions Guinness. Anything did you find much nothing? This is news like Lafayette, I don't know of Lafayette realizes, they probably don't. But this is like there is no other Guinness cooking competition of shafts or outdoors or anywhere in the world. Are they supporting you get us out two years ago? We wrote was it two years ago. We wrote a letter to Guinness, and we were like, we told them, and Tony you can you take it from there because as you experienced more. I don't know about you. Okay. What? About two years ago. Guinness sent us a little, well, we have a friend down here a musician. Cock he knows the actual Guinness family. He knows members of the people that are related to the original, Arthur Guinness family. So he let them know that we were doing and they liked the idea so much that they sent us a family heirloom. They send us great. Beautiful Guinness pewter, silver, tankard, the in ackknowledgement of the the Guinness cook off because they've been to Louisiana. They enjoy the culture here. Right. And they thought to be good for their sales. Absolutely. But also just so unique. I mean an area that loves to cook on his own. Let's just throw in some Guinness. We've just made it better. What people cook? Like, chili kind of thing. You know, we get us mixture. We we have we like it to be unique, obviously. But then we see a bunch of Cajun guys coming out and actually cooking like Irish stew and stuff like that. They're very good. They might like they know nothing about. No, they do their homework. So they like or they might do their version of, you know, corn beef and cabbage. But Cajun Cajun up little book them, we have some people that just go. No. You know, what we need to cook? Some buyer native rabbit gonna taste good. Last year the year before we had somebody that did ribs. They Cajun ribs. But short ribs rose. Good judges. No, no, no. We're not we bring outside people every year. But I will say that. It's such a great competition. Just the idea of it. But Guinness are just so amazing with it. They supply the beer that day. Oh, fun. So when you check in we literally hand, you two six packs of Guinness, and we say if your recipe only calls calls for four of them you. Yeah. We wanted to to be he's got to be one. There's a lot of them drink in the as well as pouring it into the politician. We're excited because we have raider solutions. Sponsoring one of the events. We're sponsored I I was actually I set up the raider tent the second year when it was downtown, right. And yeah, I stole a Guiness beer. We'll split it because they wanted to use most of them for the chili we were making. All right. And but we wanted to have a Guinness beer at the in the morning. Yeah. That was those a awesome event. That was only one day. This a multi this time Friday night is the crawfish boil. Okay. So we do the opening night and the crawfish boil on the Friday night. Okay. We have like two or three and sheila's dance school. Do their version of the river right now, I should say the past three years lent has Saint Patrick's Day has fallen within lent. So the crawfish boil was just such a perfect idea this year dozen because mardi gras wait. No. It does. Just right after Monaco. No, it's going to be fun this year drinking, right? No. No. And even if you do you can still come for the entertainment and the amazing. How does is it? Okay. To say this while we're still on the subject, probably we're looking for people to enter. Well, that's what I was gonna ask people get involved in us where if they go to Celtic by you fast, C E L TIC. Yes. Celtic fest dot com. There's an entry form where they can do online and it seventy five dollars to enter and and that's basically it. I mean, the rules are like your standard rules. You have to bring your own ten by ten tent. You have to bring your items that you're going to cook with and. Supply the Guinness spot race to they cook. Like is it for the crowd to taste? So this is what we say that you can either cook enough for the judging or if you would like to recoup some of your grocery Bill, then we can give you some props and spoons, and as people come over to your tent, you can just charge them dollar, and then you can make some money back because we realize how much money it costs to do all this. Tell you like to give back a lot. We allot of people have said to us. Well, why don't you just charge and put it towards the festival, and we're like, no, no, no, some of these people have has spent one hundred and fifty dollars on their grocery not cheap sometimes to do these things. So it's fun, and then does a people's choice. So if you are yes, you know, small amount to for the folks to judge themselves. I should say. So first place is I believe I hope I'm not wrong here. First places two hundred and fifty dollars cash, and then you also receive an amazing gift basket from Guinness, and it's just filled with so much goodies and stuff like that. Second place is a hundred am forgetting the Guinness trophy to we got this beautiful Guinness trophy that we had enough yet. So right. So we have this very unique trophy. We had it designed with bilann trophies. They helped us do it. I went into the office, and I spoke to Monica, and I said she said what kind of trophy do you want? I said I want it to be as noxious and over the top as possible when it sitting on their mantle I want the it's the first thing. That's exactly so she called me one day. And she said I'm going through this fake food book and believe it or not they have a pint of Guinness, and I was like what she's like it's made out of wax. It's glass of Guinness. But the inside is wax. And and yeah, as by get like, just get it. So it's like this. It's a pint glass, and we made a very tall. Paul trophy cool that we can do years it's petrol trophy. So you don't keep it you keep. To get your name. In grave your name on the plaques that there's like twenty very big. And we we in grave your team's name the year, and the dish the name of the dish that you might have to be Irish to enter not at all not at heart. Absolutely. You just have to be fun at heart. It's a really really fun day. I will say that I've talked to the cook off teams, and they have said how because the tensor on top of each other content. Another after another they have so much fun. Amongst each other that I think we have repeats because of that reason, it's everybody's drinking Guinness. You know this year to the raider. They're going gonna pull our friends from the black pot festival is a lot of the teams from there are gonna come join king. It's going to be good cooking nothing last year. They really up the onto the food cooked. I'm what we tried to do is make them a part of the festival. They're not on the periphery there in the centre or right close to where the outdoor stage. So they get to hear the outdoor stage. We also have an outdoor pub with sessions in. So once everything's in the pot, or you know, you barbecues on whatever this is the chance to walk around. And here's some good music. See some good dancing. How how does the public attend? Those is your of entry an admission to come in. So the admission for Friday night is ten dollars. And then you have to purchase your crawfish separately. I will say that the crawfish has to be purchased ahead of time. So you so you go to the website. And then we do have two bands that night and the Ryan school of Irish dance will be performing. So we have entertainment. So it's just ten dollars mission for attending the festival on Saturday. It's fifteen dollars for the mission for the whole day. If you want to purchase a weekend pass, we have a discount of twenty dollars separate to that is the pub crawl now to do the crawl that's five dollars and that drinks on town as don't type Saturday morning, thirty AM. We're going to start at a warehouse three five and then we're going to visit four bars. The we we kinda deciding on right now. And the special drinks deals in each of those bars that are provided by Jamison. They're the sponsor the pope crawl on. Then we make it back. Try and make it back in one piece two warehouse flight three fun. He crawled back rollback last year. I I guess a lot of people had horns and stuff like that last year. But Tony was at the end of the parade. So I'm always at I I don't get to ten the pub Krog because I'm setting up for the festival, which starts at twelve might not be such a bad thing. Take my place last year they were coming in. And I was like they're coming in. They're all like your husband's your husband. And I'm like is he alive like what's going on? So he was the last person to come in and the Bullhorn. Yeah. Yeah. I remember last year thinking how 'cause I had to play music after that. And like I had to be. So this is ten in the morning to play music all day and kind of run a festival, and you know, be kinda stage personality twelve o'clock that day. I was like I don't think I'm gonna make he made the experience so much like fun for the people people can just wander throughout the day. I'm sure yes. Well with the pub crawl you have to start. It's its own entertainment. We have musicians and singers that that us at the bars on that. We have our good friends the whiskey bay Rovers who are pirates. Do you play music? Would you tell people what the instrument is that you play it looks like a good tar? But it's not it's the easiest way to explain. I would say would be calling does every know what a mandolin is. I think that's pretty common down in the south, isn't it? It's a an octave mandolin, which means it's just a Qatari sized mandolin because it's more round than a titties. Tar it's got a pear shaped body to it. And it's got eight strings instead of six, but really it's just four sits as four sets of two. So it's like a mound land. But it's just a bigger version of the mind Lynn on it became very popular in Irish music in the late sixties, and I fell in love with it in the late seventies early eighties. Plug a Tony's musicianship here briefly. Fantastic. Did that United way event with us? And I had the honour of doing sound for you, those fun that was that was those were really fun night. Yeah. Yeah. There's there's videos online for it. So definitely check it out. I also I need to. You have to go visit Ireland. If you have not visited. Then my favorite restaurant in the world in temple bar Gallagher's box the house. All right. Yeah. It's amazing. Every time we went to Dublin that's the first place to go and the last place we'd go so just go to Ireland go visit it you never have typical dash people in our land. It is you could just the breakfast. Breakfast is a thing of fame throughout the world. I mean, they have they have an English breakfast and the Scottish breakfast. The Irish breakfast is it's we've got a different form of bacon. You've got great bacon down here. But in and we have rushers which are shaped very much like a very fatty pork chop. But oh skinny skinny skinny very thin baking their bacon thickness. But it's a pork chop shape with an extra bit of fat on the side. So that's our bacon. And then our sausages are our breakfast sausages, a little different and then the breakfast comes with eggs beans, mushrooms at black and white pudding, which is really different than very different Bush rooms say that and then toast, tea and coffee. It's just very very hardy. Should be able to last all day on. Raiders super happy to sponsor this year. Thanks for coming here and doing this and for a long meter record. This this hang out with you as thank you so much Jason John. And thank you. Other. So we have the Guinness cook off, but we we don't want to out out do Bailey's. We also have Bailey's bake off. Oh, yeah. What desert? You just you can make any dessert Yuan daily and there's like seven different flavors of Bailey's. There's cherry vanilla there's almond. So we've had some amazing dishes over the years. We also have the music competition. We have a young we're trying to. Get the Irish music in the young kids going here and Acadian. So we reach out to all the Irish teacher, excuse me, the music teachers, and we challenge the kids. Learn a piece of Irish music bring it to the festival, and we have cash prizes for first second and third place really an age brackets. We also have a freckle competition all ages. So if you're loaded with freckles, we we do a freckle. See it all online competition. But also our biggest thing, which if I would be remiss if I didn't say I be leaving here in saying, why didn't I mention it? We have to round trip tickets to Ireland, but we raffle on. So we start the raffle on Friday night, and it's five dollars ticket. And you put it in a hat and on Sunday, excuse me on Saturday evening. We pick out of the hat, and we choose the names to people to round trip tickets to Ireland generous. Yes. Yes phone, so so you have a chance to go to Arlen just Jay. One more thing as well. We got I mean the so much going on. But we have enough time to cover everybody. No, we have joined up with the ACA, and there's a special on a combined ticket the chieftains will be in town on the Wednesday the thirteenth thirteenth, and if you buy a ticket for the chieftains that includes a festival ticket. You get like a fifteen or twenty dollars discount. It's ten there's ten and then we another five so it's like fifteen dollar discount by the whole thing to get chieftains or Ryan school of performing with them very going on Saint Patrick's to see Arkan's dancing with. They were like my first professional group. They're still around. This is just been so interesting. And I think for so many of us we just don't know, you know, enough about your cultures. So I wanna thank you for enlightening meet today and others I one encourage people to look online, and what is the what else by you fast. Okay dot com, and it's coming up on March fifteenth and sixteenth the Celtic by you festival. It's going to be held at the warehouse five three five and other the pub crawl and other things we'll take place during that weekend and Sheila, and Tony davir and thank you for what you onto enrich all of us in our community. And thank you so much for having me larger helping us spread the word writing us here. I love what I get to do. You know, meeting people like you said, thank you in Jason Sikora and raider solutions. Thank you. Thank you for taping. This I want to get in a plug also for laughing at convention visitors commission. They're big proponents of the show. Discover Lafayette, I'm sure they're involved in what you're doing. They are as more. About the Irish culture. So to listen to this show and all of our shows, you can go to discover Lafayette dot nat-, or we're on I tunes or anywhere where people get podcasts. That's awesome. On behalf of discover Lafayette on Jan swift. Thank you.

Saint Patrick Sheila I Tony Ireland New York Dublin Arthur Guinness Raiders Louisiana Lafayette Arlen New Orleans Europe Chicago Celtic Irish coral group Arlon Bailey Lafayette Michael Flatley
Maeve Higgins, Fish Pie and Irish Butter

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

38:24 min | 2 years ago

Maeve Higgins, Fish Pie and Irish Butter

"Your last meal is sponsored by heritage distilling company craft in small batch, vodkas Jin's and whiskeys drink locally drink responsibly. Bairo seattle. I'm Rachel bell. And this is your last meal show about famous people and the stories behind the foods. They love most today on the program comedian and writer Maeve Higgins nave is a proper butter loving Irish lady who moved to New York six years ago. And she recently wrote a book about it or book is called Maeve in America, which also happens to be the name of her podcast Maeve is a contributing writer for the New York Times. She co hosts a weekly comedy show in Brooklyn and glamour magazine says quote, if Tina Fey and David sedaris had a daughter, she would be Higgins your level looks good. I'm recording right now. So let's get started. Hopefully, you can fix my accident post. So yeah, how do people react to your accent? Because I know women are always talking about like men with their sexy Irish accents. Ross Jillian accents does the same for women. I have never gotten that. No, definitely not. I mean, you know, sometimes they're like, oh, you remind me of my dad who. Died. Nobody's ever liked acting. Turns me if you happen to like the Irish accent. You're in luck. This episode is chock full of them. We've got Brian clear on deck. He's the US brand manager for Kerry gold butter hook to change some of the things that I say because people understand what of saints definitely worked on my ticket nation Ryan's gonna tell us. Why responser is so frigging good? We've also got Michelin starred Irish chef and food columnist JP McMahon who joins the show all the way from Galloway. Ireland to talk about the long history of fish pie. Amp to deliver. A public service announcement that Irish people don't only eat potatoes artist food to still fortunately tights, the potato given out of because it's own Dipa doesn't be only been in Arlon for three hundred years. People have been here ten thousand so in a near are finding wrestle. We don't serve tolls. And for that reason because I'm sick of people associated with Irish food. Okay. So those are the. Irish accents and just to brag about how international your last meal is I decided to throw in Japanese accent as well. I chat with KFC Japan about a very intriguing Christmas tradition. Plus American accent, Stella parks, senior editor at serious eats and author of the super popular baking book brave tart, she pops into explain her love affair with cheap butter. Dang. That's a lot of guests. We gotta get started. Here's my conversation with Maeve Higgins, what surprised you or what did you delight in? Or what were you horrified by as far as food in America? Well, you know, one of the big draws for me was the portion sizes here. The very first time I came to America, which I actually got those was we came to DisneyWorld with my sister one trip from drawing competition. And when I was fifteen we came to DisneyWorld, and I just remember like actual size of the food. Like, I don't know why they sell Turkey drumsticks in DisneyWorld. It's like as a kind of snack. That is my youngest memory of going to DisneyWorld. Also that is the one thing. I remember, really. Isn't it weird guess site to that? And I don't think they sell any other price Turkey. So I don't know what like geo. Mickey Mouse has like some Turkey farmer who just has legs like, but I just remember being like this is like heaven if this giant the size of my forearm of protein, like if this is considered a snack like I am home. And there's you know, my first thanks giving. Here was it was actually quite a loaded thing. Because of course, thanksgiving is unique in American holiday. And so I haven't been to one, but I seen on TV so much it stated in movies so much, and, but I didn't know anybody. So my friends who happen to be a lot of immigrants we all had like Friendsgiving. And you know, all the stuff happened that like I didn't expect to happen on a meal for one thing, we do have one American friend, Abby, and she Bros sweet potato casserole with marshmallows INA. And I was so confused. Used by the sweetness, and the fact that that was prior to the main course that have tasted to me like desert like I was really thrown Maeve girl. You're not the only one thrown by marshmallow top sweet potatoes. Plenty of us American born citizens also find it confusing, which is putting it politely. A lot of people. Find it completely disgusting. The history of the sticky sweet sweet potato and marshmallow castle. Is also American like so many wholesome American traditions. It was born out of a company trying to make money. So according to four magazine, the story starts with a couple of German immigrants who invented crackerjack in the late eighteen hundreds and for the record. It is crackerjack not cracker Jack's and he's nineteen seventies. Same people introduced mass factory-made marshmallows to Americans and a decade after that they were looking to boost marshmallow sales. So they linked up with the lady called Janet McKenzie hill, she founded the Boston cooking school magazine, and they had her develop a booklet of recipes that would encourage Americans to see the marshmallow as an everyday ingredient, not just something that you would roast by the campfire and Janet came up with all kinds of classic recipes. She's the one I guess who's responsible for putting marshmallows and hot cocoa. She came up with the idea for putting marshmallows and fudge and the polarizing sweet. Marshmallow casserole. This is the very first published recipe. This is in nineteen seventeen. So Janet, invented the sweet potato marshmallow casserole, which is good to know. Because if you hate it now, you know, who's house to teepee, well, I guess actually probably be like her grave. So I don't know if that'd be disrespectful to TV the grave of Janet McKenzie hill, but maybe you could leave like a bag of marshmallows and light it on fire. Or something. Rachel bell. Regarding is flammable, marshmallow confections, not necessarily reflect those guest sponsors pair company anywhere ever all efforts to seek revenge against the creation of objectionable related cuisine. Sternly worded letter with friends tweeting in all caps. Living in the US Maeve has gotten the experience of celebrating American holidays. And when I lived in Japan about eight years ago, I had the experience of celebrating American holidays in a foreign country. Now, I have never consider myself an especially patriotic person. But there's something about living abroad that made me feel very proud to be an American. I practically wearing an American flag bikini. But mostly I was trying to keep up with the holidays that I had grown up with so on thanksgiving all of my American friends gathered in someone's apartment and attempted to make a thanksgiving meal. This was challenging because in Japan. You can't buy a Turkey. They don't eat turkeys. They don't sell the whole bird and most people don't have an oven. There are no ovens in apartments so head to figure out this menu. And then on Passover, my Jewish friends, and I gathered to make a Seder again, we had to change things up. There was no Motte. So that we could find. So we use saltines instead of the. Classic horseradish. We used Sabi. It was really fun. It was kind of an adventure. To celebrate these western holidays when I was in a foreign country in Japan. But when December rolled around I figured there wasn't gonna be Japanese Christmas season because the main religions are Shinto and Buddhism. I think one or two percent of Japanese people are Christians. But I learned that Japanese people do celebrate Christmas, but they do it in their own way. They don't get the day off of work. But one of the biggest Christmas day traditions is getting a bucket of fried chicken from KFC the BBC reports that three point six million Japanese families eat KFC during the Christmas season. So I called up yuko Nakajima. She's the chief marketing officer for KFC Japan to ask her how Kentucky Fried Chicken became associated with Japanese Christmas. So it's a very funny story because we came into Japan in the seventies. I'll to from now it would be our fiftieth anniversary but of. A foreigner came into our stores in in the seventies. And said I want to buy Turkey somewhere. But I couldn't find it anywhere. So I will celebrate with chicken instead of Turkey, and then our people thought. Okay. Well, so maybe that's it. We could start saying for Christmas KFC. So I think that was the beginning. So one guy comes into one kid see, then how does that become a national phenomenon? I guess people started celebrating. I think in the night sixties where people caught the idea of Christmas and started getting bigger, but they read it didn't know how to celebrate. So in there, I think we started saying KFC for Christmas. And then we started a campaign Christmas campaign, which you have the family, and you have to chicken, and you have the happy feeling and that Sunday everybody thought. Wow, that's very stylish. You know, I want to do that as well. At that time fried chicken was re. Redesign this food for Japanese people. So it all associated together that's a special meal. It's once at your meal, and it's so special that secreto -cation, it's just makes people happy. So in a way KFC is pretty much responsible for making Christmas a thing in Japan and people can start reserving the special Christmas chicken dinner in November. So our main one is cold party barrel. And this has fried chicken arc AFC original recipe. And then it has salad, and it has cake, and then with this is not food, but we have a special plate that we always have a design plate that changes every year. So people are waiting for that as well. And then we have other options where we just have roast chicken, you can reserve in abandoned come and pick up on that day or you can walk in. But you will have to get in the queue. And that's also a tradition that people enjoy to get into culet Christmas. So how much of your sales for a whole year? Come from this Christmas dinner, we have. Have about three to five days that we do this special Christmas. I would say maybe ten percent, by the way producer, Aaron I don't know if you know this. This is my favorite thing that I've learned in weeks, if you go to KFC's Twitter page, they have millions of followers, but they are only following eleven people all members of the Spice, Girls and six guys named herb. They're following eleven herbs and spices. It's so clever. It's one of those things it's like God. Why didn't I think of that? It's amazing. Okay. You sit with that. Maybe we'll go to the Twitter page and check it out. We have to take a break. But when we come back, maybe is going to share her last meal, and we're going to discuss when to buy fancy European butter and wind by the cheap stuff. He rb. It's cocktail hour here on your last meal with our sponsor heritage distilling company. And whenever I have a holiday party, which I do every year. I have a big raider of Hanukkah party. I joke, but actually last year we were up till four in the morning pretty cool about that at thirty eight years old anyway, when I have a party, I just throw out a bunch of booze on the table, beer and wine. Make your own cocktails figure it out I've always wanted to be one of those people who has a signature cocktail for my party, something that I haven't a pitcher that I'm serving that is the cocktail of the night. And if you want to join me in trying to be classy and having a signature cocktail, but you don't really know what to make go heritage distilling dot com. They have so many recipes both for food and drink that uses their spirits, and they always move with the seasons. So right now, they have a recipe for a Christmas Cape Cod her. This would be perfect for thanksgiving because includes cranberry so you mix a little elk ride or vodka with some cranberry sauce, which is a perfect way to get rid of the last of that can that nobody wants to finish squeeze in some lime juice a little. Simple syrup garnished with the Rosemary Sprague. And you have a signature thanksgiving. Cocktail that you're serving at your thanksgiving table for the purposes of the story. Let's call it a thanksgiving. Cape cod. Her so go to heritagedistilling dot com, that's where you can find recipes. That's where you can order a bottle of heritage distilling company. No matter where you live they'll send it to your doorstep. You can find a list of supermarkets across the country that carry their products. And if you wanna go to a tasting room, which is really fun. They just opened two new ones in Seattle and Ballard and Capitol Hill there in western Washington. And in Eugene, Oregon, find it all at heritage distilling dot com. What would your last meal be? And I think it would be fish by made with haddock with peas Innis and white sauce and mashed potato on top that was my childhood comfort food. So I think that's what I would probably go back to when I am a hundred and thirty years old having my last male, which would hopefully be I'll be fed at my young, husbands who'd be weeping the whole time. So you're young husband will be about ninety. Nineteen. He really he'll be really good at making pie. Is that a traditional Irish dish? I've never heard of it before. Really? Yeah. Then I suppose it must be. I mean, I think had maybe it's like coli smoked fish smoked Coley. Maybe so it's like it take white fish and you smokers. So it's kind of like a tumor Seattle and color, and then you just pointed and milk with an onion. And then you flake, then you put some peas and the onion that you cooked with on new slight setup. And then you just do like a bench amount sauce and then cover with mash peso, which you do with everything in Orland obviously and then little bit achieve and then you put in the oven. That sounds so delicious on a cold day on a drizzly day. It's just the best thing, and it's just a really substantial like lovely one pot dinner to and do you still make for yourself? Now that you're here on your own lonely in New York. I just. Yeah. And I managed to. Yeah. You know, it's funny because I'm from a family of eight children, and we all cooked growing up, and it's a big part of our family life. And so I definitely find it hard to cook for less than six people's now because I'm just so used to cooking for bigger numbers all Mexicans find the same thing. And in fact, I think that's why my sisters keep having children. Now, it's just to kind of keep up to food that they make and. I I have made at one since I've been here. But I would say I just forgot like how much smoked fish like, especially when you're cooking with it really stinks apartment. And it's like a different thing. If you let the middle of the Irish countryside years open windows, but if you live in an apartment building in Brooklyn is no fun for your neighbors. Yeah. But you're in the land of smoke fish because us Jews also love smoke fish. So I feel like you could go to Russ and daughters and probably get some pre smoke Tadic. And just throw it in there and top it with mashed potatoes. I love that place for my God. But it's so funny because when I go to Ross and dodgers, I wanna get their specialty. I don't onto be recreating my home thing. I want to see what they're going to do what I do. There is the bagel with the onions and the gherkins and the smoke salmon. I have to say, I don't really try and recreate my family me is maybe when I'm older, but for now, I want I love that living in New York is that all different foods that are available to me. So I'm much more inclined to kind of go exploring rather than kind of going back. You know may have Higgins wants fish pie for her last meal, and I feel like as an American a lot of people like ooh, foolish stuff that you stepped up right now. It sounds to me just like shepherd's pie. But instead of the meat, it's smoked fish. And you have a bell sauce or kind of like a really thick smoke chowder wearing a mashed potato hat. Sounds good. The dish has a very long history in the UK. So I turned to an Irish chef to learn more J P McMahon is the chef owner of three restaurants in Galloway one of them, which is called a near only use ingredients that are native to Ireland. So we don't use any pepper or lemons or Chopard or spices. So it's all just Irish products into its mission star find. Restaurants. So it's not it's not just like potatoes and glam, and when I was trying to research the history of fish pie. Hardly anything came up online. I found plenty of recipes. But not much commentary on the dish. Except for an article that JP wrote in his cooking column for the Irish Times. I was surprised to see how old and how far back this dish went. Yes. So like when I did that little bit of research for the column, you can it goes back to like the Norman so about a thousand years ago seven hundred years ago when it was kind of regal dish. I mean that begun with like quite. What the right word is gnarly like it was made in lump rate, which are kind of like ill like fish, and it would have been picking blow it and then pastry over it. So all must be like a like a black putting fish high. Now would have had a lot of spices like nutmeg and Mace and. Cinnamon all of which would mask the strength of putting the over the years, I mean to fish pipe, so Royal fish pie this different variations of it somewhat the fish sticking out of the top of it, which you can actually still see in certain European countries as while where bake a pastry and stick on showbiz all out of the pike. But it has a house near tradition. I think from being a part of the British courts it couldn't have infiltrated down into the public houses. And that's why I think in the eighteenth and nineteenth century the fish pie would have been quite a staple of the British public houses. But also of the Irish country house tradition, which would have been the Anglo, Irish landowners. So fish used to be a popular pub dish, but JP says it's not something you really see anymore. Not even in people's kitchens at home. It's a UK retro classic kinda like marshmallow sweet potato casserole, but less cross people really really associate potatoes with Ireland. And so having mascot. Does on the top of this dish to seems to go is that something that's still really popular do Irish people do still eat a lot of potatoes. Or is that an old school idea? Yes. And no, I mean artist still fortunately tied to the potato. I'm always given out out of because it's only the potatoes only been in Ireland for three hundred years people have been here, but ten thousand so it's kind of reductive boss. It's still. It is one of those things we like in in a near are fine nine wrestle. We don't serve today chills. And for that reason because I'm sick of people associate number Irish food, but like it is a difficult thing to to shake all and because we're almost tight the potato. But for me, we've kind of Nord a lot of other stuff in shellfish. I mean, we have so much shellfish in Arlon. I'm a lot of it. We don't eat. Let's say muscles and. Steams calms and a lot of it is exported. And so for me, I'm always trying to encourage people to see Irish food to the lens of the of the sea as opposed to the ends of the land. But one of my favorite favorite Irish foods does come from the land. She loves Irish butter. I've definitely tried to make soda bread here. But I found that like it's not the same the soda bread is fine rice because it's such a simple set of ingredients. But if you don't use Irish butter, I realize that it was like the bus that I was always after like, I could eat any type of bread. But unless it has Irish butter, which is so different to American by the different color. It's different texture. And it's completely different tastes and always are butter assaulted. That's like a huge thing that I've realized makes tastes difference. I think also that the cows are general, and it's really makes a difference tire butter. You do have the superior butter. That is true. Thank you. I think in. I think in January were lucky with our dairy. I think can because it rains all the time which is kind of a high price to pay for delicious. Just to be in a rainy country terrible hair for your entire life. But maybe it's worth those when the dairy so good like the cream to oh my God. My nieces are basically raised on cream, and they're turning is fine. I mean, they're Toby. If you haven't had Irish butter get your putter living, but to the grocery store and pick some up you can buy it in the United States carry gold. They sell their Irish butter in grocery stores across the US, and it is super good. It is bright yellow it's creamy, it's rich. It's saltier than American butter, and it takes bread and butter to a whole new level. Carey gold US marketing director, Brian clear tells us why in our we've been much different dairy system or dairy environment than here in the US. So it's predominantly across based diet that are enjoy the grays doors for up to three hundred days a year mccown the country is actually used to grow gross for agriculture is the grasp what makes the butter come out so yellow one hundred percent. So we actually sometimes get consumers Eamon asking do we out of die to voter the color in the boater comes from basic, entertain which which is naturally Hernan grow. The KYW's consume. And they're not gonna goes true to change through the milk. And you kind of see visibly in the butter. And did you say that it is more spreadable straight out of the fridge? Not that I would recommend unconsidered to do this. But in our land. Belt would be kind of conversation piece of like daily the voter in the fridge on because of the temperature. Arlen doesn't really vary. Too much at home grown up. We will always just a boater dish on the table. Knock frigerator whatever to make sure that it was always kind of spreadable. All right. Aaron counter fridge where do you keep your butter? Now. This is an area of a great hostility in my home. Oh, my girlfriend and I disagree as to where the butter should be. I cannot fathom for any reason why anyone would want cold butter on their bread. You can't spread. It it rips everything up. I I get it. If you wanna keep a cold because you like to bite it maybe as you like sanitation. No that's rapper. You cover it. That's what putter dishes or for your fine aren't going to lay eggs in it. Or the various other things. She tells me will happen to this laid out butter. Well, I never thought about that possibility. I'm with you. I think belongs on the counter, but I grew up in a household where it's kept in the fridge. And so I haven't broken the habit yet. But I hate when it's cold. And when you get a little butter packets wrapped in the gold foil when you to eat I sit on them. So that my but can more them up because that is really the worst as well. Like at a restaurant. There's no reason why they are serving ice cold butter packets, but butter butter. I wish I had a bigger, but because I have kind of a small, and I feel like it probably takes me longer to warm the butter. So in my next life, all the big butter melting, Donka dunk, and you you told me in an Email that your family has a connection to Maeve. Can you talk about that? Yeah. So well, this idea of six degrees of separation yet. Yeah. Well in Ireland that's probably worn or less. Pretty sure you don't have. You don't have the Kevin bacon. So this is like one degree separation from Maeve Higgins. Maybe exactly I'm pretty sure probably moved to the US to choice. Scape this colloquialism. But I'm gonna probably hit a lot of higher stereotypes here. But I work here selling your Stary. But I grew up in a pope, my parents Rona pub on they all surround a little theatre where on fromm is Kenny on every year, they have the fairly well known comedy festival. So may actually played in our little theatre few times. I think over the years, that's. Sure that was our one degree of separation and for people in the states who may be listening to the podcast, and this could be their first introduction to Maeve is she a pretty big name in Ireland. Everybody know move or very well. Yeah. She's out Casseus shows, she's toured the country she should be hundreds NBA high sold name. But well known comedian when I was looking for butter experts for this episode. I put a call out on Twitter, and I was connected with Stella parks. She's a senior editor at serious eats. And the author of brave tart a very very beloved baking book that tells you how to make Oreos at home how to make homemade sprinkles and bazillion other delicious, desserts, and Stella is known for having a very strong opinion about butter even her Twitter and Instagram bio say I love cheap butter and expensive chocolate. But we're here to talk about cheap butter. So when I called Irish butter superior, Stella had a few words for me. Well, I think. That the idea of superiority has got to be rooted in context, you can't just say, oh, well, more fat is always better or the the flavor of culturing is always better because there's a lot of recipes where you're not gonna taste that if you're making say an American style chocolate cake, and it's loaded with coffee and Brown sugar and cocoa powder and extract all these things the flavor of cultured butter isn't gonna come through whatsoever. Like, I have done countless blind tastings is a thing. I used to do at a restaurant where I work with this kind of like side by side comparisons. And people are like it's the exact same kicked twice. What is wrong with you? This is not even fun. I'm like, well, there's a huge price difference between these cakes because this one's made extremely fancy cultured butter, and it's like well why so kind of silly for me to ask readers on Searcy its readers by buck to like pony up for cultured butter, which is often a lot more expensive. And typically in line with a euro style. It's not really a worthwhile investment for something. That's going to be covered up. I totally agree. Now. I'm seeing what you're saying. I agree. Like when it's with baking. I don't think it matters either. But if I'm gonna eat butter on a piece of bread. That's when I want to taste, really salty good butter. Absolutely. If I'm gonna make a pasta dish or have some bread and butter, or you know, buttering radishes or something. Yeah. I'm gonna spring for some really good butter where you're able to save her that flavor, but another issue is a lot of European style. Butters have a higher fat content, and they're kind of formulated in a way that they're a little bit softer and those properties are amazing for European style desserts. If you're making Khorasan's it's so hard to with American butter because it's leaner and a lot harder straight from the fridge. So it doesn't roll out as nicely, and it's it's much harder to laminate. It's more likely to crack. But if you're talking about say, an American style pie-crust chocolate chip cookies that extra fat and the softer texture are both gonna. Be working against you are recipes evolved with our style of butter. Snow says if you're gonna spring for quality ingredients when you're baking get the good cocoa powder. Get the good chocolate get the good vanilla. Because most of the stuff on the shelf is kind of bad, but she always buys Storebrand butter and Stella wanna James beard award for the store brand butter cookies cakes up. So I would stick with Stella. Now, this my feel good time to mention that. I have this big hunk of a man that I'm dating. No, that's not what I was gonna say. I have this big hunk of butter in my fridge, and it's this very fancy French butter. And it has these big flaky shards of salt ribbon through it. And it is one of the best butters I've ever had and my boyfriend came over last week, and he took it out of the fridge any opened up the rapper, and he just held it up to reveal the teeth marks in the butter, and I had to reveal of course, it was me who else would it be. I just take. I take bites of the butter. It's that good that good. Also, sometimes I'm lazy. So like. The other day. I just had an each hand. I had a sweet potato in one hand and that butter, and I just take a bite and bite a bite. No one has time to spread. All right break time. But when we come back more from Maeve Higgins, don't you love her? She's funny. You wanna hear more from her tells me, why any single Galata party should always stand by the crock pot full a little smokies? It is cocktail hour with our one and only beloved sponsor heritage distilling company. I really mean that I really like these guys are local we've had dinner together. So I know that the cool and one thing that I loved that. They do is they sell these spirits advent calendars around the holidays. So let me take you back to my childhood. There. I was a little dish girl who didn't celebrate Christmas. I was fine with that we had eight days Monica. But I really wanted an advent calendar I was so jealous of all my friends who had advent calendars. I wanted to wake up every morning and open a little perforated cardboard window and pull out a really bad piece of waxy discussing chocolate can make up for my terrible childhood by ordering a heritage distilling company spirits Adleman calendar. There are twenty four little perforated windows that you get to crack open every day. But instead of that waxy grows plastic chocolate. There's a little mini bottle twenty four little mini bottles between eleven different kinds of spirits. You can try a whole bunch of 'em. You'll get a couple of coffee flavored vodkas you'll get a couple elk writer bourbons, you'll get a few of heritage distilling bestselling Brown sugar bourbon and a whole bunch more. Go to heritage distilling dot com to get your own spirits advent calendar, and I recommend doing it right now with things are this awesome. They sell out go to heritagedistilling dot com. Doc in August, Maeve wrote an opinion piece for the New York Times called American's are terrible at small talk as in she'd like a little bit more small talk. Please. I think certainly in New York people, I very fast suggest like get into the real stuff, and like as an Irish person, we really communicate in small talk, even you know on my death bed. If my closest and dearest relatives Kim, and I probably just end up being like, what's the weather like upside, you know, how the traffic, but here in New York, you meet a stranger anti seconds later. They're listening like oh my God. My idea it's really kick it off this morning, or you know, I gave the example in that piece in the near times. I was at a kids party always the best prices, especially for food. And and this guy was like, you know, the thing that they don't tell you is sometimes you're not gonna like your kid. I was kind of like I just asked if you're online for the bones to castle are your that you've got about child. But I mean, he didn't get a bad. He was just having a bad day. But he felt completely fine about opening up to me in that way. And I was a total strangers. That's a bit of a culture shock for sure. When you come from a country where everything is a secret until you've had a drink. Well, why do you think small talk is better? Because you know, we actually published articles here about a voiding small talk. I've talked about it on my show before you know, let's do medium talk. Let's do big talk. Let's let's try to get to know each other faster. How would you promote small talk as the better way to go? When you first meet someone, you know, often the question, I get asked when I go partisan. I made new people here. It's kind of like who do you work for her? Do you know state? Yeah. Or, you know, who do you write for you know, that you're being Catholic? And even if it sounds good like if I say, oh, just doing your book with penguin. I wreck for the New York Times. They again, a certain idea of may. But that could actually be wrong. And I think it's subtler and might take a little bit of longer time. But you get a better measure of a person if you actually go in gently and see what they're really abuse. You know, and I think maybe it's because I'm afraid of direct directly speaking, Donnie, buddy. But I think kind of going around is it can take longer, but it's more fun and gets the troupe is if somebody to. Rather than just figuring watt. They're worth, you know. Yeah. I mean, I wouldn't call small talk. What I do because. Yeah. I don't really like to ask about the weather, and what people do, but I like to just come in with something relevant and silly and kind of quirky. So that you can have fun with someone instead of just like an exchange of information. Yes, totally. I think rates food is Brinton pink to talk about because you know, like, we said, it's all wrapped up in culture. And there's so many little missteps that you can make with food. And there's so many little hints about yourself that you give with food. So food is a brilliant off the boats, all my I remember discussing trifled with this old woman at my on Christmas pricey for maybe twenty five minutes, go on. Then I spoke this world. Or? Yeah. If you feel awkward, then you just start shoving deviled eggs into your mouth. So that you can't speak and the other person has to do all the talking. I know 'cause I think yeah. For someone who's pro anxiety. It's really nice thing to do to down by the dip. What is your favorite food at a party? Well, I always loved cocktail sausages. And then I remember this woman telling me who I used to babysit for. She was like a teddy the thing about cocktail sausages, men, loved them like. Like. She also I don't know where she got it from. She told me that men love smokey eye. And she was always, you know, she would come home to relieve me of my babies Jesus, you would have had a few drinks. And she's always trying impart this wisdom to me. Never forget, those are the two pieces of advice that I've read it clung to answer. That's funny because I don't know if you know that we call our cocktail sausages. The brand is a little smokies. So it's actually the combination of those two things. I didn't know. Oh my God. She was onto something. Maybe that's our business. I love you dot his my number one favorite thing to eat too. Because I will never ever ever buy them myself. But if they're out of party in a crock pot with that like sweet kind of barbecue sauce. I will never leave that pot. I just stand there with the toothpick and just eat it and eat it any that. Everyone's like, we're Rachel. She was last seen by the cross. With a smokey eye. And that was Maeve Higgins last meal. Pick up her new book maven America at your favorite bookstore. I would just love to point that is no refunds if you do by the book and if. I mean, I'm on Instagram at Maeve in America, which is the same as the book title. And I'm probably to Instagram on the main reason, I use it as for food. My sister in Ireland a food writer on constantly stalking her page to see what she's making nice. Well, thank you so much for the chat in a it was lovely talking to you. Thank you so much. Thank smokey. Bye. Bye. Thanks to Brian clear marketing director for Kerry gold, North America and two JP McMahon Irish Times colonist and chef owner of three restaurants in Callaway. Ireland a near his Michelin starred fine dining spot. There's tar tar a natural wine bar and Kabo data a Spanish tapas restaurant. You can learn more at eat Galway dot I never heard of that one before Irish people get that one. Thanks to Ugo Kajima chief marketing officer for KFC Japan. If you happen to be in Japan this Christmas eat like a local and queue up at KFC. And thank you to Stella park, senior editor at serious eats. And the author of the fantastic faking book grave tart Braveheart one eight James beard award earlier this year, and it's a New York Times bestseller Salata. Thank you. We had more guests on this episode than any other episode to keep with the Irish tradition. I'm going to call the Guinness Book of world records because as a kid. I was obsessed with it to favor pages. One lady with longest nails standing. At the balcony with her like curly nails cascading feet down to the floor. Actually. That's the only one. I remember what was your favorite page. I liked all the human oddities world's tallest, man. Yeah. Robert Ladd lo you've ever leave aim was. It's all this episode was produced by Aaron Mason and me the music as always by prom Queen and make sure and follow us on Instagram. We just had a contest somebody one eight one hundred dollar gift card to heritage distilling this, Tracy Thorpe. Thank you so much, Tracy. She posted a photo of her last meal, which was a bagel with lots and all the trimmings so following Instagram. It's your last meal podcast. We may have a contest in the future that you could win. But you wouldn't know because you don't follow on Instagram. I'm Rachel bell. And this is your last meal. I'm with you. I don't I just burp. So I'm going to do that again. If you haven't if you haven't. If you have if you have. Okay. When I was looking for butter experts for this episode. I put a put a cow out on Twitter. I was like licorice. What you at? All. Right.

Maeve Higgins KFC Japan United States Ireland New York Times Turkey Rachel bell New York Ireland Twitter writer Aaron Mason Instagram Brian clear senior editor Arlon America
24: The Juicy Details of Apple Grafting

National Trust Podcast

12:53 min | 1 year ago

24: The Juicy Details of Apple Grafting

"Hello. And welcome to this minneap sort of the national trust podcast. Today will join a reporter Shawn Douglas at the trust apple graphing weekend. Qatif? Today. I've made my way to call more to peaceful and wonderful majestic until which is just perched above the taymor river after watching Allen, learn Intergraph, do not previous episodes. I thought it was something I'd really like to have a go with myself, and what better place to do that? Then the trust annual apple often festival which happens over February. It's a weekend where members of the public can come along with absolutely no experience, and none of those Grafton, techniques, you even get to walk away with your own tree for less than five. So better make my way to find Dave is the head gardener hair. He's going to take me through what will be happening over the weekend. And hopefully allow me to graft my own apple tree. About an hour before where to start MS ready for carrying out. And I see this is the place because there's a big sign that says apple just see. Inside while this place, smells, amazing. And there is Dave. I'm just gonna say. I love it to me. I could see. We sat up today for our one of our many apple events and today is our grafting weekend. This is over I guess the second Paul of of of Nevada. So in September. We have our traditional apple day. We have some displays arraigned caring for your trees, and cultural stuff, but most importantly, we have a selection of apples people's taste. So things you won't have heard like king by it and pigs nose and Pendragon and lady's fingers, all sorts of bizarre names to conjure up images of the apples sound in the little bit like a bare fist. Yeah. It is actually. Yeah. But much much more fun and keeping that ale festival analogy. Can you talk about some of those rarely kind of Croft AO apples? I think one of my favorite apples is called Pendragon when you cut it in half. It's bright red all the way through and that's a fantastic one to chop off and put through a salad or something like that. When people are kind of looking at the strange fruit. So the plan then. Is that we hope you in September. Then you come back grafting weekend. And we'll be able to graft you one of those trees, and you can take when you've got it in your garden. So we're trying to kind of join up the whole seasons. One. I'm kind of looking forward to it sounds really interesting. I've not been this excited about apples for while ever. Work to do. So and let you get off for now. Enjoy the rest of the day. Okay. Cool. Warning, everybody just the doors open. We're ready to welcome you into our or grafting. So those are ripe and ready. There's about thirty forty people. It's ten AM in the morning. Vicious looking like it's going to be very going to have chances in people and see what they have. Have you seen anything that that Piques your interest Ron relatives gonna be seventy variety? So that's how we're going to make a decision, and you hoping something that your son have is going to want to wait. He loves apples apple every single day. Why are you say? Divest achier. Looks beautiful colors lovely shapes that won't fit into supermarket boxes. I like Cornish upon the apples huge. And they do slight if Pineau when I was child in Arlon, we had an orchard. So I won't oppose the titans Sutri or says under the tree and the apple to describe. Yeah. It wasn't cool scrimping in Orland. I don't know what we call those stealing apples. So as you come through the front door. There's kind of an array of tables, and there's this way the guy through the first table is had with a variety of pitches of apples and John's going to give me a little bit more information about what we have here off thirty varieties of apple down. Here you go some beautiful photos. Nice write papers. But what you've got behind? You doesn't car? What we thought behind us? A just the the tweaks or the silence, which are the the prunings of apple trees said people make us election here. They then go over and pick a rootstock basically sticking to twigs together and making a service of apple tree. It doesn't seem that it should be possible. But it is and it works. So that's which silent guys collect I'm going to go for a king of Tompkins country. Now, I need to refine the reach talk. I'm vacate one of the Gardner victory. So what happens at this stage? Just we have three three different sizes of rich talk. So as far as I can see each of these tables selling states. Yes, kind of like that those sticks which kind of apple will grow. Yes. And sticks. How big the Trico so to consider value, and I have a very smooth balcony. Yes. He said. Tuck tree, but of so which routes don't need the dwarfing mate. Stop which is the nines, and it doesn't grow very bake. So it can be quite small. Well, contained plans it. So it makes it ideal for about me. Or slow patio or something like that? Tastic? So once I've got my apple stick and my route stick what next thing today's end to see the guys upstairs, and they actually then show you how to put them together. And then hopefully at the end of it, you will actually have a tree ready for you to put up take. Thanks val. I'm gonna make my way upstairs and maybe. I think you should I think it'd be a good experience. So just popped outside the base getting quite noisy and this people arriving. I'm just seeing a couple walking up with what next like Hoffman offered in their own up to. I see me the apple Grafton, you've come prepared. Yeah. You're the cuttings from a apple tree from parents garden. What did you feel that you wanted to kind of replicate? Ma the pasta way pushing the the reasoning bought this house was because of this apple tree it gives the most amazing Apple's. He says a boy who needs to to school catch the bus. Mar this tree luckily late in life, you managed to buy the property, and when he passed away I thought I'd like to get extre- grafted and get it growing like to plant it in the in the village orchard myself when my sister on probably live in that village. No, we've lived there for generations. Don't children our children just going just see gravestones. I want something. But nicer if they can go with their children, forties and see grumpy tree. Just there's lots of nice energy. That's what we've come only down on quite determined to get this to work and to plant a tree in the orchard. With a plaque on it. So that's the that's the plan. Good luck. Do you mind? If I follow you through the process today points boil means. Yeah. Bombings observe and see what goes on. Yeah. It's yeah. It's a learning experience for some show. So I'm making my way up stairs to the area where I can graft my silent, and we stuck together by and I can just see. So I'm going to go and catch up and see how the day's going. Stairs. Looks like. CNN have great British bake off confident that we are we go three tables for me, this is horticulture heaven, isn't it you come. If you may in trees, and you teach people how to do it. And they go away really happy. And what do you think people's main takeaways from the day? Well, it's a number of things. So I'm hoping that the hoping they take away a tree this can survive. I'm hoping that they will have engaged with the trust. I'm hoping that they will kind of understand the work that we're trying to do, you know? So this is something that hopefully, they're going to kind of look back on a opportunity that they had it coach he'll twenty thirty forty years ago. It definitely beats appearing from the gift show. Yeah. It's very different, isn't it? And you can you take away a tree for over? And hopefully, you know, fifty years later, you can you can see fruits of your work. Okay. So we've been talking about often is probably be a little bit myself. Could you show me while meant to be? So what we're looking to do is due to cuts of an inch an inch of water long. And if you have to. When you put the tree together it will marry up perfectly. Okay. So do I just cut the restock lie this if you keep your elbow in you, get a better angle? Elbowing? And as you pull down you start to the night. You don't wanna get into action? Because you remember you won't that one nice straight up. Right. Of course, this is harder than it seems. Okay. I've cut through the reach doc, but it doesn't quite match the silent. So in an ideal world, you have one hundred percent connection, but actually Apple's are- resilient, and they'll grow really, well feeling absolute fifty percents. So that would be up suit you, obviously an expert at this. This is so much harder seem so thank you very much. Dave and this will apple tree. To the world. Just supported the family. I was speaking to they finished they often and that just going down to putting areas I'm gonna follow them and catch up and see what they've made of the day. Said you've just come down stairs. And then this is the last the process what you do in that -absolutely. Yeah. Lots of little pulse and lovely pile of looks to be superb compost. Just keep keep the happy for the six weeks. I think the gentleman said you did look a little bit worried though, when Chris was explaining the aftercare to you seem to be complicated. I just want to get it. Right. A lot pressure myself because the importance of the trees mean to us as a family mums thrilled think that we're doing this in dad's memory, I'm so grateful to to Christian for everyone. And I'm glad that we of see read about what was going to come down. So it's the end of the day. I've come away today with a newfound respect for the humble apple. My eyes have been open to the huge variety that exists just in this small corner of the British Isles, and I'm taking away with me today. My own grafted king of Tom county apple tree that I'll proudly on my balcony, and hopefully an a couple of years it will be bearing delicious free. Thank you for listening to this minneap sold of the national trust podcast. Join us in two weeks time when we'd be Northern Ireland exploring Davis and the black mountains. Don't forget to subscribe to the series and do give us a rating and review on apple podcasts.

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Episode 145 (2019) Dave Linton On The Challenges & Opportunities Of Being A Social Entrepreneur

Impact Boom

23:41 min | 1 year ago

Episode 145 (2019) Dave Linton On The Challenges & Opportunities Of Being A Social Entrepreneur

"Welcome to impact firm at all. We searched the globe should find the people stories ideas and inspiration to help you create maximum positive each week impact berm brings you thought provoking entities with worldly Titians passionate about grabbing positive social change, these designers, social preneurs educators, innovators thinkers and doers. Shed their projects in these thoughts. Insights, I'm creating a better world, you can find all the stories links other great content at impacts all follow us on Facebook Twitter for the latest updates or subscribe to the newsletter or an eye chains. Thanks for listening one hundred forty five backbone. My name's Tim Allen action. And that bring the lightest union fights positive social impact today was Lynton. They've innovator social. Vote later mentor social enterprises motivational speaker and fair and managing director of multi-award-winning MetLife unity in his company, which one social enterprise you pay Huma face in the water into the nineteen prior to beginning his journey with Madeline youth worker for over twenty years and for the past for years. He's also become heavily involved in mentoring in rising awareness of social enterprises following a hugely successful crowdfunding campaign with Madeleine over the summer of two thousand seventeen day was given opportunity to have brunch with Richard Branson in. What was a great opportunity to share the story of live with a global business? Layup is extremely passionate about using Madeline to influence in you young generation of social infinite is sometimes put will discuss Dave's journey starting them, add like social enterprise, what discuss opportunities the social entrepreneurs. And able shows thoughts on the future of such enterprise. And we'll comed- done to drive the sector forward side. They've thanks very much. Joining us to be what it is. It's nice to hear that. You'll sitting in Arlon that I'm seeing a stray leeann we can pull on opposite ends of the world to get things started could you please share background, and what led you down the path of social enterprise. Yes. Well, as you as you previously previously mentioned that I'm a I was a youth worker for twenty years on on for me. I just love young people. I love helping people on for the last fifteen years of my youth work career. I was so so interested in organizational structure of sue interested in in being attentional and invasion ring for me. The the reality was that that I always was attracted the business on the tractor to really make money. I wasn't hungry for money was hungry to help people. And so for me, that's really what kept me out of business for so long. But then Susa. Give me a way that actually I'm able to do business, and I'm able to help people. So I make Molly purely to help people and undock for me as methodic ri- defy ended up, and it's this work will fit the kind of helping on the learning of the organizational stuff that damn took me into the place of social enterprise infested. So tell us a little bit more about Medlock vein, and what it was that. Brought you to Dan the mystical socially was. Yes. So my my wife, and I are parents, and we physically foster placement those wail from we were were I Mari and edit companion, and we had a space in heist. We were living in to to do more for certain, but we have had a little we've move into different location than north Narda. So we had to go right back the start on. It was in twenty twenty fourteen. We would do not. And I remember wanted the training classes. In week four. They talked about children in care anything. And I heard a story of a young girl at Janik wars. And she told her story which was when we move the local authorities don't give us successes. Sometimes foster cares will not successes quite often are belong to move and black classic than bikes Moser nicknaming. And so it wasn't that woman. I was so moved that was in tears. I just felt like I've got. And not started the whole journey will hide hide I start that. Do I go to my young people working with and collector will secondhand fives. To to give them to local authority, not would've fixed the problem. High have for the the reality is these kids have huge worth on the right to be treated with dignity there under the beginning, upper bike. So as as I started the three while hide idea that the clear model was the savage charity and on rias and give new bikes these kids, but I am a south the thing. I didn't really like bite us work was fundraising. It was the thing that the release it. He was my skill biz or skill set. And and also, you know, the run a few Martha I was never the seek to do that. So the idea that wasn't really kind of my thing and previously read the tone, shoes Blix, but going on starts. Something of matter of decently matters. And none spared me left me come into in using business to good and thought, well, I wonder could I do this with bikes hide. Again, you buy two K while I sold a by 'cause people need bikes and everytime has started to think this three the more people. I saw the carrying backpacks carrying bags in there every day. So people are bandits. So could we generate the funds from what people are buying to give a by two to child, and it was really at that moment. I started model make difference luggage. And it was as earlier that I didn't renew must by social enterprise. Yes. So it was a not moment that I started mad lug a make difference luggage. Busily by completed we sail bike, so we could give bags tunes. Incredible children. It's a great story. And I'm sure you've come up against a lot of challenges in founding the social enterprise so would have those challenges Bank few in heavyweight QA ramen. I think what I've learned is the challenges always become the opportunity on at the time their challenges. So for may starting off in Norton. We are not really a company that that is credit Browns that we wear we are importers of brands. Yep. And so from the states from Europe on from UK, import what we what we wear, and so I was with us saying of this great idea I ever culture label something we didn't. And so it was trying to get people to support what we were been. So there was the financial issue member of home to my wife, and San look just create the into went Sagres. The idea, but we can't risk our finance this. And I remember talking to France Great idea, and they were noting their heads him yet. Yeah. But I had the reality where I didn't have finance with youth worker. I have enough to pay my bills did not think the ovens. Yes, had I remember all I took was five hundred times under five hundred pines was basically initiation cost to get the logo designs, and I forty percent up front and an I just went with it. High ended up with the rest of the money was was got my mentor from six hundred Putin on I was on. I was as another Paneriai was drunk driving way ahead faster them mentor, and the has come to end it was by three days last year of Mandarin. And he said, look, it's clearly obvious that you have had a lot of time with your design company. Designing your your logos. And your brand if you get them voice me, I'll pay the rest. Bill. And that was the the Endo fate. We went lies with new stock apart from the samples of holding and said, the guys if you order today may take us three weeks, we'll go get raise the first day. We got an afford to place our first order, and then we just kept Rian fasting reinvesting reinvesting reality was I couldn't afford to the risk of cried funder because my years with no business background new family have business background. It would have been a complete failure. If we have the money on it would have been a stop to the whole drain on on fixing the problem. I've been died so need it really to show that this work to work hard. So finance was a big challenge them move on from finance? We saw this starting to work the other challenge really as his was looniness is a leader in. I love being around people. I am. Inspired by people on. You're you're starting to get beyond just the idea and you're starting to see at work. But yet you're still on your own working until you can afford to bring other people around you from me, the loneliness was at times, I could give up give up every time. I went to give up. I got a ladder are little bit encouragements from a young person. The he'll received the bike aren't God's, you know, stories from the social worker it given it by and it was our customer is so inspired by Bana beigin. And that left me this in this place off, you know, while it's worth I'm gonna do on stepped on the next day. And then so crus- the nuts that was the the kind of those two chances finance, but I think the coach we new finance? We have a better business today because we didn't go too far into buying to bigger premises too. Many people hard too much stop book yet on the loneliness is told me hi to get deep in. Hi to to to keep the right mindset, everyday keep because of those loneliness laments. Are you have a mindset that you have to say, right? Let's move on. Let's get past this a Mexico yet. Completely is great learnings. Dave. So what changes have you seen in in the social enterprise sector since you begin mad logging two thousand fifteen and what do you believe can be done to drive the sector forward? What I've seen in social enterprises. There are more people doing it in the last few year. So in Northern Ireland, for instance, we were the first one for one business to be here in Ireland. I were sea ended because we have done it because it's worth it is inspiring many authors to becoming the everyone's thinking one for one is the way to do at our social enterprise is the way to do business. So I think more people doing it. I get excited because I think it's more. Not chal in younger people in that. They think socially star win rather than just a little odd. Yep. Like really excited the city youth grown into this. I think that it will it will move most social enterprise moose businesses into morsels enterprise model. Glenn forward have as a tick meter ship rules, send them, but I think in that we're becoming were confused in the last three years of red state a little bit more confusion of what is social enterprise? Because the there's so many where community trash company, but you can be a private company with you know, ams object, those Enya memorandum's and profits away. There's the B Corp stuff coming in. There's and I think we're grounded up with a with a strive where the floods people use language of social entreprises to to sell product, but not necessarily driven all the time yet. So I I think there's a coolness with it is bringing on people are taking advantage of it sometimes to to group business faster that way. It's a nice carrot. But actually, it's harder than probably business with rights social impact. Yep. Completely. It's funny because might sign of violations about the sector Hyun, a Strahl many ways this exhibit continuing ongoing debate around the definition of social enterprise, but we're also saying a lot of people in essence climbing bane the spice, although I might be at a pretty typical business donating one or two percent the prophets too. Because so it's funny. How to social Washington creepy as well? Right. Yeah. It's it's leave it challenge. You know? Those are pure news are genuine it's challenging us to in some ways it's positive because as making a sharper, we've got a compete on a business fitting as much as any other business in. But it just concerns me that sometimes I think the real learner will be in within the last three four years or growth in the Spitz is many of them will be Neil colors social enterprise yet in. Three years time. I will be so enterprise got I'd associated price, and you know, new longer part of the community yet. I'm, you know, taking a I for the good positive side of it, all is yours. More healthy done more money being generated giveaway, so rather pure pure something's being done more than what was done before your were warranty social mindset than disappear capitalist munza completely. So what advice would you give to to the listeners out there who came to stop throwing social enterprise, but perhaps the funny little bit hard to take the late. Maya ffices is simply this find your black dyke store. So there's lots of great social need are there who listeners kids in care system. Will there people are nursing homes, whatever there is lots and lots of social need there, and you can be so broad, but it's finding. The it's finding the thing that nearly seems insignificance finding that the because I think that's the significance in making social enterprise works for them. So for me, it was the black bike story in the bigger kids in care store. So I really keeps me focused the whereby. So when people come and say, well, are you going to become a fashion Brown beyond bikes Wego? No. Because our social story is we started to because new childcare she kinda life nothin by. So we are focused on Haida week at bikes kids in care. Not as our art the play. Yep. I'm we'll play alongside some of the other night. If another been bike story comes as the in the journey of model than we start in other things. So I would say if if it's homelessness look for the thing that really gets put something your stomach and just I've got a fix up start until you've got that. So if you're if you're. Moving to lease homeless. Because it's a little problem is if homelessness is getting at the side of our need, the FEC something or how Cape Golan Cape every day Ligand for that. One thing. That one thing is what makes unique. Absolutely. I say doing start before you've got that cause you'll you'll end up you'll get lost in the in the cried where everyone's doing the same thing. It's really interesting vice in very sanded boss, obviously, strongly dive. So when it comes to measuring in communicating your impacts thin. What do you think are the case doing this as such? A will for me in the Matlock story. It says hi many bikes generate the gives to children in the care system in the UK there ninety kids in care. We'll child move in every fifteen minutes. Many of those children are kinda belongs in either simply plastic bags or black plastic buys yet. I'm what we find. Since starting is that they many of them often seal lost in a care system that nobody cares. Everybody's pad to care yet, foster campus social workers and so forth. So for me. It's simple is the more bikes can get these kids the top of message on it. That says your incredible value were thing, which is what's on our that. We give the kids than dot for me as a measurement though of impact design knew that that got that works. We've also had lots of feedback from young people have received them stories of just being blown away. It's only care. He didn't know make. You kind of likely to anybody listening can check our blogs. And there's amusing ladder. We got I got a will news times of being looney from a kid in care on written to us on you'll see impacts us. Hi, we measure the other thing is what is teens for for me. Is it start off by giving a bike to kids in care? Do we give by boby of realized is this the impact of people carrying model bites? So the more we become a brand for children in care. Even those haven't received the bike. If they start to new the anyone around were kind pod bags the say on present cares for me person for that person. Police incredible. And so from made that's also the impacted I know that that that story of feeling loss. And yet something he hasn't got the par or the -bility are the because of the child protection issues can actually just wear them say we care. Yep. A so that's how we measure measure. I'm we're still grueling this whole space. It's it's that would be the biggest challenge. I think in whose enterprises you've got to really run a business and businesses hard work on its own. And then you like setting a charity yet mindset of giving and it's Sierra not things. I think it's it's Susanna price is not an easy option. It's really harder option yet. But it has it has a lumber impact. Absolutely, some great advice dive. So wouldn't sparring organizations of projects of you, come across bones. Mad log that you believe a credit some fantastic, positive social impact. Yeah. This this is a hard while the answer because there is so many. Yeah, I lost the privilege of Golda suits enterprise world forum, and that blew me away off took me on side of Susanna prices being a UK thing. A my knowledge of just been a UK thank to in a global thing. And the. Hear stories all people in Canada who would run employments recruitment agencies making money giving people with jobs to you know, hearing stories of people using beer to basically give clear water clean water to people in development countries. It was just phenomenal. But I think for me locally off the the we shot I for some of our logo because starting kind of on this run off on social enterprise in a country that we're we're seeing a lot of growth in with social price. There's there's one that's called AL, and they are basically our Lund's first ethical water, and until it's traceable water bottles that you know, drinking and their night into nearly all who tails, and they're just phenomenally grueling, and you can trysts trips were Kim. From the Ritz taken. But what I love about the organization is it started. A number years goes to charity work with people with disabilities. It was it was a run by the quarter million turnover on at but struggling purely funded and the turn the whole thing into this in this missiles on the price of water is only one aspect off it yet. But I run this thing off mixed workforce and having the benefits to disadvantaged young people to work with people with disabilities. And so they operated like a third third on the Seibel workforce third have really had a real basal ice on a third of professional workforce. And doc dot ortganizations. Glenn stock that one I'm Susanna price of the year in the northbound space last year. And so I'm really excited by that. I lost a love just watching not but its own fair the alerts because she'll Manny Griff things across the world today. Yep. Absolutely. So the finish often the after sharing his does examples what assessments barring books. That you'd recommend listens. I want to give you one today. And I think that this is being so K it's a bit cold. It's not on the price is. But I think so Sunder prizes built the Ryan story. Yes story. Oh, where it's come from to what it wants to day on the impact on the have is there's a author Cole. Donald Miller called building story Brown. I have find that the felt that who will not low the rhines this Kenneth thinking that, you know, hide hide out story communicate the story. Hindsight people into the story and an position it, and I think, you know, if we can get a sentence of many things on on what so many presentations, and I just think if you just you hide tag your story better. Nc greater growth angry impact because there's lots and lots of really great things happening. But we just don't tale story. So buildings story bronze it's it's a it's a book reside about a year ago worth rate as everyone is needs to the reader other BIC. Good degree get the right people on the bus by Jim Collins, gripped classic building team getting the people to be driven. So Susan packed. I think that's a classic as well in the leadership speeds fantastic. A couple of great books. Stick links to them at the bottom of the article dive. So thanks so much for sharing time in generous on tonight's certainly investigating journey to the Washington mad log on to look for the two falling into the future as well. Obsolete. It's being good to be with you catch up saying. Thanks for listening to impact berm, you'll find links to the initiatives people in Rachel's mentioned in podcast on impact spoon rogue. Please leave comments below. And remember, we'll be publishing thrashes brations insights buke create positive impact every week on the website Facebook page and Twitter.

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#201 Emma Dabiri: Don't Touch My Hair

Ctrl Alt Delete

40:10 min | 1 year ago

#201 Emma Dabiri: Don't Touch My Hair

"In this episode of control delete is brought to you by better. Help better help is a great way to connect with licensed professional counselors, and caring professionals that specialize in the issues that you might want to talk about if you've ever thought you kind of want to talk to someone but not sure where to start then check out better help, you can get help in your own time, and at your own pace you just schedule a secure video, or phone session or text you'll therapist worldwide and you can start communicating in under twenty four hours looks to be more affordable than a lot of other options. And so I'm really happy to be offering control out delete listeners ten percent off your first month with better help with the discount Emma, j say if you've been wanting to toward someone and you want to get started right now, then go to better help dot com Ford slash Emma, j you'll simply fill out a questionnaire and get matched with accounts lead that you'll love. So check it out better, help dot com Ford slash ama- g. Hello. And welcome back to another episode of control up delete, my guest today is Emma debris. She is a presente social historian and writer she is being listed as the BBC's broadcasting stars of the future. And she was recently listed as one of the observers, two thousand nineteen rising stars today. We are discussing her debut book called, don't touch my hair published by penguin. It's a book about why black hair matters stylus magazine recently said that it was pulled together with meticulous research, and don't touch my head is an unmissable read by a writer who sets become a household. Name 'em is a columnist as well for the Dublin inquirer and is one of the BBC's expert voices. She does a lot of TV presenting and radio and you probably watched one of documentaries, and if that's not enough. She is also a teaching fellow in the Africa. -partment of so ass. So she is one clever an interesting woman, and I'm so excited. I got to go around her house and chat to her about her new book, and I really enjoyed this episode. We went on a few different tangents but, but everything was so, so interesting. So I hope you enjoy this episode and please don't forget to leave me a rating, or a review on, I jeans it really, really helps more people. Discover this podcast. They thank you. And here it is. This books really needed. And in terms of the first chapter, it's only hair. It's incredible kind of from the very first shop to you get the idea. And the reality is all of the, the hapless, such a massive role. So I make the argument basically that when it comes to this was something that came through in the research is doing for my so when it comes to black nests specifically, rather than just kind of race more generally the features that identify somebody as black, and that mean that they will be racialist as a black person are a lot more than just skin color. Because if you think about it, most of the world's population are people of color, most of the world population are have Brown skin of varying hues, but most of those people are not racial, as black, so the people who are racial is his black also have afra- textured hair. So I wanted to kind of. Expand on the significance of hair texture because you hear a lot more about complexion and skin color, but Harry is also operating really powerfully. There's just less awareness and discussion of the ways that Harris positioning people and that people are being positioned by there. It was so interesting as well what you were saying about how has kind of talking about how the parallels in the and the symbolism between unruly, how unmanageable herring that horrible stereotype of being too outspoken, or unmanageable or like that blew my mind. You know what actually when I first made that realization I was like, wow, as well as I've been thinking about it for a walnut initially. I was like this is actually crazy. I think I thinking about it because I was when I first started thinking about it. Maybe when I, I kind of really started writing researching about half, and I was just like gosh, all of the words. To describe my hair texture or jar of like there. No, there are no complementary. There are no words that actually kind of talk about the positive characteristics of my hair all of the descriptive. The commonly descriptive terms used to describe my hair texture are kind, of course, wild, and then maybe some slightly better, but they're still to do with control and being out of control, and I thought thinking more. But yeah, kind of like unruly and defined, and I was, and he course, again, and I was just thinking that I'm the words that were at one stage, used to describe black, people haven't actually disappeared. They've just shifted to head height. They're now the times that we use to describe black people's hair say that really like stunned me. Yeah. And this idea of women should be kept small, and the way in the way that you were talking about half an how it's so beautiful for it to take up loads of Spaeth. But actually, what society wants you to do is make it small again yet to, to diminish it unto shrinkers, and that was my main main aim and objective when I was when I was younger for most of my life, actually, I was like mortally. Mortified by my hair and all I wanted was for it to, like for it to go down. And I even remember like to the hairdresser. Like when I'd have it relaxed our chemically straightened, and they'd be like, oh, you're, you're particularly thick and thick meaning it's more afro, and even bigger. So we should like thin out. So you actually get my hair thin. You know, everyone wants to have as much volume and full hair as possible. But this idea that, like black women actually thinning their hair just to, to diminish it and just make it make it last make it take a blessed bait. And also have there's also been in the book where I speak about different kind of beauty standards as well. And I'm talking about like growing up in Arlon where the emphasis was being on was on being like extremely thin. This is like in the nineties as well that the look was just like very, very skinny Kate moss era, but with boobs any but with booze. Yeah. Difficult to achieve eventually unachievable for more than maybe like two percents of the population unless you get some help. So that was very much the standard to, to aspire to, and I would starve myself, but my body is just. My body's just not like not that shape like I have like a like a round, boom. I have full five inherited happily inherited from my Nigerian ancestry. But when I was a teenager like I didn't even really know the often like black women had a different shape. I just I was just like what's wrong with me? Like why? All my friends have like a gap in their thought is and minor. And I, I definitely didn't. That would have made me feel much better. All my friends, all of them. But so many of them, and certainly the ones that were considered the beautiful ones had the GOP the elusive GOP wine or why like rubbing against each other. And now I know that to have to be that size after that shape to support my bum. But I was looking at him. Yes. When I was writing the book, I was thinking about, like, where that beauty sounded emerges from. And I think it's Naomi wolf that I quote, and she talks about, like a society that kind of demands women to be thin is not really about or and to take a blessed space is not really about that as quickly. It's more about like control and how if a how starved population or half starved half population are more kind of malleable. Let's thinking about how that existed in contrast to some of the beauty standards that you see in kind of, like some of the African cultures that I look at specifically the Uraba, which is like my paternal ancestry. And as looking at how a should who's the one of the kind of most well known Uraba got S's the Risha his. Considered like extremely extraordinarily beautiful. I was looking at some of the praise poetry, extolling her extolling, her features and her beauty. And one of them is like a corpulent woman, a woman, who's basically count fit your arms, enter waste. And this is being kind of celebrated as the epitome of beauty. I was like, wow. That's in such kind of stark. Contrast to abuse outta that demands that you are, are less, and you take like less space, unless room say. Wow. Yes, it that is, is so interesting to do it the space and the control because I was thinking the other day about the film Hidden Figures, and when Catherine she's like running from one to the other, but she's inhales and it's like even wearing heels is like taking control from people because you'll making them Nobile to. Walk pro-police and listen. I'm so glad you brought that up. Look at my I if you compare it to. Oh, god. Yes. That by that, starting a if you can ever you can do to like preempted getting to that level. Do I have it on both sides? And it's not from shoes. That is, so I think somebody else could wear high heels in might not develop to that level. So I think it's probably something hereditary as well even my family has it, but yeah, so I spent probably the entirety of my later, teens up until my mid twenties wearing like insane stilettos, and that definitely came from me subscribing to a particular style of femininity that I thought I had a way of presenting the I fell under pressure to present in and I was really paranoid about having short legs. But my legs not being like long and thin enough so beware. These like towering stilettos, and that's that's the havoc. They read support my truck. He's just trying to ruin. Forever complete the I really I do think those I re I see a big difference between like today and how it was when I was in my teens and twenties. Like I think there have been a lot. I think there have been a lot of improvements. Yeah. I think for me, I don't know. Maybe some of the confidence is comes and self-assured Nisus comes from being older, but I also do think there have been quite big societal changes, and I think they're more. Women can see more options in for ways of being rather than just kind of like having to conform to quite limited choices. Yeah. Do you think things are moving false store? Do you think it's like the allusion of pace because of the internet, will it feels like a something, even I have tweeted five years ago. I'm a bit like ooh. Then if I think that anymore filling nothing major offensive or anything. It's just like little things where I'm like, is that just? Growing or is that, like society actually shifting? I do think there's more idea think there's more scope. To not just look, one particular way like things like I don't like I don't shave my armpits. And that's still I'm amazed by how that still raises eyebrows, and comments. But God when I was like when I was younger too, I wouldn't have done it. But to do that would have been oh, just met with, like a level of revulsion, and I don't know. I think my friends would have been to even seen with me like Jimmy's, I think like in, in certain, I think, in certain ways, things have improved, but they're quite minimal. And maybe they're kind of in certain pockets of people, and it might not be something that is happening, like cross society kind of more generally as or as a whole, and I do think a lot about how younger women must feel and girls must feel under pressure because of the kind of unrealistic. So for me I'm saying. This diverse kind of representations of beauty. And there are an diverse representations of ways of being. But at the same time, there is a really homogenized, beauty standard as well that I would imagine exerts, a lot of pressure and influence on younger women. And I do think like a lot of social media, particularly the more visually oriented apps. Must like put a men's pressure pressure on young women. Yeah. I mean, even I feel even I feel it a little bit. I'm kind of. I'm kind of too old, and I've kind of deconstructed these things too much to really be the really be somebody that's like hugely influenced by that. But I can imagine when I was younger would have been pretty damaging for me. Yeah. God, it's true. I think if I was thirteen now, I would be saying these amazing role models that have come out of more of a diverse representation of light bulb image and all that stuff? But then at the same time, it's like there's this look at the moment isn't there of let the Kim Kardashian face and bomb, and everything. And it's like with that with that affect me. Yeah. I'm glad I'm older obsolete. Just care is absolutely absolutely. Yeah. There is not really homogenized. I mean came crashing doesn't even look like this. Like I mean, she does look like that. But, like nobody very few people not look like that. I love what you talk about in the book about time and the labor of doing your hair because I'm. Into that idea of, like women shouldn't spend too much time thinking about this stuff, but it's like, but you kind of had no choice. You felt like to fit in. You have to spend a lot of time on your appearance, and that again is, is taking away power, isn't it? Because if you give a women lots of things to do. You'll basically taking away their, the availability of them doing other things at that time. Yeah. Opposites. Am I remember being like so intensely preoccupied and paranoid by my appearance that, you know, even if I wasn't leaving the house, I would probably spend like two hours doing my makeup, just because I didn't really bash look at myself without it, and just on the off chance that somebody came by or had to leave so the amount of I mean, I, I love makeup and I'm not like kind of by any means like diminishing, the art history. But two or three hours on your makeup like every day, when this other stuff to do is. Three hours is that probably didn't happen. Been a long a long time make up time. I didn't have. Yeah. Yeah, if it's a hot hand it 'cause it's like if you wanna spend two hours on your makeup, I'm not shaming would never shame. Anyone about the same time? Is that some sort of way of making women kind of less powerful because it's like just stare at him and do that. Yeah, I the untimely like time something I thought about a lot in the book as well. I started to think about the nature of doing black hair and how it does actually require more. So in my hair is like even blow dried straight once that's been done. It doesn't kind of require as much time as it does when my hair is like kind of in. It's not troll texture. I'm very consciously avoiding using the word time consuming because this is something I talk about in the. Book the idea that one of the kind of justifications for black women straightening, there is too time, consuming to leave it in its to leave it in its natural state, and I talk about what I research, kind of hairstyles that women unman actually, because this is also something, a culture that man were involved in his. Well, men was often spend hours on their in Africa. I was just like, oh, why, why is it time consuming when from Alania it wouldn't have been viewed that way? And I was like, oh, because it doesn't fit neatly into the prescribed meant of time that you're allowed to kind of do personal care personal grooming, kind of within a carpet, list's system. But I was like black hair grows. The way it grows. For reason the time that's required to do it is the time. It's required to do. It is not necessarily. Time consuming. That's just it's Nieve. And if you live in a society where it's needs be met. You have to think about who designs that society, I wasn't designed with your best interests, a central because any culture society develops according to the needs of the people in that society. So you have to think about you being expected to kind of conform to rules that were never supposed to read include you over certain to any never concerned by you in the first place. 'cause basically saying like the norm. I'm Dan Evatt Tacoma's is to be like, oh, I don't with that and leave the house. Whereas that's just not the same for everyone. Yeah. Yeah. And I guess that is sort of reflected in. Unfortunately, the amount of products black cat doesn't seem to be. We don't seem to be there yet in terms of like walking into a mainstream outlet and bam to get what you need. Yeah. That's, that's still true. It it's, it's certainly improved. A little bit in recent years. If you go into like a really big. Pharmacy. If you go into most of the chains, you still won't find block products. If you go into one of their massive stores, you'll find a limited range, but still often, not the thing you're looking for so, yeah, you have to go to a specialist shop in a particular area and it's often just really inconvenient. If you don't live in one of those areas, coast, one of those areas or if you're traveling, if you're in airport or train station or something, and you're like I travel like a lot for work, an often being an airport or train station. And I just need to buy something for my hair, and it's not possible. It's possible for everybody else's there. It is. Yeah. Frustrating to say to say the least. It's interesting like the examples you use of the people that you would see on TV, and they would have certain types of hair, and I suppose that happens a lot when you're watching TV, and you're like, oh, I don't know that how she managed to like that. Yeah. So when I was growing up, there were very, very few on, once I moved back to Arlon, which is where I was born, but then we spent the first we spent four years in Atlanta, to, like a very black city, the remove to Ireland and suddenly, I was like felt like the only about press in the country often, but who was I gonna say, yes, so my hair was very different to the have anybody around me in real life. And then there wasn't on top of that, there wasn't much representation, but the few women that I remember when I was like, maybe eight or nine a love Nina cherry like so much, and I s she's mixed race and was somebody. That, like he knows the same kind of color as me, but her hair was, like so different to mind, she had quote unquote, good hair or more typically mixed race hair. Whereas my hair has very much favored, the Nigerian side of my ancestry, is like very tightly coiled. So I was like this woman looks like me, but she kind of has, like, quote unquote, normal hair. Like, why is what like why is that that made me feel kind of even more in adequate about my own have, and if years after that game, I took about like the fresh prince and seeing Ashley ranks and Hillary banks. But now as I'm older realizing that they're also even the in the program, they play their parents are both black. They play the children of black parents in real life. They're both mixed and for them. Unlike me, they're mixed nece has resulted in quote, unquote. Good hair. Hillary's got kind of currently ham, or Lisa curly hair, and Ashley has had that kind of very much resembles or resembles the fact that her father is Indian so she has like long dry law almost straight hair. So, again, I was just like put even like the black people, I'm seeing seem to have quote unquote normal. What's wrong with me? So you're just orienting. So the only black women that you saw on TV with their natural hair were those that had hair that already conformed to European ideals of what was beautiful or what was attractive, or what was normal is crazy. You know what in the book this idea of good and bad? And just and just like how you've unpicked that so mazing in the book and by the end of it. I was just like everyone needs to read this book, because the people listening, he might not know you talk about color ISM in the. Book and I wondered if you could talk a little bit about that for people that might not know that me. Yeah. I'm what people are often kind of unaware of, of, of color ISM. Whereas in black communities, it's to varying degrees in different geographic, locations because certainly more pronounced in some black cultures and isn't others, but it exists to varying degrees in all black cultures. I've been in it's the hierarchical ranking of black people. But according to the shade of their skin. So obviously black people in calm. People racial is his black encompass, a vast range of complexions. So it's like the preferential treatment of those who are lighter of a lighter complexion than those who are dark, complexion and the different levels, the, the different kind of. Grades of skin color that might be kind of almost even imperceptible to wipe person who's not thinking about it will be kind of very will be very apparent to people in black communities who will think about it a lot one thing, I would like to say about color is those I often hear this argument that it's like something that's always existed, and it's just a universal preference for light skin. And that's something that I challenge and. Yeah, debunk in the book in precolonial Africa. I can't talk about Colorado them that exists in, in, in other parts of the world in Asia. For example, it's not my area of expertise. I don't know about it kind of precolonial history. But certainly in Africa, there wasn't in west Africa. There wasn't a particular preference for lighter skin, that is something that emerges from colonialism and slavery. So it's not just some. Kind of enduring norm because light skin is inherently seen as better. It's definitely something that is has been imposed. And in the book, I talk about phrases in Uraba, which is a south western Nigerian, language, an ethnic group where you're about people, even if you're not talking about anyone being mixed race, just you just you're about people who aren't mixed common diff- have different complexions. So there's a saying, like one who is red when he skin is red as palm oil basically, when he's can as RAD as palm oil in beautiful, and there's another thing about one whose skin is dark as the shining, seed of the key apple and his beautiful. The point is that e couldn't you wouldn't be beautiful. Traditionally, you wouldn't be beautiful by virtue of having light skin equally you wouldn't not be beautiful or not be attractive by virtue of having dark skin. He could have lighter skin and beautiful. You could. Have lighter skin and not abused. You could have darker skin and beautiful or not be beautiful. It wasn't dependent on your complexion. So the idea that like having being lighter just gives you beauty or not being lighter kind of denies UB. She is a relatively. Is not like an indigenous concept is something that comes from history of colonialism, and slavery, sorry, I kind of. So tonight this stuff, so linking to that in the book, there's a moment, we use sort to say that you've had lots of compliments and people almost like except you because you're tractive in many cases. Yeah. Yeah. That's why I say that. I'm grateful for. I mean, I can sound grateful. Now. I didn't feel grateful when I was experiencing some of this stuff is just with the benefit of years, having pas on hindsight. I can be like, oh, this is giving me insights, even that wasn't necessarily enjoyable at the time. But I think seeing that I had periods of my life where I wasn't considered attractive is very much side, the beauty sanded, and then having other periods of my life where that was completely the reverse and seeing how differently I was treated as a result of where I was positioned, as a tractive Renault's was actually like a huge kind of, it's kind of a quite ahead fuck yet to be on both sides. See it for what it is. And with society is in exception, what they don't at some periods of time. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. I actually think. Okay, so I remember like, leaving leaving Arlanda I'm going to visit my cousins in Atlanta, where I had spent the first few of my life, I still have a lot of family there and Atlanta's in the south in America, and color, ISM. Absolutely right there. So that's one of the places I've gone, I've experienced color is at its most pronounced. And I remember like getting on the plane in Dublin, where I was referred to as like the dark one, the black ones darken, people would just describe me and the beauty sounded was very skinny blond hair blue eyes, and then I get off the plane. However many hours later in Atlanta. And now I'm I'm the beauty sounded and I wasn't prepared like I didn't know that. I didn't know about that. This is like in the mid nineties. So I didn't know things are much more localized. You didn't have the same discussions about color them, online and stuff. So I thought that if anything I actually thought I remember thinking I experienced so much racism in Ireland, and I was like, okay so black, people have never done anything to white people, but I get so much hostility in this country for being black. When I now go to a place when I go to a black place where the. These people have essentially been Tara his by why people is very obvious. The I have why ancestry I'm going to get a really hard. I'm going to have a really hard time going to shift people, but that wasn't the case. Instead, I was being Saleh braided for having visible. Why ancestry was dislike waas? What's going on? Of course. Initially, I enjoyed the attention. But that actually wore off quite quickly and of this. I will be sounded anymore. But just seeing the different position, I was the same person, but my treatment and people's perception of me, I'm people's expectations in sumptious about we were so different as well in our and being of African descent being seen as black was associated with stigma, whereas like now in the American South being light skinned was associated with being kind of, like upper class or being like more kind of sophisticated or like a lease. So it's really like jarring to just be in these vastly contradictory and contrasting spaces. So, yeah, that's kind of. Yeah. Right about some of those different those different positionings and then also an art like I did have when I got into my teams I kind of even though I wasn't like the beauty standard. The typical beauty sounded by the time I got to like aseren time my teens I did start to be seen as being like an exotic kind of beauty. But that came with, like a lot of feticide Asian. And also, as I write about in the book, it came with people actually saying, you're really lucky that you're pretty 'cause like he can get away. You can get away with being black. Was the that has been said to me numerous times in a long time. I have to say, but certainly as a teenager, that was attitude. I encountered quite frequently. So that's also a head full e-e-e-e-no. You're a teenager, and you're just really even if race doesn't come into it, you're trying to like deal with, like your appearance and you're like an on way and attractiveness. And if you're straight with boys and all of that, and then to just add this kind of racial, is element onto it, it was just incredibly incredibly notice away. Confusing. It was exhausting. Yeah. I mean, honestly it that's why love your books, much is because of all of these layers of growing up an island going through all this stuff seeing things from all these different views and being one person, which different sites to you. It's just incredible. And I wanted having had that head fuck of like being seen in different ways through different lenses. Did you then come back to yourself and more of a neutral state of like actually this is what I think about myself now in eventually, but after many years of being like all also there being an emphasis on my there being an emphasis on my looks. And basically, my looks dictating whether or not because somebody if somebody thank you look that you're pretty because you can get away being black like whoa. Like, what are they, they're being such emphasis on your looks negative? And inverted commas positive. I became very obsessed with my parents, this episode of control delete is brought to you by skill share. Skill share is an online learning community with thousands of classes. You can take classes in blogging PO costing side hustle in marketing social media. You name it. They've got it on their say. Whether you're picking up a new skill for your day job or figuring out your next project, then Scotia has clauses for you. I'm really excited. I've been working with Scotia for a long time. And I have created my very own skill share class, all about creating your own custom career and figuring out what direction you want to go in. I'm ready thrilled to have done a cloth. And I can't wait to watch it. So join the millions of students already learning on Scotia today with a special offer just for my control delete listeners. So get two months of Scotia for free and check out my class while yoga and get unlimited access to thousands of classes for free. So to sign. Yup. Go to skill shot dot com slash Emma to again. Go to school shed dot com Ford slash Emma to, to start your two months now thank you to SCO, chef sponsoring this podcast. Those the hours spent on makeup of the various starvation techniques. It was it was more after years of that. I'm just being exhausted. By it being like I remember when what boyfriends, one of my ex-boyfriends being night to me, and I went out with him when I was probably the most obsessed with my ways and the like I weighed everything, as I had, like a very controlled calorie can't every day, and this was for years. So it kept me, very thin, but he was just like this is like, I just can't use like you're, so here's an interesting and well rounded person, yet, your soap Sast with this. Like, really superficial thing he's, there's so much more to you than your weight. I can't believe that dictate your life. Let this bus. He was saying this just wasn't penetrating. And I it was many years after that the I just started to when I turned thirty I actually threw my weighing scales way, as a present to myself, and that was like. Probably the beginning of. Kind of yet trying to undo this like obsession with my with my appearance, I feel like appearance, we can pretend it doesn't matter. We can pretend that we think about it, but where we live in a world where people still place value, and again like importance on. Thank you. That's that brings me back to what I wanted to say, there's a bit where I quote, like Tony. Oh, maybe she didn't make it into the book, but there was a bit where I referenced Tony Morrison, who I reference a lot throughout the book. She's like, my, my favorite also I noticed on your book show. Oh my God. Look, here, there's well afterwards, you can look amazing just seven. A huge part of but, but I was reading and watching interviews with her, and I heard her talking about beauty, and she was talking about the blackest beautiful movement. And she was saying how she was never really a part of it because she was like understood why at to happen of speaking, though. I'm tiny Marcin them. She was like she was like she understood what white white happened, but she wasn't really interested because she was just like to, to whom are you speaking who are you saying the black is beautiful? She's just like is this to white people? She was like, I know she was like, I know that black. I know that black is beautiful necessarily how I felt I didn't know that or I didn't. Even if I had people telling me I was beautiful. There were also so many like kind of contradictory things telling me that like my features weren't that. I just I didn't feel I didn't feel secure in my parents tool, but she says that she knew blackness was beautiful. She didn't. She felt this constantly asserting the black was beautiful was kind of pandering to whiteness, in a way. But then the I found most interesting was she was just like to we need to be beautiful, too, for humanity to be recognized, and that really resonated, because it goes back to that thing of like you're lucky you're pretty 'cause you can get away with being black. She was just like beauty is not beauty is too fragile. And that's exactly really similar to something I'd written like before I'd even read her a heard her saying that, and it was like I came to realize that like. Beauty is so fragile. I'm it's such. It's such a fragile space to kind of negotiate your humanity like your humanity can't be given or withheld from you because people happen to perceive, you as beautiful or Norse. Like that's a it's like a track angels. Incredibly. Yeah. So I had to do a lot of work, he, like, divests from the importance that I put on looks completely the other way. And I was just like it's going to be like see per from p but I was like I don't care anymore. I did care. But as I'm gonna make that sacrifice. I'm just going to be kind of like a from p like militant famine est I just felt like I had to stop straightening, my hair because it didn't reconcile at my politics. But there was no part of me that thought it could ever be attractive. So I just walk on shapeless close stopped wearing makeup. But then I was like, this is also this is also ludicrous like this actually isn't me either, like an I also I was concerned. Especially started teaching if I was perceived as being like to glamorous people wouldn't take me like seriously. So I went completely like the other the other REUs, and then I just came to a state of more balance where I was like no people like if I'm going to wear red lipstick people are still going to have to like, take if I'm gonna wear people can still take me seriously. So I started to like, you know, be able to enjoy kind of makeup and stuff again. But like in a healthier way. No, it's like that age old thing of, like I'm a feminist and dole like I'm a feminist and wearing massive stilettos wearing red lipstick school chief hours, but just to wrap up just wanted with every with the book going out so you can get such a wide readership of redes- you hoping the kind of does or or is there a goal with it or did you just wanna writer? There's quite a few ideas in the book that may be are kind of new ideas certainly ones that I haven't heard much in the mainstream. So I would really like just to see the kind of dissemination of those ideas and we'll kind of conversations they spark. I hope so it's, it's really hard for me to kind of predict or to feel much other than quite nervous about it. So. For everyone listening needs to go and buy it. Dined touch my so brilliant, and I could have spoken chief ten hours, I've more questions, but maybe you can come back on, and we could do polity once it comes out that would be great. That'd be really fun. Thank you so much. Thank you.

Atlanta Emma writer Arlon Africa BBC Ireland Dublin inquirer Harris Harry stylus magazine teaching fellow Kate moss Tony Morrison Naomi wolf GOP Kim Kardashian
399 Change Your Food Mindset With Artful Eating; Karina Melvin

Mindfulness Mode

37:36 min | 1 year ago

399 Change Your Food Mindset With Artful Eating; Karina Melvin

"Mindfulness mode three hundred ninety nine what can I change in my life, immediately or gently or thoughtfully that will put me in a position where I'm feeding batter myself. I. Hey mindful tribe. I'm sitting here on a most beautiful fantastic. Canadian winter day, it's about minus. Or I think it's about minus fifteen or so minus fifteen celsius, which would be four degrees Fahrenheit, beautiful beautiful weather. I love the cold. I know that a lot of my listeners don't you might not. But I love it. And since I've been been practicing Wim Hof and Wim Hof is. A method of learning to enjoy the cold and embrace the cold. And it it actually makes you a stronger person for it. It's been fantastic. I've worked on this for a couple of months now. And so I have called showers every day and revitalizes me and gives me energy. And and I feel like it creates my inner warrior, if that makes any sense. Do you ever have troubles falling asleep? Do you wish you could sleep more soundly, I have a sleep meditation? I've recorded just for you. I've received great positive feedback about how it's made a big difference in a lot of people's lives, and you can download this free recording. You definitely deserve to be able to sleep naturally and easily and deeply and like I say you can download this for your own use for free, and you can do that at mind. Fullness mode dot com slash sleep. Well, just a few minutes ago. I made myself a Cup of mint tea, and that's that's nice and warm, and and and feels great going down. So I'm enjoying the mint tea. But I'm also about to interview someone who says to just enjoy the moment enjoy if you feel like having a piece of cake have a piece of cake if you feel like having some chocolate have some chocolate she's all about food, but she's all about living a life of joy. And she's a psycho analyst and a very fascinating person. She lives in Ireland. And that's where I interviewed her from sit back, relax and enjoy my interview today with Corinna Melvin, hey mindful tribe. You are going to be fascinated today because I have a very alive. Very fun. Very interesting guest with me today, and it's all about eating and living an awesome life and her name is Karena Melvin and Corinne are you in mindfulness mode today. I actually am. And I'm so excited to be here on crap me, Bruce. My pleasure Carina. Melvin is an author a psychologist and the creator of the artful leading podcast and artful eating at the table, which is a transformative online program. She also wrote artful eating the psychology of lasting weight loss. And she runs her own clinic in it's called Sandymount psychotherapy, and she lectures and psychotherapy at a university and she works at Saint Vincent's hospital, which is a teaching hospital located south of the city of Dublin Ireland in elm park. So it's such a pleasure to connect with you Carina. Tell us. What mindfulness means to you? What's it all about in your life? Why think that's such a question because I think that sometimes mindfulness can get a really bad rep at people struggle to practice. Right. So they fit by DEA about the level of discipline required. Not to back or forward. I'm so for me. My relationship to mindfulness is just about being present. You know, when you're doing something with intention and enjoy it or if it's not necessarily the most enjoyable thing. Do it do it with a sense of focusing pride? I think nowadays especially with the north actually just talking about this with a client before I came on the cool and nowadays with phones or constantly being distracted. I think something like the values and principles of mindfulness are more important than ever because we need some sort of an anchor to connect us to being in the moment. And I have a little. Little at daughter. She's t-. She had her second birthday this weekend. An over the past two years. I've Ray started to realize how connected I am to my phone. And so for me that word mindfulness that idea of mindful nice. It really brings me back to being president than. Vomit thrust not we constantly distracted or looking for distractions. Elsewhere just being well, I loved listening to your podcast Corinna because you called mindful eating, but you talk about how you know, what it's it's about everything is about being happy. It's about understanding what kind of life you want to live to be happy and content. And of course, eating is only a part of that. Right. And what what does your perfect life looked like? So that you you are happy and content. We, you know, actively question it often changes like every now. And then I think the last podcast I put up with a lovely guy. I don't worry interview people. But a lovely guy who evaluate every six months goals and aspirations are. I'm not I'm not fixed of his. But I think it's something that's an ongoing conversation. I have with myself. What is a good life is the question that I carry with me all the time am it's an ongoing. Sation? I have with my husband and also my friends what I noticed something because I haven't been asked this question. I'm thinking what I've noticed in the last. I would say it's got to be two years, Bruce that I've actually really interrogated if question what is the good life for me mnay has traffic changed. So my relationship to my work, which I love. Is that work? You know, it have a place, but doesn't take over which it had in the past. Because I enjoy it so much that my values and my principles needs to be aligned with how I carry out each day. And that my environment is writing for it to me. So for me all about quality quality of food quality of time with people, though, don't say, yes, I'll do XYZ. If you can't be president. Enjoy us know your limits on quality of sleep important, especially when you've toddler on recognizing that you're the architect of the life that you because for so many of us on this with really the case for me, you just allow to happen to you. I knew don't realize we'll actually I'm the driver of every interaction. I have with every person I need. I'm the driver of my career on Heim preceived in my work. I'm the driver of how much money I earn. I'm the driver of how often I try. Level or her wealth tonight, go and do something that's gonna stimulate the weather. That's going for a hike or go to CNN or go to the cinema. So when we start to take ownership of how we want to live our life. Really magical than Kaplan. I think that certainly my experience didn't really answer your question. I totally agree that it's magical. And and you know, what I'm fascinated by the number of times, he used the word quality because he said quality in the way, you live in the area, breathe and all these kinds of things. And yet when I listen to you on your podcast, you said my theme is good enough that I think that's fascinating. How those two things go together because good enough can be, you know, the work you put into a paper or your book or whatever. Because of it isn't if you don't have that that way of thinking, then you may never even produce that book is that the way you look at it clinic. Well, something you didn't mention I think in in in your introduction. If that yet, I'm a trained psychologist, but in my heart and in my practice, I'm psychoanalyst. Okay. What literally means is that I'm very aware that we've any go on. In that space that we practice mindfulness and being present in where we think about things like quality. But we also have an unconscious, and that's that part of that often times is in conflict with the conscious part of ourselves. And so when I say good enough, there are a lot of people who have this push and strive towards perfection, the complete deep within them for all sorts of reasons. It's different for everyone. You know, an older sibling that was really successful. Or parents that were quite hard on them, whatever it might be. But if you hold onto the idea of good enough, the right Saeb Reuss you you'll do so much more. You'll be so much more productive. And also you'll be looser with yourself. And it's not my phrase. It's at Donald Whitaker who is a famous like Llamas to specialize in working with mothers and children in the move. Like, a forty in the fifties in the UK, and hey found that a lot of mothers were just really trying to be the perfect, mother know and actually. When when it comes to mothering being perfect can bring up its own problems. It's important for the child to know that you're not perfect. And you're not only presence. And so that the child can have the space to full learn grow. So I love that. And I take that with me into everything. I do good enough that that awful. I think it's great great. So you're all about mindful eating an artful eating is that what you lecture about at the university as well. I didn't think so tell me how this one part of your life is about artful eating. But then you spend a lot of time at the university and doing this kind of thing on another theme. How does that all work that catoon interesting question, actually because you're right? There's a real diplomacy. Two one two. And it basically artfully Shing was born out of my clinic. So I have a psychoanalytic tonight where people come on a couch. I sit behind them they do a lot more speaking than I do on there. It's it's very I would say where I would put like a very privileged space for people to articulate their desire and without somebody else enforcing or imposing some sort of a master position or knowledge like, I I know because I have this training. Now, I don't know only you know, what you want. What you need NYU. Do the things you do the true for any of us. So that's one half. And I lecture in psychoanalysis that extra. Desire addiction, sexuality opiates of different things. An election the canyon psychoanalysis avoidance likely mouth. So that's very academic. But in my clinic every single day people, regardless of their age, regardless of their gender and interesting enough to me, regardless of their size, people would talk about their problematic relationship with food and with their body. So a dissatisfaction with their body. And then also whether they were an honored, actually. Sorry. Just be care, Bruce. I don't mean people with eating disorders efficient. I'm talking about everybody. That's what I thought. Yeah. Yeah. Just to be care there could be thinking 'cause I work with people who are just regular people. But that have some sort of questions about themselves that they're trying to work through. So I just kept hearing it over and over again, I might with sit there in Waco analysis, you say very little because it's about the clients face to speak of myself biting my tongue going don't do that diet. Or, you know, enjoy that cake, if you want that cake gore, but you look great you don't need to worry about your weight here myself, I'm on over time. It kind of grew into a realization that I have something to say about this cartridge based on my own life experience going to boarding school. And seeing a lot of young girls really struggling with their weight in Nevada party to my own experience. When I was studying abroad living with someone who had huge easing issues that than I kind of absorbed without really realizing it ended up actually putting on a lot of weight I south and yet though artfully ding came out of all of that. And so the two things are rather separate actually the clinic my lecturing, and then the book in the course, investment attack to you about our leading because I agree with you. I think it's it's kind of bizarre that we've arrived here in twenty nineteen and we're still like in a quandary about what to put in our bodies. How much? Of it. How do we make these choices? Why do we have this thing called emotional eating? And what can we do about it? I mean, a lot of people are truly lost. So if someone came to you, and they said, look, I'm lost. I just don't know where to start with this whole eating thing. What would you say Karina? I wish I had a simple answer. But I don't and I think that that is I have a very comprehensive answer to that question, which is multi a covers multiple areas that are person fly my biggest complaints. I could you're so right. There's a lot of information there, but the focus is really on the symptom. So the folk not the Coles if someone has a problem Matic relationship with food, whether they're overweight underweight binging nod, eating constantly dieting, you know, very controlled about what they eat constantly measuring their food. It doesn't matter. Everybody's different. But. If you go to nutritionist or a therapist, you wanna lose weight, or or I don't know like him a weightless expert anyone who's wait. If all you're doing is toll campaigns through I'm talking about exercise. You're just focusing on the symptom nothing is gonna change there in that terrain. You have to look at the Kohl's. Why am I over weight? What is the function of this being overweight because it's very simple. We know her to lose weight, eat lack of move more riots at the beginning of my book. I dispell a lot of the midst around kind of I would describe it as a hyper medicalisation of a problem that absolutely mental rice for their the real focus on being biological genetic sugar addiction. You know that the problem is external, but in actual fact, it's it's in our mind, and it's our mind that makes every single decision about what we eat our relationship to food. Not our body. Yes. We have craving. Yes. We are body reacts differently to every piece of food that we eat. But it's the mind that's in charge amid a real push not just with symptoms like wait would in all sorts of different symptoms. There's a push to to kind of take the responsibility off the individual. And what I say to people is it's not that it's your full or that you should feel bad. If you're having stroke a struggling difficult relationship with food. But it's so empowering to know that actually thinks can change a need candy something about it. So I go through the science dispel a lot of minutes. I the most shocking thing again to go back to your question, watch, it a person do the first thing. In fact, if there's only one thing you take anybody, let's today to this podcast. Don't go on a diet at the first thing because the most likely I come from going on a diet is that you are going to put on weight. That's what the stitches. Styx show. So if you're going on a diet with the best one in the world, you're owning focusing on the symptom. You're not changing anything at a deeper level. So no matter what you do. You'll end up after you started. I would agree with that. Yeah. For sure. And I think more and more people are starting to say that now aren't they they are they are. I mean, there's a realization that we've been looking at backwards. So then when I the very comprehensive response that I have to problem. I think already set Bruce definitely done your your background research before we chatted. It's about your quality of life. You know, if you're in a relationship that is making you feel bad if you've terrible work situation. If your home is a mess, and if you've been terrible commute, you don't have enough time for yourself, if you're constantly worrying about money, or if you're not happy with you know, any of the codes that you own so when you get dressed every morning, you feel like crop. You. You are not going to be in a position to tackle. The issue of being unhappy with your rate because watcher doing not a wave everybody different. But this might find a bit bizarre people because of a very strange way of looking at things of looking at things if you've not been countered before, but when you're overweight or under age or have a problematic relationship with food. You can then go this is my dissatisfaction, right? This is my problem, and it it puts the spotlight on the pain that you have some Altana me over but choose to do nothing about as opposed to looking at the context, which he stayed in. You know, I'm not happy with my partner IVA terrible relationship with my mother. I wish I'd studied harder at school to do something different with my life. These are things you are much harder to change on much harder to acknowledge of being pretend to your reason why your defense fund with your life and the way. It is one of the easiest things we can go. This is my dissatisfaction, and I will be happy when right? So what I encourage people to do is just to really look at their quality of life. I start to see what can I change in my life? Not not even looking at food. What can I change in my life, immediately or gently or thoughtfully that will put me in a position where on feeding battery myself first, and then losing weight is a piece of cake. Well, that makes a lotta sense. It really does. I know that you you put on your website rediscover, the magic of eating for pleasure and enjoy a life of balance with the freedom to eat the foods, you want without dieting, how can we make eating a magical experience? So that we have no stress Seraing Ziobro about it. It it it should only be a magical experience. But I don't want to found like this is it's something that's very easy for people to do in everything. I encourage people to do is enjoyable, but there are lot of blocks and entrenched beliefs and historical positions that were carrying lead to a symptom of being overweight or unhappy with food. So if it's like a kind of attacking on all fronts to challenge full of beliefs and behaviors and teach Shane. It's place him behaviors that I do through the courts or through the book. That will help people gradually over time change how they feel about food, but what a waste of time in life, Bruce to be worrying about your body when nurses so many other things that we should be worrying about or considering and food is a magical implausible resource that we should enjoy every time or sitting down to eat. It's oppose. It's a moment to be mindful to be presence pinching joy, though, for me food is a real treat on it's not about. Focusing too much on watch each it's much more by focusing on. Why you eat on my hungry? You mentioned already are emotional eating learning. How to listen to your body recognize on my home green? What am I hungry for following the signals of your body if you're hungry for something? He's hit on enjoy. It. Don't eat anything. You're not gonna enjoy. There's no point wait and find something that you will enjoy and though so what you eat. And then also Hal eat though, that thing of setting the table, you know, putting some flowers are lighting a candle making the food look nice having nine cut region. You know, there should be a ceremony around food. We've completely disconnected connected with where food comes from. We completing undervalue the resources required to create the food known terms of environmental. And I'm we don't respect the nursing to nutrients in the food. I think when we start to reconnect with all of those things. And enjoy the food, and when we privileged quality over quantity that starts to happen. Anyway, through tasting thing, make tastes better and the more flavors of the food guide, the less you eat because you're savoring more you're appreciating it when you're privileging quality. Also you buy 'cause it's more expensive, you waste less. And yet it got more substance to it. So it's hard to eat as much. What have you learned about mindful and artful eating from your two year old and well, very interesting. I think I talk about it in the book and someday she eats around her someday she eats nothing like because she just because she knows intuitively when she's hungry. She's hungry for never forced her to eat. And she's a very she actually just had her checkup to your checkup last week. And she's a happy healthy Giles that great weight. Even though I'm never worried about her eating. She. Eats what she liked 'em when she likes and children in eighteen know, what they're lacking in what they need though, they'll go for fading meet Phil gopher after it needed. Or if they need through vegetables, they'll do too. So I'm so interested in your answer. Because I I go into school sometimes than I do mindfulness work in schools and sometimes I'm in kindergarten room. And and they'll have a snack time are lunchtime. And I noticed that the big trend seems to be the teacher or the supervisor going around and saying no you can't eat that. I you have to eat this first. And no, no, you can't eat this all you have to eat it, all and all of these kinds of things. And I always keep thinking let them eat what they want to eat. You know, like because you're making eating a big stressful deal when it shouldn't be that at all. Do you agree? You're so riper, and you're already discerning, good foods and badges. Yes. So we had a birthday party. My daughter's name is Claudia we'd a birthday party on Saturday. So on the table I had like like cocktails dick with fruit, you know, like little like kebabs, and I have of fruit and I had like top corn. And there was no fizzy drinks to be fair of sparkling water for the kids and normal water with like Minton or engine it or whatever, but barking city during aren't crate all aside from that there was chocolate and their cake. And there was and it was all just on the table. I was watching the kids we're going for the fruit on the chocolate amnesty weeds. It wasn't just the sugar in the suite on. I think in Arlon were really great about recognizing that food does not need to be problem at ties. You know, you shouldn't saying, no sweets. No chocolate. That's bad. It's let the mounted and they'll regulate themselves Mets exacting how I approach it. I love my chocolate. I love, you know, sweet treats in case, I've a big feet tooth, but it's not forbidden along the good quality. Then there's nothing wrong with it on your body knows what you need. But there's a making it found a little bit easy. It's not I want your listeners to know. It's not because what you just described there with kids in school today is a lifetime of negative training around foods that we have to relearn, but the whole process with artfully ding learning how to change your relationship to food, but also to your body that were so negative about our bodies employees. It's argument or strange if someone fans really like my hips, or I really like this part of my, you know, we're so so trained to to be negative about our appearance on when we when we shift that lens and start to look at the things we like about ourselves when it's just Joyce, right? We can choose to look at the things we don't we can choose to really give energy and attention to the things that eat do like. And then we feel better in herself a feel better in ourselves. We're not reaching for the sugary foods or the fatty foods to make feel 'cause we're already good. I so agree with you. I think that's great. And I think that the name of your work artful eating is fantastic. Because I I think that makes it sound playful and fun, and and we don't have enough art artistic qualities in our life. These days, I think I think we think everything has to be serious. Everything has to be, you know, this straightforward serious thing where you know. No, do things paint do music and do all kinds of things that like like that and food should be one of it should be part of that. And I absolutely agree. I think it's great to play with food. My daughter plays with her food. You know, I'm here by people don't pay with food of pay with food. She's. Merriment, you know, if there's ever sold on the paint. She painting actually with is on the plane mccheese to let her added food should be it should be enjoyable time of the day for kids, but also for adults, and it is possible to change of worked with so many people on my book the best seller here in Orland. It was it, you know, a lot of people read it on it re just so so many people press the reset Fulton and say, you know, what I've spent X amount of years feeling dissatisfied with my body. Feeding unhappy with the various aspects of my life. Now, I'm gonna think, you know, get a divorce and move state. Evaluate your life. She'll start to ask the question. What do I want? You know, if I could, you know, wave a magic long, what would my life really look like. And I think what you'll find what a lot of listeners will find it. It's not that you want a completely different life. If that there are small changes that you can make in your life day to day making your bed doing meditation. Spending more time with friends being playful and creative, you know in incorporating art into your life in some way. Whether it's going to concerts, or whether it's doing something creative yourself. There are small changes that we can make day to day. But only if we rethink about being more intentional considered at the life living for being proactive rather than allowing life to happen to us totally agree while your book, artfully ding, the psychology of lasting weight loss is a great book. So mindful tribe, get your hands on this book. And of course, go to artful dash eating dot com. And you can find much more about Karina artful dash eating dot com cream as we move toward the end of the interview, I want to ask you five quick answer questions. So the first one is this who is a person in your life that is influenced mindfulness for you. The my friend Libya, she's a friend in a colleague her name is via FOX, she's a psychoanalyst. And she did of course in mindfulness a couple of years ago in Oxford in the UK. I'm I'm prior to that I had I had some like very limiting both about mindfulness like unrealistic. You know, we have this unconscious. That's always informing what we say in do have anyone with my Vilnis, and she came back from this week long training and. Just her position in the world had fundamentally shifted from this training. Now, she goes back every year until this training because she recognizes it Sam, it's it's a lifelong learning, but just holding onto this idea of being present in the moment, am I love that. So my she her. I love the the two how has mindfulness affected your emotions. And I think the awareness just being aware. And when you're more present in your self. You're more aware when you're being crabby in difficult, which we all can be at times. But also, you're also more aware of what someone else stuff sometimes we can really get drawn into somebody else's bad, mood or negatively or drama or issue on. But when you're being much more mindful about your life. You're much kind pined to be drawn into unincorporated. Thera shoes struggles, totally agree. How is breathing a part of your life? Tell us a vote the meditate. Yeah, breathing. I find that when you're meditating NET that in the morning, you are just pin netting. What your breath, and that absolutely helps I'm sure you know, this. Well, it helps with connecting with your being being private in your body. It's it's my way into meditating whenever I find myself completely frazzled or stressed to bring back to breathing. Three deep breaths, breathing in one two three an outlet to three chest centers. You and helps you get act of presence. Totally agree. Your book artful eating is fantastic. Corinna Bundu him any other books. You would recommend that are related to mindfulness or even related to food G. Now, there's a book I love that I often recommend. I mean, maybe it's one your listeners have already come across a very famous book. But if the seven spiritual lows of six by depiction pro. Oh here. Now, it's a terrific book isn't a terroristic book the first the first Lowell chirp temps geology. I think he's ready token about presence being in the moment. Silence. Down this now more than ever we need to respect and cherish silence. Because we're constantly plugged in. We're constantly turned on. And we're constantly being interrupted. You know, the phone is always paying with emails are what messages or Facebook or whenever it is. So to now more than ever. And I think it's probably quite annulled book. I think he wrote it before the internet was what it is. Now. But just to hold onto that idea of stillness. Silence to great book. Marie interesting reet. Yes, it is. I think we spend too much time. Avoiding silence. For sure. Well, let me see can you share an app are there any apps at all that you would recommend or maybe your clients use that can either help them with mindfulness or with eating. I love your answer. No, I actually I would encourage people to we don't need to outsource ourselves. We don't need to is worth our bodies. We don't need some sort of apt to tell us when to meditate or to guide through meditation or some accounts Hammy stacks. We've taken or you know, how many calories even jested, you know, we're getting far too obsessed with Externalizing are subjectively. I'm we're we're getting far too lazy on relying far too much on this simple hack or easy solution. And then we feel like competing under failures because we don't maintain the thing habit. It's about habit decide what do I want the intentional by July unformed, healthy habits? You know, it's hard work guys. I've said that the holy through stands reading, and it is everything I encourage people to do with enjoyable, but we need to be. We need to take responsibility back now. That's what I would. I totally agree. And I think it's I think it's so cool that you're so emphatic about that. No, no, no. We don't eat enough because I was actually going to eliminate that question and not ask it on my shows anymore. And then it was funny because then one of my listeners reached out and she said, oh, I love that you ask that question. Because I I just love hearing about the apps, and I thought, well, you know, people are finding value in it. But I'm more on your playing field. You know, like, no we use too many apps. We use our phones too much in our devices too much. Just get rid of them sit down close your eyes and give yourself some quiet time. Yeah. Yeah. I make your pink and it back the bails or the fins or you know, your kid find project. That's okay tube. Absolutely in silent on your client is coming to mind who been feeding very low. Depressed for a long time. And and she was using an app each day to to just input in out of ten. How does she feeling what was her mood, and she did it at the same time every day? She found that she was looking at the app to kind of tell her have she should feel or that. This was kind of informing her overwhelming sense of who she wasn't how she was my said fees just stop using the app. Rid of it found it just very liberating to just step back from that. So I think we're we're getting far too caught up in an end. It's geno. What brazen? I'm crying sidetracking annoying wrapping up with chew with food. Like people are always saying. This convenient food or here's a great recipe or hero, these nutritious and delicious recipes it outsourcing things what you found sees. There's nothing like a tomato with some olive oil unfold on crusty bread. You're not gonna read that in a cookbook, right? Leave the it's too or just crying some fish with sleep the laminates boiled potatoes with with Minton real butter like that's going to be an cookbook because it's too easy. We're constantly looking outside for some solution. Look within guys, right? Right. And that's why go in the grocery store and everything is in the boxes. You know? Everything's in a box. And it's because that's how people are making money, but putting some product in a box, and we have to realize. Thank you. Don't get me start because it's true. You know, we go home from the grocery store with all these boxes of things in packages. Raise in pretty pictures on the outside, and it's just sad. It's just out massive over-complication in there's a capitalist and motivation for all of that really simplify simplify simplify totally agree create. It's so much fun to have been talking with you. I love your energy. I love your your life outlook. It's just so much fun. Thank you so much for being on mindfulness mode. Thank you. My pleasure. All the best to you by now. Right. Thanks so much for joining us today on mindfulness mode for show notes for every episode checkout mindfulness mode dot com and type the guest's name or the episode number into the search bar. You can also go mindfulness mode dot com slash whatever episode number. You like if you've enjoyed this podcast, you could help us out by subscribing to mindfulness mode. Wherever you listen, whether it's on I tunes or Stitcher Google play Spotify, so many places you can hear mindfulness mode, so hit subscribe and share because that truly helps our show and remember what I mentioned at the top of the show this sleep naturally guided meditation that I have for you just for mindful tribe members. It's to help you receive the deep easy sleep that you deserve sleep. Naturally, and you'll be able to fall asleep easily get more work done tomorrow and feel better about it. Rest comfortably without effort. Go to mindfulness mode dot com slash sleep for your free. Download so remember subscribing and sharing helps keep mindfulness mode on the air till next time mindful tribe us what we've learned today to reach new heights of calm, focus and happiness, stay in the mode.

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Scouting Radio with Justin Dawson May 2019

Scouting Radio on Demand

1:13:50 hr | 1 year ago

Scouting Radio with Justin Dawson May 2019

"The. Empathy. Though everybody has everybody doing today. It's just Dawson this case you live from Dublin Ireland. Starting off the show with the comp far blues. This song, absolutely ages guys. We like to get in contact with the program, you can do so by emailing me. The music in the back of that can Email me Stu mayo dot com. Dot is our emails. You can tweet me sketching radio. Or you can visit us on our website. It'll be it'll be w dot skating. Radio dot com. And if you missed the programs he can always listen back to the programs by going on our website, WWW, ducks Gatien made the dot com or you can go on demand dot scaping radio dot net. If you want to tune in get any of our programs. Downloadable. And to your device, whether it be Android. Whether it be apple we have all the order of problems. Also, you can visit WWW dot YouTube dot com for South Sea four Slaski. She may do and you can guess all the details their IT. We have jingle for this radio. Employees bug faced come forward slash scouting radio YouTube YouTube toe come forward slash c four slash scouting radio studios or as a podcast search scouting radio and you'll favorite app still. Well, hope everyone doing. I haven't been on air in so so long listeners because of being a lot of teams. That's what went on personally in the past two months, you might have seen this in one of the quick bills that I put up on Twitter on Facebook on our schedule your Facebook page, but we are in the campaign to the world scout. Jamboree really is. Like at the summer's here is being twenty. Eighty degrees in Arlon for like the whole day really looking forward to having our reporters, and you have to look for reporters, and they will be wearing the schedule decker, which just reminds me. I put on Hellum. I note to self listeners, I gotta tear actually Bates as soon as I stand up from Ed, this government Necker, it's a better put this up to say, alot table. So if you have contact with the just Dawson, you can Email me studio at Scana mater dot com. Econ can tweet me sketching me do also on Facebook, Facebook dot com. Ports Skyping, male, and if you've got a comment there, we're gonna put it up on our live stream as well here in the Dublin iron at studios. So, yeah, so much has happened. Then the great news is Skyping Orland decides to give me one of these let me hold up clear, the screen, they're cheapskates commend Dacian of mayor for ask tomato backed apparently this nurse. Some of the listener some Kanda nomination before this, which was fantastic, and then got warded, if by the chiefs case in recognition of mercy Mets can't say the word service disguising really pleased without that's gonna go on the wall. I think so I don't know. Let me know where to put it up on the wall, and really pleased with and similar to the mental of merit in and another Skype associations Levy peace with us. And so, what are we going to be talking in the program? Well, of course if you want to get your house on the scouting radio world scotch number eve, on holding up to the cameras. Well, there's only a couple of these left guys, he really wants to get on board and start ordering these all the proceeds going to scaping mater, we're going to actually do and know the batch of these at the twenty four world's number. If you can see right up there on HOGAN, closer. That. That's the official world. Skype Tom breed, only available on skating NATO. We want to buy them, and our Thais to green about just for supplying with Bart. If you wanna guess you go onto our website, WWW schedule dot com. Also valuable in our Facebook store to buy it, there as well. So we're gonna be talking, but that was going to be talking base, having enough to clean up for the world, Scott Jabri also, we're going to try this question. This is beginning question to show how many groups give family, welcome kits when escapes joins than the Greek fresh, whether it be cups guy. Beaver skies cups gaze escapes. What do you give the parents of an information booklet our, as part of the welcome cash, when as a new member joins to clip love to hear that your toss enough Sanderson emails to get major dot com? You can't Facebook Facebook dot com slash sketching radio, and you can tweet us scouting does. Well, it's just an awesome. This live from Dublin Ireland, this is Skyping radio. Ten. Scouting radio. On your. The. Ps. MP's. Trusting men. Hulas there. Doc young. Donald. Tiny. Threes. Gaza. The voice therapy polluting. Me, nick. Betty ended on can also beat them quarter. Transatlantic five dollars. Tackle auto cashier Colonel loro. This wasn't mall. Wasn't can see say, John, we've, I give on your thirsty, this iguana batted. Mondo yawkey. Maybe. Followers WWW dot Facebook dot com slash scouting radio. Yes, it's just Dawson. It is Skyping radio. Live from Dublin Ireland, you can live on Facebook dot com for slash sketching radio also on YouTube. If you miss one of our program, so you can listen back as a podcast by visiting on demand dot sketching dark Nash or all the details on our fischel website, WWW dot skating, radio dot com. Now do send us in. Tom comes. I'm let us know where you're listening in from, and we asked the question, how many groups, give families welcome kits and watch being -cluded in the welcome case. Well, I always think first of all, you should have a charter, and I don't mean I know that some. Scoops allowed use to decide their charter. I'm Jeter stood swing for the listener. It's been for that. But I also think the charter should be made clear with the parents are the this is the scope creep. This is what's expected of uniform wash is worn on a weekly basis. This is what the commitment is of the parrot, like I really want to drill down the, the commitment of the parents. I always think that if you are at the parent commission to bring your scopes to equiped you have to get involved in some fundraising. I'm all right. Then let me know what you think. And because. The bone tears are the leaders. They're taking your son or daughter away, on camp on hikes or whatever. So they don't have the time to also do fundraising. As well. I think the parents should have parental committee is doing the fundraising. If you have any comes like this, let me know studio at scouting dot com. Dot is our Email address, love to hear from you. Are hug cats that try to talk scouting. There is scouting radio live twenty four seven three sixty five to thirty million scouts worldwide. This is interactive internet radio for the scouting and guiding movement scouting radio, which is all media awards, finalist, two thousand seven. Two. Leykis followers WWW dot Facebook dot com slash scouting radio. Three. This. Haven't played up song they just listeners. Level down inside my soul. It's kind of just Dawson live from Dublin Ireland where live on Facebook, Facebook dot com slash radio. We're live on YouTube. To get us there. If you missed the show you watch back to the show. Or you can't tell the pub car and just visit www. Sketching may do dot com. All w stocks calculated dot com, and you can node whether it be to your apple, I part or whether Pete, the iphone or if you have an Android device, you can do there's well, it's start simple scouting radio employees I come forward slash scouting radio YouTube, YouTube com forceless C at four slash scouting radio studios or as podcasts scouting radio favorite app store. Yes. Thank you for tuning in, and I love when people are sending me personal comments. Say just great to see you back in the Dublin. Ireland shooters have been absent for quite some time. But we are really ramping up towards the world sky. Jamboree. In the summer of twenty nine thousand nine we have Ed Evans. We have scars we have everybody, I think ten twelve different reporters that's going to be on the ground WorldCom breed, are you attending that snow's to dot com is our Email dress. People are asking me to hold up the dodge again that you can get yet. They twenty four th world jamboree Scott dot com. These are only available through scaping radio. You won't find the money where else to not lie and get the matter jamboree Easter very hard to come by yet. You have to buy them in advance. All proceeds going to keeping scares me live at kicking because our station is purely by volunteers, and our volunteer reporters will be at the world scout. Jamboree size and our thanks to Karuna badgers, who sponsored St. sponsor. Stay are really awesome. If you see some of our team with the schedule Necker, maybe go up to the monastic can you get them? We might have a small supply at the jamboree not going to have forty thousand of them, though. I'm fade. So if you wanted to get them, get them into pants to be w w dot scheduling dot com. For more information. Hey, we were asking the question. How many SCO coops get families welcome kits and I'm sort of linking in with had to go engaging parents in your meetings. Now, okay. We have the debate before listeners boat, helicopter, parents are this jolly, Johnny little Jill under just, I, please leave us to be the skate leader to the program. You don't have to watch every movement, but. Other times where you say, we need to get you involved to help with fundraising, so how do you go guessing? Parents involved or even learning, what is this -cation program, and then hopefully groping not leader while you ask, whether it be barbecue to, to father sewn mother door for family camps. I say the more publicity correct? Slow into pot on now. Do you found Mecom swear? You invite the parents along, and maybe have an overnight and get them to experience. What did you do days where invite the parents along and let them play with the titties? Let us know Stewart's gonna dot com is our Email address love to hear from you today. Switch votes Cajun radio. Well. Two. Leykis followers WWW dot Facebook dot com slash scouting radio. Is followers WWW dot Facebook dot com slash scouting radio. You can also point on YouTube online, too. Sketching radio dot com. It's just endorsing with you. Hello to Simon troop faces when dusty Adrian start when the air. I guess is comedy. However, was take my finger out at the screen there. Yeah. Early. Thank you time. Suddenly, you're listening in from my love to hear where you're lifting from silence. And message on screen there. Hello gone. You know you want it. Yes, yes, yes. I do. Just does skating vigil live from Dublin Ireland where talking everything's coaching. And if you have questions or only top start you like us to cover. Please get in contact with a stubby. It'll be w sketching radio dot com. Thomas listening in Glasgow. Thank you for tuning in from, from Gasco. They're signing. You know, I love my air guitar look my Troms. Well. So question, did come in earlier on is due only to use part for the parents to sign that children in an ace and not even the technical listeners, you know, when even having into a hall meetings, and all of a sudden that tweet meetings over. All the skates, all the call just tons in puff of air undertaking. I hope they were collected by the right parents. Or if you're on a hike, the same things happen. So how do you deal with us situation where you get to the end of the hike, the load of cars in the car park? Hoping to cope or the sky is leaving to the car, have you because sometimes especially with younger Skype find. They just run off to that parents, the car. Look at you might get a tank or a good ball, dribble, SCO help they got into the car. Sometimes parents carpal. So let me know what do you do? I'm getting some competent hero, ready. Alan says we have electric tides which parents are given investiture. So when they walked to the entry door electrically registered on our central files, and simply, if they leave with parent earlier, they leave this completes the health safety assessments. That's pretty cool, too. But where do you go about getting these tides Allen? And how much do they cost that system science, expensive or an ipod to, to sign scouts in our or do you just use simple paper for mash and apparent Haas to sign their Sono daughter in eighth of escaped meeting, let us know what you think? Studio made dot com dot is our Email address. You can visitors are to be taught sketching dot com, and you can send a message to a stare or you also. Tweet us schedule. Or on Facebook, Facebook dot com. Slot schedule. Love, if you just hope to comes there will put them up onscreen as well to show it's just in Dawson on scouting radio. Just Dawson with you. We love to hear your about what do you do two guards to. To getting scouts signed in an eight we had the kid years ago who didn't turn to pick up their large. So we drove him home to find parents had moved over the weekend. It was supposed to be a big surprise for other was for us to, to. That's terrifying. We had a kid didn't turn up to pick up their large. So we drove from home to find parenthood moved over the weekend. Is scary? I felt situations where. Let's call a friend and was doing a chunk hike. And we I sat for all the patrols into different time zones of when they were taking off. I'm honest to lose the whole group while because all the hope one patrol started off, then that fifteen minutes, another patrol started off and went on hike. And where do they all end up the nearest petrol station buying sweets are kitchen office, nurse started sweep views scouting radio on his face folk talk forward slash scouting radio Kyushu, but YouTube dot com for slash say at four slash scouting radio studios for podcasts scouting radio and your favorite app store. Here's Paula rock. Joe's. Try. Tracks. Scratchy. Good. The scouting movement is listening. Unload, the twenty four world scout jamboree with forty Facebook live and YouTube. I only scouting radio, we are painting to the world scape jamboree it's going to be massive. We have ten of twelve reports on the grand after world scape jamboree. We're going to be ramping up the programs really up on till the world sky Chambery, and you can hear it all here on scouting radio. Don't my queens aware by navigating unfamiliar territory to the nearest pulps lunch and dinner. Well, we won't leave at the pope's there Simon, and we I've had situations where I've been on challenge hikes. And when I was a Rover scout aren't well still morose. Where we just saw it will not get past the nearest. The nearest place that sold apple tart in the mornings, sometimes participation by clumps, but. When the challenge hike is in your country. It's great because he got to start to know the nearest and how can I put the nearest drivers dot drive tour buses that might give you little bit of helping heart of the wrote to the nearest spot. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. We've done. Don't toy that at home children. Don't know. If you're now it's different L in your twenty to walk twenty twenty five kilometers day. Maybe a bus driver has Spacey in the back of his boss to help you up that biff further the way on the tour, especially when you were going along the salary cap in in. No never not knowing never to. I take my way awards to be taken away from me. A new day, Johnny, Johnny radio. And you. God by. Off. Purse. God. Comes. God of my mom. Does. Skating. Hello, Glenn Webster. Thanks for tuning in. Hello. Steven me. Jason away with. Stephen stay. The com- teeth in castle. Sanderson his schedule, Joe, thanks for tuning in there, guys. Busy. We can cuss onison next week as Dom looked to be going up to castle John again. But I'm a busy man on the Jim Bank called. But hope it all goes well castle, John. Well, don't all volunteers up there council Saunderson my probably my favorite comps in Arlington to because I love all the team up in caps on Sunday. Great of guys and girls, I should take out girls. Would Partick's there? And people are saying hold up. Okay. Okay. They teach combination of mash, loved us. Thank you to all those who nominated me for for dot com Dacian of marriage from the chiefs guy. Four schedule NATO. It's it was printed, actually, was an Canadian and listener dot nomination at intercession are fantastic. I really really appreciate. It's really cool. View scouting radio on his face folk talk come forward slash scouting radio YouTube YouTube dot com for slash c four slash scouting radio studios for podcasts scouting radio and your favorite app store. The ways you can find those out. Of course, what is coming up in the summer. The scouting movement is listening on the twenty fourth world scout jamboree with forty Facebook live and youtuber only scouting radio. Oh, yes. Indeed. We are covering the world's Gautam Marie this third world scout jamboree that we're covering today, Rato crazy. We covered to pan we covert talk. Well, actually hold them. We covered to your radio. We've covered the tates. Two thousand seven leave covered Japan we cover tweeden this year round goats. It's america. While America with Mexico and Canada water, Tom Brady to be we have loads of reporters on the ground to world's guy Chambi. You can shoot in also view it because we have people on the ground, it's going to be doing Loy for shit. Stop on our Facebook page Facebook dot com for its scheduling lake or subscribe to stare YouTube, as well, if you miss on any of our programs, and if you want to listen to the audio podcast, you can do so there. WWW dot sketching, Rato dot com. I stole the idea by one of my friends at big man in the world podcast, and I would just have brilliant topic to cover. It's called confessions of the state leader. Compassion skate leader. What are you willing to confess and funny? It's communion time here in Arlon, load of the local chapels are doing their first communion with little boys and girls here. Of course, your first confession. Right. Well, we're going to bring out of stars start here listeners confessions of escape leader. What you like to confess. I'm not a priest and I'm not going to tell you, you are forgiven for anything that you want to live there. And we've changed names if we have to I have to confess. Yes, I have fires with foreign lectures at comparable course. When and you have thirty scouts that you want to feed whatever like stuff. Okay. Okay. Okay. On plant miss. Okay. Now's your turn. Let us know Stewart's cutting dot com. Email address, you can tweet me ask eighteen major. And you can send me a comment on, we put it up on screen facebooKcom Ford slash sketching. Oh. Let me know wash you ought to admit confessions of escape leader. Let's hear them. Surrounded by Dr. Around. Beautiful life. Time. Grants. Sky, your favorite color. Yes. If you're an independent on you'd like to get your song on schedule. Don't willing to share your music with us. You can do so by sentence to Email to studio, Skyping dot com will include it in our library. So or you can visit our website, WWW Skyping, radio dot com. The scouting movement is listening twenty four th world scout jamboree. We've live Facebook lakes. I'm YouTube only of sketching radio just around the corner. No confessions over scoped leader. I like this one. I took the clock away and told the clubs are the sleepover dot. At eleven thirty pm, three am and to go back to sleep few days later, the parent Email to say sorry, I kept them lakes. I like that one. Have more here. We have more. Here. I want to underestimate the ability of scope group is working on, on an expedition in Tanzania. Actually they finished a section of. You some power mansions, much earlier than into spatial toy slowly told them that they taught was finished point that was just impact checkpoint. I then gave them the coordinates at sent them on a big loop for base, and not that two hours, so I could finish reading the book taken with me. Nice helping. They wanted to play sleeping lions and having respect work wrong beavers and then be called corporate. Okay. Ichi life. Let's do. That's. Oh, that's been sent in okay? Unin. Invent can we had a of sketching after service cooking for Cope's, the food was so bad? They didn't eat anything when you myself until the leaders organized a wide game where I had to hide didn't hide. I drove to McDonald's for Berber. After confession. Have you ever not confession of the scope leader on skating me, we had to cope being extremely knowing one of the other leader sent him for a long ways. I had waiting for five minutes before sending them back to us. One of the leaders if there was a color preference. This went on for by Turkey Mets until we extremely bored, something else games. They never never grow old compati- of escape leader. Let's hear them. Scouting radio on Facebook com. Forward slash scouting radio YouTube YouTube dot com for slash c four slash scouting radio studios or podcast scouting radio and your favorite app store. Come on the have to be honest, with me, compassionate other skate leader, Jeff speed girl, like you once. The scouting movement is listening, twenty four th world scout jamboree, we live Facebook, Klein, cheaper, only sketching radio. Oh, we're going to be doing low approval. The. Was housing the twenty four world scout. I see what's happening here. Sorry about that guys. I'm getting doubled. Saint. On like just echo. That's fixed we go. That's better. So. Tune in turn the week because we're going to be catching up with Ed and scarred over in West Virginia talking so much better reserve where the world scout jamboree is going to be taking place where gonna be finding the plans are in motion as not long way. If you're going as a contingent we love to hear from you so many people are contacting skies radio saying, have you got access to sketching are Necker. That's going over to the world's numbering forty I don't. But if you wanna get your hands on one of these on hold to scream, then, the oh, fischel world scout jamboree twenty four th world scape. Chambery schedule major dot com. Sponsored by crooner badgers. You can only get them through Scotian radio only get them through skating Rato, so you have to get in contact with cash radio. If you want to get your hand on one of them, the scouting movement is listening, the twenty four th world scout, jamboree face Folklife, and YouTube only on scouting radio. Yes. I was saying we still markets from big mom in the woods podcast. This idea of compati- of escape leader. Decided not to read because they. The fully confessions dot just go. Here's an example. Well, some comp in Wales we took some skates, swimming pill as soon as we got there attacked the main, as we did before he left when missing where's, where's what's his name? I, I won't name leader who who's car should have been. He been in audit comes someone else pump stricken. I realize his left behind. I sent the auto leaders on skates into the pill jumping the car screamed back togue greenfield conversation. I find stunning there at the gate with the power way. Look on his face. This was some sort of the kid, he was where did he go and went to ten foot jumper after I came to? I said, I talked I talked to the skates affects your temper. Yes, we've had those types gates, we've all had those type of skates where they're just away though. View scouting radio Facebook Facebook dot com for slash scouting radio YouTube YouTube for slash c four slash scouting radio studios, or as podcasts scouting radio and your favorite apps. Don't know that. Second place. This rain. Toning down. The town. He is finished. Down. The founding. See. Don't if down. Found. No. Found. You know. The found. Few scouting radio on Facebook Facebook come forward slash scouting radio YouTube YouTube, Tecom four slash c four slash scouting radio studios or as podcast search scouting radio and you'll favorite app store. Our? Phase. Fox myers. Astor's. Six. Can. Three. Nice. Astor close. Have time for listeners. During the we, we gonna be to din by. We're going to be doing skull on all the guys over in America. That's getting ready for the world's sky. Chom breed the twenty four th world scout. Jamboree from the summit Bechtel and. Yeah, you can find. Plans are going. And if you have any questions of what to be expected at the world Skype jamboree might latching on couple of secrets as well. Stay tuned view scouting radio Facebook, Facebook talk Ford slash scouting radio YouTube YouTube Tacoma for slash c four slash scouting radio studios or podcast scouting radio favorite app store over me. Just thank you so much for the welcomes returned. Back to the airwaves here in Dublin Arna, prescription, though, it's being well, since I've been on the air working away behind the scenes. Some family commitments as well have taken pace in the past Malta, too, but really looking forward to get involved with the team for the world scape jamboree don't forget, if you miss any of our programs you can go onto our website, WWW, sketching dot com. Keep the confessions of skate leader coming into our station. You can tweet the main at sketching radio. Or visit us at WWW dot sketching. Rato dot com for me, just Dawson all the team behind the scenes. Thanks for listening by the scouting movement is listening, twenty four th world scout jamboree? We live Facebook live. And you only standing radio.

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Diversity in Tech [2]

Rocketship.fm

26:31 min | 6 months ago

Diversity in Tech [2]

"I. Think this blame on both sides. You look at look at both sides I. Think is blame on both sides, and I have no doubt about it, and you don't have any doubt about it either. So. What a week to be releasing these diversity episodes right. Yeah, it seems like there's just so much going on I honestly in the whole country so I actually. I think US releasing these episodes. I think the timing is perfect. Yeah, yeah, it's It's frustrating to watch. But you know we. We've received a lot of really positive feedback from the first episode. I hope people really enjoy the the second one is well where we talk more about what people are doing to change things inside of their company or in inside of the ecosystem as a whole. Yeah and I mean that's always what I'm interested in understanding is like okay. Yes, here's the situation. But what can we do about it? What are solutions and I definitely don't. Don't claim to have all the answers, but we've talked to some people that have tried some things already. Some of those things are working really well and I. Don't know. I'm pretty encouraged by what we were able to find. Yes, we've got three stories today from stripe from crowd funder, and from Arlan Hamilton backstage capital, so stay tuned. We're going to get right into it. Welcome to Rocketship DOT FM. Rocketship is produced in partnership with product collective where your hosts Michael Sokha and like Belsey up. At Stripe! They realized they had a problem. They realized that their pipeline for new hires wasn't diverse enough, and they're losing out on this whole segment of the talent pool, simply because through their hiring process, there are actually preventing underrepresented segments from getting through Christina Cordova who leads stripes partnerships team. She saw this and she took it on his personal mission to fix it with inside the company so about I would say year and a half ago. I was very passionate about Versi in inclusion internally at Stripe and I actually got the company to launch its first inclusion survey So this was specifically a survey asking for. understanding the representation of various different backgrounds of employees at Stripe so gender race, ethnicity, etcetera, and then also asking questions about on the employees feel in terms of inclusion whether or not they feel like they belong at stripe whether they feel like they're getting resources to make them successful here. When she saw this, she started digging into some of the data, and she found that stripes percentage of underrepresented. Underrepresented candidates was actually lower than the number of underrepresented candidates that were graduating each year from the pools that they were pulling from so even though that it was a smaller percentage of people were graduating was even smaller percentage of people that were reaching stripe. She's figured. Let me start there. Let me start at the recruitment process and see what I can change in that process so that I can increase that number. And so Mike. When was the last time you've submitted a paper resume for a job I. Honestly can't remember. It's probably at least ten years exactly right same here. I don't know if I've ever submitted a paper resume for a job. But this was still the first step for many of these new graduates. They would go to these job. Fairs and Stripe would be there, and they would submit a paper resume to stripe, and there isn't much on that. Resume at this point right there. New College graduates they haven't. They don't have years of work experience, but this is how they would start to filter through their new candidates on ensuring that people from underrepresented backgrounds who are providing a resume are actually. Getting through to strike that the phone screen stage or the onsite interview stage at very similar rate as it was from Georgetown grounds. this paper resume process was flawed from the beginning right one was that it didn't give people equal footing at that point in their life, people already had very different experiences and people that may have been very qualified. They might not come through on paper. You also have issues around their name right from a name you can generally tell. What their their background is, and so this can lead to bias in hiring managers. And so when they started to remove the process, they started to change the process and guess what they did. What happened so offer candidates more passed than just showing us their resume. Who get into the pipeline. For strike, because especially at this stage of the kind of internship program, the likelihood is, is that like most of these candidates don't really have any work, experience or very significant work experience right. So how can we go back to the fundamentals of what really matters in terms of capabilities, which is the ability to code? And Produce Code of of high quality and focused on that interview process. And it! Ended up. Teaching a lot in terms of our broader to be processed as well so the the still did the paper resumes, but they also included actual skill testing, so they made it so that you could go to a computer at the job fair, or you can go home and work on your own computer, and you could fill out these early tests these early coding skills and submit them. Them so that that made a new way for you to get into the pipeline, interesting right and so people that didn't feel comfortable walking up to someone with their resume right. Maybe they felt intimidated, and they didn't look like the other candidates at home they could code and and submit it, and they were judged by the quality of their Code Not by the caliber of their resume. And then we were looking to monitor for bias and inconsistency route every step of the recruiting process, so yeah I, you know. A lot of people discover a company by looking at job descriptions. Career websites those kinds of things, so yeah, we used a text analysis tool to examine the language with our job descriptions to ensure that we were orienting them. Towards a growth mindset rather than A. Fair is one that is super simple, but it made a huge difference in their job posting themselves. They changed it from. We're looking for the best to the perks of the job, so you know we. We want to help you grow right. We want to help you learn in advance in your career. That changed the type of people that applied because the people that were generally identified with with we want the best were generally people from privileged backgrounds who've been told they're the best. People from underrepresented backgrounds didn't have that same confidence. They might not have been coding for as long. They may have had different life experiences. And and so they were less likely to apply to a job that said we want the best versus one that said we want to nurture your career. That is an even though those people actually might have been the best. It's like if you don't have the person telling you, you're the best all the time like maybe those from more privileged backgrounds like you just might not have that confidence, even if you still perform everybody else exactly right, so y you know you changed the verbiage in the job interview, and then you change the tests that they're able to take to prove that that they deserve you know this entry level position and all of a sudden. You're able to get a better idea of what people can actually do. And that led to a more diverse. Internship class, and did they like what happened to the pool after that compared to what it was like before right, so they started to see differences. We did significant amount work that actually brought us up to forty one percent of in underrepresented minorities in the class for two thousand seventeen. That's crazy. I mean forty aren't so usually. You hear like Oh and then you know it improved by ten percent the next year, but that's that's four X. Yes, in one year she made. Made some serious headway on this. That's awesome, so that's a that's a good step for stripe. It seems like yes, it's a really good step, but one thing that I would want to point out is that they have in diversified necessarily at the executive and senior management level, and there are studies especially in schools from from when we were at desegregating schools when they started to integrate schools, they would often integrate the children, but they wouldn't integrate the teachers and what studies? Studies found was when a white teacher had an integrated class, they were more likely to promote white children to the honors, the advanced tracks, and this would put them on track to go to college and go to Ivy League, schools, so what this means is, if we're not diversifying our executive teams and our our senior management teams, the new internship class that comes in they may not be promoted to the next level at the same rate as their white counterparts for all of. Of this effort would hate to see that happen right for them to get into stripe and then feel disenfranchised, because no one on the management team necessarily look like them. No, I don't know if that's the case right, but I know in a lot of these tech companies they haven't diversified. The executive is senior management teams, and that's one of the initiatives that I. Think comes next you have to. You have to be working from both sides of the table. Yeah, well. Yeah? It absolutely does make sense and you don't want to. Hurt for as much as stripe as making an awesome step here. You don't want it to end their right. It's like wouldn't those interns they graduate from the internship. Class you on hopefully stripe wants to keep them. You keep promoting them throughout and so if you don't have that happening at the very top. I can understand how things could stall out. So this is a great first step hopefully. It's just the start though of. Rethinking how the entire organization should look out just for stripe just for tech companies in general. Absolutely. We'll be right back after queered from our sponsors now back to the show. You probably heard about the trend that some companies are taking towards salary transparency, which is idea that everybody at the company should know everybody else's salary, and there should be more of the standard structure calculator. However, you want to think of it, but that salary should be something that is pretty much the same for people at specific positions, not varying so. Bright, yes, so for instance. If you work in customer service, you might get a baseline salary of forty thousand plus you earn extra for experience and time spent at the company right so like no more blind negotiations, no more wage bias. Yeah, and so I I had heard about crowd fun doing this, and so I I wrote Steve, McClurg who was their president and asked him if he'd come on and talk to us about what they did, and it was fascinating I actually have the opportunity to address the issue at Croft under itself. Where I did notice a wage disparity when I first joy, we decided that it would be a really good idea to not only implement a programming crowd funder, but distort encouraging companies on our platform, raising capital to also address the gender wage crowd, so that's something that we are actively encouraging, and possibly in the future could make a requirement for raising capital. So try that again. So the first thing he did was analyzes payroll to get a real sense for the level of performance that for each individual compared to wear their pay was. Going into any company there are people that are probably paid. You know people that are overpaid people that have titles than they're real. Experience and performance, and entitles that are lower, and you can kind of imagine this right, so there's like Bob and marketing and he's getting ninety five thousand a year, and seems like it might be a little high, and then you have Suzanne sales. She's making sixty five thousand a year, which is killing it and he probably wants to give her a raise right. But how do we do this fairly? And that was that was what he wanted to take on, so was i. what did he find like? Was it so all over the place? Was it was? was seeing any sort of like common patterns. Yes, so the common trend was that males were earning more and sometimes significantly more, and that females were being underpaid. What he did was he took a couple of Munson. He he watched however working and how they were able to perform, and then he also took a look at each position, and started to lay out that calculator right, so we started to put some baseline salaries, and we found was that women were often under the even the baseline that he had set for that position, and that there was a lot of men who were significantly over there was different reasons why, but they were often overpaid in his perception, they were under delivering. So he's basically proving out what pretty much. Every woman has been screaming the entire time and US guys. We might not have gotten it through our heads in this. Is Proof right here? Yeah, yeah, exactly and he just he's like Ugh. I just took over as president. I'm GONNA fix this. Of the women on the team pay raises. Because, they were underpaid You know by the by the standards that we were. Putting forward. But the pushback. Came from the team that either got salary reductions or or did not raise because they felt like they deserved raises, too. So. It was pretty. Evenly split about fifty percent didn't care twenty five percent. We're very happy and twenty five percents, a little disappointed, and so what I mean once they instituted this now. There is a salary transparency. How have things Ben for them I did he talked about that at all? Not only the teams attitude improve right and and kind of the culture. Improving the company word got out that they were one of the companies in La. Who paid women fairly so now when they put out job postings, they get get disproportionate amount of female applicants. And this is because people are very excited to work there and. This blew him away in and so now they're engineering team. which engineering teams are notoriously just mail it sixty percent female right now that that's incredible. And so what he found was because they're getting more diverse candidates. They're getting better candidates and he has a better hiring pool to pull from. It's not just. WHITE MALES RIGHT HE'S GETTING He's getting underrepresented candidates getting women and they're all coming him because they're excited to work there because they know they're going to get fair pay and they're not going to have to negotiate. For the salary that they deserve. This is going to be a little bit more anecdotal, but there were two women on the team very specifically that when they got raises, they were pretty significant and and to get them. You know level to were. They're true. Experience performance was. And in the comments from from these two women was. Look if you think I worked hard before. I really appreciate this and I'm going to you know, do everything I can for you right also garnered a reputation in the L. A. Tech market that. We pay women equally to men. In what that did was. Never a big proponent of just going out and hiring somebody because they are a woman, they are person of colored, but I do believe in casting the net very widely and hiring the best possible person, but what that enabled us to do was cast a very wide net. And we had a lot of applicants, it came and we had open positions that were female. So casting a wider net allowed us to build a a great diversified tee. We'll be right back with our story about Arlan Hamilton the backstage capital team rafter quick word from our sponsors. So finally we talked to Arlan Hamilton. One of the most unlikely venture capitalists around today she took the initiative to bring venture capital, two underrepresented founders who traditionally have had trouble raising money from established institutions. There's one problem when she set out to do this. She didn't have enough money to be a VC on her own. And she had no experience working in venture capital. My past work has included publishing a print magazine. working on tour. With everyone from you know garage band from Norway to Toni, Braxton Jason Derulo in stadiums so. That's kind of. Tiny part of my background. Also for a long time. A few years ran a website called your daily lesbian moment, which was a? Fifty thousand. Women. say gave women and gay adjacent. Women. Would would read it every month and it was just. It was kind of a main Gig for a few years. Really loved it and then. Okay. So. How did she get past that and actually get her sir? I thought you might ask. In Two thousand twelve, she became fascinated with startup culture, and she saw some of the celebrities that she was working with and their managers they were. Investing in startups and she was like. Why are they investing these three to four person companies? And she began researching it. Yeah, that's that's awesome at. She is researching what she find. Yes, so what she found was. It was really hard for people of Color and women to raise money. When I started reaching out to companies and investors and getting into the mix of things, assist remotely working with different companies to connect them I started noticing really really quickly that there is a disparity in the funding and at the same time there is a lot of. Writings articles that were being done starting around that same time like two thousand thirteen as when it started seeing a lot of these articles about. A conscious unconscious bias and she found that like eight percent of funding goes to women and people of Color. And this was her whole like she ran a lesbian blog, right? She's a black woman. This was this was her identity. Here and I think it really moved her right that like someone needs to fix this. And maybe it's just gonNA. Be Me. That's awesome, and that is such the. Mindset writes some people might see that kind of data and be like. All right well I guess. This isn't going to work out because you know. The odds would be against me, but obviously that's not. Arlen did obviously Harlem went on to bigger things so. Happen yes, so she hit the road and she found essentially all the the venture capitalist. That would listen to her. And she she brought them her case right, so she said I. WanNa Start a fund. I want to invest in underrepresented minorities. I want to invest in women. That's all I'M GONNA. Do Right so any money that you invest in me that this is where flirting in this, so a lot of times the found the investors in our fund. If you look at the list, it's not so much me convincing them of something. It's that they already had. Had figured this out and said that perhaps they weren't the best person to go out and try to do this brick by brick, but if they could back someone else who was already doing it, then that could be their their resistance and there you know pc found a lot of women VC's became her initial LP's. And then she brought in some some heavy hitters like Chris. Sacca Anderson. Horovitz people like Mark Andreessen and Chris Sacca. Who are billionaires who they're going to be okay right? I think that they're. Just really smart when they look at it like okay so. Are you know some of you're mentioning Jason Chris like. Day pretty much can invest in whatever they want invested their these like celebrity investors now this point UAE. Why did they feel like? They wanted to invest in Arlon like why why her? Yes, I think it was that they understood the problem right, so they understood that. Yeah, they could probably get a deal with anyone but not everyone was. was showing up in their pipeline. Be just like hiring at facebook, right or or stripe? Their pipeline was had bias in it, too, and so to get to mark Andriessen. You need to go through his people, and so his people have the same biases that a hiring manager facebook has and so he found that I'm not going to be in the same room as arlene is going to be. Be? Arlen is going to be able to get in rooms that I am not going to end up in and so by putting my money with her I can make the same bat as investing in minorities or women founded companies, but she's GonNa do a better than me because she's going to have access to more people and so that's what really excited them about her. Yeah, so it sounds like. Like I mean this isn't something that is completely altruistic. It sounds like the they're realizing. This is good for business. It's like if we can invest in other people as a fund that are going to go out and find entrepreneurs that we might not be able to find. They could get in on these deals that they can't get in on like a good business. Move for them, it sound. It's good in that. It's the right thing to do right like someone needs to do this and they saw like. Yes, she's the one that do it, but yeah. No, it makes business sense to. She's like she says like she's not in in venture. Capital to hand handout checks right. She's only invest in the top three percent of the people that come through her door and she's. She's just as picky because she's spending other people's money, but with that she's she's still on a mission to bring funding to people who aren't going to make it into Marc Andreessen pipeline. Harsh critic I am very. My standards are super high because I'm investing other people's money. This is charity. This isn't my angel money. So I have to say, are you? The three are part of the three percent invested in so. It's not just like. I'll Koumba. Hanging holding, but it's it's at least take away a few things that they would in other cases perhaps after think about, and that's why they're just needs to be more women. With the ability to write checks. Funds, in general, it's not just me. I don't have any secret sauce you know it needs to be. A better reflection of what's truly out there and I think. The better that gets, you know. Over time, the better investment choices will be made. And it'll it'll trickle down. In so arlen just emailed us this article in Forbes where they announced that they just invested in their fiftieth company, and guess what percentage is led by a white male. Well. If it's like, most funds would be like overwhelming, it'd be like eighty percent, but I feel like that's not the case here. No right so just two percent of the companies or literally one out of the fifty. Is led by by a white male, so we have covered a lot over these past two episodes. At least I hope we have the part that I find inspiring is that there are ideas coming to table, and then there's there's actually data supporting the fact that we're moving in the right direction when when we try to right, yeah I. I know for for me personally. I was excited about this. These this two part series that were doing. Because I I think it's a topic that we all should be talking about. Sometimes, again as a white man, there might not be a lot of white males talking about this this topic, but the other thing is. There are solutions to this writes a lot of the interviews that we conducted with folks and we're hearing about companies trying different things. They're realizing that they have a problem. They're realizing that maybe the things that they've been doing aren't working. They're not leading to results that they're happy with when it comes diversity inclusion, but they're trying different things, and some of those things are actually working in. Maybe other companies can start to take notice of this. And maybe those fifty companies that Arlen invested. Maybe they can be the next generation I. If I'm going to bet on anybody making that difference Arlen in her team. Would place about there for sure. Thank you so much for listening to rocketship DOT FM. It's your support keeps the show going rockets dot. FM is now part of the. Network you. WanNa learn more about the other shows on the podcast network Goto, the hot golomb dot. COM ROCKETSHIP DOT FM is produced in partnership with product collective the community for product people. If you go to product collective dot com, you could check out live video interviews. Sign up for our newsletter. Be a part of our group over six thousand products. People just check it out product collective DOT COM.

Arlen Stripe US executive president Arlan Hamilton facebook Michael Sokha Versi Christina Cordova Jason Chris Ivy League La Bob Mike Georgetown A. Fair Arlon Arlan Hamilton
235: Dual Factor Infertility [SUCCESS]

Beat Infertility

48:35 min | 6 months ago

235: Dual Factor Infertility [SUCCESS]

"Welcome to be infertility a podcast where we get real about infertility empowered you to take back control and provide you with hope for the future ready. Here's your host fellow infertility warrior Heather whom in. Welcome to episode two thirty five today you'll hear the success story of a woman named Dahlia. She is thirty-three-year-old financial analyst who enjoys working out traveling and spending time with family. Dalia got pregnant the first cycle trying to conceive. Unfortunately, they learned it was topic at ten weeks, and her tube was removed, however, because her other two was functional, they were told she should be able to get pregnant without difficulty moving forward. After two years and no additional pregnancies, they decided to seek medical help. A semen analysis proved her husband had as Bermuda, so they were referred to a reproductive urologist and a fertility clinic. Due to her hormone levels after a thorough fertility workup, they were told even IVF might not be an option. They decided to switch clinics and her new doctor developed a treatment plan by then her partner semen analysis results had improved, and they were advised to continue trying on their own a year and a half later they returned to the second fertility clinic, and she was diagnosed with endometriosis and Dior. They were advised to try IVF unfortunately. Her first cycle was canceled due to poor response. Lets US know how Dahlia's second is. Cycle was much more successful and resulted in her son. Dalia welcome to the show. Hi had. Why don't we start by hearing a little bit about you? How old are you? What do you do for a living? And what do you do for fun? Terse cheat three years of age or Moxley turn in hurt for in two weeks time so almost at the end of maturity towards year. I'm a financial analyst for one of the major banks in Arlon. And for fun, I love to travel. I looked to coke. I partake in a bodybuilding so I love going to GM and exercise in. On I absolute zero spending time with my family and our lovely Beagle. WHO's four years of age now? Think about life before infertility back then. How would you describe yourself as a person? I was very carefree. I suppose I was I. was always a planner for I was more kind of go with the flow type of person. I wasn't really overthinking many things. Where obviously since we've started trying for a baby, everything, Kinda more or less involved about trying for a baby. Tell me about the first time you met your partner. We mess us work, so we met in January are Roger. Should I see? Should I say he seen me in January. I never noticed him. Joined our company. He took a Sirri and started asking me Oh pretty much immediately and I kept saying no now. I wasn't interested. About six months later became an item, and we moved in together fairly quickly. I think we start to go in May and we were living together by August. Today how would you describe you and your partner? As a couple, Daphne became very strong given its We have a children's backs and just very loyal to each other and very supportive to tutor. For also below of Two four and go L. Sandra both into exercise, and under both into same type hobbies so virtuous I suppose quite similar. was there a specific moment in your life? When you? I knew you wanted to be a mom, there wasn't a specific moment to search I always knew I wanted to have kids up. Never really imagined my life the way with not having children. Of younger sister. So when she was born, I was absolutely smitten. Treated her like my own personal little doll, an ever even Asia for I, knew I wanted to have children. Did this longing to be a mom impact other decisions in your life. It didn't really change anything in my life too much from making sure I have a really good solid career. 'cause you know I'm sure everybody knows who does have children by now. Our kids are expensive and so I made sure my career a stable and. When I initially. Joined the company I'm working for now, which would have been thirteen years ago in the role I was at from the stars. I wasn't really crazy about it. I didn't really love my job I stayed in. It's unjust changed direction just for share reason to make sure I have a gross income to support the kids are will have in the future rather than. My life really wasn't impact us as a search anything else. Suppose like we stayed in the area, we were living in just to be closer to the parents as well just to make sure, but when the baby's do. They have some support from family for Orleans, isn't very big country like you could literally travel from one end to Yoda invest six hours drive. So it's not like in states where you know. If you move area, you could potentially be leaving day's travel away from your. From your parents or your savings? Let's dive into the journey to build your family. Take us through your whole infertility timelines. Starting at the beginning, this decided as I said, nobody moved into ever would have been around August July or August and fairly quickly, we knew. We want to be together visas as he's the one. I'm the one for him and decided to try for baby by year. I was on the pill on the north. I'm not really a fan of being on the Pale for you know as I got into new relationship, I obviously went on contraceptive pill. Just to make sure doesn't get pregnant. I came off the Pale in December I never even got my periods and I got pregnant. Of course were overjoyed, and we couldn't believe it's strays away. We were expecting a baby on. Fortunately that pregnancy ended up and X. Topic. It was in my right. Philippian tube onto I needed to Andre going into surgery to remove the pregnancy and to remove my tube. Obviously we were absolutely devastated the news. Once I've healed from the surgery I was advised to get a procedure called Cozy Don, so it's where they put the die through your uterus and your remained Philippine tube just to make sure it is open. Once I got done. It came back clear, so it seemed as if my tube Boris clear and I was told we should have. No issues getting pregnant again and at the time now known of extra star were involved in my case, no new the reason of why are you have Karen around my Philippian tubes? There was no reason Far East as I've never had any type of infections or anything, so nobody could really figure it out, bobby, reassure just you know the time I was fairly young I. Finger was twenty eight gone into twenty nine, so there was no reason of why we couldn't get pregnant. Flock into was clear, and my age was fine. His Age was fine, so we were just told to go home and try. To then three months after surgery so off event, trying for baby and nothing happened for a year fast stage I started tracking my fertile days and. Using ovulation predictor kits. I wasn't really getting a strong reason any of the cycles. Now I know, but there must have been gone. Hormones bought at the time. I was so naive I didn't know where to start. All a knew is that you need to track your periods? My period was very regular was every twenty eight days like clockwork and I knew your fertile day is supposedly day fourteen again. HOW NAIVE ON ME! Thinking about for you know that's what I thought and I wasn't really a strong reason. Any of the month for we kept trying on a northern was happening, so we tried for for two years, and after I decided to go on. See Specialists, no in Ireland. That medical care is slightly different. Different you have with General Practitioner. Are you like it's like a family doctor who you go to see with all the ailments? And then if there was underlying, problems are your general practitioner fields, you need to prepare to go and see a specialist. You get a referral to go and see a specialist, or you can just go and privately, and just go as a self-referral, so while we did issue straight away went in to get tests on. Blood tests no initially only my perisher. Got The blood test. Results came back. His hormone levels were absolutely rock-bottom so his efforts. H and L H on his. Levels were practically non-existent now at that time. I think Stephen would have been thirty one or thirty two on his hormone levels specifically his starts her own came back as pretty much equivalent of a sixty year old man. So from those results straightaway new. There's a problem, so we got the fair to. Reproductive and chronology in the biggest fertility clinic and Went in to see the specialist. Dare you got semen analysis and his semen analysis came back so poor that specialist advisers spot. It wouldn't even be good enough for an IV F so from there on. We got through fair to. A notre? Reproductive endocrinology. Who then read on all his blogs and she told or stop we can. Stephen could take certain supplements to try and increase this facility, so he took so convinced for three months, and came back to her to get his blood drawn again after three months, his bloods came back. His hormone levels came back fine at they were fire improved, and after another couple of months she has the request repeats of his semen analysis, which also came. Fine so it looked like his Taylor was back on track. So she just told us. There's no need for any further analysis in anything and again just go home. Try for a baby. This was obviously the cause of the infertility. And you should be pregnant been six months snowshoes. You tell me if you're not pregnant within a year, just people are still fairly young just to come back to her on. She will then look into my side of the things, perhaps to all of my hormone levels and see if anything can be found. So, be continue trying a home naturally again. Assuming there's no issues and then by John Re two thousand nineteen. I came back to her again. US Stephen Hats issues in the past. She first of all ordered Notre Repeat Semen analysis for himself. At, Fitch came back fine, and then once she started investigations into my hormones. My hormones came back low. Low levels of M H, aunt, she diagnosed move diminished ovarian reserve after some folder. Folder. And Investigations. I was also diagnosed with Endometriosis, however from listening to. All Your podcast and listening to Dr Alison I know usually you get symptoms to get quite severe pain during your periods on strong periods, which I never had I've never like never had any pain of never had any discomfort, so it was complete shock to me. However that would explain off all this carbon inside my flop tubes, and outside all the adhesions and explain why. My Philippian tubes were damaged so badly. So after getting the diagnosis are was referred. To Your Onoda fertility clinic. I actually had the choice of to fertility clinics. And after some research, which shows the clinic? We've now on. It's obsolete your best decision. Be were advised to go via fruit straightaway. Due to me, only have one Philippian tube to second to perhaps not functioning correctly. We didn't know at the time. Also might diminish varian reserve. Just the the most guaranteed route supposed to have a baby was IBF, so we started our IVF in May. However I cycle cancels as I produced absolutely zero follicles, and after gone on a different protocol in July, we managed to get sixty and follicles. Eleven of them resulted in mature eggs, eleven eggs fertilized. Out of eleven. Fertilized eggs be got six really high grades, embryos and the first one was pouring in July. Results in my now one month old son, so I wanNA. Ask you a couple of questions about all of that. You saw a couple of our ease. Tell me about your initial impressions of both and why you changed, so the first clinically went to as a surf referral. Eight is as I, said the biggest on the most famous clinic in Ireland, and that's the only one to be honest I knew off. I say majority of Couples Living Orland only kind of know office clinic as well. We do have a public health, service AND ORLEANS. The fertility treatments available, however weightless called the anywhere between three to five years or even more. As you know infertility, world at time is of essence for Corpus the only choice really to go royal and private. Coppola clinics available to us. Really everyone knows this first clinic we went to and when initially when we went in for a first consultation. Anne test and dawn the Ori. Straightaway took out the brochures and started talking about IVF and the cost plans. And how much it's all gonna cost on. I got so overwhelmed as at that point. We didn't even know we had any issues Stephen. Semen analysis wasn't doing his blood. Swear, and my blood were. Don't like religiously has zero investigations into anything at that stage apart from my initial tests on. On for Philippian to buy was doing in the hospital were I got the pregnancy and the tube removed, so I just felt like they're literally telling me high place coming through the door. Take out your checkbook on start writing checks move out, even know, and if there is a problem, are so many doctors before hunt told those there is no problem were young. Came back clear of they talk could have been potentially even an issue. Basically busboy felt. We need to go somewhere else, not second. Does Not do. It's not an IV F- clinic. Is endocrinologists at the public hospital. She does have a private appointments so you with pay her pair appointments. However all she does is just actual initial investigations into what ruled costs could be. She doesn't just deal with fertility either. It's all endocrinological problems. Once she established that there is a problem. She had to referrers to a fertility clinic for further assistance I. Suppose to as far as they know, she only goes as far as prescribing likes of. She does not do. If, she does not do. Are you is so if you need some for like back then you'd have to go to actual statistical in. However, she is absolutely amazing. Still Torch and bureau. Absolutely grateful. She did refer to a clinic. Be ended up topsy and. She'd recommend to the clinics, and we chose the first clinic based on the locality, obvious and on the reviews from order couples on our initial, the first appointment first consultation. Were very lucky. As our case got taken by medical director off the clinic and he is absolutely amazing. He truly does his job now for money, not as a business not to profiteer vote just generally because he loves to help Corpus after first initial consultation just new. Faces demand that's going to help us. We never regretted our decision. How did your partner feel? When he was diagnosed with factor, he was devastated. Absolutely devastated I. Think for women. We take it slightly better. Of course. It's very very hard to be told that potentially you may not be able to have kids, or you would not have kids naturally, or you may not be able to carry a baby for I think for us, women. The kind that just move onto a next step. For Man? It's a lot to do very ego as well so he was absolutely devastated, but then when he was told. You know, there is a ways to bring up his fraternity. Knocked, completely lost 'cause he just got headstrong, and there's Evan. He had to do to get back on track was the treatment that he did and was the cause ever discovered? Yes, the cause is actually himself. My pyre star is a competitive bought builder. So Ninety five percents off competitive builder say do take 'em steroids, so it'd be thrown injections and order injections I should say order hormones, and if your body is overwhelmed with additional hormones here, poison into it, it will stop produce your natural hormones, and in torn, absolutely killing your natural fertility. Treatment did we take? He was poured on. Hormone replacement therapy for three months, and he took some natural, some natural supplements as well such as zinc. Magnesium multivitamins and just got his his results by contract. Was the lowest point during your journey. Absolutely lowest point was losing our first little baby down the line like after the surgery we found out because they did some tests and we found out it was a little girl, and I was absolutely lowest points. It took me really moans to kind of accept that we've lost our baby. Guess obviously of wanted kids all my life and it was such A. A joyous time when we are pregnant and then out the blue. It wasn't viable, so I felt robbed Johnny Way, but that's the only way to find to describe it. I just felt robbed I. Felt like somebody went into my body, and took my baby away, so by was the lowest point, and then the second lowest points with being our first IVF cycle. When my body did not react to the drugs to the protocol. eventhough are are had me on. The highest dose off GonNa Laugh and love areas that he could potentially put me on, and now one single follicle grew so. For whatever reason I just assumed wants to go into fraternities clinic, and once we start treatment. It's just GonNa Happen. Something's going to happen be we'll get at least one embryo, and then when I got not even one single follicle, I just got three down because I was Dan, I was like okay. Maybe this is not gonNa work started considering as virus, even donor eggs and order order options. Did you have any signs or symptoms that your pregnancy might be ectopic? Dot Really I had no. Beedon I had little tiny pains on the right hand side of my abdomen. It's not anything I assumed to be a sign of something going wrong. For whatever reason every time you get, some type minor pains in your abdomen. You're always assured. How is just a stretch and pains from the pregnancy itself? It's your body's changing your broad grown. Your body is a accommodate and the baby, so it's fine on last year in severe pain, you kind of just writeoff and dismiss it us all. It's just normally it's just. Part of the journey of the opened a motorized suppose the first sign that something was wrong. I got on Easter Sunday. We were getting ready to go to our parents house to at for Easter. Dinner on I started leasing, but the blood wasn't even like period blood reds. It was black tar block and thousand. The first sign that something wasn't right. Obviously, we cancelled our plans on went into maternity hospital immediately. I assumed at that point on miscarrying. However after getting checked, they told me my services closed. So it's not a miscarriage. It's probably just Boston. Fair, Schumer me by most likely it's fine. However, they did. Tell me to come back in three days time to get a scandal. Unfortunately, as it was Easter Sunday, there was no technicians available to Jewish can on the day, so they told me to combat three days later when they came back I can. They couldn't even find the features. They had to Kinda dig around and then eventually they found. They found her in my rightful up in tube. She was. Quite big, so there was no other option. Just to go through emergency sorcery on. The doctor sojourn advise me by the came in another two three hours later that the tube would actually would have ruptured. My life was endangered at that stage, so if I if I would waste as if I would've gotten referrals for us can. And saying four days time in three days time, potentially menu wouldn't be talking right now. I also had an ectopic pregnancy, and I was in aveer pain very severe pain to the point where I was blacking out, but it's interesting that you said you had black tar. Like blood coming out of you I had the exact same thing. It looks like Black Tar, and that is when we went to the ER and discovered that it was a topic. He expects it the cooler off a below to to be like that. Know when you think of think grads. Pink. Wherever! You do not think black on when I seen that I. Knew. Something isn't right for the only thing I knew at the time because everything was so new to me, pregnancy was neutron for baby was new to only thing I knew. Okay, so there's pregnancy unders miscarriage I did not know anything else. What's do fertility? So my initial toil was miscarriage me was told actually. No, you're not miscarrying, you know. The relief was unbelievable. Only combat COUPLA days later on be told gets ready. They're bringing you in to operation room immediately on behalf to take out the baby. Hey infertility warrior. It's heather. This episode of beat infertility is brought to you by me. Regular listeners of the show know that I struggled during my infertility journey with everything from finding the right clinic to advocating for protocol customized to my body to allowing infertility to consume entire existence and everything in between in other words. I've been where you are. Now that I'm on the other side, and if interviewed, hundreds of other warriors and fertility experts, I discovered the fastest way to realize your dream of becoming apparent is to get educated. Regain Hope, build resiliency, learn self, advocacy, skills and partner with someone who's been there whether you're an infertility Newbie or a seasoned veteran, it would be my honor and privilege to provide as one client put it unwavering support with fully engulfing and genuine empathy. If you'd like to learn more or schedule a free thirty minute. Call to discuss how I can support you during your ability journey, go to beat infertility dot co slash. Now back to the show. I want to talk about your to IVF cycles. What did your doctor do differently between them has so my far cycle was antagonist cycle, so it was very straightforward, just started four hundred fifty gonul f one fifty layers, and I got steamed for eleven days 'em on Day, nine Con Vacancy My follicles just Warren grown aware to follicles only and they never even got to as millimeters. Pervaded kind of want to keep me going for another couple of days just to see, both if it even happened and they suggested okay. If we get even one them past ten millimeters speak with Roy. Are you I however chances of? Work and were slim, just didn't want to waste the cycle, I suppose, and then by day eleven. May doctor just to make decision to just to stop 'em. As Newton was happening I think one follicle Gaw to four millimeters on the order, one got to six or seven second cycle. He just wanted to exact same protocol, and this is where I'm blessed. I've been listening to your podcast. All airs paying attention to order a women's stories and absolutely pay attention to Dr. Rogers on August new. Diminish severe and reserve is recommended to prime with eastern and he wasn't prime in me. He just wants to exact same protocol in how. It would work. Bachelor is time for I had to put my foot down. I insisted that we prime of eastern eventhough he kinda, said look. We should maybe just throw same one if we with eastern got take six weeks, and then the actual actual process would take another two weeks, so you're taking like delay by two months before I. Just I just had this nagging feeling that this is the right way to go so I insist this eastern prime aunt. He changed some of the medication, and which obviously Dan resulted in completely different cycle, even the nurses on himself or completely surprised as he. taught the best case scenario. My Body could produce maybe six seven eight eggs maximum, and all of us Oh and we ended up with sixteen. Obviously, it's completely different results so obsolete licensed. I got a chance to find the PODCAST and research all in two different protocols on be able to just advocates for myself and insist. By. Is the correct one regardless of his voice. Tell me about a positive moment during your journey by positive moment is kinda still go in at the clinic. In to a colleague of mine, who we would the quite close to our work, bobby wearing like best bodies, but we both have been close, and I bumped into herself at the same clinic out the play until going through IVF pretty much exactly the same day she's also got to diminish the area and reserve, and so as myself. It was absolutely amazing to have support body throughout the whole journey. She's just given bears to little girl a week ago, so now over gone through first stages of motorhomes together as well so my happy Marlins I. Suppose Way Positive is still is still going. Tell me about the moment when you first learned you were going to be a mom Soviet Gos- are embryo transfer in August. I was under strict guidance to protest at home. As the home task could now. Be Accurate and I was advice. am the blood tests will be drawn ten days after transfer on fast one. You can really tell if it's a yes or no. However I was very impatient of say was designed to. A home pregnancy test I was gonNA white at least a week, however day four today five night after transfer I woke from feeling absolute nauseous. The nausea in last on is the only time throat me pregnancy I actually got nauseous. It only lasts for a couple of minutes for I got the NOGGIN field, and on my gods, maybe I'm pregnant, so of course me being so on patients are run into the bathroom. I did how pregnancy test on the faintest second-line came up. was just happiest absolutely happiest moment, however, being absolutely obsessive Pearson I of course had to. About ten tests J just to make sure to second line, it's definitely different there on jade's pregnancy test every single day until my boss blows Gudrun by clinic once ago, my blow task backhand back off five hundred one so quite high, so at that point we knew about the pregnancy. How a really great chance into developing into a live based, were you at all worried that it might be a topic again? Absolutely I had worries about the topic, and then when it wasn't a topic. They don't Kinda. Seven weeks we manage to hair a beautiful her. And it was confirmed to be in my uterus, and seemed fine and healthy and strong I started leasing are eleven and a half weeks obviously, I was not worry Costano Ali panics thinking miscarrying. Frankly it was just a wound in my Sarah Rix from progesterone suppositories, so one kind of got over five fear. I managed to onterio percent, so I couldn't feel my baby. To her two weeks of pregnancy, so as fatality to monitor a baby movements from preacher much early on I had absolutely no way of June. Nakas I can feel him out all. I have to go in for a weekly scans throat pretty much my whole pregnancy, just to make sure he's fine, and he's healthy so every week up to discount. I was absolutely near wreck. And then thirty five weeks pregnant I started bleeding again, so I had to get steroid injections are. Maternity. Had fears that the baby is GONNA come early. So that was Onoda worry I. Know Yourself You hod earlier. You know the fear. The motor feels their tolls or God's be. Come early as opposition last thing I want to. You got to the steroids, and thankfully he wasn't born until his exact date. So basically for forty weeks I was just worried about one thing or something else. If it's not a believes in, it's no movement. If it's no movement, it's low higher base. If it's not, it's something else. I also had an interior placenta with Aurora and I felt her very late, and she was also very tiny as I'm sure you know I think you said you follow my story quite closely, ABS, I always advise people to ask whether it is an anterior or post terrier placenta, because then they can have a realistic expectation of when they're going to feel their baby moving and what that movement might be like for some people who have a post terrier placenta. It's very strong and for those who have an interior placenta. It's very subtle and so you really have to be paying attention. Yeah, I totally agree on. My Oh no. I never got the proper like tapping or kicks or anything like all I, ever got to a stretch, and and from about thirty four weeks some days he'd moved grace an order days. I'd have no movements for twenty four hours so obviously every time and the panic in a frenzy get into my car and I drive to hospital for yet another con with no movements so. Midwives saw the hospital where actually making jokes at this stage show you again, sure you're pirates of a wallpaper. No office stage fate new me on I, knew all of them by name so by time I actually delivered baby I knew most of staff at the much added. Tell us. How did you and your partner Balance Work and your infertility journey very actually really really looking no in my own role I can work from how I'm blessed like. And Luckily for me, my boss. She's been extremely supportive and extremely on your son off the process. We need to go through her own sister hot to go through the herself and ended up with twins, so she was quite familiar hardships off infertility, due to her sister gone through similar experience, so she was just very supportive, aunt. Anytime I needed to go off for an appointment. Is Absolutely no problem? I have to work time back or nothing like. I was just just go. It's fine. He'll be back to work on your back to work on throughout my actual cycle I work from home by June the half to. Begin on have injections and perhaps inject myself in the bathroom or She felt it's more appropriate for me to be able to access fridge to storm medication our home rather than our work for everyone to see. I just be less dressed. And perhaps have a better outcome. My partner know. His boss is is very good as well now. He didn't have to come to many appointments of suggests initial test and. Then just to give his sample for fraternisation for embryo transfer, so he really his appointments for minimal. However, he's boss. Foul was very understanding on. He could just Govan. He needed to go. Did the public health system pay for all aspects of your fertility treatments? Yes, they do however as I said the wait list is so long that you I be probably still be wasting to be seen by a public health care and. Probably wouldn't even have child for another ten years. If we're lucky, however like if you go privately, the cost isn't as big in Orleans. The Hall of Cycle Cost Five Thousand Euro. Nobody is not included medication for for your Medication Anaconda Medication and arguments that monthly Max. You have to pay holders and forty four. You're so. It's very affordable, so all we had to pay is five thousand euro for actual idea cycle. and. Hundred forty four paramount, so even if you're cyclist canceled, realistically, all have to do is just buy new education, which is, that's very affordable, hundred forty four and absolutely noten compared to walk. You guys pay in the United States, and and then obviously if your cycle is court short, or if you're transfers council, for whatever reason the additional cost that you have to. To pay is pretty minor I. Think About Thousand Euro Maybe fifteen hundred zero tops so unless you have to do a whole new cycle and even the thought. Lake five thousand. Euro is fairly affordable. The way we look at the is look. We just have to postpone any holidays for a year or two in order to have a child and that's relates. How did infertility change your relationship with your partner? They just got so much close stronger as the corporal. I suppose if you can go through a loss of a child, and she can go through long infertility journey, and you can go through months of Mon. Simone's of trying and years trying for a baby and. Where you know sex thrown into not just a sex with a little were really. It's like Oh, my God relation. Behalf the truth right now if you can go through all the on the disappointments on the hardships on the upsets on the happy moments of all the journey on commodity, order end, and you're still together I, think that pretty much means there for life. I know law couples after you know miscarriage or loss of a baby or anything lake. Usually if you know if they can get through together, they usually split up so for us. It just made really solid family unit at this age. I think we can get through anything on. If in future trousers. What about friends and family did infertility change any of those relationships in relation to family I suppose we just all got. Stronger together closer together. From. Family and the support from. The everybody our siblings are MOMS DADS are granny's everybody really got involved? Everybody was chair for us and worrying about and praying for us, and now a baby is here. He's absolutely adored by everybody unspoilt by everybody even more than I think. If this was natural pregnancy, course, everyone would love him for now. It's just extra special in relation to friends. Some friendships unfortunately didn't survive. You for people they just found is bit too much. If if if you tell somebody or I can't see right now, or if I was down upset over something, not every time I'd want to go out and have a cup of coffee in the friend of mine. So people just took a pair Salihi and then three pursue the friendship orders that eventually found out of the reason why I can't make certain dates are why can go out? For few cocktails or wherever else are nice? Else got extra safar sieve on like our own families. Just absolute cheerleader Spurs I. Know You advocated for Yourself? Your second IBM cycle is self advocacy something you had to learn along way, or is that a skill? You always had I had. Some of its I suppose in the way Benaroya strong usually I if somebody is a specialist in a field, I tend to kind of go along. Before all face for me. I just felt that. If somebody started and in the field for fire for ten years or breeze, and has extensive work experience usually bear opinion and Barrett voices right. And throughout my inferences to journey I found that isn't always the case, so I had this in the way before hunt for a strong where in terms off now I'm bit more. No, if I, feel, something is the right way I. Think is the right way, so you know if I'm GONNA pay your money for procedure I'm a costumer. Please take my advice on board or I would be more insistent on something. Do you have any tips for listeners who are still learning how to advocate for themselves? Just listened to your feeling I. Suppose I've always. Had the NOGGIN feeling for it's not gonNA. Be As easy for me to become a mom and every specialist I went to beforehand every like dede's asked my gp before. To draw a blood test for me and every time the answer goes all don worry about is you're very young. I was told. Look your tasked with fulop into Kim back fine. It's clear you've not. You've not to worry about. So, I really wish the time I was just more insistent together. My blood drawn to get four investigation of why I'm not getting pregnant. I could potentially saved maybe three or four years off the hardship and with the May be my baby longtime ago. Instead of wasting all this time, and you know now I'm thirsty for on now I, have to think or God's when to have a sibling for for the baby unavo-. Just given bear on already have to think about these things because I don't want to be forty five. Having? My second child or forty having may second Charles on pastor is view years older than me, so he feels the same way, and if I was more insistent at the start of journey to double, check the Goldfield and heart, because the bane because harder end result so much faster so if you have. A feeling or sense that something isn't right or something is not agreeing view. Just be more insistent, just insys that checks out. How has infertility changed? You made me so much more compassionate to people to to cope with A. Little bit ashamed to say but years ago I used to hear. Somebody had the miscarriage to me. That was bit like Ashley. Was Only airlie -ill happen again. I did not see airlie miscarriage as a baby somebody's child. It was just like everyone has a miscarriage. And I probably would have been one of those people that blown tely was asked somebody, so you're married for five years whether you're going. GonNa have kids. Now I know something like about could absolutely destroy a person for months. The upset that could cost so I'm so much more aware of. Everyone else's George Mason. What's going on inside? The person isn't all be shown on the outside so. Of of land throughout all this by just sometimes, just keep your opinions to yourself. Keep your questions to yourself. And and Maybe if somebody is in the bad moods, just let them off Kazaa. Varre they're dealing with something very very traumatic, and they're just not ready to talk about. Our beaches. Don want everybody to know about it. Knowing what you know now what is one piece of advice that you give to your past self research into everything much much earlier, just research into potential ways and potential. Ways to get white you while you want to suppose, achieve your goal and dont warriors much as eventually if you really really want to core parent as naive us as ironic as the sounds. If you really want to become apparent, you will be apparent. There's always GonNa be away. A may not necessarily mean it's GonNa be through. or V on, it's going to be your own egg or your partners, our husbands pairing there is way to become apparent, so don't worry as much. Don Get. Upset as much. To rebel the episode. What words of hope would you offer to someone who's at the beginning of their journey right now? Just keep going. Just keep going, and you're GONNA. Get your little baby and you're GONNA be hauled in your little darling just so soon soon about he'll think eventhough some Giuliani's take years when you really look back and none of matters anymore, and it's really really truly it is worth everything all the tears, and all the obsessed and all the injections, an all the processing, and all the tasks in all every single worry, the end result is. A No matter how you got the baby you want whether it's you given bears whether it somebody else carrying your child or adoption, its worst ever finish war, said the minute. That child looks at you. Everything is worse so just keep going Deli. Thank you so much for coming on the show today and share your story. I appreciate a thank you header. Thank you for listening to beat infertility? Join our free private support community at beat infertility dot co Ford Slash APP. If you find yourself meeting additional support visit, our paid programs that beat infertility DOT Co.. Slash Pope you. If you'd like your story to be considered for a future episode, please fill out the form at beat infertility dot co Ford slash contact until next time.

partner Stephen Hats Ireland bobby Dalia Dan financial analyst Orleans Arlon Dahlia Heather Bermuda Moxley ectopic pregnancy GM Daphne Dr Alison I
Geeks Pub - 1982

TechFan

1:11:05 hr | 3 months ago

Geeks Pub - 1982

"You're listening to another great podcast in the my Mac podcasting network and. It's time for another Geeks, Poe with Tim Robertson and David Cohen from Tech Fan podcast noted that I. kind the to remove synergy. So one of the things that. David. And I have talked about with a tech with The geeks pub is kind of maybe teaming it a little bit occasional episodes. We haven't really done that to date. because. Honestly. Lazy. I can't speak for day but. You and I are very similar. This week though we'll talk about a a little bit of a some current staff, but we're going to focus on nineteen eighty two. So we're we're teaming this episode as nineteen, Eighty, two which. was what thirty eight years ago as we were this. Time. It is and yet in some respects a lot these things on on the list women you think he back of things to talk about seemed like any yesterday. Here's a scary part. As. We record this. I'm older than my father was in nineteen, eighty two. Strange. That's Really odd on each Jain Con- Kinda mentally dismay gymnastics. Present from signed to be on the spent. Probably. Yeah. Yeah Yeah, eighty two is a co year we're GONNA get todd that, but I got things about star wars and tenant that you put in the show notes, Yep, Let's start with tenant it opened up to twenty million dollars. Yeah. And they're like, Oh what does this say about the future the movie movie industry and Blah? Blah Blah I don't know that there's a pandemic going on in some idiots to release a tent pole movie when. Four fifths of the planet aren't going to go to a movie theater to watch IT I. Just a on my part. I could be wrong. I mean I'm sure a good movie and most people would want to risk death to go see it. While I. Chance. PA problem is because of the typically Nolan and the people around Arlon ran this movie because they've been very aggressive aren't pushing about. We've got to see this as we need to get it in theaters. It was one the loss wants to be pulled from really. Yeah, there's been a lot of hype around this and and. You know this this also linked to. It, it's been pitched as the saviour of movies during condemning because you know this is the one that's going to get people out. And it's had mixed reviews to be fair to. Some. Really good and others are like Okay. I think it's a typical Nola move moving that in an and this is going to go against as well is the plot is incredibly complicated and it's probably one of those movies. The requires more viewing to be able to to really get your head around and people aren't you know the belly singing at once let alone gone. See it twice and the. Pandemic pandemic yeah. circles the grosses are tiny and are nothing like what it needs to make to be able to return a prophet because this is a. The the budget well, ever on underlying sunny. Well, the budget one. Hundred. So I'm and they have done crap marketing for it to be. Honest. Well, because I think is interesting marketing at the moment because to marketing I'm seeing here in the UK does the don't worry everything's GonNa be alright and by the way we're doing everything he can't keep you safe and then the other which is is basically Connie pretending that the coronavirus here at all or parents pitching for. Advertising now so you can come and do this stuff next year now movies. Movies can't really do either of those things is very difficult when you're promoting a particular movie to say, but don't worry the fish you're gonna go see is safe because it's not fair to promote the movie at the movie company. And secondly yeah. The last the last thing you WanNa you WanNa say in a movie promotion is coming Saint next year so I don't understand why they even released it. Well? It makes no sense at all because they look the they're desperate to get some income and I think they're all set desperate to make sure that the movie theaters have some income. Well, I mean you're a little bit concerned about the movie theaters but at the end of the day warner brothers and that's who did it yes. Yeah. Warner brothers. So they're more concerned about their bottom line not cinematic theaters, right? Well they. They could give lip service to the the theater experience. But at the end of the day, they have to make money why not have sold US Netflix or HBO for two hundred, million, I think I think the movie companies they kind of stuck between a rock and a hard place because yet it doesn't affect their bottom line if maybe thesis go out of business except that they need to have somewhere to. Sell their movies to when this finishes. Everyone's kind of got this thing our next year it's going to be better I. Don't think it is to be honest as things at the moment but the point is everyone's looking beyond the coronavirus and they're saying, well, WE WANNA get back to normal. We need to have movie theaters to sell our movies to otherwise we don't get the groceries and so so I think from that point of view, they do want to do software releases to try and keep me is taking over for the problem is they're doing it with with movies they've invested hundreds of millions of dollars in and they'll saved a lot of money on marketing. Because the marketing, some of these movies is kind of out control. At this point the know they probably say fifty, sixty, million dollars a marketing not Pushing tenant as hard as they would have done but. You Know I. think that's that's the difficulty is that is that they don't WanNa, find a landscape when krona vars finishes the all the movie theaters are business and they hide their on how to bond them up and invest in their selves and take that risk on themselves or alternatively not have anywhere to to push their movies out to. I. Suspect the problem with the streaming will be interesting to see what? The experiment with the Disney plus Milan has generated virtual room. Really good. Well, I'm sure it's good but I don't think it's anything like the heights of what you would get from a big worldwide cinema release and I think that's the problem. Well, nothing's going to be aiming its world but by the same token. You'll look United Derided Milan spending twenty bucks to have early access to something. If you just wait are few months, you can wash cummings coming into send us. There's no. Way No but a lot of people who've done it. So I, think that they've shown that this is somewhat of a success we'll see. What. The data money. Yes. I think the problem with that sedate appoint a one. And That does not mean that the entire movie going public is ready to transition to this model. It would work with black widow. I can tell you that right now I'll be honest I'll be one of those guys that will spend twenty bucks to let the kids watch it on the big screen here at home it probably will. But that is not the whole movie industry fat I would be upset if it ended up being. Just that because then we would have even more of a situation where you have you know these big tent pole movies that kind of can support the one of payment model the pays you pay you watch model but the there's a hell of a lot of other babies that just won't get made because the the the economics won't work. You know you won't have a one we won't work for sixty million dollar movie. House an in Netflix's already shown that well, they're making fifty, sixty, million dollar movies and. Releasing them on Net flicks noon extremely well, well, I think I think some of them all some of them on the the problem. With. The that's movie theaters you're GonNa win either or I think that the clearly the streaming is the way to go. Early access is going to be a thing that's going to happen and look for anybody listening to this that owned movie theater or works in a movie theater or a members working in a movie theater. It's a different world and it will eventually get to back to the way it was probably is going to happen within the next twelve months probably not now I'm thinking end of twenty, twenty one, and in the meantime they've made a lot of movies between when everything shut down and where they are now and they have to release them somewhere in not going to be moved I think what ten at proves is you know what we got all this Are these movies we can't put him in theaters. No one's going to go. And that's that's what that's proving. Let's move on to Some star were stuff here before we get into nineteen eighty-two ewing two two different ones here to star wars movie or two. Star war stories the first one. And they kind of relate to each other to be honest. John Boyega. Who? One of the most refreshing things about the force awakens in my opinion I i. completely agree the the the idea of telling the story from a storm troopers. Point of view was was a great idea I remember when that we I saw that trailer some. Racist asses on the Internet is a black. Real Blake stormtroopers of course, you are like Oh my God. Really. it was just disgusting racism at its worst and he caught a lot of of that because he's black but you you and I we could care less off the character and about the movie and his character in the force awakens showed so much promise. Yeah. He he was I don't WanNa see an innocent but he he of was the everyday man. Being dropped in the middle of everything that's going on in the movie opens with him. Really. That's right. It's him. Seeing these atrocities and he's just like I this isn't who I am. This isn't who I WANNA be. He sees an opportunity with a rebel. To use that guy to get out of the situation and and. Get Out of the military if you will, and he does an an fincher starts, yeah I feel it actually it it painted and very nice contrast between the empire and the first older you know it it was despite the fact that later on in the movie, and then through our some movies, I, have some real problems with the concepts of the first order. You know about the fact that they had always quick and. Budget and infinite number of people. But you know I think opening at the beginning with them. Basically, they forcibly conscripting people into your into their military and then to have one of them basically say in the now on the I can't do this. and. Then switch signs. You know obviously the the journey that Finn goes on in the movie because he starts the movie thinking he's a coward because he doesn't want to do what the rest of the troops are doing. Yeah. But of course, very first act in in helping Poe escape is incredibly brave act. In in even though he he continues to believe himself to be unworthy in a coward. In fact, what he tells this is incredibly brave to break out a very high profile business, a prisoner escape with him so and then he has. He basically allow well, he he brings. Rain to the story an an he he basically drives the entire movie. And he's a very interesting character I mean complex he has up. And I was really looking forward more than ray or Poe. I was really looking forward to seeing where his character is going to go. Yeah and the last Jedi I and of course. And you know this is one. Of. The Says says, volumes accounting remember the names of them Also, lost. So. Yeah he he's basically complained about you know he felt the same way. He liked the first movie script. He thought the character was going somewhere and then basically becomes background for the red for the remain savy's. And once again, which the second story that we'll talk about her points to is a complete lack of leadership a complete lack of creativity. No one knew what to do. There was no overriding plan. Yes it was simply let's make money making star war movies. That's right and and of course you know it's it's it's tough on Giambi guy because he sees her a racial element to it, which I think is there in the Black characters often get get forgotten them push this online. It's not. It's not conscious racism. It's not it's not a Oh, well, we don't. We don't want a black guy leading the movie. So we're GONNA push into one side is basically institutional racism of just forgetting the black guys there. I. Think it goes. I think there is an aspect of that but I don't think that's really what it was. I think what a lot of that is. They just didn't know what to do with these. Could say the same thing with Paul what what does he do? Yeah. No I I knew anything about ray the character that really sees any kind of growth or doubt is Kylo Ren he gets more interesting as the stories progress. Yeah. In very uneven way and and yes, and this goes the second story, which is Daisy Ridley says that all the way through the filming of the funnel movie. The script wasn't clear about about what her journey was and whether an initially they were taking that she was going to be. She said initially, she was She went from being pouting grand, which he ended up being and then a couple of weeks later they were saying she was she was. Kanobi child or can I be relation and then it went back to being the no one that she was in the middle fill and then they settle back on patsies granddaughter and Yes you're absolutely right just goes to show. They hadn't. There was no overarching plan to me that this is what the idol I had some problems with the false awakens. You, know that the slavish. Adherence to the structure of the original Star Wars movie was something my I I kind of understood why they did it but I think take the towards the end it didn't really work but you know the the idea of cycles repeating themselves and was good and and yet they scenario the universe they built for the force awakens I thought fantastic. The idea of final battle over desert planet with wreckage I thought was brilliant. I thought, yeah the whole the whole idea of somebody coming out of nowhere suddenly is able to challenge rise up against the. New. Pseudo Empire I thought was you know an interesting collect? Kaluka was. Later, that Luke kind of was maneuvered into that position but in the first movie that was his story to is like. Katie's come out of nowhere and all of a sudden you know he's found to be a four season on that sort of thing I was interesting where that was going to go You know there was the the stuff with a lot of the the idea of the jet I being moved very rapidly. Mythology is because they gone away and everything I thought was good. And then they kind of just blew and the reason is it's they didn't. Is Clear. They handle those ideas, but they didn't sit down and write well, where does that take over trilogy? Right, they just basically left than there, and then the next guy comes he says, I'm going to pick this pick this pick this and do that and do that, and then he has a fully out with Kennedy and this on the comes in. And and then the phone thing. Aprons comes back and the Hagan. He's doing the same thing. He's picking up bitsy once from the previous movies he throwing stuff. Why is clearly even he doesn't didn't have the vision at the beginning. What does Boyega? Entire third movie nothing. Now, he runs our. They set him up to come I think the idea was they offer that we're GONNA operate a B plot with him and. The people from the you know what the movies are so Bad, it's going to be on on on this now so bad though I have difficulty remembering the specifics of. How he got together with the Horse People. And I. in fact, I was thinking about thinking Hammett the requisite that that was an indoor. The Law was on. It was indoor but don't think of Return Jacobs remember that was a moon of endore that that happens on right? Okay. Hey. Indoor. Kate, well, again, that will became somewhat confused in my mind thinking I'm going to minute why was that was not forest on indoor and wise? Is there ocean? You know I it is all very yeah because he returned the I. Saw was definitely in orbit around the moon of indoor shouldn't have four. And and and yeah, and it's just all. We've heard this before that they basically had an idea had a mood ideas and they start picking them and building a narrative thread around them and it's just such. An, it's hard to say that. Because, we know the original star wars movie yeah. Lucas kind of did the same thing it was originally standalone movie and then it was you successful and he turned into a trilogy and then he claimed out. The. Trilogy. Six of adver trilogy nine and we know he made off that. You know well, technically, yes. Of course he did it because all of this came from his mind so. I I always accepted. Okay. That was originally going to be nine but you know what? The I hate to say this you you know what the last this last trilogy did it actually made the prequels bachelor. Absolutely it most definitely did that because for all, we criticize them they had applaud on the structure across three movies. They had character development hell even Georgia had character development capsule. It was all planned out and hangs together former coherently than the final three movie. These three movies are mess on more than a Master's insulting and that's why I know you disagreed with us, but maybe you've come around. I think that the next trilogy needs to just wipe the slate clean. Those movies never happen if it's time travel thing. So be it I as a star wars fan. And when I say that I mean as A. As a concept of what star, wars as at universe. I really I'm a huge fan. These movies need to go away. I. Go Away. I. Think we disagree on how they should do that my view I, don't care how they do. They should just ignore them I think they should have them as a background. Of the whole new set characters may a different timeframe and they should just basically say you know because because actually if you take a look at. If you take a look at the the second of the the original star wars movies, which is the second of the the second trilogy, and then the final ones you could say, all of those orders a massive to galactic battles to empires the you know got rid of. Galactic Republic says not down sets up again and you can turn because i. all of that is a failed experiment. The whole thing is failed you. I'm talking about if you're a person the galaxy now you could turn around and say look the cosby fighting over here and they all they do is just fight each other and there's walls and we will sufferers in the meantime they should just around. The galaxy is done with the law of you. We don't care about the Skywalker we care about the Jinnai yet because all you do is calls death and destruction wherever you. Want. Something New I think that would be a far more interesting story a place to. Remember the the republic had a thousand years of peace. There was no big big wars and stuff until the rise of the empire and realistically that's only about an even if you include the first order that's less than one hundred years of history over a thousand. That's right. I think, I think what could be argued for is that the the rebels beat the imperfect as type round went much better because they did is allow another empires or rise right under their noses and I can imagine a scenario. We say you know what we want nothing to do with the. and see. You know I don't think they'll do that anything that brave I think I think their ability to throw away what they perceive as the legacy. Of of of what those nine movies represent is I don't think they can resist going back to that. Well, even though I think philosophy movies are showed, they don't have the creative chops to amount probably agree and regardless of the demand delorean. nothing is going to get better until they get rid Kathleen Kennedy. She shoes just this is an. You guys don't like because she's a woman I I don't care who she is. It her leadership is been atrocious. Yeah. She does not know what she's doing. I don't think she's qualified to do the jobs that they hired her to do the only thing the Star Wars universe that she's done really correct was higher. Jon. Favreau give him. Basically. Complete control over what he wants to do. delorean even even the I've seen some criticism have some. Of. These things bought. You know basically saying that even with the Mandate Laurean there is too much throwback. Yeah, and only unlike I talked about this with the scene in the in the tattooing Cantina yet, they could easily done the to Laurie without having any original star wars characters in at all you know they have not they could've they could've made him a different Rather, than Amanda, Laurean they could've had two different baby baby Yoda yet they could have done all of that and it would have been just as good. And yet they? Continue to have the the links into they've arrested the stalls universe and that's fine. Though well, it depends it depends how it's done and. criticized. For. You know how well has done it's been amazing. Yeah I. It's going to get only worse in your opinion then because they're bringing back, Boba? Fett I in a soccer I agree it could. It could possibly get worse because I think they will I think the problem is if they lose focus and they start dwelling nestles stuff venues, he could get was. So, let's jump to nineteen eighty, two How old were you in eighty two? Siamese twelve year twelve years old. So that is. Twelve years old you're still a kid still boy. But you're not a teenager yet. So that it's a, it's a weird age. 'cause you're kind of getting out of playing toys. And you're kind of really starting to notice the girl Although to be fair, I liked girls pretty early age I remember being. Very young kid in those girl named stacy and there's something about her. Second Grey to So nineteen, eighty, two To me. Really is kind of the beginning of eighties. Well. Eighteen eighty eighty one were kinda carrying over from all the stuff that was popular in the Seventies. An eighty two was when the eighties kind of things started happening down and when. We were the cates DC in stranger things you know does that was one hundred percent off and twelve his conduct Pete Kid I think you know because let's say you become a teenage stop thinking more about all the things. Cars Girls. You tend to you tend to voluntarily stop pushing away the things from your childhood as Babyish but twelve, you're on that cost. So yes, you know you start look at those things but at the same time, you still really get kid the stuff you had when you were smaller. And really the eighty two was a a year when. Conde the key culture that we like today really snotty really started. To say Oh apple the seventies known what about Atari now really I mean eighty to win win the Yes. Yeah. So in nineteen, eighty to one of the big things was the commodore sixty four in the UK, the spectrum. launched and that was a seminal moment in technology. When both of those launched, we still look finally back at that I, mean, just this year they launched or within the last twelve months they large the c sixty four mini and a couple of different projects based on the spectrum that one I back to the key sausages finished a couple of days ago and they raised they were aiming for two hundred, fifty, thousand pounds raised one point eight million. And the WHO's a strong well. And the thing is, is that what these projects are trying to do now is that the make the best of old systems but develop on them so they can do more modern stop as well. You get community around that and it's really it's really quite exciting but you know. I recognize the spectrum I think the total the spectrum next total backers over the sukey starters is just less than ten thousand people So you know this is a fairly Nisha. Style Ginny. If you lying and I think the sixty four mini as well is is appeals to a lot of people of a certain age because. Modern kids look at those games and kind of got well You know he used to play Linus but. Yeah, I mean, you're gonNA, the season and the thing about the six foreign spectrum and all those other systems. This is just before the big video game crash. I'm an economist survive through that. I may kind of. Video Games alive until Nintendo came along lice in the eighties early nineties and if they not been then and possibility video, guys will deter differently. So video game crushes really the next year eighty-three. These things. They launched an eighty two and eight eight basically took us through the video game crash and if they haven't been there, there would have been nothing supply. Of the trash so arcades were so pretty big. You. Know what I mean I'm talking about how? And they really they really can't hung gaming home computing alive as thing in showed the industry that despite the crash, there will still interest there. I would argue that you wouldn't have got We'll talk about something else systems on this list as well, but you wouldn't have got the conduct the rising because intendo intendo became much bigger later in the decade than the Taurean. Coleco, have you ever were and that probably wouldn't have happened who who knows maybe ten they might never even gone this west market hadn't been for the Commodore Sixty four in particular because it was I being in the stays. So. a little company called Adobe Launched Nineteen eighty-two. I you know we we kinda overlook adobe nowadays because they're just kind of a a a permanent fixture in the world. and. You got to think in in eighty two. How many tech companies software companies we're launching. we could do. Different. Companies every episode of either the GEEKS. Pulver Tech Fan. And we would never run out. And Ninety nine point nine of those companies are long long gone. Even some huge ones from. US. All those woodpecker things yeah. They're all they all fell to the wayside but adobe. Has Little. Program called. Photoshop that. It it becomes synonymous with what it does. Photo manipulation on home computers. That's. That is what adobe founded their entire company based around, and it's still here today it's super powerful I. Mean when you see a manipulated image, you call it photo shopped just like if use Kleenex it's it's it's not Kleenex. Kleenex is the brand. So Adobe became that I'm sure to this day they probably hate the that term is in use. It just look every every time you manipulate an image on a computer now or a phone or pretty much anything. You are using the controls that abduct Wien vented. They even use the same symbols you know. Cut Copy and paste and the and the The frame paint was doing it as well. Don't you don't you know but Adobe Eighty two yet adobe became the shorthand standard for all of that stuff a when you use the same terminology and the same tools that adobe created when they creative shop. So that's that's kind of how much they are the bedrock of of an of an entire way of life that will probably never go away because I think we will always end up editing images that same way because it it kind of hit it. Right. The first time is the best way of doing it on computer interface. With way you have a pointer or a finger or something. I I don't know if it's the best, but it's the most accepted. Yeah. You know I think one of the problems was saying anything is of this is the only way to do it is that then you discount anything that may have come. Ahead of time. Yeah. But it's Forty years neely and it still sticking around probably also go for it. Well, it did something right right? Yeah. We'll. We'll jump down a little bit on the list because it's kind of related in a way, and that is a CLICO vision launched cleo vision was I would I would argue the first viable competition to Atari. someone in the states and I don't know how it was the UK but at least in the states. Atari was king. There was also activision but or not activision In television television. It just it was never a thing. It really really wasn't people don't get me wrong next to Atari. It was like the graphics were actually worse on the television than they were our. I already had huge brand presence because they had space invaders and they bundled it with the council and that's the. Biggest game of the eighteen. It wasn't even close. Yes. COLECO. Vision comes out and they did something very smart. They licensed to gain from Nintendo. Now, this was before the any s of course Nintendo was. Don't A. Gigantic arcades but they had one really big hit donkey Kong and the COLECO vision came with version of Donkey Kong that was Very, very true to the arcade. Well, it looks way. It was much more powerful than twenty, six, twenty, six, hundred was like mid-seventies design. COLECO vision was was much much more powerful and consequently produce something that looked much more like an all K- game Don't don't kill Him the vision. I mean nowadays. With the news I will not let close, but it was a little closer than the the Atari. It was amazing that we get arcade. We thought of Anyways arcade-quality on the home council and that video game. That port if you will, it wasn't poured. It was written from scratch but donkey Kong and Coleco vision went and hand. Yeah. they even CLICO vision even came out with tabletop little mini, arcade? Games. That were led once I got a donkey Kong tabletop from CLICO vision and Mike Eighty two eighty three and it's probably I would say it's the oldest thing that I own when I was a kid that I still have it. Still here I can. I can see it from where I'm sitting I re- stickered at a couple of years ago because stickers getting kind of not good but I still there I still have it. That's how much it meant to me. I was talking before about the link between the. Computer Games, and then what happened with Nintendo the end of the eighties where they came out with the tournament sinuses I'm basically. Floated. The. Video game market again. and interestingly enough the developer of the FAMICOM which was the Japanese version of the new segment system. He had COLECO vision and he used it as the model for how he wanted the smoothness of the graphics only only any. S Bay and and really that was the any SS defining feature when you first Super Mario, the fact that the the it was so smooth this scrawled so smoothly and you can turn that directly back to the power Coleco vision and what the Japanese designer soren it so it really is even though it wasn't the world's biggest Selah and Basically was killed in in the Games crash the following year it's a tremendous important system for that especially as. I think the difference with Coleco is because they were a games company rather than A. Computer Company. They came in and they were focused on developing. Presenting a very good Games experience because I knew that's how they sell toys and I think that's what differentiates them from. Their competitors who were constantly hampered by cost cost saving measures that were made by engineers because they thought, they could say a few cents on the dollar. And those those things then compromise the quality of the Games and the is amazing. Really how quickly before the crash of eighty three is is how prehistoric Atari Twenty six hundred to look towards the end It was Brenna because because he just did not have the power to keep up with these on the systems toll I remember going out to lady squirm all. Probably end of eighty, two beginning eighty-three. And those couple of different toy stores. But the one that was in the mall I liked a lot was kb toys. I remember. Yeah I liked him a lot. They had a fairly robust selection of video games, but I remember towards the end there they would have these bins. And they were technically not even inside the store there outside the store you know in the. They didn't care if people stolen. No. And they had all these Atari Twenty six hundred games for like ninety nine cents. I remember going out there. And just buying. Air Every game that I could find that I didn't have on the Atari Twenty six hundred and playing them maybe one or two times. It was a few of them that really kind of stuck with me that I really liked like aliens or I guess it was it was from the movie franchise but it was basically pacman but it was really well done I liked it a lot better than the Pacman game on the Tar Twenty six hundred. But that's when I knew something was changing whether video games are going to go away forever or we're going to get something better because I I knew that the My problem with the collision is that my parents didn't have a lot of money. Yeah, and so they were not going to buy me a COLECO vision. So I, just wrote off that I'm never going to own one or Setswana I got into collecting old video games probably about a decade before it became a thing on the Internet the first system that I bought was CLICO vision wasn't even an Atari is I already had an Atari. But let's let's move on at the end of the year. Time magazine does person of the year right using a man of the year and then it came person of the year because. It should be. but nineteen eighty two is kind of weird they had had. Early access to have something that apple is working on and that apple debuted in the super bowl commercial call the Macintosh. In I, remember reading stories. About how pissed off Steve Jobs was because his impression was that the MAC was going to be named person of the year. And of course, Time magazine didn't do that they named the computer man of the year which. You know. I think is more accurate because the tire industry the computer was really on the rise and that was kind of driving the crash of what we saw with Atari and CLICO vision that, hey, these computers can play video games but they can do a lot more hence the rise of Adobe and. It really was a sea change in a way that even to this day though the only thing that we can really rival that too is maybe the coming the IPHONE. But even that isn't quite the the way that computers it was just so different than anything else that kind of existed in the home up until that point and I'm sure the one of the reasons that Steve Jobs was annoyed was because the cover image she shows it shows a computer's not dissimilar to the MAC as a separate keyboard and the screen normal VAT but the graphics, even the screen is clearly text graphics. It's nothing like the the vice, the the Macintosh would eventually have and I would imagine that would rank with him that it was backward-looking. But. But for most people that was computers. Everybody was used to so yeah to me it made sense and I actually I do remember that. issue I remember when it came out in the computer was named man of the about on the news. Yeah and it was a it was a big deal. I mean, whoever was man of the year up to that point in Time magazine that was whether it was for. Good things are bad I mean. Man of the year doesn't necessarily mean you're the greatest guy who were that year because clearly Adolf Hitler was may have a year. You know. So it was probably the most influential person for the past year good or ill, and they made it out to Steve Lecturing. About Twenty s lights. Manage your well, he was man of the year and there's a picture of him holding the I Mac. So that must have been the light light nineties late nineties. So he's wearing his elvis cuneiform of then of his black turtleneck and jeans and he's got to be small myspace on. You can tell him, he's the tally, his IBM. Go Yeah. Another big I and This was a big change. It didn't really explode right then and that was the first CDs. Were raised. That was a that was a big deal for audio quality but you and I didn't get into CDs to a few years later. Way Expensive. I. Think it was probably Yeah. I would say my face. Eight, five, eighty six. Yes. Because basically I got bought one for doing well in my my exams. And and I was one of the first hour was a boarding school. So I was one of the few people at a boarding school had a CD player do you remember your first see Yeah. It was slippery when wet by. Bon. Jovi are really was. Yeah. Mine was pyromaniac from DEF LEPPARD. Okay. Yeah. Well, that one to you pretty sane. We'll my my first CD player was given to me as a Christmas present, but I actually went to the store and bought it. And gave it to with my parents money because they didn't know what to buy. because I had a component stereo system. Yeah. Old. Photo of me on on Facebook Stan sitting in front of that. Stereo. System you not yeah I had a am I also added Component Stereo system of different different bits and pieces I put myself and the CD play was the smallest thing I had it was from to Sheba, and it was like a little top lighter. It was almost like an early version of opposable see the play but it run on the maintenance and at the plug into a high flying But yeah, that was that was later on because it took two three years for CD's really I mean even. Bought wine the not every album came out CD. No, no is quite big deal if an album's remastered ray on CD. so So yeah, you you had a fairly limited collection when even even lights are on but but the the you know eight when the the conduct the. The format was adopted and really the Phillips in the on the other people who who helped develop. It really managed salt industry into kind of committing to it in a big way Yes. It took a few years for volume salts increase by the you know I it was the CDs important because it is we'd have no MP three today the CD was the beginning of the digitalization. Amazing. Oh. No question about it I I remember going with the reason I got one. Is Because a store called ABC warehouse was having a sale and they were having a sale on a JBC CD player. And it was like maybe. Hundred powder box. which in eighty? Five I'm going to guess was a really. That was a really good sale. Yeah. I mean that that was just like holy crap it's how much. and. So I bought one and it was like two months before Christmas. So I wasn't going to get us this thing for a while. So I remember thinking before Christmas, it while I should get a CD to listen to this. So I went to a record store called the Rock. Cafe. And CDs at the time were like twenty bucks which. For the mid eighties is a lot of money. And I I remember looking through the poultry. And when I say paltry, I'm not kidding the paltry selection of CD's that they had. And there was a few that jumped out at me. I almost bought Thriller, which by for Michael Jackson which by the way? Biggest album of all time was released in nineteen, eighty two as well list. So we hit that one we can skip But looking through these and I remember seeing Def Leppard Para Mania. And I knew some of the music. Obviously, it was one of my favorite albums so. That's the one about. Yeah. Once I saw those it was like the one right there. And I remember listening to it on CD on Christmas Day and. I could not believe how good it sounded comparative cassette. Well, you have. Quite, literally was night and day. Nightmare it wasn't even close. They was the Hase was gone the you could hear all the music will leave instruments farm clearly because they went to muddled up in the Hague. Nonetheless static and crackles remember dark side of the moon with filing released on CD. Yeah. What A it was a huge thing. Dark side of the Moon from Pink Floyd came out on. CD. It. was gigantic. I just found a picture of my CD PLOUGHS ENTITY THE J nine from. Sheba. I remember it well. At that House loader. I don't remember my. I just lost David, because I hit back on the screen. And so that's that's. Tim so I'm just GonNa back. That's what happens when you send pictures over Wyche is it hangs up the phone unless tim hanging out. Did you. Did. You. Did you hang up the phone when you the Co when you look at the picture? But then I hit back instead of closing the Pitcher, right? Back and went to the previous website previous website Kanye. All right. So anyways moving on one of the biggest and I would argue most influential movies of all time came out mets e I didn't realize that was eighty two. I was thinking that was like a four but knows nineteen to. and it's really the movie. More than any other cemented Steven Spielberg. Steven Spielberg, yeah I mean it was. It's hard for those who weren't alive at the time or old enough at the time to understand the cultural significance of E. Yeah. So big it was and. I question myself about how well it holds up today and in some respects it holds up because it's it's a classic story. Yeah. But in many other ways, it doesn't hold up I know I know is great. Yeah. I know from experience of showing it's my kids that he doesn't really grab them the way grabbed me. I'm on all, but there was nothing to compare it to at the time. Nowadays there's so many movies that take that same formula and do a much better job in special effects and acting and action. At the time for the innocence that we were living in at twelve years old. There, there really wasn't anything like it no and I think. One of the things spill but was good back at that time was good back in that time. Because he did this. Close encounter the third condos well, he was he was the Stephen King of cinema. He could really captured domestic American life on fill in the way that was extremely believable either when people with an exposed to these incredible events you know the family need the way they live the single single, a single parent family and everything. And you know that the stuff we see brave at the time for. You but the stuff you see them do is very, very credible. The kids sitting around playing dungeons and dragons and riding around the bikes and all of the things they do the way they live and you know the girl with all the company toys and Rim and everything. It's all very real and and and it doesn't come across the way that nowadays those things when they when they portrayed come across as you can tell, the set designers built it whereas back then he just felt like you know a real thing. I remember reading that Drew Barrymore he played played little sister. Yeah. She was only three or four at the time she did that movie. And they basically they they played it that it was to her that it was real. Yeah they didn't. They didn't play her that. She was no film Morales offing as far as consent. The whole thing was real an et was real. Obviously the wants to get the best reactions. Alpha. But I think it shows too how much care they had for the story they were creating that they would go to the effort doing because let's face it many movie company's gone. Right bring the kit in. You know give it a lollipops stop crying. We'll. We'll grab the short we need and then bumbler off again. and. They didn't do that with a and I I think For me that's part. What makes Ata great story is the fact that eight feels despite the fact that he's dealing with you know an alien from another planet feels very real. Me But I think you have to. I think maybe the reason it doesn't engage my kids is that it feels less real. So then because the the way people living in that movie is not the way people live nowadays fifth stated no. It may seven, hundred, ninety, two, almost seven, hundred, ninety, three, million, dollars, nineteen, eighty, two game almost a billion dollars that is. That is so much money and that was just the tip of the iceberg think of all the merchandising around e t well. Yeah. But the point is is that he didn't he didn't allow an awful lot merchandising many years before allowed any appetizing based on it and It was also many years before he let the movie come out on video. I think I think he deliberately kept a bit of a lid on that and of course, what happened to is an we remember this from the eighties. Do you remember how many basically knockoffs of et came out? It was probably five years. Probably about thirty or forty movies. The basically were clones of et and we can't we can't mention one. I the only one I think that that really. That really stuck in my mind because it was so famous for being. So banderas Mac and me, we should have the McDonalds. Yeah. the Nikkei at the movies. We also had a blade runner, which wasn't a huge success at the theaters it really. It really became a cult classic auto and SAPS afterwards, which was surprising because it's Harrison Ford kind of not quite at peak but pretty damn close to us peak Also that year you know what? The number two grossing movie that year was rocky three well yeah that's unbelievably huge. Rocky three, the club lying one or the US. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And then I think you and I would both agree. The best movie. Made just shy of one, hundred, million dollars at year but it's the movie that completely turned a franchise around after its initial movie. And TV series the one that really was like, okay. This could actually be good again, and that will star trek to the wrath of Khan. The. First Star. Trek. Movie was bad and Boring Oh my God. It was just like we're all excited from Star Trek or Star Wars and Oh, they're going to bring back the original crew from the Enterprise Hokey TV series from the sixties and odds going to be great and then Star Trek the motion picture was just Oh, it was so bad. Yeah. The motion beaches suffered because with basically they were going to do a TV show another TV show like a like a bit like the next generation really and then at the last minute the decided they weren't going to do that and we're going to do movie, and so they rehashed a couple of scripts into the movie. So we it creatively suffered because the TV show was going to be kind of like the next generation became his robbery was behind it. The first first series of the next ration- was it suffered from an awful lot of plotting plot and Kinda big ideas and and fairly pedestrian an exciting. And the difficulties you can get away with that on the TV show but not in the movie and motion picture really suffered from that also as well I think. A lot of the design choices I made bearing in mind that that even though Star Trek had been off of the TV for. Over a decade at that point. It wasn't off the TV because it was in reruns and that's what made it. So successful, it was so jarring how different it looks in terms of the technology and the look of the ships and everything. Remember there's a five minute montage of just approaching the enterprise. Doc. Yeah exactly an and it looks like a completely different universe and. It made made it very difficult to buy into. Well we would have been okay. If the movie would have lived up to the visuals and it didn't, but they got it right with Star Trek to the wrath of content eighty two, they did a one eighty they made it all about. And some still say that it is still the best of all the Star Trek movies now. Yeah it's extremely well done but I actually like all of the newer ones better than. I, the thing is I watched the wrath of Khan recently is still holds up really well, it was a great idea is a great idea to to basically turn into kind of like a battleship submarine style Levy. Like the fights against each other From the twentieth century he thinks in two dimensions how handsome and you know and then obviously had the whole sacrificial of sparking it, which is Was Con-. Of Star treks equivalent of. I am your father. And the Connie kept. Under wraps until the movie came out certainly from. Elseneer nowadays but certainly for. Many of you went see the movie the first time that was a real shocker. Bombed out that they brought him back in the very next movie. Thank God. They did because I you know one of my favorites of all the original star trek movies. If it's the voyage home voice chime your people's favorites, which is funny because it's probably the least star trek of the social movies. Very character-driven exactly yeah yeah. It's definitely a fun movie though the clever thing they did with with Star Trek to is they bought in a TV producer to produce it. And he conned, he got the property in a way that the people done the motion picture hadn't, and he knew how to how to make it pop, and then they used Nicholas Meyer a great director. And really also really understood the material. and. Really Really Kinda Kinda got it and it. Yeah. It's still pretty much holds up today as a movie, which is You know if something in. The forties pretty good. Some other things The Falklands, wars happened. So. When I mean the reason I put on these because if you were in Britain this this dominated. The probably four or five months of our of our. Time in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two but it's interesting to look back on it because it was the. Festival win. So the Falklands these relatively the bigger than you think they are, but they're a savvy islands in the South Atlantic they're very close to Argentina Lawson close in the also Britain and The the people who live there on. You know I mean it was colonized in the in the mid eighteen of people who live they consider themselves to be. British Argentina always always liked claim to these islands an in last night to they had a military government they decided to invade. As PA propping up emily she government. Now at the time I think everyone expected Britain to just go. Well, there's not very much. We can do about that. Yeah, I think that's Exactly, the sentiment a lot of people are like, well, they're all. The loss of. Their about ten thousand miles away from Britain and instead what we did and I'll military at even at the time was not I mean it was nothing like the American military in terms of sophistication and what have you The Harriers were pretty frigging. Awesome. Remember but they're very, they're very off the wall and the time they'd never been proven in combat toll I'm and and the thing is the Henry. Because of what it can do because it does you know vis landing and everything that imposes limitations L. Yeah. It's but it's not a supersonic aircraft It's it's not huge. Well, it wasn't thought to be hugely maneuverable and really I think everybody thought Britain goes down there you know Argentina's Within five six, hundred miles of the phones are GonNa get their asses kicked, and instead we went down there and we most certainly did not get our asses kicked. and. The other thing is well as. You, look back at it now on from she subjective you might say, well, once we got there, we should have just spanked the Argentinians and we didn't, and the reason for that is that despite the fact that we had the Argentinians, we using I, mean the some of their ships they bought from they were ex World War Two ships from America most of the navy. Walls. Their aircraft were a Vietnam Era Douglas Skyhawks from America. which by the way, our fifties and early sixties designed exactly. We're not modern aircraft by any stretch of the imagination. They did have some modern missiles that they had the exit miss, which is proved itself to be a truly devastating weapon. But, but it also exposed some quite serious deficiencies in the capable. This is the seventies area stuff era stuff that we were flying and we were sailing in particular. And also, some real tactical problems we had but the Harrier. Well Harry. Really kind of proved itself. Turned out the white. When when you've got an engine nozzle that can be rotated. So the land vertically. Yet, if you do that while you're flying at closest closest five, six miles an hour, then basically your aircraft can jump around the sky like a school, the cat. And they flew absolute rings around the Argentinians. I remember watching the news that that's why I knew about the Volkan in wars because. Back in the eighties everybody watched, you know the evening news that's what she did and it dominated here in the US too and it was always. To me and I'm probably mistaken but what I remember anyways was the Harrier and that that fascinated me to no end. I knew it wasn't as fast as what the American military was putting up in the air. But I was how that that is such a fascinating thing that that that Harriers just awesome and they were only recent retired from the royal foles. So eight goes goes to show really what? Innovative design convey an innovative tactics can do over. You know regular salt like by the numbers comparing two different types of thing, and it was air support superiority they achieved over the Falklands that loud that campaign to succeed and. Don't get me wrong I mean all I was still tied today that the British Army soldiers and British Kamado soldiers probably some of the finest in the world Atlanta land you know straight infantry fighting and that was a very important part as well because you know they the ceresnjes increases your air force that got off the supplies exactly. Yeah from an and. Then, the you know the navy was despite the fact they lost several ships and some of them some of the losses were quieting really because they got caught with their pants down you know the British navy. Con approved. It's it's it's worth their as well as I said, he dominated our news for most thousand, nine, hundred, ninety. So it was pretty. Back on the map as as a power to reckon with. Yeah, and you know what? We're seeing some parallels today at the time of the eighteen there was there was a lot proposed cutbacks in the armed forces You know the Loft talker wheat, we get up for wall that we don't ever need to find anymore the Falklands kind of proved that sometimes you have to adapt to find something you had an expected and we kinda go in the same through through a thing with our military the then talk more there was a talk last week actually retiring all of our tanks. Because, we don't need them anymore which. Mean it's. Almost gets the point when you go political cutbacks with military a case of where you might as well not have armed forces at all and no warmonger. I don't WANNA see soldiers fighting anywhere but I do recognize that. Having an forces is is necessary in in the modern. World. Nineteen eighty two was in some respects scary year. here in the US and remember I'm in. West Michigan, not very far from Chicago, Yep and one of the biggest stories that year, which by the way has still never been solved. Was the tylenol scare you a number of people died because they took tylenol and it was poison someone had got tylenol from some stores, put poison in it and return them to the store shelves and not took the died. A Let listen we saw nine as well, which is pretty horrible way to poison. And this was the national media. This to me. This is one of the very first stories that I remember seeing the news at directly affected me because. I in short order every bottle tylenol in the entire country improbably the world was pulled off the shelf. And we saw something change in. It was the tamper proof bottle. You know it was you can tell quickly whether someone has opened the bottle and the the issue was no one ever found out who did it that that is one of the big mysteries that we still have today. I don't think you will ever know who did it unless. The the culprit dies and leaves a deathbed confession will never gonNA know it's You know some people suspected that it was and it was only Indus cog land area and only a couple of stores it was. Targeted at certain individual. And whoever did it? Did it in that way? So you couldn't pinpoint who was an Iranian no. The F. B. I. Investigated that angle I washed a unsolved mysteries or something like that. Probably fifteen years ago about it but. Never found out who did it and it was never repeated. Ni- I is is definitely a strange one And You know I guess probably not just because of temporary bustles but probably, they wouldn't be able to get away with it nowadays nowadays, he'd be able to chemically. Analyze the cyanide used and probably audience five whereas manufatured and the DNA evidence and everything goes well. Lou -gistically tracking of. Of Manufacturing bustles and things like that. Which I presume also came out of that incident. The fact that trach track any individual bottle batches and that she see where it's gone all the way through is probably related to your to that and let's face it. Everybody has that solve logistical capable listening now thanks computers. So yeah. Thankfully, not missile crime you would hope you. Could ever be repeated but I I think the big thing for me about that one was. I have heard this discussed several times as a as an object lesson in how to deal with the crisis, Johnson and Johnson because they basically, despite the fact, it was just a few bottles of in Chicago they pulled the entire US stock of Tylenol and rice off, and that's because they knew they recognize that that was the only way to public confidence and you know a a masterclass enhancer you know. The brand forever and he did it do do the right thing and. And you know have the public continues to buy your products the meantime also, you know guarantee that. We'll the customers can. Bottle of this. So a couple of the last things before we wrap up this episode lawn chair Larry. Idiot, who tied a whole bunch of balloons to a lawn chair rose up in the sky with a pellet gun his idea was he's GonNa pie his shoot a couple of the balloons to come down Any did it was successful he didn't die. But what an idiot I remember being on the news and it's one of those things that is almost become a main. No you often see jokes of people with a you you. Obviously. Find most famously it was in the it was the base that movie up where he tried balloons to his house Most people don't realize quite how many blades you need to be able to lift yourself up in. A hell of a lot or I'm really really big balloons. Yeah. John Belushi died that year. So John Belushi is A. I- alum of Saturday night live He. Just kinda started getting into the movies One of my favorite movies have his was cutting divided actually a love story, but I really really liked that movie. blues brother's of course. I knew him from nine, hundred, forty, one on the team forty one is the pilot Yep, he he he I think he was on the cusp of being a megastar. Yeah. Until he overdosed on heroin I, think it was heroin anyways. And yet he was basically his drug tiling taking was out. Through through all those movies which talks about how he managed to deliver performances because he was just it wasn't just heroin. It was everything it was I understand this actually got off of it pretty good for cotton divide and I think it really showed in his performance in that movie that it was a serious. It was kind of a comedy love story but it was also kind of serious and the character he played in there was extremely well done. It really show it was the only movie in my opinion that ever really showed his the. The range of character that he had that he was a good actor and he could go beyond you know the funny fat guy. you know Chris. Farley famously said he based his career off John Belushi that was his hero and he died at the same age of drug overdose. So long that's that's taking method method. Exchange. the late night with. David. Letterman started that year in the US David Letterman. was. You know alternative before though such thing he was the Anti Carson he was you know he had a snarky nece that didn't exist at that level and he took chances on his program that nobody had seen before. He came I mean. He's always water very long. He really came across the Soviet reverend he would constantly be dissing the network. Was, he was It was an ugly Guy Yeah. You know you're supposed to be a good looking guy or woman if you're going to do a show like that and he's a gap tooth curly-haired orange hair I mean. There's no way the should've worked, but he is so brilliant at what he did I think I. Think one of the. We have this lot nowadays but but back, then one of the things that really might bring him was the fact that he didn't completely just kiss ass to the guests know if he thought the guests something about the guests was ridiculous or stupid would silo. A joke and he was he was a very good at not being too mean I think that's what a lot of people nowadays kind miss is the fact that is easy to be mean to people. He was very good at just crossing the line a little bit and. Without but yeah but without making them feel upset. Ask. The. Audience was in on the joke even if the guest wasn't vast, right? Yeah and you know you see them now he has a Netflix show I think he's done one or two episodes. It's bad It I think his time has passed in every kind of late night show that's come. Afterwards. Owes a lot to the late show with David. Letterman, way more than they owe to say Johnny Carson Yeah As good as the tonight show with Johnny, Carson was. the late show kind of lay the groundwork for what? kind of a every. host in gas could expect on a show like that. Yeah, and and I would argue that. You know those kinds of late night TV shows. are kind of passe now and people don't really care and not very many people watch him outside a youtube. So I wonder how long that? That's going to continue the last thing. Maybe. The most significant event of nineteen eighty. We, still talk about it to this day. A Fan? Through a bat on stage at Ozzy Osbourne Concert? And is he picked it up thinking? It was a fake bath. And bit the head off of it, and it wasn't a fake bat. Well meal of. You've putting the nights the first time leaving. Because he he's he's GonNa. Because it it kind of. Made National News. The interview him talking about the Bat and and as brilliant of a musician that Ozzy Osbourne is and you can agree or disagree I really liked eighty stuff the best He He. He picked it up literally and rain with it. I got. Well. Why always wanted van the stories is. What was the Fan Thinking? Where did they get the bat from? Was Dead. So you through a dentist. At a rock star. To get. Test and say find it. Wasn't in the stadium. So you you found a dead bat probably outside I. Drove to the event with a dead bat so you found it. In your I thought that you went with is I'm GONNA pick it up and throw on stage. Well I mean you can't argue with his results I guess I mean you would think that is you would probably pay this guy some kind of finder's fee. ADCOSE nowadays people go oh. Setup. no, it wasn't her. That's what people will see sharing. It probably would have been a settlement. So that was nineteen eighty two the few things that we have time to talk about what What do you have memories of nineteen eighty two how old were you? What? What pops out in your mind when you think of that year, these are just the ones that David and I found in in that we didn't talk about. We'd love to hear from you You could send us email. It's the show at. A GEEKS PUB PODCAST DOT COM. You can either go to geeks pub podcast, DOT COM or my Mac dot commonly the message in. We'll read some of your feedback here on the show in the future we'll be back in two weeks and who knows what we'll talk about we're going to do a year again but we'll find something else One to talk about and I'll see you then go ahead and next week tech fan at the this week. So Apple I, think we all are expecting new iphones so Mobile Trash. CEO CEO next week on Tech Fan and in two weeks geeks populated. See Them.

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44 - A Neurotics Guide to Perversion

The Fundamentalists

56:32 min | 1 year ago

44 - A Neurotics Guide to Perversion

"Hi, everybody. Welcome to the fundamentalist. We're gonna start just a second. But just a quick announcement. There's slight chance that maybe Pete's microphone was not on four. I fifteen minutes. So we might have had to do some finagling with the audio. So if there's something off hang with it it lasts for sixty minutes. But we didn't want to lose it because it's a good conversation. And yeah enjoy. Welcome to the fundamentalists, folks. Pete. It's good to see you get to see you. Yeah. You have not been no, no, not at all. And I'm about to get I'm about to leave. And I'm about to get on a plane. I'm going to go back to Las Vegas month after going recently, and I love Las Vegas, but then between the stops twit gut's. To go casino and then also Palm Springs. So every weekend I've been fundamentalists sponsored by new this week. This will be the Lux work because not sore because they never ask. Yes. And very excited. And I'm I'm having a great time, but life is a bit of a whirlwind. And that's also going to relate to us being on a scheduled for this podcast. We're gonna talk about here this podcast folks is a combination of philosophy comedy myself. Some would say the comedian, not many, and some many would say that you are an philosopher, but you know, some would. Yeah, disagree. This is. Yeah. This is what we do. I I'm enjoying a nice Cup of coffee here as well. As a hair of the dog cocktail to ease. My woes. Yes. Before getting ready for the Vegas. Yes. Exactly. This spot a podcast is actually sponsored by a try, wink dot com slash fundamentalists. If anybody likes wine out there, we can get more wine from actually as together. Why it's so good people you use it. It's wonderful. And it helps us and we use it just pay for editing podcast. So anyway, are you doing I'm doing good? I've been very relaxing a few months as being very eventful. I I've just been enjoying being an L A and reading and do my usual stuff getting ready for what's what's next? What's on the docket? Probably the next big thing is back to Arlon where we're going to be as well. Yes for we. We should talk about that. Because AMB wake is a boot teak festival that is like full of art and talks, and I've never been and I'm very excited, we have mutual friends who've been you. It's obviously your your thing. So I think you've been what can people look forward to? Well, we have. Uh-huh. We have some world class thinkers there. We're gonna told Mogollon who's a film theorist ach damage. We've got Jamieson Webster as a psychoanalyst Nakad democ. We have Elliott Morgan Kelly Morgan comedian, pull curry comedian. We have I was gonna say academic. But that's the academic struck a comedian. We have. Yeah, we go. We haven't Neil dying the music. Yep. I've got a couple of bounds at a really wanna get cooled though. He retaliates. Barry Taylor is going to be there. Let's just basically it's a it's five days of pub, crawls ideas, cabaret, art, music, whatever. And when you show up you're like, you're no hotel, you're in like, a really cool. Like, no, that's the other one right back away wolf off out. You're not getting any nice hotel. I see to get a shitty. Yeah. Yeah. You got a tenth. Well, in that case, I am infuriated. None of you will get somewhere to stay. Yes. I will get somewhere to stay folks. I'm a special special case, I will be an Airbnb sounds great. But by the way, if we have any locals because like to be honest at this stage, it's hard for anybody to to buy tickets with basically, you know, what we need to sell. But if you're a local there's a fringe tickets to suit, they can go in here, you know. So they don't have to buy a ticket for the fan. They can just buy a ticket to hear you call Monday. They all the evening stuff is is open for. Oh, I can't do that. So fun because I take an advertiser exactly Cooman. What super exciting? I've never been to Belfast. I'm a war even in Europe at all. I've never been in any kind of place across the pond. So that's very exciting. What are we talking about on this say, well, you know, I wanted to talk about it? Why we're so rubbish? Putting these idle time on what I wanted to do is justify that shoe by actually this is the way we should be doing things. So this is an episode of rational rationalize it. You do some member of excuses by reasons to justify it, exactly. Because it was funny. Actually mover token about this. And I was thinking about it. I was going like, well, there's a slight issue that many of us fierce today, especially your generation your generation cold. I'm right. On the late early early millennial this issue. I think more of a millennial problem. It's a pro has been a problem screen time. You guys are in it in a very acute way. It's basically there's this if anybody's ever read biblical stuff, they'll new this free as be in the world, but not utilize doodo phrase unpack without means. Because really what we're facing today is this need to be completely integrated into the world. So what we're doing and people are doing is fooling in their hobbies and their interests into their work into their way of making a living their way of being more integrated into the ideological structure in society. If you find a way to make money doing what you love you'll never work a day in your on. You'll start loving what you do that should be the next part of every visit goodness as you stop loving. Yes. It will start to spy your hub. So here's an example. I was on explained. Why haven't done stand up comedy is? Yeah. Yeah. It's funny. Because when I see that call medical like yet, find a way of doing what you love your that work day in your life. You're going yet. But there's something missing, which is a sooner. As you start. He fooled. What you love into the desire to have a reputations who have mummy to have success as soon as all of those get wrapped up in your hobby. Your hobby changes your knocks leak the way you would into your hobby because one thing about a hallway you could say is that a hobby is actually supposed to be a way for you to resist being in the world. It's what you do it his skit to to get a moment of something different. Or in more academic language. We've talked about before it's a temporary Toma zone. It's ties movement. Were you re imagine your world in a brief look at two days a week go off, and you do this thing that you love doing and the ideas about toz movement does improve the rest of your life. But as a critique of your life, it's not integrated acidity integrate atolls movement into your existence. It stops being tiles. On it becomes something else. And that's what I love to kind of on cool. Cool. I love this. Okay. Great. So one example, we were talking about us. But I met a lovely guy is actually had a Petri trae on event this high note, I shoot opposite from five to nine the we showed up five clock that we were the first their realize us a bit about height felt like the cool kid reliving roundtable nose bigger, you get your experience while. So my experience was you guys? I think we're at that kind of the cooler kind of we were definitely the more. Yeah. It was like one of fill the Franco's. Him wanna his people was there were few people have one guy had like a network hit. I forget his name. But yet he had so many different patriotic counts that were or pages that were doing really, well, he manage all of his very you're at the steel. I was basically a focus group for around whether were like is this. Okay. What do I what direction? Do you want us to go? And I was like, I don't know. We just don't know what we're bay company. I got to the table. I was at the children's table because I was with all the people who are individuals trying to make a living. So it was more fun signing you ugly right at the cut off too. Because they they broke down. How many what who actually is on patriot unable to sort of make their life happened with it? And it's it, you know, it's gargantuan Li yeah. I mean, it's like infinitesimally small and how what which is. So that means that you probably were bigger fish is the under some people up my grip doing very well. One of the MRs particular, dicey, lovely guy. He does sloppily. I didn't even know a slow videos where but it's where he goes to someone like the Gessen Eli slot machines videos. What happens on pits that up online? And that he does this every day he house like so many kitchens. I mean, he has icon remember the number, but it's it's a lot. But what struck me this is just a good example of he pro the enjoys slot machines. That's his thought was something he enjoyed doing. But then he find a way which is kind of wonderful out really wonderful moment where you find a way of making a living. Doing what you actually enjoy yet? But gambling takeout married. Yeah. But by he's ever beat the system. What a genius. Yes. The Sifford never gets beaten dos. The parole always wins even wonder filming it yet on. That's definitely to Ida gablers hice always wins. And the system always wins. There's ways to beat the system, but it's not by playing the system's rules. And if you play by the rules, and I did get talking to very much. He might not say this. Nah, he Haas to create these videos every day. He's having to record these these slot machine. Things very soon that the enjoyment of that is going to is going to wear. So when we first started talking about this this episode you'd mentioned. Because we talk about these things for hours before we do them people. Don't know, you know, we go back and forth with a lot. But would you mentioned it you said it was about beat becoming a product. And I thought the term like don't become a product. It was so interesting because you're right. Like, you do this thing the patriotic create a world in which all of a sudden, you're like your machine yet just like has churn out stuff. And I know this is like we're it seems like we're flirting with anti capitalist rhetoric, and I simply won't stand for it. Yes. No, no. Not this out in this. Household. We watch Fox News, and we will love America. But yeah, it is there something in that. Is there some kind of connection they were? It's like we're just becoming drones. I mean, there's a beautiful freeze of used by a guy who was Herbert mukisa womanly. He wrote a cold one dimensional mom. It was basically to say that really with the industrial revolution amazing things happened. So like incredible advances, but there was a d injure that we do integrate with. Thin whatever political or economic system we exist within that we become one. They mentioned we start to each other as commodities we start to your life as commodity. That's why I was thinking about our Paul Constas in one sense. We are commodifying our French guests, we hire we sit in the super we chop. Then we thought that's recorded. Megan. Do putt cost dot can come bite you in the valley. It's so funny to LA don't even like each other night. Exactly that this is Terry as apart the success of this podcast, much of any. I think any like group of friends that I know in Los Angeles has started a podcast, which is such a weird. Like eventually, you're just like hanging out. And you're like, you know, other people should hear this at. Narcissistic? I mean, we have like we do sort of in create together a product that is good in this podcast, which is talking about philosophy and comedy. But then it also. Yeah, we don't really I mean, obviously lately I'm completely. I'm gonna phase enamored having time off until it's different. There's also that which is a scheduling becomes a not good. I'm probably that's gonna last forever. It probably would live that good line and peepshow. What is it? Yeah. I do I don't speak too soon. But I think everything's gonna be all night eroded some. What I think everything's going to be great forever. That's exactly how I feel like I don't wanna say they can. But I think I actually had that thought those in Palm Springs of grace, and I wasn't with her. I was just in the bathroom. And I was a great time when I was restroom, and I looked at myself Maryland. Do I need to be happy. Now, it's weird like with with with bated breath. But yeah, we do the podcast kind of when we do it right now. But I do think it creates a better dynamic than being like, you know, I don't like when people are like we go back and forth with this in the valley foot because we have a schedule, but there's certain times where it's like nobody in the options and not do things video will often how fun and I kind of like today it's Friday, and I'm not going in. And normally we would shoot stuff on Friday and Steve knuckling. And so it was like it was just have a day. But behave do that. We're all shot. I we have our schedule in place for not missing anything. And it keeps our editor from our main shooter editor from having to drive up. And it's like this also creates a world where we don't were when we see each other. Again, we're happier and having more fun because it's also like another stuff get serious. But the podcasting is like I would hate for either of us to be like I can't do something because I have to be filling the podcast at nine. AM exactly. And we do that we schedule it. But not in the way, it's like regimented we schedule it. And then I don't know if we ever. Fulfill? Let's schedule look like. The moment to the astronaut. It's not going to happen. Yeah. Because I see I saw a clinical psychologist well known clinical psychologist, for example, saying that he works with people who say have trouble sleeping or have trouble hanging out with their parents or their their children, right because they're always wanting to work. He was saying that one of the ways he deals with this is he shoos them high sleeping more hyena with more with their kids high enough more of their partner will actually make them better workers. Yeah. So what's weirdly hotter there? Yes. A friend of mine. My friend Joe last night about doing just that rose. Like, we need to do once or twice a month. We need to go out schedule it, and let's get drunk and have fun and talk because we're not doing that. And we're not doing it as a group or not doing it as a company, and it was like, this is it looks gonna make us better it, well, the sorts of this is the by way is well the hangover yet. But the thing is suddenly what happens very corrupt city. What happens is even your social time is fooled into making you better yakkers, if rather than your social time potentially being walk gets you to think of another type of worker another way of doing. So that that's the issue think millennials really fierce even drug use and stuff like auntie Zayed's pills. All of the stuff, we've talked to this can make us more efficient workers, but that's not necessarily a good thing. Because then we become more and more product. Yeah. You know, very interesting at there's no win. Except for the fact that what a good problem to have. Yeah. Well on the Goodwin for you. Because you know, like one since you're working very hard the moment on yard trying. See that's very sweet of you to say. Yeah, you are really going for bucks. The great thing is you're also going to Vegas of the how fun I'm actively seeking a certain amount fund. Yes. Unders as bataille, grit, floss or tie. He talks about high any system any energy system any political system at basically any system requires energy to function, but that systems also gather at more energy than they need to think about the sun. So the song gives energy to the earth, but it gives Oxy more energy than the Arthur choirs excess of energy, and what we as human beings to find ways to get rid of that excess energy. And this is fast Ables come in. This is where parties come in. This is where basically bataille saying up any system that tries to make you completely efficient. The you. A us all of your energy for cause is going to collapse that actually human beings need spaces where we are giving an excess of energy for new return a system based on endless growth is unsustainable. Was that what you're talking about? Let's just amused. Song that I like all right? Yeah. Yeah. I think it's called unsustainable. But it's like, yeah. It's really it's a fun song. Without that's dot dot is true. I trying to think it probably does connect vamp, and it's not what you're talking about primarily. But it is this idea of like, you're starting read need these spaces like vehicles and Palm Springs were were there is no there is no economic economic. I don't mean financial. I just mean like I exchange. Yeah. You're not doing fun for other people. And of course, Instagram's a big issue for us soul and videoing is are we having a good if we don't actually find a way to monetize it or MC MC us, look better. There's also the flips. Mean the Instagram stuff is such an interesting because as a social influence her, which is coincidentally how Hitler's moms grab a condition for a living. Classic joke. That's your. I need to start saying in Boston OB laugh Boston on February seventeenth folks, come on by but with my zone and Craig on and anyway, as that as that type of person with followers, I also have been that for six years now. And when it comes to the commodification of my pastimes, I have stopped giving a shit too. And I happen to be with someone who I think also doesn't give shit. And now it's like if it's a double edged sword too because I don't want to be the person who hides things either. And then when I show them, of course, there's a bunch of comments, and it's a bunch of like opposite. I have a in that part's cool for a second. And then it's very like. Okay. Like, let's shut the door. But there's no I don't know what the balances there, and it, isn't it? It's like an impulse to be like, this is fun. Let me show people. And then there's another impulse. That's like now, it's it's there's no win really mess. Right. And the thing that's not right, which a lot of people talk about. We we all want easy solutions. So some people for example, go the I'm going off social media or I'm not use my food and three days a week. Whatever dots. Not a problem. That's create. If you all of us have to set Bindra sometimes on our life. This screen time use the screen time thing that's a. Yeah. Haven't used it. But you know, that stuff can be helpful in a lot of people. But the only thing that we have to remind ourselves of is that it's not that social media is bad or good. It's it's hard. We're using it. So so people competent videos up of them having a good time on it's not economic. It's not a newer to build their brand a, but but also people can do it for that reason. So a lot of it is like on my just as an individual becoming a one dimensional Jill on my starting to view myself as a Kamal through the lens of whatever you're putting out there even on like Facebook. That's a huge thing. Yeah. I posted a photo on Facebook for the first time in ages, and I was like. Oh, this is very interesting. And you drop it in there. Oh, yeah. This is a whole nother world that's closer to like just my friends in family Muslim family. But yeah, it's a diff-. It's like, oh, this is like I wanted to post something I didn't want to go it to be a huge public thing. So I did it just on Facebook. And it's like what a weird mental thing that we all have like we all kind of have different digital worlds that we can exist. That's different is true on this is where all coming perverts. Yeah. Well, finally tightly everyone else's catching up then a bit ahead of the curve. Yeah. You you've been doing it? Well for years I've seen your room. Joe came out of the bathroom is he was like, dude, you gotta clean your bathroom. And I was like Joe I haven't been here in three weeks. I don't know what's happening. Ruin. You're breaking some rules for like. Please. You couldn't cook food in there. Shut down immediately. If you had weakened immune system, I think you couldn't go in there. And how people. Yet, so perverse. It's not we live in a society, potentially. We are being encouraged to have a perverse structure. This is why there's two good documentaries on that flicks. By with the she's ex. She's really, yeah. Yeah. Really good. I know there's actually maybe three there's his famous ones are the perverts guide to cinema. Yeah. Thanks. So maybe it's on YouTube by. Yeah, you can watch on YouTube guests find I'll definitely search for project on Netflix. I didn't know that was cool. They're very good. But the reason why the question oversee I come to. When you hear those documentaries is why are they call the perverts guides perverts guy to ideology perverts guide to cinema on one way to understand up is she's Acas making the point that we are being encouraged the have a type of perverse psychic structure, and what that means is the pervert is a person who is able to be fully in the world perverse. Subjects find it really easy to be fully integrated into whatever environment they're in. So for example, they're very good at being judges. See us lawyers politicians. Butts with a caveat because nobody can be fully integrated into the world kill you. Right. So the caveat is you have a transgressive private world. Right. So the perverse subject. They're really good at just giving themselves to their work hundred percent. But then on the weekend. They're sniffing kooky and off ramp boys aas or their do do. You know, Brazilian Palm Springs has all sorts of activities. The fact that I did that isn't like, yes. Be the headline. Yes. Not unhealthy necessarily pastime Sunday. It's not don't put me in a box. Yes. I mean. So, but but here's the funny thing. That's the extreme. Because we all know. Oh, yeah. Perverse subjects like at private schools where everybody is tall to be, you know, treat everybody fairly bassoon Lurgi Ryan on yet bouts, then you have your secret society where you get drunk, and you're you do terrible things. Right. Dawson perverse structure. But in a way dots. What we're all encouraged? Denver the weekend. Yeah. You should be like that. Right. Shouldn't you kind of go out, and then like B O blow up steam Stamen kind of there's nothing necessarily wrong with it. There's a better way. I'll just before he gets on a plane to Vegas. But that's a good thing. Right. I'm being my best self. It is definitely the way that we are being encouraged in the west oct- sue in other words, fully integrated into your work nine to five Friday. But then at the weekend you and you get drunk, you do some crazy stuff. Dot's dots. A Louis, you're not a perverse person. That's a perverse structure. So the the perverse person is very good at being in the world on the other side is the psychotic the psychotic is really out of the world. They a psychotic individual can create fantasy worlds were you know, they get into conspiracy theories. They become paranoid. Somebody's cool who've rain somebody's vacuuming are outside door for the first time in ten years ever been Tano. Yeah. Yeah. The the the sided carpet out there till right now, you'll be able to see it once they. Take shelter. The this iconic individual they get caught up in found the cities of the FBI being after the or Cam trails or or psychotic communities that believe that foods are going to are going to take us away on a certain d it etc. Etc. So psychotic individuals are always tans awards being out of the world. So if the temptation of perverse object is to be in the world, the temptation of the psychotic is to be completely out of the world. This is. Here in that, folks. It's pretty funny sounding, but it didn't you Roddick is in the world, but not offer. Okay. But here's the thing. Yep. I'm definitely under outta. Yep. Put I don't know. I feel the perverted stuff applies to that said though. I don't know, ma'am. I go there's an interesting. Thing that happens at work where like I go into work, and I'll be like gung ho gonna write this. We're going to do this. And I'll get there early make coffee, and then my buddy Steven show up. And we'll do a thing where he's like. He's a you wanna smoke something real fast. And then we'll we'll film and I'm like, yeah. I do it's a very like, I don't know what bracket that fits into because there's an element of leg. I guess it would be I guess, you're right. It would be literally doing recreational active. That's funny. Yeah. Was talking to Joe about this world. Like, I haven't smoked pot in a long time. And then Joe's like you do it before we film, and I was like I don't count that. And I was like, oh, no. That's what that is. Not so funny because my my Jimmy once he was telling me that had given up drinking because I'm not drinking a mouse. He's telling me, he's drinking a beer, and I'm like, you're drinking beer. He's oh, no beer doesn't kite account. That's nothing. Especially the. Yeah. Normal beer union. A Miller lite. You can have like twelve of those things and be fine. But yeah, it was like it was like, oh, yeah. I guess I do. But that doesn't that's not real that stuff is that's for work. That's me. I told him. I was like it's just my chance. They can go down and like hang out with Steve IRS, I getting blow off steam and then come back up. But yeah, it's a living example of jazz on shootings literally Hopkins to jazz. That's talk would Jess I wasn't a drug addict. Right. Mark says like dude telling it every day. I am telling you I'm going to write the pilot that I write that is about us living together is going to be peepshow two point. Oh, it's going to be. It's exactly that except with the comedian, and the philosopher, and there's going to be added stuff, and it's going to be a little bit more. Not you know through the eyes person. I will. All of my check. I think we could do we could do some cool. We could do a cool like spec thing and fell mentor something maybe about because it'll be real isn't a real. Harry sitcom. But anyway, yeah, we own because what's happening is most people low most people that are kind of new Roddick's, but you Roddick's are always tempted to either get rid get to get rid of their anxiety, either by giving themselves to your perverse structure or a psychotic structure so anno- on giving myself to perpetrate yet, which album to self diagnose them. So then your audit person might go. I want to join not sex cult, right? I thought songs like they've got the answer to that them being tempted to get rid of their Ziobro by getting rid of the world or they might give themselves fully to their work on then they tried to release their tension at the weekend by getting obsolete drunk number. But this is where there's a better way, this is where the free as being the world, but not actually has a real philosophical insight. First of all is want say props to you because I've been oh looney toon during this podcast, and you have done a great job of keeping on topic. Oh, thank you. I bet people are noticing in their appreciation because I appreciate it because we're going off on tangents and stuff, and you are back at it's real good conscious than Mika. This we go and we go off in a time. When we come back. We'll it's a perverse structure. Yep. Oh, we do the thing. We do the talking then we go, and we come we enter into the world of us just chatting, and then and then we go from the absurd zaken. Yes. It's actually this is a beautiful metaphor for the entire thing that you're talking about in some way, and I can't bullshit enough right now because. Yeah, I'm hungover anyways. Thank you. Thank you. You're doing a great job this episode than I am at all. I love your new. I love the meta analysis where we stop and go like Hari are we doing the back to? Okay. So it's better that because we do that at the end of every episode every every time we stopped recording. And then you'll go I think it was good. And then you'll get or you'll go. What did you think of that? And I know there's I know what that means. Oh, yeah. The two different meetings. The add on the they had the movement either to get rid of your diet yours as remind by by either giving ourselves to perverse structure or a psychotic structure, but what's the alternative deal? Turn it is high to mobilize your anxiety. Hi to enjoy it. Hide. A to weaponize it for the good. And that's that's because the perverse structure. It just won't just wants to make you into a woman. I mentioned individual who feeds for that. We commodified everything in your life fools up even sleep even meditation yet everything into being a more productive individual or the psychotic which is get rid just jump bite of society joined the sex cult or join, you know, the little community. That's in the middle of. Of newer on try and get to the world those are two ways to try to avoid this. But the real challenges is highly you enjoy your discomfort in the world, and Heidi make sure that you have spices in your life. That are not commodified that actually are are not voluble at what bataille would say basically pure excess of sacrifices. What sacrifice was the care or not obsessed of sacrifice was I mean because it when you sacrifice your your best. Honorable one of the symbolic notions. There is that there's no commercial or economic value to that. You're literally destroying something with like entail floor it with a using. It's a pure access of sacrifice of getting rid of something with light return. That's kind of what a hobby at its best should be it should be something that is quite side of a Konami. It's it's something that is pure gift or pure destruction. Not not come out of. Yeah. Interesting. I've never thought of sacrifice that way. Yeah. That's what Weipa tie tie. You is a religious thinker on a pornographer. And really, yeah. Yeah. He was a grit kind of a. A eclectic person. He wasn't a surrealist here. He was a pornography. Oh, of course, things sue well together in bataille, they do because it was like the pure access of sex. This is why he didn't like the sexual revolution in many ways. He he didn't like the commercialization commodification of sex for him soccer, Feis and sex are oct- of pure destruction. With a return, dude, we we were me and Joe were at this event, and this thing, and there was this person. Who is like they were talking about like, we started base Jews talking about sex, and she was talking about how she does like sex stuff. And at the end, it's like we're dudes were being kind in. We're also assholes we can be assholes. We very self self admitted assholes, and there was a conversation of like what happened to sex and sex used to be like. She used to be so cool, and as to be kind sexy, and it definitely got usurped by we talking about. It's everyone now is like Saksak's XXX, and it definitely has made me on a personal level. Just be like, well, this is like this is something I used to having Zayed you over at will. I still have anxiety over sexy doesn't but like growing up in a Christian world sexes. Like this big taboo like mysterious thing. And and now we live in an era where it kind of is like just so ubiquitous and everywhere, and I guess maybe every generation goes through this. Maybe it's part of entering into my thirties where I'm just like up like this is not everyone has this in everyone is commodified it, and it's made it less special for him. Yeah. An onion indefinitely. There's something. We should do. We always did do who episodes on sax. But you get more to. Yeah. People would listen if we did more episodes. Yeah. Because there is a certain sense. You see this oxygen the popular culture that things like sex and desire personal idiosyncrasies on like, what makes you like the things that make us all switch. Our our our desires that are often. Bob, our desires at are often dirty and on and secret that that those are there's no space for them in the public realm that if you know, if you're yes, it used to be if you wanted to be if you wanted to go I be a drug sacks rock and rule. You Kim a rockstar you just lift this crazy life, but interestingly ni- within the entertainment world, there's a certain sense in which you do things are like you have to be very careful and rightly so in many ways, but the point is is a big din their big things, it's almost like you have to everything we do house to just be commodified hostile be part of this. What's? The what's the answer? What do you do with that? Like, I mean, is it a if you exist in the world, but not of it like there is a which I love free to talk more on. But like, there's what can you do like this is the world we live in it certainly the world I live in. I have commodified. My actually, you know, what's interesting. I don't know that I it at least in terms of the valley folk, I don't know how much value for what you commodified. I try to sell my soul, but didn't get much. Exactly, my soul, my soul. But it was turned out. It was. Yeah. Yeah. He saw argument said the job. Yeah. I feel like my friendships with the other folks of have has grown exponentially since commodifying it. So I can't I would say like we didn't we weren't all hanging out all the time before the valley. Fo- kaplan. We would see each other every now, and then it'd be different relationship with everybody. And now it's like a very good time. But it's also like em I think I don't think that time of closeness would have happened without the commodification. Yeah. Well that that's been in the world. But not in the sense of your we all have to live within the world. There's nothing wrong with a lot of our world. Again, you know, you can make a good life. You can enjoy grit food these days, you can do lots of things you've commodified something with volley folk, but you also have spaces that are not like, you know, last night, you want your friend who Juba on us for charleena by life dutiful all of that. And so. In a way. It's it's basically going do you need the species of resistance to to your world within your world? Yeah. And that's why I think you're you're doing, you know, but but we're so tempted on I have a temptation wars, the perverse structure. I was wondering I was like, yeah. We should talk about like are. You you go to casinos. You got you can't what's your what's your sort of? Yeah. Yeah. We'll see. I don't really suffer from much anxiety. I should suffer from word. That's why with a you. Are you are perpetually relaxed? So this the drugs is the the the what they do in psychoanalysis is when you go in they kind of Mickey into neurotic, thus the ideas, whatever whatever you are they try to make you act like a neurotic in other words, they get you to start questioning your life. Why do that why do I think like why have those dreams? Why treat my mom or my dad or my friends like that? So you'll find that in the therapeutic setting the neurotic is the person he has the most potential for change. So you get people to inhabit the neurotic speaks to feel anxiety to question themselves because then you Roddick's the one he's always questioning do. I love them. Do I know D I like my job to like my do. I like where I live not used to undertone of constant stress yet. This concentrates is constant question. The. Yeah, that's really hard to silence except me when you're drunk long. You ought to people get drunk or not even drunk just have a few drinks just to skip that. Anxiety on my I might be on cool in this party on my did I say the wrong thing all about sick of plague of like self-awareness? Yes. Really, you're too self aware. And then yeah. Because I get like in my head where I'm like, so self aware of everything, and it's like, you got what do I do to just get out of this brain? Yeah. On the problem is if you if someone's going to say to party on the drink a bit in order to silence voice, it rid the return of the repressed the next day. They can go. Oh my God. I act inappropriately. What did I do? Did I talk to you, etc? So but the the analyst Oxley tries to in a controlled environment. Get you to be like to actually turn up that voice to kind of really get to look at. Yeah. On the ideas, going Dopp voice is actually if you can mobilize that that will create a libido energy Belkin energy for you to to begin to work through stuff. Maybe change dimensions of your life on also accept the voice. A little. But I find it very hard to access the voice. Yeah. Interesting. But you know, about about I feel the same at times. I mean, yeah, I've I've in my. Extended sessions of bla-bla-bla therapy, blah, blah, blah. It's a lot of that's lower like, okay, let let's look at that. And he'll do he'll he'll do the funding. Like, nope. Stay in it. And I'm like, it's very fun. But it's also like, it's exhausting. Who cares? If the if if your therapists can't get you into that space. It's kind it's not we as to time, but it doesn't get very far. And if you get into the space of feeling conflict within you feeling that's why psychoanalysis again, the the what's called the short session only leukaemias practices, but we're a session might last it lost three minutes. It could actually you could walk into your onless on this rim, and they could say sessions Hoover still have to pay them. And then you have to leave only Laconda dot really, but I did short sessions for awhile. I would have the majority of my psychoanalytic sessions were fifteen minutes or less. Why why would well because the? Ideas that you're well, I think this is what he was trying to do is the I was not getting angry. I was not getting annoyed. I was not having a fact I wasn't getting frustrated so actually by shutting off the session early. I he was trying to vote. My fish reassurance. Anger. Get me to does ended that work. You get to a certain extent. But probably yeah, I should have done it for longer. But but the the angrier. But it is it's a grip technique for some people. It's only by the way, they're very precise about when they use an high. They use a. I agree it. Here's a good example. I was doing psychoanalysis with a win Patricia Patricia Garavito and won't point. I was talking about my previous analyst who was brisk. And I said who's book I have an yeah, he's he's Stacey one of the leading leukaemia on really incredible. His the book on. Yes. A clinical approach to Freud is is really good. I still haven't finished it. So it's gonna remain on my shelf for. Yeah. Ever. But yeah, no. It's really NO. He's great. He's a great writer. You're talking about him with Patricia Tricia. So I was I've said what would hop on is often. We would be talking by something in a soon as I would kinda reas my voice and say guess that's good insight. He would end the session and Tricia was like did that did out. It was frustrating for you. And I was I guess it was and then she went, okay, we'll end the session there. Number. It's hilarious to ten minutes in. But he has a problem getting angry. Oh, good on that. But it was like the very what was clever by short sessions. I think some people don't like him some omelets don't like them. But is that the very length of the session is used in order to help get you. It will to help do something. And in this example, is to help you get get frustrated start to feel otherwise I could go three RS of just talking with. I Anne Anne emotional effect at all. Yeah. And then it becomes that sword elect topical lake issue based where you're like like, I did that my last therapy session where and I didn't like it, but it did help. But it was throw the nature where it was out. Whereas like bullet points rose like this, and he'd be like this this this we covered like five subjects or something. And when it was done. I was like well that was just me asking advice that wasn't really therapy. That was just me being like my here. My good hear what's going on what's going on. And I don't like that. Because that fell. Dependent more than felt like like, I was really working on any sense psychoanalysts are very very attuned to stop not. I mean, some psychotherapists and some kinds lers dots. What you're needing? But in psychoanalysis, they they'll stop that Gaga's soon as you start to talk theory, for example, Togo is this what you're doing. And whatever they'll they'll they'll go wire centrists, and you're asking why are you asking like it's always a bite trying to get under get get under get something almost like there's an unconscious thing. How long with almost as if? Theory and see if we can come up hammer anything. Yeah. It's very remember as I was in the therapy session. He would start talking about one subject, and I'd be like. Got I understand yet. The next thing is, and it was very like I was cutting him off. It'd be like, okay. I get it. Let's not like, whatever. It's always time. I got also talk to you about this. And the wasn't as good. No. It's about it's not a fun part. You don't get very far you're paying for someone to listen to you. And maybe give you a bit of advice, but not really fundamentally challenged the whole structure of your life to for the change changes spots to change its spots. I like that. Yeah. We're the leper to changes spots. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Different cool man would have fun fun. So anyway, so back to product you'll be having a pro you don't want to become a product at the same time. We live in a society in a ecosystem that's going to kind of like make that happen. Regardless of what what's the advice that you would have to people to not become a product not become a machine not become a thing. That's like, you know, how how what what should you? What's the most tangible advice, and maybe this is an impossible question asks probably goes against the the very nature what you're talking about. But like what's the best piece of advice for people to live in the world? But not a not. Yeah, that's great. 'cause this is tree like really of any ideology or any system. Whatever world you live in. There is always a temptation to give yourself fully to it. Or to completely reject. But Heidi you stay within up, but not not become audit in a healthy way that mix difference. And I suppose a real practical advice is first of all go Kay. What's my temptation is my temptation perversity, which is all through myself into my job five days a week nine to five as long as I got my Zan retreat on Saturday where my church on Sunday or my drinking on Friday night. Then, you know. So I do is I deal with things. Or is my temptation to threw it all away. You know, join some religious cult whatever. And then start to kind of try to ask yourself. Are you commodifying fooling everything into economy, and by Konami, I simply mean valley everything you do you sleep? Because it makes you a better worker, you you how fun because you can put it on Instagram. You're not being human. Yeah. You're just. Yeah. You're becoming one dimensional. You're you're. Treating yourself as a commodity your commodifying, not just other people, which we do all the time. But we are commodifying yourself and ask yourself is their area of my life that resists thought what does the area and Heidi I protect that Heidi I expanded Heidi. I enjoy it. And it'll be different for everybody. But it's kind of isolated. What is your hobby? I it is funny. You said you said it brilliantly about you talked about that free as a whole make your hubby your job your number. And then the second bit which is the thing to remember. No, hold on a second may be by definition, a hobby is something that should never be something that you fully tick mickan to your work dudes. Cypress hill has a song called to rock superstar to you wanna be Iraq superstar and live large big cars five house where it's a old rap song. And there's a line. There's like a spoken. Word rap at the end Murray's is like, yeah. It's a fun job. But it's still a job. And it's like, oh, yeah. This is inevitable. Evitable? We've talked about this with the valley folk it's like this success. The this stuff that like we're on a good path right now. But like the best moments are still get like, we're always just like, this is work. This is a it's taking from us in somewhat. Even though it is bonkers fund yet dot that. Rob songs dot shoes, they desire we all have to try to get rid of the struggle of life in some way. So you get rid of the struggle of life by making your hobby. What you do or by skipping whatever. But actually the point is new e confiscated struggle. That's the insight on an in philosophy. It's called the onto logical antagonism at the antigun is and that is built into being self. In other words struggle is is inherently a dimension of being the onto logical antagonism of Cyprus hill. Every there us out the title. That's very good. Of. But it's yeah. The struggle is part of being itself. And that's why that's why there's new way of of fixing it sue for the perverse subject. It looks like it works, but they have to have their crazy weird faddish club on a Friday. They're saying club on a Sunday, there, whatever the this iconic thinks they can skip it. But then, but they fall into power Neue on this extreme sense at the other is attempting to destroy them, the neurotic is just like why can't I escape it? Yes. Exactly. Then you're all like wants to be perverse or psycho right on the. But the the hopping Roddick walking in a park is a good metaphor for what we're aiming up is a, Hoppy neurotic, not delude, the philosopher, he says, Hoppy, schizophrenic is his notion. But I think the psychoanalytic ideas that we wanna be a hopping your Roddick being in the world, but not Alva challenging are. Sales to try to live better up. But realizing that there's no way to escape thought struggling tie that you're never gonna get out yet. You're not gonna make it L new exit Lazard would say, well, that's very beautiful. I have thought I don't remember what it was do you want to tick away? So we have the takeaway point probably are. Yeah. We're at a nice forty nine minute. That's very good time. Oh, yeah. We do feed the Akasha lutts tick away. We'll talk about this last podcast. We did. But you have a remarkable ability to come up with subject matter that does in some way feel very relatable in miserly. I look at your life, and then decide subject matter in relation whatever's going on and it works, and you're hitting it out of the park. Yeah. I mean, there's definitely like I can relate to all of that. I also feel like there's but I also go their seasons of life and I'm like season. But this also if you wanna go crazy with it in this perverse structure, maybe the season of life is part of the prefers structure, just you know, it's just a longer elongated version of it. But yeah, it's a like it a lot. I think that what would be my take away, by the way, you're saying like these are old offenses like the perverse structure is a defense against the struck. Well of life the psychotic structure is at defense against the struggle. Yes, you Roddick's attempts to self medicate, three religion or drugs and alcohol or whatever it dots way to try to sell you know, to to protect ourselves not all of these are legitimate strategy. Yes. To some extent the problem is when they become so big yet. So if anyone listen to this go shit, sometimes I do go white and go crazy on a Friday night. Whatever like there's nothing wrong with it. Because it works is a works on the because life is difficult butts. You don't want it to become such a solid structure the economic challenges who really you're you stay in a terrible marriage because you have that. The thing on the side or the Joel or whatever, you're perverse, the perverse structure. The problem is your transgressive oct- keeps you in the Siyam world urine. It keeps you in the rally March Hollis's is much as you feel like you might be wild. And crazy, you're actually just do using it. So you can be monotonous. Yes. It's I mean, we we come to this theme in different ways like when we talked away via like people Gouda vehicles too crazy because then they go back into the they're the life that they hit for the rest of the year. And it's like, oh, so vehicle is not actually helping Chinchar life. It's actually making Yunan your life for your transgressive weekly or yearly visits Avia goose actually keeps you in a situation spot for which also might be a result of people going. They choose that they do that like they would ever life that they're in which is something I have to learn because I'm always like go for do this change this, you know, make the life. That you want, and blah, blah, blah. And then you some people, and I'm guilty of this to you. They're like, no, this is this is the situation. I'm in. I have priorities that might be different than my own. Yeah. Happiness or growth, and I'm like, oh, that's just not. That's nothing. I can be like I can't not respect that. But anyway, you're you're you're inviting people be conscious with that. Because you're absolutely right. There's sometimes you're in job, for example. If course I'd like to leave my job, I'm not happy in my job. But there's no other options. Yeah. Exactly. But then put be being conscious because if you're unconscious of that. Then will you'll do is you'll get become an alcoholic or something. You'll get drunk every weekend, you'll damage your liver. You'll die young. But if you are aware of all damages saw the say some research points to it, but I'm not convinced. Okay. I mean, I still believe Guinness when they say Guinness is good for you. Yeah. I'm not gonna start believing scientists now. No, no, white you on this stage. So yeah. So the the person who's not conscious of that. They're going to damage him. Selves. But if you're conscious of it Yukon begin to be healthier hell, you so you can. Yeah. So that's we just made a good episode of this God dang podcast. This is a good year economic weight. We either your think that because the edible just kicked in no edible. I am completely. I did have a drink. But yet only because I'm about to by the way, folks listening. I'm not like on a bender right now. I'm having. The funny thing is you're I think you're a healthy example of what I'm talking about. Which is you are doing work hard. You're in the world doing what you love you've made your hobby into your life butts. You also have these areas of your life that are just pure access on fun on the joint with light commodifying everything. Yeah. That's kind of what I'm arguing for is that we have to try to be conscious of ourselves and our environment have realized that we need to work try to make our work batter and also have areas of our life. That's pure expanded. Your pure sacrifice. We have to be the religious figure killing our best cough every night again, I used to and I was young I'm on the spheres that I just remembered when I was Elliott teenager is a few times, I destroyed something valuable of my own to kind of like remind myself of this. There's a coffee machine well better than the vacuum. Maybe I should I love that coffee machine. Maybe I should destroy that. But at least. But it was after I kind of come into terms. I'd heard about this just destroy and something valuable meant that. There was it was not economical. And it kind of it did make me feel more in control of my life. Advocating that people do that. But that's what sacrifice walls, you took one of your animals. Your best ensemble on took it. I'd of economy. So we'll have him saying is tick little part of your life and ticket item of Instagram. I was in Palm Springs. I have this outfit that I wear. That's like flour. I've seen it once, and it was worrying rain, and I was wearing I just like took the top off. And like put it on a chair. And it was like getting just completely drenched. And was Grace's brothers boyfriend. I think was like can you? Here's like is. Okay. If you're like, that's like a vintage thing. He's like is. Okay. If it gets rained on, and I was like, I think it's fine. If it gets right down. Also, I don't value. My belongings. I've really bet by prominent biggest route it's fine. I don't give a shit. That's probably not. I don't know if that's a likable thing for somebody to hear just like, oh, I don't I don't have any like my car has dents in it. And it's just like with that was very because I saw that you really really nice car. You've scratched both times my fault. We'll no one time my fault. Yeah. But you don't care on a healthy way. You're going because they knew you like it. But you're also going to doesn't control. Ye it's not like. Yeah. Or somewhere or I'm so enraged by an so repressed by that one day. I'm just gonna take a bat and just destroy my car or somebody else's car. It could be that. But now, I think I just don't give ship. But that's also an it. That's the comfort of that's a place of being in a place in life where it's like things are going well generous, and when things are going, well, generally, scratches on the car don't really make a big. Yeah. Big dent. Oh, yes. Ending on a solid joke. All right. Well, I've enjoyed this podcast. Do you have a takeaway? I think you kind of said you. Do you have a takeaway? I think you kind of said yours, but I think my takeaways kind of in their all radical but just to to say like because we always do tick away. It's like it's like ask yourself in Ohio. D I tried to get rid of mine Zayed. And actually is there a way of mobilizing. I love it. We'll thank you very much beat has been very biggest.

Roddick Joe Las Vegas bataille Palm Springs Heidi I Konami auntie Zayed Facebook Pete Arlon Airbnb Europe YouTube Elliott Morgan Kelly Morgan Maryland Fox News Cooman Barry Taylor Neil
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Family Secrets

11:40 min | 1 year ago

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"Is there something that interferes with your happiness, or is preventing you from achieving your goals, if so better help online counseling is there for you better help offers, licensed, professional counselors who specialize in issues such as depression, stress anxiety relationships sleeping trauma, anger family, conflicts, LGBT matters, grief, self esteem, and more. Best of all, it's a truly affordable option and family secrets listeners get ten percent off their first month with discount code secrets. So why not get started today? Go to better help dot com slash family. Secrets, simply fill out a questionnaire to help them assess your needs and get matched with a counselor. You'll love family secrets is a production of iheartradio. Danny Shapiro, and this is family secrets the secrets that are kept from us secrets. We keep from others and secrets, we keep from ourselves as I toured the nation for my book, inheritance, I've heard from so many about your own family, secrets and realize that what we are creating for each other on this podcast is a community a community for those who are looking for a safe and supportive space to unburden themselves to that end. We've created a number for listeners to call in to record stories to share here in this space this week. I'd like to share a few of those stories from our community. Thanks for listening. I just wanted to share a little glimpse of my family's secret growing up. We always knew my mom had been married before. But it wasn't until I turned eighteen that she had revealed to me that she had a son that she had given up for adoption. My mom had always felt like she had lost it child before she had my brother and I in that giving him up for adoption was kinda God's way of punishing her for, for her choices. And so we tried this line out information about him as much as we could. But my mom just couldn't I don't think go down that route. And so about twenty years later, I finally got a Facebook request from some gal trying to find my mom and through some Facebook stockings out, that, that was kinda her service was helping adopted kids and families. Find each other and lo and behold, we. On the son that she had given up for adoption and started contacting him found out a lot of information about my mom that for about I eight months of his life with lots of adoption records and caseworker visits. And that kind of stuff that really painted a new picture of who my mom was, I started looking into my ancestry and decided to take the test just to find out more information that I can pass onto him. And of course, lo and behold, a gal was on kind of the people that are closely related to you. So I think it was like a first class in or closer and I was thinking, oh, now, my dad has the son or my dad has a daughter or maybe my aunt or something like that. And so I called my mom to find out that no when she was eighteen she had gotten pregnant, and she had put another child up for adoption and. That I think hurt me more than all other secrets I had found out until that time because, you know, she told me about her son, but not about this other that I had as the stir to out there and it's been a interesting experience. My story is not really my story as my dad's story. He was born in the UK born of the mother and baby home, which was like an unwed mothers hold. And he and somehow ended up being raised by his grandmother. Lost her short, his grandmother, died news thirteen and he's left his on devices, and he has two or three big memories of his mother coming in life, great touching his life before the age of eight and other than Nashes kind of offi years. And as I grow older, I have my own kids. I got really interested in fighting her and with the advent of the internet. We were doing lots and lots of searching and, you know, we found records of her from an early age. But just what she reaches the age of twenty one she comes just face fell off the face of the earth. And so I heard on any professional searcher, one of those TV searchers, I cost me hundreds of dollars couple of months ago and she found her, but she married in London. And she married in London in the seventies, she married using birthday. It was ten years before her real birthday, then she married, this guy who was from Arlon than, than she died in two thousand four living in London. Which is really tragic, because we looked at London. I was two or three then we weren't that far away. So I guess it's still developing story because there are people out there that know about her in. No, why she loved. It's my uncle still alive and he won't share a lot of the details. And it is still developing because I really wanna find her husband and ask him if he knows anything about her, but I can't find him 'cause he's kind of on base appears and I, I'm not going to send the doesn't find him somebody who not really related to. But anyway, that's my story. There's a lot more. But it's just I thought that's kind of the reason why I interested in podcast 'cause so I have my own story kind of developing. had. Maga- steamy secrets, where instead of the my father being someone who had children, a lot of different people. It was my mother. I was not raised by my mother. She gave me to my grandparents maternal grandparents, and when I was around ten she's married and I had little sister. So fast forward about another ten fifteen years, and my sister sends me a picture of little baby and everything's written Spanish, but she's been she sees our mothers names, somewhere in there. And I, she sends it to me, and we find out that it's a picture of what appears to be a baby that my mother had given up for adoption when she lives in Mexico, a little bit right after I was born. She there, I asked my mother and told it was none of my business, but we did figure out that it was our brother things were rather quiet for a long time years past six years ago. I got a phone call from gentleman who said, I think I'm your brother and we compared notes me we're talking. And then you know what he was the two year younger than me. Lo and behold, he's six years older than me. He was actually my mother's first child, but long story short. It's now my. Brother, who's six years older? Be and our sister, who's ten years younger than than me. But all of us have bothers from different countries. No one was from America. We won't find the Mexican one because I think that was so well with adoption. So we also are wondering if we're gonna find anything else out about other children that might have popped up along the by our mother passed away two years ago and was tight-lipped to the end denying everything. My mother had a big loud, Jewish family. My dad had a family that was darker, and little more confusing. My aunts were married to very strict Roman Catholic men and I don't know there was always something a little off. My dad was Jewish, too. And then I was eleven or twelve when we started saying, well, where's your parents, because we didn't know our grandparents on that side at all? And if a while probably year for my father to finally tell us that my grandfather had gone out to get a pack of cigarettes. My grandmother was home with her seven children, and he never came back. And I don't know if she suffered from mental illness before that, but. She sort of became catatonic took to her bed, and the way that it all came out of public with semi father was found roaming in the streets in his dirty diaper, and the butcher recognized from took him home, and all the kids got taken away to the Jewish orphanage when she was a wonderful place. Actually, so my father said, but this secret of my grandmother, being mentally ill was was just like the thing we never talked about. She lived for another thirty five forty years in the tuition, but she didn't know who anybody was. I never met her. My sister never met her. So we understand your family. Thank you. If you'd like to share your story, call one eight eight secret zero and record your story. We won't be able to run all the stories but we do want to shine a light on his many as we can. The number again is one eight eight secret and then the numeral zero. Just a brief housekeeping note, for those of you in and around New York City on June. Third, I'm gonna be with the awesome Nora mcenery host of the podcast, terrible. Thanks for asking who will be joining me for a live family secrets event at Rizzoli books, which is on twenty six Broadway will be there at six pm on June third. And we would love to see. For more podcast from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Have you ever wondered how the smartest marketers cut through the noise, I'm Bob Pittman chairman and CEO of I heart media and on my new show? Math and magic. I'm sitting down with the day's most gift that this ruptures. When I did this people thought I was crazy. They're really no other rules, aside from, you know, no full frontal nudity. Go out there and do it. I don't like to follow the trend of listen. It subscribed to math and magic on apple podcast, the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

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Daring To Be Wild - We ARE The Ark - With Irish Plantswoman, Mary Reynolds

Cultivating Place

57:54 min | 1 year ago

Daring To Be Wild - We ARE The Ark - With Irish Plantswoman, Mary Reynolds

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden from nor state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer jewel Irish plants woman, Mary Reynolds has cultivated a deep love of her place. Mary is known as nature activist a reformed landscape designer she is the author of the garden awakening and the inspiration for the two thousand fifteen movie dare to be wild. She joins us today. To celebrate the week of Earth Day, stay with us. You're lucky if you've learned to work with because you're basically have a big Majdic posh is like a universal postbox where he can send at your intentions from. And it's like a magnifying glass for all those intentions by allowing on supporting the land to become healed in. Well, you find the land is willing to support you back. This is taking place. I'm Jennifer jewel happy week of Earth Day, the idea of our gardens as habitats is not new to you or to me, and it's not new to my emphasis here on cultivating place. It's no secret to any of you that I hold our gardens as powerful containers for ourselves our minds, our bodies, our spirits for our children, our communities of people and our communities of planet meets our companion plants. Insects birds microorganisms and so much more as such gardens or model. Teachers and partners in forging relationships that he'll us in all directions. My guest today Irish woman, Mary Reynolds has cultivated a deep love of her place in all its complexity and mystery and as a land guardian she listens to her place and works in partnership with it to move forward. Mary's known as a neater activist, and she often refers to herself as a reformed landscape designer she is the author of the garden awakening designed to nurture our land and ourselves and her early work in design wherein, she became the youngest person to create a gold medal winning garden at the Chelsea flower show was the inspiration behind the two thousand fifteen movie dare to be wild. She has recently launched a new initiative called. We are the ark Mary joins us today via Skype from her home in Ireland. Welcome mary. Hi, Jennifer is lovely to talk to you. So I I really want to jump in. I'm so excited for this conversation, Mary I have been a longtime follower of your work, and your your passion and your voice, and I'm really excited to share it with my listeners get started by describing your your current work in the garden. Your nature practice in relationship to plants. Well, my my. My practice in relation to plans to do main work in my own garden. Jennifer, I'm sorry. I mean, actually all of it. I mean, when I ask you that question, what comes to mind first for you. It might be your professional work. It might be your work at home as a mom or as a partner with your land. All of the above are part of what I'm hoping to get to I suppose what's happened. And it's I'm I was I was forty five the other day and every year, I get more and more aware of how far away from. Our true selves, we have gone and so every year, I strive to move back towards the place. And so at the moment, I have come to an awareness that we are almost out of time to repair the damage we've done to the earth and to ourselves, and it's a very heightened time of crisis and people all over the world are waking up to the fact that we have to we have to change everything. So that that's where I Marsh with my work, my life, everything I feel like it's a time of crisis on the time of great hope. And I knew this time was coming all my life. I knew this time was coming on. It could go either way. But I do feel that it will go in the right direction. I think it's the crisis is right now. I think for money people all over the world. The crisis is much worse than the one we're facing. But we have the ability to transform our society our planet. Our our our world, but it's not going to happen from the top down that all this change is gonna come from the ground up disliked plans. We're going we're going to have to grow this change the grand up because. Nothing is going to happen otherwise. So we're all waking up to that. I think don't you agree. I really really hope. So, but I do find that I'm very much with with the way I hear you articulate so many of your your passions. And I feel as though especially the informed and engaged Gardner and gardening community. And I'm using big g's on both of those words to sort of help differentiate the different things that come to mind when we use the word garden or Gardiner. I think we are among the most. Ready to to to really lead the way forward. Yeah. Yeah. That's true. So where where we realized that gardening is the wrong term on its guardian that we really need to return to that. That's a pretty common term these days. Everyone seems to realize that that's where we went wrong. And our our whole our whole existence can be traced back through myths and stories on old ways of working hasn't been that long since we've forgotten all that. But I think I can trace it back to the the. Kind of. Influence of their of of religion seems to have been when we all disconnected from who we truly are religions true. An understanding that power could be had true fear convinced everyone that didn't really matter. How we how we treat it the earth because this whole place was just a preparation for the next life. So not every religion is like that. But a a lot of the more influential in have been and so that's when it started the rot set in. And so now, we have to we have we have a huge opportunity because a lot of soul nuns, and I think it's time. Owning is the wrong word a lot of us are looking to have land to look after. So it's time to step up and do something. So we've opened up a lot of really big concepts in just that one answer that you gave us, and I want to especially listeners who may not be familiar with your work. I love you to briefly just sort of take us through your your early years, and what created you into a nature loving connected person that you became and briefly lead us to to how you got to the garden awakening because there were some key moments in there that. Created some tense relationship with the word garden or Gardner. How you've come to approach it in this book. So give us that context of briefly as you can. And then we'll dive into the book itself and your more recent endeavors as well. Okay. So I grew up in Wexford societies violent, and I grew up on a farm on when I was young everything was very alive. Still. There was still a lot of life in the land and snus very different now. But back, then I a very inexperienced very short experience. When I was kid where I wandered into a field. I was I was young I was between five and seven kind of age, and I wandered into field at the top of my parents farm, and you know, nobody knew where you were all day that was kind of normal, you know, and I wandered into field. I remember it was may because the whole. Authorities were flaring, and I remember the smell very, stinky. And I walked into the field. And then I noticed something had changed behind me in the Goth lead walked true into the field completed appeared and this. Sexually something that has happened a loss in our land in kind of myth and magic, and I didn't realize that until the money years later, but was no way. I just a little too. I was pretty frightened. I wanted around. Eventually because I just got distracted by sunshine, Bush flies, and I sat down in in the meadow in the middle of the field. And and I just south there on got distracted than I had the other feeling which is just that. I was being watched and I looked around and I recognized that I was being watched by plants and all the creatures that were sharing that space, and they'll weirdly want me to notice them, which I find very unusual, and I never understood that until I started writing my book money years later, and that led me to an I ended up going to college money or later to garden design landscape design, I fell into it because I found Sita boy in the course, wasn't like I always knew what I do. Went into that way. And anyway, he didn't last more than two weeks. And then I ended up with this degree in landscape design and started business a really didn't like designing gardens. I mean, I was good at us. You know won awards and things, but I enjoy it. And I knew something wrong with the way reworking John. But I couldn't articulate and it was only a move to countryside in mansions in Wicklow. I moved into tiny caution Wicklow, and I. Walked a lot in nature. And I remember the relationship I used to have my understanding of plants and kind of different energies all around us that we generally aren't where we're just don't give any tension to. And so I realized I was I was working badly. I was only damaging things. So I didn't really know what it was doing. But I wasn't very good designer in the sense that I wasn't very good at bullying people into doing what I wanted soon. Nobody would let me design garden full of wild plants, which is what I thought was the solution at the time. And so I went the Chelsea flower show in London because I didn't know anything else anything better about it. And that was quite magical story on a magical time. And thus what the film was made by and anyway, skipping past that when I'm basically I designed to garden there. I designed with a particularly strong intention and the land held intention Fermi unreflected back is. And the garden was called chairman sheet, which means in Irish means sanctuary of the fairy folk my intention for the garden as a which I built there, which was full of basically, what people would term weeds was to remind people of hub, useful nature is unto try and protect before. It's lost. You know? On when I stood at the garden on. It's like being in zoo. When you're in these places, people all try and talk to all people to try to talk to me. Were crying which was quite phenomenal. They all wanted to tell me stories of places they remembered when they were kid that were gone, and the that energy that they saw in this little. Space that didn't really exist tree weeks previously in London, but the intention was held by land. I I it's a very simple kind of obvious thing to say, but I asked that that was you know, when I was building it, and I told all the guys building with me that this is the intention and they held us. And that's what came through. So anybody who is Irish kind of laugh and say ashes dislike home because back then even so much changed since then and that was like two ties to but back, then everything was very alive in Arlon still that there was still alive left here before the, you know, these chemicals has increased massively since then so the the life has gone out of the land since then, but anybody who is English or from different parts of the world. We come up to me, they would be crying. And they all wanted to tell me a story of a field near their granny's. Hi, sir. An apple orchard near where they lived or a rock at the end of their garden hidden away somewhere where there was that energy and how it was gone now. And they were all crying and grieving the fact that this is gone. That was where my journey kind of began in a way. And then so I kept trying to sign gardens like that. And I did that refu- years. And then I realized that wasn't good enough that the something wrong. And so I I was supposed to write a book about my work because of the film coming action star writing, but I wrote miss out of a job because I realized what again, nothing I was doing made any sense, I was still controlling the land and still not listening to what the land itself onto to become. So that's what the basis the next book was my in my understanding that the food system is current that we're currently using the industrial agricultural system is poisoning the washer land Elliott creatures. We live with this poisoning everything. So we have to grow our own food. But we also have to allow the land become wants to become an so I mixed those two concepts because most land wants to be. Multi multi tiered woodland. It would become a dot canopy of woodland unless you know, we step in and provide the clutch surrogacy services, which we need to provide that we've removed most of the large predators from our system. But forest gardening of system of growing perennial food in multiple layers in a very small area on. So that's what that book was advice. And then I came around understanding that none of those things were good enough. An actually where I of time now completely and thus all of us that have any land need to step up on provide allow the land to become wild. And you know, remove any loans that we have and to kind of screw up the soil, or, you know, portend cardboard a little bit of compost in so wet meadow on reboot should ecosystem an allow the land to become wild and scrubby and Bromley and tourney because we have pushed life to the edge. We've lost eighty percent of all insects have rewind dash in the last twenty five years populations of. Of every creature's dropping rapidly convey nowhere left to go anywhere. They have generally is becoming poisoned by agricultural chemicals on garden chemicals. And and not only them all the micro-plastics everything we're doing is destroying everything that is supporting our life in our ability to remain on this planet. So because it is in one hundred fifty to two hundred species every single day. I don't feel like we have any time to waste on. I think what we need to do is at least consider the half earth hairy, which means to give at least half of this planet back to nature to bring back into balance. I am going to stop you right there because we have so much to unpack in what you just talked about. Mary are and it's fabulous. No, no apologies. At all. Mary Reynolds is a force of nature. She is the inspiration behind the two thousand fifteen movie dare to be wild. She's the author of the book garden awakening designs to nurture. Our lands and ourselves, and she's the founder instigator, creator of new movement entitled we are the ark in which arc stands for acts of restorative kindness. And in which gardeners are in fact, guardians of the wildlife and wild nature of the world around them woven together, these nurtured garden guarded spaces create a patchwork of for the planet. We'll be right back after a break to here. I really loved this part of my conversation with Mary so far in which were exploring intention with our lands be they tiny gardens or sweeping Wildflower meadows. I love my little garden a small city lot. But with enough space in front in back and sliver along the sides. I can get quite a lot of plants in when I think of these small spaces with which or with whom I spend a good amount of time and intimacy of sort with Mary's concept of intention in mind, how I hold an intention for this land. And she then holds that intention for me. And reflects it back, I'm really moved. That's the only way to explain it. It kind of tugs at my gut in a good way, a responsibility and accountability and love kind of way, which is exactly my intention with cultivating place. If you're a sustaining donor of ten. Dollars a month or more to the program. I hope you got your April garden life. Love letter this last week all about what a gardener looks like from. Amanda thompson. I hope it made you laugh and think the way it made me laugh and think well, actually it made me laugh through my nose kind of. But it made me think pretty deeply about this concept. It's for all of us to think about and to act on what does it Gardner, look like when that comes into our heads, and how she would may be changing this. If you love and want more cultivating place in your life. You can always subscribe to the newsletter of you from here, which is the Email update, I send out towards the end of each month. A new one will go out next week. These newsletters include botanical thoughts, plant information reviews and more upcoming event information with me, and then I think you might be interested in these are events in musings of been loving. But haven't been able to feature. On the show you love the podcast. And I think you'll really love what I have to share in the newsletter head to cultivating police dot com forward slash newsletter to sign up. Oh, and hey, if if there are things you'd like to include mention or talk about in the newsletter. Send me suggestions I'd be happy to consider them and add them as it fits now. Back to our conversation with wild loving Mary. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel. Welcome back to our conversation with Irish nature activist Mary Reynolds, who intrigues us gardeners to wake up to the wild nature of the land. We live with I I want to make sure you mentioned the movie, and I mentioned the movie in my introduction. I certainly don't want it to be a focus of this conversation. But from your perspective, so listeners know one way or the other is it a fair depiction of this magical moment in your life or fair enough that you would recommend people who are interested in the journey of your philosophical approach, watch it. Yeah. I mean, it's really it's a really positive an uplifting film. It is. It's not exactly you know, what happens, but it's, you know, just characters in it that didn't exist. Like, there's a girl in the beginning of the film wasn't real. But I did not. It's pretty pretty pretty much on on on on point. Yeah. Okay. Good. That out of the way I wanna come back to the word intention because it is one of the primary sort of threads of exploration that you get us into in the gardening in the garden awakening, and it clearly has evolved even further in your we are the ark. And. That initiative moving forward the the idea of right relationship and our relationship to the land, we have the great privilege of being in relationship with whether that's a potted plant on our window sill, or whether we have an actual space of land around our home and. You you talk about tracing back the the loss of this relationship as far back as the institution of some of the bigger, western religions, I think a lot of people trace it back to the the industrial revolution to the World War Two and the introduction of big chemical fabrication or production that then led into you know, that was four war and then led right into the war. That is the petrochemical industrial complex on our land and our living beings on this planet wherever that kind of power that is accumulated and wielded from a not great intention, but an intention of control and power and profit probably you ask us to reconsider what our intention is. And what our relationship is with our pieces of land. No matter what word you use for that guardian partner co create. Ter- Gardner top to us about that philosophical process for you of that right relationship, and that that tool of intention that becomes really important in the garden awakening. Okay. So. So what what I what I came to understand is that the earth is like this massive, big heart. And when we started looking at in terms of ownership instead of in terms of guardianship shattered into millions of tiny pieces. And each of those tiny pieces. Are separated by all these boundaries that we've we have pushed on them. Okay. So my my my hope within the is that. We. Have become guardians of tiny pieces of heart in case. Oh, I think there is. There is the option now for step, and he'll each those little pieces of of the earth and create a patchwork quilt that will connect up and very quickly starting percentage of the consciousness shifted. I'm sure it will shift very very quickly. So there is one within that concept of boundaries. There is this being. It's own kind of personality and different levels of dommage on different levels of everything. So for example, I try and give an example because it helps people understand. So I have some Lund k it is very particular type of damage assist. Is this kind of what you mean? No, no, it is a broad question because it is a broad concept. And I want you to walk us through your interpretation of it. And that idea of which I found very beautiful, and I really visualized how I would do it on my tiny piece of suburban land in northern California. And so yes, walk walk listeners through exactly what you're doing right now. Okay. So I started to look at the old ways of working with lunch, and I recognized that people understood that they had a relationship with the piece of land. They were looking after and they understood the land needed to know, which part began with this police people which parts ended with these people where the neighbors boundaries were annulled sorts. Thank this is just it was quite a confusing concept. You know, but. People here. Not just here. You know? This would have been a late concept like this after the the heartless, Josh, okay? This is aleisha concept. This is after the religions were established became Parcells as opposed to one big body, which it is underneath the parcels, of course. But you you can work with each of these parcels. What they used to hear to walk the line the beating the boundaries to beat the boundaries. So you'd walk the land and you'd make Bank to stones together. Are you would saying are you would just simply walk and let alone know where it was ending. And where it was beginning. So you've walked hope Andry and you'd let alone Lana. What year this is the piece of land? I'm working with on. This is who we are. So then the land would hold whatever intention you had I, and I think that the intention is held in the magic of the washer within the clay or the soy. So my land, for example is quite damaged emotionally in some ways unfair similar to the way. I'm damaged emotionally on the seems to be the way is that we are all attracted to places which require the same levels of hailing ourselves. And so there is there is a like my land is has huge issues which abandonment trust and. Quite the same. As me, you know. So there is like people travel all over the world. Now, they all get attracted to different places in. I believe the land attracts them to it for a reason. Just so happens, very hard fix yourself. But if you work on fixing the land listening to whatever needs to be listened to their in step by step process. What happens then is you fix yourself? It's giving attention to issue on fixes yourself at the same time. But that's kind of handy. It's also Honey that you're helping the land he'll because it releases all the toxins on the on the rips in the in the in the emotional kind of body of. So you describe this beating the boundaries so beautifully in the book. And you emphasize the importance of whatever land you're on and you consider to be in your care or. Are you coexist with you emphasize, the importance of just trying to listen, I listen and observe what you are hearing and feeling and picking up from the land, you're on and then, and you're you're very clear about pulling in, you know, the the Irish old ways the current permaculture ways, you know, of of recognizing the the the various approaches to this throughout time. And and one of the things as a side note that I find so beautiful is how the old ways of your place in Ireland resonate with the old ways of what is now North America and the United States the articulation of some of our most. Passionate indigenous plants people very much reads in the same way. And so this idea of then walking the the boundary. The physical boundary of this land, you coexist, with and just talking to it and introducing yourself to it and getting to know it and having attention be part of the intention is you walk through this very very beautifully in the book. And while it might seem to people who aren't kind of land connected. But who are maybe longing to be land connected. You could easily kind of dismiss this in our modern day as kind of hokey, but the fact is when you do it is so powerful, and I can see why all the people who came to your Chelsea garden, cried because it is a remembering of connection that is. Absolutely supposed to be with us. Exactly. Yeah. That's that's a good way. Putting us. Yeah. Yeah. Understanding that the piece of land is part of your family member of your family now and your job is to raise as an independent healthy being on the loud. Become what it wants to become a nut forces into a pink too. I went I was reading as I was reading the book. I'm looking in my backyard and thinking, okay, I've got it wrong there. I've got it wrong there. I need to add a little more leniency and a little more abandonment in terms of joy, not in terms of leaving relationship. But a little more wildness in in several areas and remind the garden that I'm learning as I go. Yeah. And that's that's the that's the key is to. That's actually, very interesting. That's that's the point where I lost my kind of. It took me a while to realize that I had to go step further than this. You know? Yeah. And so the step further happened sitting at my desk here one day last year and I work upstairs. I look down over my my garden a FOX run across in front of me. And then a couple of hairs Ron unusual to see them hanging together, you know, two hours round cross. And then a few minutes later was a little family of hedgehog scuttling across underneath the hedge on. So I got I went outside and see what was going on. Because it was like Noah's ark in verse. And so I went on across the road. Was this field which had been a massive Brambles and Hawthorne's skulks as we call them over here while plants basically that had been left alone become a massive ecosystem all on its own from being abandoned on probably had been cured field at some point on over the years. It become a ticket. Something had got planning permission to build high at the top of the field, and they'd gone in which Dicker, which is what everybody does thinking thinking about it. Because you know, that's what they do. And they cared at the whole field with the digger left it as bare brand scorched patch of land. Her of it. And then everybody that lives there with no taught for the the creatures that were sharing this planet with they were all four stylish. But no host for their lives are their families their homes, and I realized in absolute Har that I have done this myself so many times, and that's when we are the are was born because this. I had forgotten that we have we are sharing this planet with so many other creatures that they're Jesper desperate for places to live on places to make families places to each their is they're they're being pushed to the edge. We are filling up the land with plants from garden centers that we think are pretty this. Just we've gone so far away from the truth. Mary Reynolds in nature activists in the beginning of launching a new movement worldwide, entitled we are the ark in which arc stands for acts of restorative kindness. Will be right back after a break to hear more about this. Stay with us. Okay. So thinking out loud here on her website. We are the ark. Mary writes, an arc is a restored native ecosystem, a local small, medium or large re Wilding project. It's a thriving patch of native plants and creatures that have been allowed and supported in reestablishing in the earth's intelligent successional process of natural restoration time. This becomes a pantry and a habitat for our pollinators wild creatures who are in such need. All we need to do is leave nature alone to lead the way, and then support her to heal and thrive we need to allow the land to rewind herself and protected while she heals so stop cutting it back stop spraying stop trying to control it. This is a call to arms of diff. Type. It is a front line battle of courage hope an individual action. We have got to wake up to how linked we are to the planet beneath our feet are health is mirrored perfectly in the health of the earth. What reduces our stress reduces the earth stress and vice versa. She gets sick. And so we we fight to live. And so shall she? We must create the island away sees in these desert's. These OAC's will be the ceding ground for our new story to begin they will be sanctuaries for as many creatures as we can fit into them safe havens for the magic and abundance in the natural world. These spaces will become the ark for the flood of extinction. That is upon us. We are the last frontier and the last generation with enough time left to save this planet by the skin of our teeth one. Person can cause such big change in this world, simply by inspiring change all around you one person one patch of land one decision at a time. It's up to us guide your land into becoming a thriving living wild sanctuary for as many creatures as possible. Wakeup don't turn away. No one else is going to do this work. The system is broken badly caught in a web of its own making. This is a different type of web weaving. It's a web of interconnected life interconnected magic. And hope we are weaving ourselves an arc now back to our conversation with Mary Reynolds of dare to be wild author of garden awakening and founder of the movement. We are the ark. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel. Welcome back to our conversation with Mary Reynolds, her tag name on social media is wild Mary Mary. And she explains her idea for returning half of our lands back to the wild. Welcome back, and that importance of both recognition on a personal basis, and then redefinition of terms for those of us who might be trying the best we can to be in relationship with our land. But still have a ways to go in getting it as right as we can. I think is so important. I was I was very moved by your Ted talk in which you you really do call out the leadership of our nation's and say, you know, the our leaders our so called leaders from the top up they are not going to do this for us. They haven't and they're not at this point. And it's gonna be up to us. And it's never been more clear to me in the United States that if there is going to be a change in what we what we define as leadership, and what we define as valuable and what we define as success. That's got to come from each one of us, redefining it for our own selves our land, our communities and outward. Yeah. So just to get back to the book because we kind of jumped ahead to the arc program. And then we'll finish with the arc program as well. Yeah. Yeah. For yet. No, no for readers who are interested in in taking a look at the book and going through some of the steps, you you start off with this idea of setting an intention and the importance of that, and and in some way developing your intention after having listened to your land and yourself, and what the two of you kind of need and want in in this relationship together. And then you go through the idea of the forest garden and wellness, you give some really nice examples of, you know, garden design for. Lack of a better word right now. Some some basic ideas for people to start being inspired by how to incorporate wild incorporate food incorporate habitat, and then you do a nice job of offering some alternative management practices because the fact is that if you know for any Gardner who is new new gardening or new to land relationship in care, you you you need to to to learn some of these things if you're already deeply invested in gardening as you've always done it or known it, and you need to relearn some things I think these are very good resources for people. Can you walk us through just kind of give us the essence of each one of these sections? Okay. So I think there's I think it's is it three or four sections to book cut us being awhile since I've opened up starts with the forest wellness goes Darden design goes to the forest gar. Gordon and then finishes with the alternative management practices. Okay. So initially it's all kind of listening to the land on it's kind of ah by basically being quiet on seeing what failings emerge there kind of acknowledging that they're probably the same ones. Shoot have yourself in terms of things that need doing and just aknowledging that the land is real that the land you're working is is a living being and that it it in order to form relationships with that you have to give it attention and listen to what is required, and then and I am care on high to do this probably signs bay. But in the book, I'm very clear on high to do them very step by step. It's not difficult on then the understanding that if you are going to design spaces within your land that you have to design them within the shapes and patterns of all the things found in nature already. So. Everything in nature follows same patterns and shapes the few stay within them. Then you're staying within the flow of universal energy or not blocking us. That's that's very important. So I help people design spaces using those shapes and patterns and different different shapes in different patterns also have different frequencies intentions of their own. And so if you have an intention for space, you want to hold it in the garden, it's often helpful to use different ones, depending on what their their, you know, what the the intention you have is. So it might be you know, that you want to create a space for healing. You might want to create a place where the magic of nature is dripping out of every leaf in might want to create a lacy a garden where you can really connect in two. To ancestors are you know, different reasons for having a place. So this this kind of multiple layers of your look if you've learned to work with because you're basically have a big magic pot that you can it's like a universal postbox we can send at your wishes and intentions from. And once the land is is in connection with you. It'll it'll it'll it'll it's like it's like a magnifying glass for all those intentions wishes that you have and. And till you're create your secular. It's like, you're you're missing a weaving. This magic spell in the slums that you let you live in that by allowing on supporting the land to become healed and well and full of life. You find the land is willing to support you back to create a very powerful on magical connection and. And. The food that you grow their we'll have we'll have very strong hailing for yourself and your family because like every single plant has a has a connection with when health when the soil is healthy and hasn't been dog over which is you know, how you destroy microorganisms by digging action in if you create a no noted permaculture situations different situation than restoring the health soil in the life comes back into it and every single plant that lives there has a relationship through its roots with these microorganisms like the fungi micro say in the bacteria, the creatures that live in the soil. They they they get fed with carbohydrates from the roots of the plants photosynthesis. In return, they go off on the web of of of my Celia beneath the soil. They the bacteria breakdown release nutrients, and the my Celia transport them back to the plant, whatever the plant needs the creatures. Get on. So if there's, you know, there's an interaction between your bare feet on the soil on the enzymes in the in your in the the soil react with the, you know, the enzymes in your skin. I'm sorry. I'm getting all mixed up with the bacteria bass gained to wracked with your skin. You know, they get to know what you're missing from your diet. They will supply through the plants. It's like a it's like this really interesting. Interaction because because they want to support us and they'll give their lives to do this. And that really interesting because I really come to the understanding the plants are absolutely as live on have same feelings and emotions and family connections that we do. It's a very difficult and painful reality that we have to kill life in order to survive here, and therefore in order to get through that pain of that reality, we have to be constant service to the land that we we are in relationship with. Yeah. And then let's finish with. A little bit more about the we are the ark program that and I'm not sure programme is the right word, but we are the ark initiative that you are. Encouraging people to to take up. What are the are there? Details to it where can people find out more are there specifics to it. Or is it the general idea that every single garden should provide as much habitat to as much life as it possibly can whether that be the Beatles? The Byrds your children other mammals. Okay. Well, I I myself and my manager. Her partner, we made this website. It's it's not it's it's not for profit. It's called. We are the ark dot org. And it's to give people step by step instructions on how to build an ark. Why we need to build an our wash arc is all the resources in links. They might need. They can download the whole website as PD. So they don't have to sit looking at a computer screen. The whole thing is free. It's it's it's my effort to try and start movement to to pull the extinction crisis that we're living through back from the brink. By turning every single one of us into warriors to guard, our pieces of land like warriors to guard on raise into a strong wild place as as much as we can if not just gardens I want people to go and put signs in their garden saying this is an arc with the website Andre. So that people who look in and think that's an obsolete mess. What are they doing won't won't make them ashamed? They will maybe take a take the time to go to the website. And see why this is important how to build in our for garden on the website is high to build an ark for schools is high to build an ark for commercial situations. I don't know how to get this movement to take off. And it's such a simple idea on it's such a it's such a it's just it's such a good idea. It doesn't cost money. It isn't a straightforward as abandonment. It's it's not a by putting in plants that are good for bees flies. That is not this. Is a badge. We have to step back and allow the seeds that are already in the are coming to trust the nature has way way more knowledge of how to cope an high to restore health to herself in all these creatures than we do by this idea that we somehow tank by putting in certain plants that it's helpful. Yes, it's helpful. But it's much more helpful. For the local genetic diversity of the insects that live in that area for the native plants to come and be allowed. I'm try because they are the plants that they have relationships for millions of years with they're the ones that are plant specific to those Pacific insects in that area. We have to allow what is in the land to come out. We have to stop controlling. We have to give at least half Vanni any that we have back to nature on. It's very very simple. If you can try and involve yourself in it by watching what comes to to stay there overnight. It's almost like almost like all these creatures. No wouldn't wouldn't. I don't know. What it is. They all arrive overnight practice simply gardens going full of life. It is obsolete. Ly- the most empowering and fabulous thing that people can do. These days is to turn your land into healed. Patch of this earth and the more of us to do this. We can connect this up. We also have to we also have to try grows much of our own food as possible to step by the industrial agricultural system, which is absolutely destroying it. But there's no way of changing Nash unless it's from the ground up. The only way they will change we stopped buying their poisonous food. And so in the meantime, we have to troll a lifeline act nature on give her somewhere where we can hold the seeds of life for everything to be restored. As soon as we all wake up and Cup on. Yeah. Well in new site use this statistic in in the book, and it certainly been cited on my program many times, but the the millions of acres in North America that are dedicated to main poisonous -ly for the most part maintained green lawns that could be converted into habitat and life giving space right there. We have a lot of work to do. Yeah. Yeah. There you go would be would be a huge could change the ecological future of that continent ready cuts, and it would set a model for every other continent that it is a valuable thing to do if what. Sorry for my dog barking the butter. We it's an art. It's okay. Is there anything else you would like to add Mary? I would like people to really to to go to the website really take their time. I've spent six months writing, I I was going to write a book, but I taught no because I don't wanna make any money from this. I want people to just just take it on board own themselves and Grosz as the wild hang that. It come become, you know, so I would like to consider making arc signs putting them into like schools in showing kids, you know, there's this whole concept of shifting baseline syndrome where children unto we have forgotten. What nature actually is you know, when we were young chase butterflies all around the garden these days children hardly ever, see one. So they think that's normal. Yeah. When we were young we didn't know it was normal that the seas were market. You know, the was always size of England. Near us on the kept the crystal clear now sparky 'cause we've dredged all of them away. There was shows of fish leaping out of every crevice of the scene there. Almost gone. You know, we we we. We've almost killed all the life here. So we have to we have to find a way back. So if we can even take like industrial places places out of being bound in edges railways, put signs in saying, this is an arc than perhaps, it will open people's eyes to the importance of those wild scrubby scrubby places that actually they're holding a huge amount of life in there. Just we see a lot of the time and just just to just to just to give some hope to all these creatures that are desperate for places to go. You know, there's nowhere for them. Thank you very much for being a guest on the program today. Mary Reynolds, it's been an honor to speak with you. Thanks Jennifer's to talk to you. Mary Reynolds is a reformed Irish Lynn's gape designer bestselling author of the Gordon awakening and nature activist director, Vivian decor. See made a movie dare to be wild about Mary's Chelsea gold winning adventures. She is a proud page. Brin of wildlife rehabilitation Ireland and strives to do as much as she can to re educate people about how to live in harmony with nature on their own patch of land to become as she says guardians as much as they are gardeners ever-evolving in her own relationship to plants in nature. Mary's articulation of her new understanding about our right relationship with the land is called. We are the ark in which arc stands for acts of restorative kindness. In her movement manifesto of sorts. She writes, we are all becoming more aware of our climate breakdown. But we seem less aware of the silent killer that is via diversity and habitat loss, which is happening at a staggering rate and is equally if not more potentially devastating with climate change. We might feel the impact in our everyday lives. But with bio-diversity it is. Not so clear by the time, you feel what's happening. It may be too late Mary quotes, Christina Pasqua. Palmer, the UN leader on diversity. She goes on to say, whether we realize it or not plants and all other creatures we share this planet with our key to our survival and continued existence on this beautiful planet in basic terms. They clean our water, recycle our air pollinate or food crops and help us in myriad other ways that we know about and ways that we're only just discovering the earth is struggling to provide food habitat and water for all her life forms, including humans. We are not making her job easy for those of us that care about the living world around us and are aware of the challenges. We all face, this is a painful and desperate time. But she goes on. There's hope we have waited too long for changes to come from our leaders in politicians. We cannot wait any longer that change must come from the ground up. It must come and will come from us. This is a call to step up and reassess our management of every individual tiny patch of the earth possible. She says it's a call to the guardians of the earth to step forward and make themselves known to raise their voices. We need to help the natural world and not hinder. It. We have to invite nature and wildness back into our gardens are parks and every tiny patch of this earth. We can to create sanctuary food and habitat for the creatures were supposed to share this planet with and who in return help us servive here within a truly natural and beautiful environment. It's up to each of us to rewired our world piece by piece until we have a patchwork quilt of sanctuaries that wraps its way around the globe. We are the ark. We hold the seeds for a new earth. Things are only hopeless. She reminds us if we do nothing. So let's do something. Let's build an ark cultivating places a listener supported co-production of north state public radio for more information and many photos from this week's episode with Mary Reynolds, please see the show notes under the podcast tab at cultivating place dot com. Our engine near sky Scofield original theme music is by Mont muse, accompanied by Joe craven, and Sam Bevan cultivating places distributed nationally by p r x public radio exchange until next week. Enjoy the cultivation of your place. I'm Jennifer, Joel.

Mary Mary Mary Reynolds Jennifer jewel Gardner partner Ireland California Mary I North America United States gold medal founder Skype Chelsea garden Majdic Gordon Wexford Arlon Wicklow Amanda thompson
Pillows Queens Make Spirited Pop Punk

World Cafe

23:59 min | 1 year ago

Pillows Queens Make Spirited Pop Punk

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from American pest as the leading provider of safe sustainable pest control solutions across the DMV. Let American past help you take back your home or business. From menacing pests. Visit them today at American pest dot net. You're listening to world cafe I'm Talia Schlesinger. Today. Another adventure in Dublin Ireland, my guests are the band, pillow queens. Pillow queens have this spirited approach to pop punk. And they seem to take pride in singing with full-on Irish accents will most of my influences would be American bonds. So I've had to make a conscious effort to not sing. Like, I'm trying to sound American. Sarah Corcoran, shares lead vocals with Pam Connolly drummer, Rachel lines and guitarist Kathy mcginnis round out the band who played their first gig at the end of two thousand sixteen they were very particular about the lineup. We didn't wanna play. I because we thought we were better than playing. We'd never played a gig before really say second. Have a bit of humility. So but not much pillow queens have put out to EP's and one of the songs that you're going to hear them perform was nominated for Ireland's RT choice music prize. We met up with the band at the iconic windmill lane recording studios in Dublin which has been home to Irish acts like van Morrison and U2. and international folks. Like Rolling Stones. Ed Sheeran lady Gaga Spice Girls for now. It is our world cafe playground. And pillow queens starts us off with a live performance of their song. Favourite? Fully fully. Phony. Phony. Let's do it. This puts. Surrey's? Can fail. Straight. That's so RAD that's pillow queens hero world. Cafe in Dublin at will million studios. Sounds so good. Can you all introduce yourselves? Let's start with Kathy over here. Hello. My name is copy I play Qatar in pillow queens. Hello. My name's pas on I sang, and I play guitar on bass sometimes, Sarah, and I also sing and play guitar on bass, sometimes I'm Rachel and I sing play the. The harmonies on that song. We're so cool and so- crunchy. You don't often hear like such thoughtful harmonies in a song. That's that. I really appreciated them. Yeah. And I love that. You're Irish accents are. So prominent when you saying we get the loss. I always think that I've got a really neutral. Excellent. Put apparently. Not somewhat non-regional that a decision that you made as a band that this that that that was part of your identity, or is it just what happens and comes out. Well, in terms of my own I was a decision that was kind of like, I did a vocal classes few years ago when I was in rock school base got vocal teachers I was just like just saying in your own accent? There's no point to just because you know, like, obviously, the Americanize your your vocal, and she just kind of stopped me down. Just singing your own accents. You know? It'll be easier for you to write. It'll be easier for you to kind of like to say what you mean? And so from then on I just continued to do. So and I think Sarah's always hanging in our own accent same you think all of my info will most of my influences would be American bonds. So I've had to make a conscious effort to not sing like I'm trying to sound American. I think even when I was growing up. I watched a lot of American TV. So I would have had a bit of an American twang, or at least people in our would have said that I had an American my accent? Put now, I think it's I don't know. Maybe it's an organic evolution that. We've just kind of started singing her own accents more. Well, sounds wonderful tests at case I'm trying it's just really enjoyable to hear you have had this incredible couple of years as a band because really you're you're banned for for like two years, right? And in that time you've managed to sell out your first show that you ever played. How does something like how does how do you sell out your for show? Manipulation. Again, we did it in aid of rescue dogs. We got four of our friends bonds remaining to play on a four three four if you've friends to play. Yeah. And then also we didn't wanna play. I because we thought we were we were better than playing never before really ourselves. Second. Have a bit of humidity, but not much. Not less but second good. And then you've toward the UK and you played some incredibly significant Irish musical events, including electric picnic and other voices. It's a lot to happen in your first couple of years. Are you surprised by the trajectory that you're having as Bandres feel super-normal shocked? No. It's very strange because we've all been bounced before on it's never it's never gone like this before. So in the in the couple years that you've been banned we have heard about in America. Of course, the recession to happen in Ireland about a decade ago. And one of the things that we've noticed here in talking to people is that things seemed to be on the upswing again and on the swing really quickly. And you're all young people make making your way in the world. And I was wondering what that economic situation in Ireland right now does for a band that? I think I think as a DIY sort of underground band like is there any connection or anything that you can tell us about what the economic state of Ireland has to do with being abandoned this point what when when you say it's on the swing on the swing for soem. Like, we are like in the midst of one of the biggest crisis like. Dylan are onto ever seen. So, you know, it's very it's it's almost impossible to to to live in Dublin at this point. If you're not in a home with your parents, the recession is over like, the consequences of it are thought we've certainly become like a tech company. Hope so rents are property is rising. Intern means people are getting pushed out of their homes foot. Yeah. Like, the music scene is is looking great like during the recession. It was at a lot of bonds quite manipulated into like paying to play gigs like because they're just k-. You know, the it's the recession, you know, people aren't going as much so you kind of have to to sell these tickets make sure people call them. What what has changed is that like there's not as much as half the promoters? Are are people you trust on anybody's trying to manipulate and that way it's because the communities become so tight that goes through the grapevine don't work with them because they're they're going to they're going to like take take for granted. Or like try to fob often not pay basically. I mean different things to I think I think there's a general sense of anger towards our government, which is rippled. Thought inspires great art. So I mean, there's you continental anymore. There's so much great stuff happening in the country. Now, it's just about trying to rally together and. Direct sum annot money into that. And the make sure everybody can can afford to live everybody. Not just a certain group of people. Does it change? What it means to be an artist like what it means to make make art for you. Yeah. I think there's no such thing now is being able to separate art politics. It never we never said it to be political bond, but even being for women on stage that's political being for queer women on stage thoughts political. Living in Dublin is political just because if you're not political then you're not paying attention. I guess. I know that representation is also really important to you. And you just said your four queer women in INA band. What do you hope that somebody watching? You would see what do you hope to represent like what what would you hope that somebody would would take away from from seeing what you do? I know myself like, I suppose when I was younger. I definitely didn't see dot kind of representation in Arlon at certainly in America. I obsessed with Teagan Sarah as queer grow and put to sea in in your own country. Like, it was it was only it wasn't that long ago. It was in my lifetime thought it was like illegal to be to be in this country. And obviously there's been so many strides. Taken here. So I think it's. If someone sees be like at their whatever like I wanted to be normal. I don't want to be a, oh, there's forgave women on stage sporting, you know, we're just for women playing music. Yeah. I wanna guy to look like I might have a chance for deleting. Sorry leasing. Meant you last? Whatever look at me. And thank you. Thank you for. Thank you for saying. Thank you for doing. What you do which play some more music, of course. Rachel to move. Go back to your dirt from cave over there. Yeah. Favor. Queens with a rendition of their song gay girls, which was nominated for song of the year at Ireland's RT each music prize. Thank you so much to the whole band. Thanks to Pam, Sarah, Kathy. And Rachel thanks also to Jim for hooking this all up and making it great Jim Byrne. Thank you. And also, thanks to Alan Kelly at windmill lane recording studios for recording the session to the whole crew there, so wonderful as hosts and to our very own Chris Williams who mixed that session back here on home turf in Philadelphia. And of course, thanks to our fearless travel adventure leader, Kimberly do not who coordinates these amazing trips that we get to take. Luckily for this. So okay, I'm Talia Slinger. And you are listening to the world cafe. This message comes from NPR sponsor Capital One offering variety of credit card options with features for range of customers from foodies to travelers Capital One what's in your wallet credit approval required capital. One Bank USA in.

Ireland Dublin Teagan Sarah Rachel Kathy mcginnis Pam Connolly Dublin Ireland America Talia Schlesinger Sarah Corcoran DMV Ed Sheeran Queens Surrey van Morrison Jim Byrne Talia Slinger UK Qatar Arlon
Eurovision Showcase on Forest FM (Special ESC Jukebox - 25th Nov 2018)

OC Talk Radio

1:02:35 hr | 2 years ago

Eurovision Showcase on Forest FM (Special ESC Jukebox - 25th Nov 2018)

"Introducing the new buttermilk crispy chicken biscuit McDonald's. We don't need that music made with tender chicken. Let's lose the echo on a warm buttermilk biscuit perfect juicy simplicity of our buttermilk. Komo crispy chicken biscuits speaks for itself. Get it now for just three bucks and get a two dollars sausage mcmuffin with egg or one dollars small hot coffee all from the one two three dollar menu simply your breakfast at McDonald's prices and participation vary cannot be combined with any other offer or Combo meal very good afternoon and welcome to the Eurovision showcase right here on Forest F._M.. This week went back to the Eurovision jukebox where we're going to be playing nonstop. You're a vision music all the way up to six A._M.. And I'm your host Karen Ari Associates now. Let's start with some really cheesy your vision music from an Dora in two thousand eight uh-huh God aw the the yeah aw yeah the that's the way that cazenove for the for the states of Andorra in two thousand eight now. Let's go to the Netherlands in nineteen eighty. Seven hair is Masha with hyped up in Devine's and which means upright in the wind talkers sit he loaded and the pain Eh oh out and <hes> the the globe the World Yeah Mozelle all the Maga vest on the voting all shoot in new does still Dolphin Norbu MoD about food aid Scott old eh <music> yeah hi everyone. This is Jack Holdig from Croatia. You're listening to a eurovision showcase on Forest F._M.. And this is the song my friend enjoy Croatia two thousand seventeen. There are only two ways to live your life is this the miracle is everything's miracle. There's a Mary and it happens every day <music> auto turn after the four all taking the my her <hes> uh-huh yeah yeah sir. uh-huh <music> to crack down but <music> she'll the talks except me uh-huh democracy on your beloved swear Shoe uh-huh Yeah Yeah Holly Brera if I wish I loved him more from the U._K.. National Final in two thousand seven sane in a song long which I thought should have represented San Marino at this year's Eurovision Song contests here is motors very own Franklin with stay these scape up <music> made lease June of please me and the rain is falling all me. It's hard to be strong. Don't who the day save don't let go to now <music> in the not be saved with me `do phone us. The d'oro closer is now the movie Razan and the Song Ritzy again. He let day that these Tom Shoe own lease me resilience <music> <music> uh-huh <hes> hello. This is Donna from Ireland. You're listening to Eurovision. She'll case forest F._M.. My Me Oh <music> I see less sunny. Pau percents awful men. I got this. I skipped the snappy <music>. It must be in his V._C.. Representing paintings I in one thousand nine hundred to Cyprus's second-ever entry into the Eurovision Song contest that is Mono Yuppie which means from Greek into English only love now. Let's head over to France in Nineteen Ninety Nine Heroes Niagara with Jehovah Dunham Wa. I want to give my point and this is basically like neue trying to become selene deal. Enjoy this French Eurovision classic here on the European circuit in the New Zealand Musso thome <music>. <music> aw <music> senior Sydney GonNa Eh Ah uh-huh uh-huh bless her now. Let's hear the real thing Celine Dion euro visions winner for Switzerland in nineteen eighty eight here is how dipa somewhat two T._V.'s T._v.'s able to you. Ah Eh the LEN in any new in the the dolls <music> Switzerland's Eurovision win in knowing teen eighty eight. You're listening to your vision circes right here around forests F._M.. It's a special Eurovision jukebox show with South Karen our associates and it's now time to hit the seventh Heaven Remix of Australia's Eurovision entry in two thousand sixteen came second here is Demi in with sound off signs Yeah uh-huh through the key <music> <music> the breakthrough they aw yeah uh-huh. Doc The breath K- <music> uh-huh yeah <music> in the seventh Heaven Remix from him sound of silence Australia's Eurovision entry in two thousand sixteen. It's now time to go to a national twenty sixteen wedding overtime allergies Allen starts here with now. Although the US can mistakes <music> you'll miss one we and we made this <music> thing to change today. Go Away Illness. One we in the past and this <music> uh-huh hello this is Surrey from the United Kingdom and this is my song storm enjoy. Hey the do you remember yeah. Well we kids would no fee. Hey sister do you believe and nothing's Wendy's <music> Austin stone stone. Remember we can haul <music>. Hey in your proud. All I do is aw don't remember we can hold uh-huh <music>. Hey Dome uh-huh in Surrey with storm the U._K.. Eurovision entry in two thousand eighteen is now going to go to Italy in nineteen ninety. Seven here is jealousy with Fuming D. pod Hora coming fourth in Dublin yes but the snow few money bottle again. Mark was the Judah who voted League Corey Matt and the media does. It you'll be uh-huh. Look at the split the fees aw Ah Yeah Eh <music> hello and these our pay hi this is spa from Iceland and this is my song paper enjoy in this is Nathan trend from Austria. You're listening to your vision showcase on Forest F._M.. And this is my song throwing on air enjoy that'll be that'll be bad. <music> uh-huh mm-hmm <music> yeah aww mm-hmm yeah <music> <music> uh-huh <music> Gina G are just a little bit the U._k.. Eurovision Entry Nineteen ninety-six coming eighth euless just into the European jukebox here on Forest F._M.. On with you until six o'clock money is Karen Ari tessies. We're heading over to another contest and it's the one in nineteen sixty five in Naples in Italy with Napoli Burleigh bellies Tim O. Hair is the first ever entry from Arlon D- it's walking the streets in the rain by butch more <music> you still <music> still <music> streets news on my wall. Yeah still does aw verse US three and the in data Nevada been assigned flagging some fun Novoye. I'm Jay. They come this mine. Eh that the Lakers do yoga in April <music>. They still get nightmares of the Spanish too far in two thousand seventeen that is Morella with couldn't go. It should have been morella damage right. Let's move on to a classic Eurovision Song now. This was one of the pre-contest wants his favorites. In the one thousand nine hundred contests Zagreb in then Yugoslavia now Croatia here is the Dutch century from the Netherlands Hair as Maywood with Ville Alice Meccan dalen which means I want to share everything we haven and I'll told me allison of say they would golf <music> laser beams woods you. Should you <music> hello. This is Francisco Bonnie from meter. You're listening to your visual showcase on Forest F._M.. These my song coach Scott d'amore enjoy two thousand seventeen s he do them logical comb temple Anu Coleman mom on the newly vehicle Gabu Petra Eh Bad T._d.. Comando Intel it twenty nickel indefinite polity such group eastern on him. He leaned to the deny me not me uh-huh ooh taste good sedition and the soup got the key to donald logical web call ability poverty money uh-huh uh-huh the Vita City Stri Kaduna Domini coach students daddy's mom none of say in the enjoy this weeks Eurovision J box right hair on the European showcase on Farce F._M.. 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Racing Review | From Champions Day to Cheltenham | Racing Postcast

Racing Post

41:18 min | Last month

Racing Review | From Champions Day to Cheltenham | Racing Postcast

"Potty power streaming. Racing are at new bet required just located watch terms and conditions apply must be able to. That and welcome along TV's Monday racing post, US Monday the nineteenth of Taybeh meaning it's Been Champions Day were wonderful events. It was it was holly, Doyle, and tomorrow on show on its. Dot Com via with jump season is taking. A Notch. This week's gets off Tom Collins, we also have friend Jake Paul Benfield as from Patty power is gonNA join us with all the prices the big upcoming races. First off, we're going to have a look back on that champion style mentioned what a fabulous it was. The gear wasn't not looking for John Gosden more of that in a bit, and then we'll take a break and talk about the big races upcoming including the one ver- temperature. So, let's get started to then on the Long Distance Cup is going to be all I. of course, Star various the hot favourite, but he was deeply disappointing in the ground. True. Shannon was the winner the first on a memorable day for Holly Door on Alan King. The training is full from eight at the track. This year just excels his. Sister's. a could you see this coming? Not, really I mean sanitary shun of few times in the past including last year when he wanted newmarket. Favor that was in the old world. Cup. And then on the next lost last year in October that was on heavy ground at neighbor he beat horse could. Hamish trying but William here's a horse I really like really financing this year for some of the big thing handicaps and he was ruled out off the picking up an injury. So the former's in the book he was one of the lowest rated horses in the lineup but clearly relishes testing conditions. He was just miles the best won by seven and a half lengths. Was Excellent on the day. But to be honest you didn't even have to be that good on True Sean Shams just. Above cobb all of these on the day. Huge career. Best. Achieved in. All PR. One to one thousand a six pounds better than when he wants to read a time before. Seven for eleven in his career now looks real staying superstar moving forward. It's just a four year old and believe he was a breeze up purchase. What breeze just goes wins the Long Distance Cup. Mild isn't it? Crazy. I think he's by plum tears well, isn't it? So not the most sorts of familiar pedigree and it's been a tool can in recent days about champions day and the mayor of having on soft ground and whether it sort of needs changing or moving around or anything else you'll feel not. Happy with the way it is. I mean, it's just calendar. Isn't it everyone knows it's going to be soft ground escort is always soft ground for champions day. Some. Of these horses of Saddam relished the testing conditions Alexa Stratovarius as you've already mentioned this in the ground. which caused to Donelson said was pulling on a very deep rather than wet hands. Why started bursting through? The ground but used to be and sixty two. He never really traveled a tow is a rice markle for him. I don't know. I kind of like in October is where it belongs at the moment is where it's always been for one off being following racing. Say I'm used to champions die being todd I think there's any way we can move forward as there's plenty of the matrix throughout the year for these big offices big names Oh sorry If a if a host doesn't go testing conditions, guests don't talk at Champions Day off other talks elsewhere magical could have gone to breeders. Cup for example, I'm sure there's there's other targets while elsewhere. BEAT JOSE southbound hostesses over Diana's sons Champions Day gives them the I agree and if they're not good enough to handle the ground if that doesn't seat and then you know not just the different divisions for different horses and the. Ground who says need their opportunity to shine in is not true. We're going to get ground vis Tom. Year, in this country. On your rate off the cut races. Next season he'd have to be after that performance. Whitney do you take it with a pinch of salt or do you think that was legitimate? I imagine there's a bit of a trade in all of that because you have to be careful with seeing the huge efforts on not grand a graduate but I'm inclined to be a believer I mean search for a song and Fitgerald Prince, round pretty close to their Irish alleger form troops down its own expose that the trip. But he's all exposed Jan Rutta as Tom says, the only had eleven ruins the he he's a winning is a wind machine. He has forum I'm better ground. I mean just looking at has strongly was at the line over two miles on graduate imagine even Stephan up to two and a half months but listen more improvement. So yes, I'm I'm. A believer that he is the the next thing in the same division. Well heard like he would've made a such a shame. They never went for the hurdling campaign Allan King at our after his last season. Ministry Sean I mean on a massive massive, follow the source. If you read the sedate jury shameless plug, you know I was pretty keen on his chances. could have expected a performance like this I think I saw tends won't fit. Next year is go cupping quite also that was a big generous. Yes. Could often matt well, done on the Saturday Jerry I'm. Surprised how short he was Personally bought Brendan and yourself dismay made good cases as to why he might. He might be a very good style next year. So possibly we've got stratovarius in their four to one Galileo crime five to one Santiago. And then True Shannon ten. My only reservation would later. I think it was Hollywood said. He went like attractive track to ground on Saturday loved, and are we going to get to like ground Aska in June? Yet very valid. Let me then to the British champion sprint stakes marvelous race. This wasn't as big charge up the straight, and again it was holy he came to the fore Glenn share on a real bombing finish with Brandi the oh boy running up somebody stole it was a first group one for the ride as she became the first woman to win on Champions Day in long distance culpable Tree Shannon. This made it even better for her on the whole. Well, he'd been progressive throughout the season adventurously campaigned by Archie Watson. What did you make the race Brendan isolate those warm holes in particular the obvious came to take out of it but what did you think? Of. This lead shared. It's just it just the opposite warrior at the TARP gets in September last year Archie Watts will sixteen on since then on the all weather on the turf area services has been to France being to Arlon I. Mean that was just such a professional purvey. That's that's what he is. He's a model professionally turns for work almost every time he hit the trucks Lake Astana ultimately dot as the difference between winning the losing because he he only WanNa knows. Horses came item. It's a funny taste better because when he when he came from France Watson soccer mop over ten furlongs and every time I, see him over six hundred he wants to go up and trip he wants to open trip because just he's easy kind of grinding sprinter if that makes any sense but I don't suppose they are going to go up and trip because he could second group over six furlongs wanted group on over six furlongs. when you were talking earlier obeyed habit champions day in October. I mean obviously daily we want to see flathorses ruling noche Emerald Green Tarp under. But it does bring qualities admirable qualities in in horses and one of them is courage and he is a very courageous. Joined to watch he, it's take not his his main quality isn't it was a good day for pivotal his sire on Saturday Glenn Shale. Interesting thought it was really refreshing to see some of the less heralded faces in racing. Four I don't think it's a big deal. Necessarily have you know jungles to win every single rice? Alright. Night Bright Accent Trough It was thoroughly enjoyable but anyway. Tastes Glenn Shale. Would you be thinking he could progress again next year or do you think this was about his limit and it was his day but he's not a very tough campaign he he's a starts since the return of lockdown. Hasn't been out the first two in in seven of those eight. There's only one time he's finished outside. The I two is four wins three seconds as Brandon said, super gain. Halls. And it's really easy to make. On a straight course in a sprint. Of If you're in the front in a sprint people say, well, it's the best place to babe. It really isn't easy to Michael, especially, as a headwind, you run it into the wind, you don't get any cover and this victory was. The biggest one for holiday of see, amazing achieve. Short has sports personality of the year price the twenty dollars from fifties, which is great news for horseracing photos and get to see her name big lights on on a big stage and there's a great ride. I said earlier holiday need to be fantastic. Sean. But she did Glenn share but she got the job done. Brenda. A training performance Kevin. Ryan by the way we've got eight year old. Just one pound below his career-best on appears absolutely fantastic software. Yeah Mister. Met I got that but Glen Shiel and holiday just they just how their head down at the right time didn't like also oxted was the host to take out of the race to be honest with we're looking at next season authority. So cain and then he he actually go in front of Glenn she'll always going to win but the complexion of the race changed dramatically on us we can see law when it hits softer ask on I thought he'd be the one for next. Jay still any a year old is excited to see what he does next season. Bennis takeout from the Trumpian sprint I mean just to a massive volley wasn't it? Yeah, of course, it was Maddie and. She's just been brilliant for this I turn turn to my local news. The other guy just before her past six when it came on and and the BBC news was doing hr Holly, which was which was amazing for for for her and amazing for us both on. Land. Continue You've said already about Greenwich Sale Brilliant agree with you about It's great for other the to have a big guy in the sun. Doesn't one, John Gosden winning everything done I did not gone winning everything is great brought to Watson and gone back to Brendan's point hates hey set. Then was really quickly reminded me of Tom Desk Fulmer. Britain it will fight. It's spring training and catchier the why he got out and the trap. and. I'm sure there's big promises in Safavi list sprinters who trying to the minute and who just put in these brilliantly brave performances on. Those horses a gelding say we will see them next year, which is fabulous. Another hosting Muzi next year in who could be just beginning will be an amazing career is wonderful. Tonight she wouldn't has second group won't it was dignity I in Britain in the phillies amass stakes she won the Prix Roy beforehand that was some debate as to whether they go through the Kim facts before that big target a long shot but they did go four the long distance race. Unsheathed dominated this really I think characterize traveling really strongly the William Buick was head buffets and she just really. Was So, generous in the run-up sibylline really exciting performance a want to watch for next season. Do you think she can make him? All can open company. It's the colts. Brinton. Well. Yes I'm always interested in phillies because it top class fillies because of the sex salons I the probably. Hear a campaign around the yard. You'll see. is off ramp does appear to be important to her. So I don't think you'll see her and take on the the boys may be a until the end of the Arcus such a valuable prize and she's almost certainly going to get a conditions. She clearly very effective in the autumn. Yeah. I mean they they should be. That could he's allowances of is a big deal. It can make a huge difference and and she's an improvement video would just give a shout out to the phillies that she bathe in France piece who I was a little bit unlucky dot day slightly overly aggressive ride. Maybe don't a little bit by experience. So that farmers how the boosters while she she's affiliate watch out for going forward piece. Nice, one and In you know I'm a big fan of the trader. To say the least I think he's managed they sources career to perfection. Would you have reservations about her needing soft ground next season? It does seem that's important to our but equally, she's just a horse on the isn't shake. She's definitely wholesome the up. Only eight starts have four victories. Three of them have come on heavy ground Ones Cohen soft. So this stage it, you've got reservations that she needs testing conditions, but she was definitely worth more than the two and a half length winning margin because William Buick certainly went for. Pretty soon. Enough in that race, he went three phones out she was in the lead from for. Seem about forever. She was taken them along and I was thinking somebody's come to pack here because she's just going behind too soon but she keeps finding for precious she doesn't stay. I don't know how many of those in behind rarely run to form the top full round anything achieved anything like an all Fiat close to their official writing. On the four five didn't stay. So just tell you the first three passion is just just plugs on and she kind of had the rights run to suit. She needs about three miles. But she takes that the second day knowledge. Took a cane hold early on, say a multi sure the forms worth. But she looks really promising and cheering thousands and now the good news story for cheap cut just a trainer that doesn't necessarily have the big string come into the floor on trump, Wednesday? Indeed more on trainers that we wouldn't necessarily usually in headlines at just after this puppy power shops are back open and with them the return of a massive racing offer we're getting best odds guaranteed on singles and multiples all UK an Irish racing. All Day limited time only terms and conditions apply can shop some more details eighteen plus gambled org. It's time to talk about the Queen Elizabeth. The second steak Senate was one by the Last year second he beat Roseman with a very hot favourite palace pit only third I. think that was another disappointment from hosts hailing from the John Gosden stable. He didn't have the best day, but it certainly was a great day for PSG food on fronts Grefe. They source was second in the race last year and he had time for that to he's really strong traveler and relatively lightly raced for his age on your big phone Tom Tell us why A huge fan of this horse that Hugh Palmer. Reverend originally started his career with you've got palmer two, thousand seventeen. He's got it still doesn't turn the source because water model of consistency is he's won ten races from thirteen starts and it's three defeats have been who seconds and a third. Crew over nine, hundred, thousand and total earnings best off your one, hundred and twenty three official. Rating. One, hundred, nineteen, he always produces yes. You may need soft ground or DEEPA ground. Let's say he's he's as good on rotten fos conditions. This horse is unreal. He has a great. Cruising speeding up with the pace. Shelled. Bhutto's look around at some point and not race even though he wasn't necessarily getting the run of the rights because they went. So slow early Rosemont eventual runner-up definitely the run of the rights but PS shells booth. I was literally just looking around thinking on a machine here on the revenue proved that kicked Clare made amends for his defeat twelve months ago he's just fantastic course. To good rights pilots pay was unlucky lost should Frankie said it was spoke. When it came off. He was kind of spinning seemed to stop in the final furlong. I certainly wouldn't give up on him, but the revenue is a great Holson deserve to be fought. Mulkey should have been about three, two, one, seven, two, two at against it a great rice from what I read enjoys. Yeah most surprise giving you A. Cane on him. So well, done all not let's talk about policy pit in isolation that because you mentioned lost the shoe I think he will so bit his tongue there was blood in his mouth whether that had an impact. I'm not too sure Frankie again insistent. He didn't move very well on the ground and he was easy on him in the closing stages. You mentioned that Rosement helped the run of the rice owls a big rosement fans as a bit gutted when when he got chin The revenue deserved it. I'm probably spare on the other hand I think he was best position didn't in the rice you made really sweeping moving again should turn of foot just sort of way with spinning on the ground in McLean stages. What do you think he's he's going to be ultimately capable of if they keep him in training, which I believe is the plan next. Jay Burned and do you think it was just a case of the ground one thinks conspiring against Emoji thinks maybe even over rated. Notes certainly I'M Being overrated. He'd been outraged by me because I think he's the best three year old and train on I still think he's the best three year old I'm trying an absolute monster he's able to just sustain these loan bursting practically has in his previous role in Scott Deauville wasn't able to do it on Saturday book. I mean whether it was the grandfather was the shoe obviously wasn't that well positioned in the race, but I don that ultimately made the difference between winning the news and given us being for Lance but. Next year, they're going to stop him up to ten furlongs, which I think is what he wants and he's GonNa. He's GonNa Shell the mall what he can do it easy. He's a machine. He just wasn't able the machine malfunctioned on Saturday for some reason but what he'll be back. We can forgive any horse one sort of polite Labron company and it was still a titanic effort I think in the circumstances and Ben is what did you think this was a fascinating race really and I'll stacy mentioned about the phillies man's race some of those in behind didn't exactly to on but I thought it was a really good result to say, yet the French will come home in front. Was Mighty young looking at the revenue four he's been so consistent has an end up. You know it was a marvelous training performance earth crashed thought said that he was only eighty percent fit when he won. His prep race in and he proved how good he is interesting to hear Brandon's folks about Palestine Frankie said you need four wheels when you rice and I mean I think that's probably fair. Enough Thumb. I did not stepping up to ten items but you'd have to think the Prince of Wales might be one of the principal targets for him. But yeah well, done to the the French connections and Yeah it was it was it was a great race despite. Panelists discipline. And we'll say sources again next season thing this cost wasn't aware of him stepping been trip either I don't know let's just by personal theory I have I think he wants them for. We'll pass onto mystic allston fully. Maybe. Maybe we will. Maybe we will wouldn't count him out every that trip. We've already mentioned fabulous weekend holy. Dole. But what about tomorrow on his day sunset and he came in the champion stakes day another horse he was second in his race last year and then when warm best beat French Scotty with the lost hero. Much. Co. Insert Really impressive performance in again I, guess we have to take the ground into context. This is. Has, really proved himself when the risk in the ground I think maybe some of US may may be in particular thing guilty of just paging holding him out sort of horse whereas maybe with this win, he proves that he is just a very, very, very high class horse. What do you think TC? Do you think else fair? Yeah, Lychee GonNa say that and he's being pigeonholed as heavy ground self ground holes. Clearly, he's best in those conditions he seems to go through any any kind of ground. It could swamp there and it still win any kind of rice He's magnificant magnificent animal. Is One on good ground on good to soft ground as well by so he can't just be pigeonholed as a heavy ground comey. He has clear speed how he was sent off an odds against the time before in a listed race in in. Scotland are just ridiculous because this is clearly top level not was a career-best on opioids is now three six Lasko Tomo Britain inside while much like the revenue that they've just doesn't get the. Credit he deserves he's a phenomenal horse. He extremely smart rivaling scarlatti trouble for the rights talk machine magical run her usual rights and such. He's the forum sector in a failed. She probably would have been close but she ran into some traffic problems and the full time. Well, we're going to sleep on. Serpentine again, this whole Smith five links at the star rushed up us. All is energy early on went behind predicts the early and still stuck in fourth. Unbelievable engine just when he's GonNa put it all together. There are definitely put him in the truck amazing fluid. This details indeed from me today on those happen but. You're in grateful Let's talk about the second sq Alexi because I think he deserves a bit more attention. We didn't know that much about never never raced at the very top level before they as he say, he was pulling his jockey domes out and then dig at home. What do you think trip was? Do you think he will step in back to a mile? I think he. was very keen on as you said, he was he was tugging shelves. Buddha arms out That one. To at Longchamp in the pre dollar when he beat Patrick Sarsfield, he was still quite keen that days while obviously not excuse was Lasko and his turn of the end was unbelievable and he stayed the trip Dixie well as well. especially barely nudged out for a commanding victory. I. Think a Maltese fine for him he beat sought SAS as well. This season over multi salt has won the ARC subsequently. Vermont as well. I wouldn't be given up on this trip with Scotty. Okay. More to offer outlets level a day than I. Mean it's interesting. We we speak about his wins in Australia won the round in the Queen Elizabeth stakes are you that and the whole debate? Very elegant will just gone on to be an absolute cheapest all season. She won the Coalfield Cup and not leads us nicely on to the Melbourne Cup, which is often a a race. The worst is take that route anyone any funds for the Melbourne Cup in Germany Melvin confessing. On Day Mattie. Con Interesting selection for you as well. We got five to one favorite tiger moth. Eight one Russian camelot eight along with the event nine one surprise baby tend to one very elegant, just mentioned and sixteen to one bar. You gave it some warning that you were going to talk about the Melbourne Cup listeners will know my form. My full knowledge of British racing is sketchy. Let alone Australia racing so. I had a word with our Internet. One of our International Traders Column Eight And Hayes come up with a host. San Hubert who is fifty to one apparently hill nate luck to get into the rice but should be suited to this test has some very good form in the book and we'll be very lightly weighted if manages to get. Brilliant. We've got the Cox play as well on Saturday another group one. In Australia, I think armories running in not race to Dracaena might be another one as well from a neighboring stable say if you've not enough of the flat just yet, there's plenty of international action tastes save you have much look at the Melbourne Cup, I think toy. Favourite I really funding him. A has been set. Australia knowledge is in great either I mean, I pride myself on on nine climate around the globe Australia hasn't really come to me as easy as other countries just yet. I have been saying a lot of a lot of talk on twitter. I'm home schooled, finch? Trying by Chris Walla. Also, trains are elegant US trying by fob they show seems to be warming up and for a huge run in the Melbourne Cup run fifth in the coastal behind his stable companion. This weekend was held up the on was right out the back kept on pal the only beaten off links he would be the ones made him also, very interesting. Nebraskan it's not raced I get to stuck into until probably the evening before when I have a quick car because I think what's the mobile COUPLA will look at a cod. but with the to takeout the rights of this point. Brilliant. I think it's of another thing with mentioning is what William Haggas the way he's trained Davis. Just fantastic. Really Really Testament to him and is blurred trump troughing they're either is also that the Saudi Cup on the debt could be next day burgundy things Well. It's a bit of a guess of which would tear for has going to the dirt I don't know. Date. Is By. Pivotal is niece. So I don't know if pity pivotal has had many horses to run on the dirt foot again it's such a valuable prize that what if they got to lose I mean he's probably he's generated more income than so countries they share with the with the right things ourselves the mud, the mud as well. Have a crack about that Saudi Copa. mean. What's that were ten million dollars or something scandals In. Law. Isn't it? I mean? I understand the move but really like the for a date I I've done I bought that is he hasn't won. Lost on his own your weather star the hair and you're gonNA, come against Americans who just used to running on the debt that's furious. Kicked back at Riyadh as well. I'm not too sure about that. Hopefully, the price massive but yet Nelson may not right anything. Yeah. You'll. The master of of also running on being such a follower of American racing I mean, what? What do you look for an air force to notice that suited to the? I mean, I'm not too sure about the move from turf to. Anyway even though weather for that loves soft heavy ground I'm lucky day I said early goes on good etc but he's unproven on since that accepts is like he's never won a race on any synthetic surface and then go into this course at Riyadh is ridiculous if you're not in the Vine God early, you're not gonna get into the rights. You're just GONNA get kicked back in your face. Obviously, we saw mid not be finished second in the rights lost year, but she had the inside trip. Literally off in front of size, she was able to call. You shouldn't get any kickback was kind of like a bit of a what a bit of work a breeze in the morning. If you're not getting on the speed, you're GONNA get loans of the in your face and it's just not gonNA sue died I. Wouldn't be looking at rice with this whole series phenomenons GonNa win, Cup races for fears the comedy carries on. With his niche, which is like self ground this trip. Fascinating isn't it? We'll out the efforts in Australia won by classic legend who is also going to be globe-trotting income next to maybe ruin get down. The line site is really exciting time for racing in Australia the locks race on champions, day went to New York for tomorrow and Jessica Harrington topped off a magnificent dykes his household we you mentioned with holly go to the panel have any art catches already horses to add before we move on to looking ahead to this week and tea CR note that you know I was very look in the Balmoral with horse. Keep pick anything else out. Yeah King in the race and King Ryan is king does he found trouble in the world and it was the best performer from any host ruined high One thing of for him I think GRONYEA was very in pre interesting finishing fourth George Baker sent off a huge price forty, two one he's definitely not once give up on. Turned has when he costs six hundred, thousand dollars in training this tongue last year, he'd only one rights which was his maiden on. Debbie, I, think he was ten or eleven defeat since then. And then he was picked up six hundred K which look ridiculous at a time. I mean it's not looking anything other than riddick. Now it's because he hasn't WANNA awry since. One hundred full. Work will buy so not effort and you got to mention Paul Kelly for a great tip of nodes easy when it wasn't in the end. It was I. Think he did true shown as well. So good weekend for all top tipster at Brendan anything else to add for me. Justed. Not for the Marlon particular. Would just give a mentioned to Elizabethan who broke her maiden? Yes. The she stays she takes a bit of time to come to hand. It's a big ask for it to live up to our low street pedigree but that was that was a fair step forward yesterday probably see our next Guinea Straw in April next year, and she won't look at a place in company. A bit of everything for everyone on this pace gas flat jumps label racing. We've got it all and we'll be back just after they for some more on bugs with the boots. On the gentleman case meeting coming up this weekend here at Paddy Power We want gambling to be fun and encourage customers to bet responsibly. That's why we offer a number of tools to help you stay in control including the ability to set deposit limits get reminders after a certain amount of time playing and to take breaks for more information visit, responsible gaming, dot patty power dot com eighteen, plus gamble aware dot org. Welcome back to the show then we're GonNa talk about the big highlights on the weekend is ver- temperature trophy stakes run over. A Mile Doncaster on our entries of just filtered through as we speak I guess the main talking horse is that you has second Wembley he's been lifted for aid no Brian at Brendan, you hoping lead in high definition, but he hasn't his words at this is a race. The train has dominated obviously when it was camelot with case Bombs Tax Maria, I'm Magna Grecia in recent years with a whole host before that to on the Wembley is GonNa look the leading light TC. Think he could be vulnerable because he's run quite a lot this season. As I can see he's I need anyone actually on on one occasion. Yeah definitely I mean he could be vulnerable the step up to woods sue I think he's got huge Darby next year the way he stayed on us to take second. Streaming catching I think he's sixteen won the EPSOM classic next year. So I think he needs a mile and a half. And Amal. Half in time I think we'll be we'll be audio for him. animal maybe bit to show on is run over seven furlongs. He just hasn't been getting the over seven. Step up triple. Definitely say I wouldn't be within the if is favorite of the just seeing the the entries the woman is I catching I think. A bigger price. Definitely, a bigger price is king. Vegas. Booting hasn't won a race. I will start south goals is in this race that never won missile probably not great but he's run a couple of notch race at sandown being by small holes in Uber. Anatolian attorney didn't really run his rice last time out. But I think he's a small small host. Third time lost is a polar one east one since King Vikings interesting runoff Sandra. Boone's go direct in this rice as well. I'm off to take it with make. Up Twenty fourteen. I think with you on that one. big fan of the Lakers debates but King Vega. He's just nooks each run as if it's been a bit of an education and stuff hasn't really going right for him. So although he hasn't won I, think he's capable of a lot lot more. So I think I'm with you on that one at Brandon said no high definition in their disappointed because of A. Little bit disappointed. Once again, a new Brian has failed to listen to me but they copy. They they may just see him I know Tom Season Darby hearts, and most people seem darby carpet by just in terms of making stallions. Mugler argued again is more important than the diary and they don't think he's going to win a guineas off the back of. His career stocks. But if they see him as divy arson rolled into Gandhi's out of your own, the first six that we kick on for the diary but that's fine. We again, I don't repeat yourself what we do have to consider the fact that I had no brown might not more horses than me. But, he he's going to have a good guy with this. I'd say, I'd say when Lee wonder will be probably ruled that Bolshoi ballet was very impressive Leopard Sam as well. He might give him around by gough of you could argue found golfing. We're both lucky at that new market made and what seem to be a bit of a array of bias. But I actually I'm not sure you have the favor Kosice. This lapper Rossa seems to be very well regarded horse. impressive new mark. You've still plenty green in your market sent off four to seven. which suggests the regard that they they held a very interested in the batting are take laparoscopy would just shade favoritism on a be a battle between the boys in blue on Baladora which is always interesting. You read my mind is always gonNA bring the Godolphin pay into it. Then Lover Officer another light Vega you'd have to like say he's got attractive profile the two ones next to his name will definitely be fancy for many near the one one ruler I wouldn't discount him either you mentioned Van Gogh, he beat him in the autumn stakes a group three last time but the Charlie appleby TC was here analysis of thought pair. wallpaper sorry missed. Labra. One relax. Yes. Well, I. Realize both of them. Forty to tip last time out and. Flying Scotsman's looking good isn't it with knee mandate winning the second captures mentioned on cash. In a in a previous podcasts as well I'm not tolkien whole one bike races. On debut Lacrosse mouth the full moon decent. Ask the third time great guardian. Navy struggled to win a lowly Novus subsequently in the faith Escobedo up on Scott Balls and and on Tuesdays on the racing post website and subsequently disappointed in three outings not sure without forms worth. It's going to be an interesting rice. I not see the prices on it If off a good horse every now and again to show how does this year but we'll see. Yet I miss jumping pay up though he's one since that was the full play source in that race but I think largely we'd have to agree. Seek therapy again. Anyway, let's go into the money himself. What do you think of this race? Well. Just mentioned lanny, who who I'm probably GONNA later in in pies cost I'm going to go for a different wanting this. Racer, Barracuda. gyn Raja Ovarian He's he's had two wins over seven furlongs. He got a got beaten in the hind, Heinsohn claw conditions. It's a neighbor which is always one of the best rice, his level fatigue. I wondered whether we got them all day Thought Roger. Very. Obviously thinks he did leave him in. The attempt to charity. He's Lambeau phys starts on soft ground soak the ground will be an finally ran. He's one of two Roggio verion entries in the Irish two thousand guineas along with Lenox. So I think he's right up there amongst berens coats as as obviously with the. Being entered in this race the hopefully and give the boys blow in Aden Abed's a run for their money. Safer and from flat to jumps then Conway hurt. You can tell how excited today I'm full the case meeting, which begins on Friday. We help those entries now scrolling on websites. Get me very excited the upcoming jumped season of we got either. From Friday or Saturday we're looking forward to seeing or indeed just one full the jump season I believe somebody was me on social media if the lots have worn each to fully guide different was indeed the past I think we might have mentioned this Days ago if we could rock our brains for will not be super Me Myself, I just look stream on a global fame for the informed. Vaguely Brian would be very interesting in the evening ballymun novices hurdle on the Friday who found him on track for a while what about you is there anything that you keeping your oil? Well? I'm just writing my. Column and up to Friday. The weekend just yet I'm up to Friday and I've looked at this show them. I'm also with you with global fame I. Think he's got a great chance to tug and I brought. He seems to be pretty it. What at this meeting has associates ready to go early on in the season And the holiest that I'll take the whole cod. We use as my host of the season is pipe smoker. For Nicky Henderson hasn't won a race against three stars. A son of authorized the really cold the I showed them in December last year. When said behind century house stable companion was a very good rights to second stolen Silvis one since and Pops Mike is only been seen once after that and that came ask on February on soft ground got be hosted sports in John who is considered one of the next big thing i. Thought Hamas Mazda Debonair very good holes I think pipes Mike of Young. Expired unexploited. Think you develop into. Very nice. Lettuce campaign. Pep Rally in an Brendan doesn't help too much to add on the challenge Saudi thinks. So I'm going to be really nice and still a bit of his ass on the to foam is Chris on behalf puddle at three o'clock on the Friday. That I'm interested into town boy is to edmonds. Will send offensive for the silver trophy chat stay but he was one of many taken out due to the ground. Let's say he could still be well handicaps of a mock of just one thirty at. The following race is with forty eight ground than I. Think Puna. Quizzes dose in that his rated one six warning might be willing to bet horses a set to contest the race on Friday any thoughts on any of the calls? While many. Cultures Career the hoses on looking forward to one train by. Brendon's father Brendan near the Karaoke Kendra he's Co. made in PIMLICO. He might run at slidell on Friday probably wants good ground. So we'll have to wait and see whether we get sat hates thing fourth and second one, hundred, twenty, five to one hundred, fifty to one and ask to starts and hopefully improved from that and. You have one I'm really looking forward to might run at Cheltenham on Friday Champagne. Supernova for Max McNeil This one is different to the to coast this one nate's self ground and He got beaten at new brand in a good bumper there on good ground lost on. Think he was. Not, a bad effort considering the ground was against him and. When pressed Max for Sofala this season, he went through Champagne Supernova. Vibes about that horses and that I mean I should win was the horse in front of him on that occasion at New Brain I. think everyone's thinking that he could make into a really nice type this season lot. So we got time for too damn afraid to say it's been thoroughly enjoyable forty five minutes or so if you have any thoughts or any horses you're looking forward to for the jump season the make sure to give me a shout on twitter just tack me. And we'll be interested to discuss the post postcards and what will converge in this season at thanks to you run into Tom, answered vinas. We'll be back next week as well as the louds on the Friday show giving you all the best for the weekend. So we'll see putty power games has over two hundred fifty. 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Thanksgiving Leftovers

Only A Game

49:34 min | 1 year ago

Thanksgiving Leftovers

"Hi I'm Karen Given -secutive producer of only a game. This is a sports show sort of so it might not come as a surprise to learn that we hear it only game. mm-hmm are relatively competitive people and this week marks the beginning of a competition of sorts. NPR's year end digital fundraising campaign. Okay so it's not a sport exactly but stick with me for the next few weeks were going to be asking you to go to donate dot. NPR Dot Org. Greg Splash game to make a donation to your local station by supporting your local station. You'll not only support only a game and the other great great. NPR podcast issue here. But you'll also support local news. Something I think we can. All agree is pretty darn important and if only Lia game listeners raise enough money we get a trophy. That's right a trophy so this is serious folks. Your local station needs your support and we need that trophy. We have the perfect spot already. Picked out for it right next to her bobblehead collection just go to donate dot. NPR DOT ORG slash slash game to find your local station and get started and thanks. This is only a game. I'm Karen Given last winter. I was entering the second hour of what I had promised would only be a one hour interview with with TV host and former NFL player. Marcellus Wiley when I decided to ask just one more question. I've already run over my time but I cannot resist. I A have to have you tell me the story about Bruce Smith and his shoes. This amazing that story resonated so many people love it. I'm thankful thankful for you. Even asking I grow up on a huge fan of John Elway and Eric Dickerson. John Elway quarterback Eric Dixon running back because I play that position loved them. But Bruce Smith was the man. Bruce Smith was the hard hitting defensive end for the buffalo bills. He retired from the League in two thousand and three and was inducted into the hall of fame in two thousand nine his first year of eligibility he still holds the record for the most sacks in an NFL career with two hundred but in one thousand nine hundred ninety four when Wiley was playing football at Columbia. By this time he was also a defensive end. Bruce Smith was at the top of his game playing for a bills team that made four super bowl appearances in a row. And I remember you asked him shoes come out. And they were Air Bruce Myths and he had a commercial with Dennis Hopper. And I remember just watching that commercial like fresh. I'm holding you bruce dozen these shoes a- bad things man. I mean bad things. Okay Akeso in this commercial. You might remember it. Dennis Hopper plays a deranged fan dressed up as a referee. And he sneaks into the bills locker room during a game. mm-hmm Detach Bruce. Smith's shoes bruce would do if you found me messing with this shuman bad bad things man. I remember asking my mom. Can I get those shoes. Say how much are those shoes. I sit seventy nine dollars boy. In other words words other choice words she had for me no way I was getting no seventy nine dollars shoes fast. Forward to April one thousand nine hundred ninety seven Marcellus Wiley was selected in the second round end of the NFL draft by none other than the buffalo bills of Buffalo. Bruce Smith WHOA. I got drafted to Buffalo Bruce Smith. He's the best diene ever and I'm like man. I fast forward. I'm in the locker room of the buffalo bills. I fast four. My locker is to lockers away from the Bruce Smith and I'm like are you kidding me for Wiley. It wasn't the name on the locker. That was most exciting. It was what was inside aside the wall. The back wall of his locker was a wall of air. Bruce mich- shoes like dozens of just by pack. And also all my I just looked at those shoes take appear his shoes and just put them in my locker. That's what I'm GonNa do now. Look Wiley. Really had just signed a contract with the bills. His first year earnings were five hundred thousand dollars. He could have bought himself. A pair of Bruce Smith. Shoes heck back. He could've bought himself a wall of Bruce Smith shoes but he says it wasn't about that stealing Bruce Smith shoes was his way of proving that he he belonged in that locker room that he belonged on. That team is weird. I wanted to be initiated into the Buffalo Bills Gang so one day after practice swin widely thought he was alone in the locker room and I walked by and I just grabbed appear issues and I put them in my locker being not not like full stealing because if so it took him home and it just hit them in on it I was just like let me. Just keep a memento from Bruce Smith. Bruce moves gaming amy his shoes right details while he was sure he had gotten away clean but he hadn't so once saw me. Take those shoes. And it was Thurman Thomas Big Mouth Diarmid had the best vantage point in the locker room. Locker was like right dead set in the middle so he could see everything everything and have never one day shortly thereafter. Dharma's like just joking around. He's there bruce. Check them shoes shoes out. Man Bruce like what he's like you might be missing the pair. It might be a little light in that locker. And Brewster's looked at it as wall of shoes. And then just looked at Thurman Ed Edit I was sitting here like just biting my nails in my mind I'm like God. Bruce Smith stared over at Wiley and Wiley says he just stared back. He didn't know what else to do. Bruce would do if he found me messing with his Schulman. Bad Things Man but Bruce Smith just laughed it off. Nobody better be messing with my shoes. Whatever and I was like whoa not not long after the two became friends while even told Smith the story about stealing his shoes he was like you could ask for them? And I was like just wouldn't wouldn't have felt the same. Yeah what did it mean to you that he didn't call you out in that moment. What did that signify to you? Yeah I it signified. That was part of in. The buffalo bills is signified it. I was a part of this crew That I was one of them. Bruce I call him POPs. He's my football family. Dad like Bruce Right now before I finished and hit send on the tax. He's right me back like that's my God loving the death but here's the thing. Those shoes shoes that were so important to Marcellus Wiley back in nineteen ninety seven when he was rookie for the buffalo bills. He doesn't even know where they are anymore. Funny as it is as I probably should have put them in a glass case in protected them but I think that was the beauty in it that it didn't have to be just a trophy anymore. It was attainable. It was Israel Marcellus. Wiley book is called. Never shut up the life opinions and unexpected adventures of an NFL outlier our full interview with Marcellus Wiley aired last January. Dale Berra was a member of the nineteen eighty five New New York Yankees and on April twenty eighth of that year. The Yankees played the Chicago. White Sox at Comiskey Park after the game. I go into the clubhouse Russian. This guy's cursing they said to me. Go Into Your Dad's office Dale Peres. Dad was baseball. Legend and Yankees Manager. Yogi oh Gabeira. So I walked in there. I said dad what's going on. He said they got rid of me. Dale Yankees owner George Steinbrenner had it fired Yogi during the game. Only Games Gary Wallich has the story. Dale Berra says it was tough watching his dad. Get the axe. While the entire entire baseball world watched and I wanted to console him and he had no part of it he said. I'm going to play golf tomorrow. So don't worry about me. He was going back to New Jersey back to Mont Clare. Back to see mom but Yogi. I needed a ride to the airport. Now Dale says that standard procedure for fired. Baseball managers is to say goodbye to the players in the clubhouse and then take a lonely cab ride to the airport for a lonely flight home but not Yogi. He was the first to board the team. Bus Any sat in the same manager seat so that he would have sat and had not been fired which was right up front near the driver. All the players are getting on the bus. And they're passing my dad sitting in the manager's seat Dale says some players tapped Yogi on the hand or shoulder or offered words of encouragement as they went to their seats. The Yankees next series was in Texas against the Rangers but before the driver winter the terminal for the Yankees Charter. He stopped the bus at the entrance. For the United Airlines departures. Dad stands up from his manager. Seat turns around and says you guys are great team you guys go out and play. Hi You guys go out and win. Go out and play for Billy Martin your next manager exactly the way you did from a billy's a great manager you guys are good and then Yogi did something that triggered a response. He had seen from Fan so many times during his playing days. On the vaunted the Yankees of the forties fifties and sixties only. He didn't need to belt clutch home. Run or throw a runner out at second. It was a much simpler polar act. He walked off the bus got his bags from underneath and walk toward the United Airlines turned around and waved at the bus. The whole bus stood up and gave him a standing ovation. Every player on the bus Yogi Berra never again managed a major league baseball team. And that's only a games. Gary Wallich a little less than a hundred years ago. The most popular barnstorming baseball team in the nation was called the House of David. If you look at the biggest crowd attendance during the Nineteen Twenties and Early Nineteen Thirties. It was the house of David versus this team house. A David versus this team house a David versus this team. That's Chris Syria. No He's the founder and director of the House of David Baseball Museum in Michigan again. So they were a huge. Draw the House of David was a huge draw because they were so good as they travel the US and Canada and Mexico and Cuba Cuba. They would poach the best players they could find. They tell them. Hey come play with the house of David. We'll pay you three times. What your local team is pain can you? And you can travel the world with us and all you gotTa do is signed here start growing your whiskers and don't shave till the end of the year and that brings us to the second reason for the House of David's popularity. They definitely stood out in a crowd with hair halfway down their backs and beards longer than Santa Santa Claus because members of the House of David didn't drink didn't smoke didn't have sex and heard of their belief. Was that never shave or cut their hair. They quoted a scripture in Leviticus For that and there was a third component of the house of David's appeal. That team had access to a lot of money. Apparently running a colt has always been a big business opportunity. Well by nineteen twenty three. I think they had thirty two million dollars in the bank. Thank and so the House of David Baseball team could pretty much afford to sign anyone. They wanted Satchel page the best pitcher. The Negro Leagues had ever scene. He played for the team. Babe Didrikson the Darling of Nineteen thirty two Olympics and Jackie Mitchell. The woman who struck out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig in the same game they barnstorm with House of David and then there was Babe Ruth footage of Babe Ruth put his fake whiskers on and getting up and cracking like a three three base hit. It was just always publicity how to get the biggest crowd to be clear Babe Ruth only played for the House of David once or twice e was is nothing close to a regular but there was one man who played for the House of David for quite a long time and his name had been almost almost as big as the Babes back in his day. The Grover Cleveland Alexander who had been a hall fame Pitcher to manage in pitch for the team from thirty one to thirty five. I grover Cleveland Alexander's first year with affiliates has been called quote arguably the greatest season by a rookie pitcher in the twentieth century. Sorry but that was nineteen eleven and by nineteen thirty one. He had been through a lot. You know he played for the Philly team and then he played for the Saint. Ain't Louis Cardinals for quite a long time. And then won the world series for them in twenty six and then went on to keep playing but then as drinking gotten away and he got fired for Major League. Baseball -ASEBALL got a real bad reputation for being drunk. If Grover Cleveland Alexander couldn't get sober to play in the majors he certainly wasn't gonNA get sober to play for the teetotalling house of David. The paid his wife the same salary that they paid him to keep him sober through the fourth inning stretch. 'cause they had to assure the competitor editor that he was gonna be there because he was such a big draw. He was so good he could totally throw strikes intoxicated and they let him whereas house slippers so so he could feel the pitcher's mound underneath his feet because he couldn't quite see it so good when he was drunk because while members of the House of David couldn't drink couldn't smoke. Couldn't have sachs sewer shave or cut their hair. The teams ringers. Didn't have to follow those rules. They pretty much could do anything they want. Just make sure you show up and play our game and and don't shave till the end of the year except grover Cleveland. Alexander couldn't even do that. He had a phobia for facial hair so they didn't make him grows whiskers so he's the only clean-shaven housing David player ever. We first told the story of the House of David and its association. Ca Shin with Satchel page in the Negro Leagues back in April. It's the weekend after Thanksgiving which can only mean one thing. Thanksgiving leftovers brand new stories made from the leftovers of previous interviews after the break a former inmate tries to use an iphone own at cave diver travels to the end of the world and the real life friendship between an NFL kicker and the player known as beast mode coming up on only a game from NPR. Thanksgiving can be full of Turkey. Disasters was just pasty and white and had this gross rose cloth over the top of it. We'll talk about how to avoid that. An keep Thanksgiving simple an edible plus a chat with celebrity chef semi nostrand. The next time on it's been a minute from NPR. I'm Karen Given Valentino Dixon. Spent twenty seven years of his life in maximum security facilities. Ladies for a murder. He did not commit. He was released from prison in September of two thousand eighteen. Thanks in part to his illustrations of golf courses sources. It's a crazy story. You should go to our website and listen to the original. Here's only a games Gary Wallich. I caught up with Valentino Dixon about about a month. After his release he was a happy man ecstatic. Even only issue. I have is just iphone. My daughter bought me. And I'm GonNa take this thing of smashed up against the wall some update because it's so difficult and it's giving me a hard time you know it's really drive me nuts. Let me tell you something. That's so crazy. I was in New York City. Eighty right I was in the hotel I needed to get over so I didn't know how to download the UBER APP on my phone. I stopped this guy in a hotel. Seems like a decent decent. GotTa stop and I say Hey guy could you do me a favor. He says what I needed to download just over apple my phone so I can get uber ride from the hotel. Uh excuse my language he says you kidding me. I said Yeah I'm serious. I said missing man I just got out of jail for twenty seven years for something I didn't do i. I don't know how to download the APP on my phone or get. The Uber Uber says. Guide it what are you talking about twenty seven years. You don't even look twenty seven. You know they always tell me. I look young so I said Google Valentino Dixon. So Valentino had mastered the iphone but he knew about Google so he goes my name and he says Oh my God you did time in jail you serious. He says this is you isn't it that's the told you he says you got a smaller. Your face he said. How's that impossible? He said I'll never smile for the rest of my life if I did twenty seven years in jail for something I didn't do. I says man Dan. I'm not even mad. That's not who I am. He says guy. Listen man you got me shaking right now. He says I'll do anything you want me to do. Come on let's do it in. He hooked it up for me and he says dude you changed my life man. You made me think about things a whole totally different. Valentino Dixon Goddess. Huber ride. He got to where he was meant to be. He's been helping people think differently about things. Ever since. That's only games. Gary Wallich since his release Valentino. No Dixon played golf for the first time and in April he attended the masters where he met. Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods Dixon's art is exhibiting happening around the country and just for good measure. He started his own foundation for prison and sentencing reform. One of only a Games most popular stories of two thousand nineteen was Jill. Heiner th stale of cave diving arriving inside an iceberg in Antarctica. But there was a part of that interview we left out of that original airing and it has to do with how Heiner and in her colleagues got to that iceberg. Jill tells that story now in her own words the ship's name was the braveheart Gr- great great little vessel. It was a former Japanese fishing and research vessel only one hundred eighteen feet long which is pretty small and a crew of eighteen people. It wasn't ice strengthened But it was a good little ship to go to Antarctica from New Zealand. Is a twelve day sea crossing across the craziest ocean conditions. And so you're constantly in horrendous sees up to sixty feet high and I asked some of the other the people involved I said well you know all the other ships. I see in Antarctica. The other four in this part of the Southern Ocean role three hundred feet ice-strengthened Hall. Will you know built in Russia big strong wrestles and I was told flow at one hundred. Eighteen feet you have a chance to kind of bounce in between the waves as opposed to breaking in half so that was not a lot of comfort for that journey down. When we loaded the boat in New Zealand? I remember I carried a bottle of beer from Canada and it was called Luthan Dumont which means and the end of the world. I remember jumping from the dock onto the braveheart and the captain he was very you know dirty dirty looking New Zealander with big meat hooks for hands and he wore this pilled argyle's shirt and a little a little vest but he had this stern look on his face and when I jumped aboard. He was rather disgusted that he was going to have to travel with a woman to Antarctica. Because women were bad luck on boats and sure enough as I ah jumped on board from the dock to the braveheart. I slipped and smashed my bottle of the end of the world. So if that I wish my my Christening of the braveheart that's Jill Heiner in her own words Heiner and her colleagues made it to that iceberg but they almost didn't make it back really. You should go listen to Matthew stocks original story it aired back in September hambur back in. May We told the story of the brothers I who created the hit cartoon series game of zones a mash up of the NBA and game of thrones. Oh how quickly they forget it. Nine years I released from three one down ice lead the warriors well for our next Thanksgiving leftover. We've got a mash up of our own. Here's only games. Martin Kessler the four Adam and Craig. Momma started drawing cartoon versions of Lebron James James wearing flowing purple and gold robes and a crown. The brothers worked on a different cartoons sports series. Who doing this up Lebron? I'm kind of craving something right now. On craven what do you craven kind of craving a championship. A really want one was called sports friends. Here's Adam followed by his brother Craig. The series was basically just athletes talking to each other But unlike like vulnerable ways that like I think made a lot of people uncomfortable. Just an intensely fictionalized version of sports. I say it was really cool. Actually is Chris. Yes S.. Yeah he's like when I first got here I was like I don't know about this guy but then like just playing with him and dunking with him and like experiencing basketball him. I really like him. Awesome cool like he's just so happens that one of the Athletes Adam Craig parodied on. Sports friends was also featured on only a game. Game this past year My name is Steven House. GotTa I go by Steve With my friends and everything. I guess I'm Steven in the football world. Sometimes it's spelled with H. That's my given name and I also spelled with V. You may remember Steven. How Shaka's story in brief? He was an aspiring division. Three soccer player at Middlebury College who ended up kicking for the football team at NC state where he was so happy you to make the team that he didn't complain when his name was misspelled on the Roster Stephen Housekeeper ended up on the Seattle seahawks from two thousand eleven to two thousand sixteen seen a stretch when the seahawks had a number of superstars including marshawn lynch a running back known as beast mode which not going to get anything Lynch's famous for the creative ways he avoided questions from reporters orders to keep the ball on the ground and run out the clock especially in the fourth quarter in. You know this team is so good reporter. How how does your backfield mercer heating pads and your cleats I got a foundation? Dinner at Azure water on December fourteenth and in two thousand thirteen a cartoon version of marshawn Lynch Aka beast mode appeared in an episode soda. Sports friends with a cartoon version of Stephen Sometimes with the P. H. sometimes with the V.. Hash Guy. I don't know if we met by the way I'm Steve. Hey a marshawn. Hey Nice to meet you nice to meet you. Marshawn Lynch meet Stephen Housego the kicker for the first time during a game like they never met these. They meet each other at the water cooler. And he's like. Hey Hey like so. So you're offended. Yeah Yeah I'm with the offense. I'm look I'm a running back. I'm I'm the starting running back so I'm the guy you've seen gene probably much touchdowns cool. Yeah Yeah Okay you're the beast mode guy okay great. Yeah Oh yeah yeah. Yeah that was awesome. That's Alex buggy close friend and former college teammate. Of the Real Life Stephen House when I spoke to Alex for our story about Stevens career. I couldn't help asking about the cartoon. And he had this to say about the real relationship between marshawn and Stephen. You know marshawn is kind of a quiet a guy with the media but but him marshawn get along really well and marshawn families pretty pretty cool hung out with his uncles and stuff after some of the Games so yeah it was a unique body and I think marshawn was one of Steve's biggest fans actually on that team so it turns out Steven how Ska in Marshawn Lynch really were sports friends. Yes y'all see around. I'll take it easy you to you to go see. Yeah because see hawks cool man that that story was from only a Games Martin Kessler. We'll have a link to that cartoon and other episodes of sports friends at only a game dot Org My name is Brenda Tracy. I'm here from Portland Oregon today. I'm a Oregon Ryan anybody. Oh Hey this is a recording from the two thousand eighteen national character and leadership symposium at at the. US Air Force Academy and Brenda. Tracy is doing something. She does quite often standing in front of a group of strangers and telling them about the worst day of her her life. I forget where I am sometimes half the time. I don't even know what time zone. I'm in Brenda Tracy's a rape survivor and advocate. Her goal is to get men involved loved the fight against sexual violence so she travels often forty weeks a year speaking in locker rooms and team rooms and university lecture halls. Most of the time time Brenda is standing in front of athletes almost always men at colleges like Michigan Nebraska Arkansas Stanford and she almost always starts starts with a question is under the age of twenty five and yeah and then I tell them that you could be my child because my sons are twenty four and twenty five. I want you to think think about that because I mean seriously I share my story today. How would you feel if he were? What if you were my son or my daughter and you're sitting on that side and it was your mom up here talking about this story story and What she went through so and then do you tell them the story of your rent? Yes we start off with that. It's hard for everybody in the room and I usually cry. I always cry. But but yeah I I go into very graphic detail about I actually reopened that wound And and I walk them through it. We're not going to go into detail today. But here's the short version in nineteen ninety eight. Brenda Brenda Tracy was a single mother of two young boys. She was visiting an apartment near the campus of Oregon State University. She was given a drink. She believes gives. It was drugged and over the next six hours. She was sexually assaulted by four men. Two of them played football for Oregon. State Brenda reported the rape. The next day she told the police she told the school but she says the prosecutor told her that she didn't have a case so she dropped the charges and for the next sixteen years every day. I literally just wanted to die. I felt that those men had ruined me. Who would ever love me? Whatever respect affect me? How could I ever talk about this to anyone? How could I ever be in a relationship? How can my children ever respect me? What if my sons when they were your age? What were they going to do when they found found out about their mom how could they ever respect me? Not Be ashamed of me not embarrassed to me. I hit it from them for a long time. My older boy was seventeen before I told him. We kinda came into a space where I knew I was either going to be visiting my son in prison or my son was going to be dead so so in that moment I felt like okay. I need to tell him who I am in. Why am the way that I am? Because we had a very contentious relationship while he was growing up so I remember we sat in the car. You're and I cried and I told them what happened to me and I said please don't be mad at me please. Don't be ashamed of me. I'm so sorry. And he kind of looked at me and he's Blake Mom. Why would I be ashamed of you? You did nothing wrong and that really surprised me. I was not expecting that response from him but then the other thing that he he said to me that broke my heart was he said so. You mean all these years. It wasn't my fault and what he meant by. That was for those sixteen years as I was raising him as I was dealing with. Depression couldn't get a bed angry irritated you know. He was blaming himself the he had done something wrong all those years and so that moment for us was was a transformational moment. He looked at me in a different way. He looked at me as a mom who was just doing the best that she could to survive her trauma and he is my biggest fan. Both my boys are people. Don't always realize that it's not just about the survivor. It's not just the victim that has survived was the families to do. You know my my sons are survivors. Neither of Brenda's sons has seen her speak. She says she doesn't want them to have to hear the details but they know the work. Their mom does traveling the country talking to athletes about putting an end to sexual violence. It's important is amazing for them to to see the love from the teams that I get and you know the players support me and there's one more aspect of all of this. That Brenda Tracy didn't didn't expect when those athletes reach out to thank her for sharing her story. They often tell her something else. Many of them say that after hearing her speak speak they went home and called their MOMS. Have you subscribe to the only game podcast yet. It's the the best way to make sure you never miss a second of our show. Find US wherever you get your podcasts. And thanks we'll be right back with more Thanksgiving leftovers and don't forget to follow us on facebook and twitter at only a game. NPR only a game is produced in Boston. Austin with help from listeners like you why not make a donation today just go to donate dot. NPR DOT org slash game to find your local all station. And thanks. I'm Karen given in a lot of ways. This next story begins ends with this song. Call Honky the Christmas goose got so bad. That was no US -til he. We learned how to blow his nose hard that way loose no blows in the fall of nineteen sixty five at producer for for the CBC. That's the Canadian. Broadcasting Corporation went to a Toronto Maple leafs practice to look for an NHL player willing to sing on a Christmas Miss Album for kids. He found goalie. Johnny Bauer Shirt on his legs. And just to give you an idea of how much of a big deal Bauer was. He won three consecutive Stanley Cups with the leafs between sixty to sixty four and another in sixty seven for good measure. The Canadian government put his photo on a stamp in two thousand and four so anyway Johnny Bauer recorded Honky. The Christmas goose in November number of nineteen sixty five with his son in some neighborhood kids singing along and as soon as the song was released it started climbing the Toronto Music Charts. Yeah right around this same time. Brian McFarland Arlon was just a year into his twenty eight year. Stint with Canada's most popular weekly program it from coast if hockey night in Canada as Hunky the Christmas climbed the Toronto Music Charts. Brian had an idea and it involved. One of his favourite players a forward nicknamed the entertainer. Eddie Shack was a rambunctious colorful player player. Who Dashed all over the ice and bumped into his opponents and he bumped into his own players in his goal tender? I tried to find some highlights from Eddie shacks career career but when I searched online all I could find were fights dozens and dozens of them. I had locked on rail out of a fabric. Swing by at back head That Winter Eddie Shack was on his way to a twenty six goals season. And that's when Brian Approach Daddy with his big idea. I should Eddie. Oh I'd like to write a song about genie's I don't care what you do at the time. Brian and Eddie we're friends but because of this moment this seemingly inconsequential the moment the pair's relationship would become strained and it would stay that way for decades but back to our story so I wrote clear the track here come shockey knocks him down. He gives a whack. He can score goals. He's found the knack. Eddie Eddie Shack. I'm not a musician of nothing. About Music Zeke. But my brother-in-law had a doctor music so he dashed off the song I wrote. The words we hired a group looked like the Beatles but they weren't nearly as talented and they were called the secrets. Brian approached them after a show at the Toronto Precedents Club and offered to pay them five hundred dollars to record the song he wrote for his friend. Eddie Shack the one we booked. RCA Victor Studios to do the recording and my brother-in-law heard them in the studio. He came over the Brian. They're not very good high school. Bill how would I know. I'm not a musician. But they're good enough. Maybe the dog spelled never mind. The the band's talent or lack thereof Brian had the perfect plan to debut his new song see he was the person responsible for producing the vignettes that would air on national television during the first intermission on hockey night in Canada and he figured why not feature clear the track here comes shack during the next maple leafs broadcast. I suggested we have the musicians on the ice at Maple Leaf Gardens. I was going to put them all. In number twenty three swatters shacks number and have them playing and singing on the ice. But that got vetoed down. My boss said to me. We'll just play some film of Eddie Shack Skating back back and forth and bumping into people and play the song in the background. It's the same. It's all so clear. The track here comes shack debuted in February nineteen nineteen sixty six and it was an instant hit quickly climbing to number one on Toronto's music charts and staying there for two weeks while I was astonished to see climb the charts and become number one ahead of the Beatles and the rolling stones. I always thought the other side warming the bench was was just as good. But when you do a record I found out. Decide never gets played. It's always the side. Brian was thrilled with his songs. Success Eddie was not any Herash me for the next thirty years saying saying. You're never paid any royalties. I said you don't get any. You gave me permission to write the song and you're not featured on the song. Mr Shack even went to my boss one day and and tried to get me dismissed from my job because I wouldn't pay him but he was quite willing to ask me for free records to giveaway to his friends now. Did he ever have as good a season as he had that year. After that twenty six goals season and He He had other twenty goals seasons. Eddie couldn't seem to hold his place in the NHL. With one team for very long. I know in Boston Austin when he played there. He was selling hats as an avocation in the summer months. He was working for some hat company and he criticized the team team owner in Boston for wearing the well. Excuse the word but the crappiest hats in the world and of course she was traded. La About six weeks slater. So I don't think the owner liked. The comments. He made about is the hat she was wearing. I haven't been able to independently. Confirm that Eddie. The shock tried to get Brian McFarlane fired but this part seems to be verifiably. True Eddie was traded to La. After disparaging the Bruins bruins owners hats but back to Brian McFarlane and those royalties he never did get any payment. Frankly neither did I. It was thirty years went by and I said I wonder why I never got any royalty so I called some music union and asked and they said walls far too late for that Mr McFarland. Would you take a thousand dozen dollars. I should I absolutely would as for the friendship between Brian. McFarland and Eddie Shack. We both mellowed in time. And we're back on speaking in terms. Now we left multiple messages for Eddie Shack trying to get his perspective on this story. We never heard back but just last week Eddie appeared on a Canadian. podcast called writer's block to promote his new book. Everybody's favourite Toronto Maple leaf the great the colorful Eddie Shack joining us and before the hosts could even finish introducing him and his CO author. Eddie launched into the song. He's he's got the Knack Eddie Eddie Shack Eddie Shack is quite clearly still proud to have been the subject of Song that spent a couple of weeks at Toronto's number number one Nancy Sinatra Nancy Sinatra food at number one the beach boys. We're at number six relates way better than the Johnny Bauer Song. I gotTa say if I had to choose between clear. The trump cards johnny anew Hong Gay on Christmas goes around so it all turned out all right for Eddie shack in his old friend. Brian Brian McFarlane. But what about the secrets. The Band Brian paid to record the song. Well it turns out that they were in no way proud of their number number one hit so they changed their name to the quiet jungle and they grew long beards and they work turtleneck sweaters and they didn't want any association with Eddie Shack Track and the song. And it's the only song they'll ever be in order for Brian. McFarlane is a former commentator for hockey night in Canada. He's written ninety eighty three books on hockey and believe it or not. There is one more story. Brian told us when I interviewed him last winter. Keep listening for that piece on an upcoming coming episode of only a game. Journalism is a public service and back in October. We brought brought you the very important story behind Keith. Comstock nineteen eighty nine minor league baseball card. You know the one where he struck opposed. That would go down down in baseball card history. I'M GONNA take it to the nuts and then you know to make a a face like that ball of it new in that area and how much it would hurt Keith. Comstock was a guy rebelling against baseball tradition. Only a games. Martin Kessler has the story of what happened next Keith. Comstock Doc. Last pitched in nineteen ninety one. He was in his mid thirties. Keith stuck around the game. He started working as a minor league pitching coach and in nineteen eighteen. Ninety eight Keith. Comstock the guy who posed with a baseball to nuts became a manager. Did get to manage for years in the minor leagues. I loved it. I loved it when the game was going on. I didn't like it before the game or after the game because too many times players we get in trouble. And I'd have to go address the trouble as Keith suggests. Managing a low level Minor League club involves a lot more than setting the lineup and pitching rotation. You've gotTa make sure a lot of other things run smoothly smoothly to like the photo shoots for the baseball cards. You might not be surprised to hear that. Keith's players came to him with some creative ideas this anytime. They came up to me if they want to do a picture. Like with their with their catcher's gear on with the ball to the growing area. Knock yourself out go for Blocking a Baltic. A ball your throat go for it. One guy wanted to stick the ball in his mask. Knock yourself out. That's a beautiful guard but Keith wasn't going to let just any idea through C.. Keith comstock had a code. As long as it wasn't a a photo that disrespected the game. I'm all for it if it was anything. Anything that disrespected the game. Then I was absolutely against it. So what did you say not any factors that A guy wanted to take a picture with an apart. I didn't want to do that guy wanting to take a picture with With with a girl in there. No no no. No no I think can happen. Keith is now The Rehab pitching coordinator for the Texas Rangers and he takes it upon himself to keep players safe from particular injury with which is closely associated. Did today's generation of pitchers just don't like to wear cups. It doesn't feel comfortable and trust me. Getting in there in in that area will not feel comfortable so get used to wearing a cup. I know what the Rangers we tell our pictures. If you don't Wear Cup we'll find out because we'll take are fungus around those fields and we'll pop you out if you're not wearing a cup we're gonNA find out. That's one of my favorite things doing spring training. That story was from only a game. Martin Kessler the nineteen seventy five world series between the Cincinnati reds. And the Boston red socks was a memorable one. That was a great series. That's Pete Rose and he has good reason to feel that way because his ten hits and aggressive base running running we're crucial to the outcome as was his cockiness. Only a games. Gary Wallich has the story back in July. I talked with Pete Rose about his. USO Tour of Vietnam. With Joe Dimaggio Rose was self deprecating and humble now those those are not the qualities for which rose infamous for his lifetime banned from baseball for gambling on Major League Games is best known but toward the the end of our interview roses hubris emerged in all of its unfettered glory. It happened when I told him that. The nineteen seventy five world series broke doc my twelve year old red sox loving heart. I'll tell you. Let me tell you one story about this. Jerry okay. How could I say no to Pete? Rose we're playing game. Seven seven and buildings ahead three nothing. Kurt gowdy had the call here. We go pete rose just for a little historical context next. The Red Sox hadn't won a world series since one thousand nine hundred eighteen anticipation among red sox fans that they'd finally win it. All at Fenway Park was ridiculously high. And now they were up three to nothing in the top of the sixth with their best starter on the mound road. The bill then got Joe Morgan to fly to write among I face years one out. Reds catcher Johnny Bench was the next batter up. I hope ability could get them to ground into a double play over while oil into the dog. Rose slid hard into red sox second baseman denny. Doyle I knocked any door on his button. He threw the ball into the dugout. Okay no double-play because they broke up a double play. Rosa was out but bench advanced to second on the throwing error reds cleanup hitter. Tony Perez came to the plate with two out in one on Lee's first pitch a fastball. Missed outside the next pitch billy through an atheist pitch the pitch which was a blooper thrown high into the air to fool the battery into thinking. There's no chance the ball could drop in for a strike. That worked for billy. Some of the time Eric has a high drive is waiting for that. One at one is gone over everything. varez mind that blooper the patch and the screen. I don't know Don's plate at how we have another one run ballgame. It has world series in because I broke that double play up up now. It's three two two all the momentum's on our side to make Adama play by play to the Red Sox do hit us down three to nothing in game aim seven but because of hard slide in the second the whole momentum that game turned around and then we went on to win the game tonight he has has won the world championship. Baiting often let Jack Horner three when I confided to Pete Rose that he cincinnati's big red machine had broken my tender hinder young heart in nineteen. Seventy five I was hoping for a little bit of consolation or sympathy or the kind of mature insight rose had shown when he shared poignant stories about the G. is he and Joe Dimaggio Madden Vietnam hospitals and war zones but not this time and certainly not regarding the nineteen seventy five world series. which many including Pete Rose consider the greatest of all time? You know why that that was the best ever why because MVP NS series. Thanks Pete. That's only a games. Gary Wallich only a game is produced by Martin Kessler and Gary Wallich with help from Jonathan Chang. Our Technical Director Marquees Neil. Our executive producer is me. I'm Karen Given only a game returns next week. Thanks for listening

Eddie Eddie Shack Eddie Shack Bruce Smith baseball Gary Wallich Canada David Baseball Brian Brian McFarlane NPR NFL Martin Kessler football Marcellus Wiley Brenda Brenda Tracy Bruce Keith comstock Eddie Shack Yankees Boston Yogi Berra
Bitesize History - Ireland Last 100 Years

Brief History Podcast

15:28 min | 1 year ago

Bitesize History - Ireland Last 100 Years

"Aw Come to brief history Paul all cast my name's on June nine this the buy side episodes who can do a profile on the Irish troubles on Irish problems over the last hundred years. Thank you to hurry. Edmonson who provides the sound composed the music and does the editon. The game having already done so. Please subscribe on your Apple. PODCASTS listen to podcasts. Make sure reach us on social media brief history focused on facebook and instagram and be history podcast on twitter and there were wearing night special. Also if you leave a five star review on Apple podcast show in now for the chance to win hundred Perfect Christmas I must or you need to leave. A five star review must be on apple podcast and the focus. Must we will release the wind up and Lena who that is and you get hundred pound. I'm Aventis while with doing so. He'll go. This is the lawyer lawyer risk profile for the last hundred years we will write that down as a time line Logical event over the last hundred years so in nineteen fourteen so the outbreak of war. What delays which implementation of the new home rule legislation which would have have restored the Dublin pond foreign centuries of unrest over British Dominion in Ireland Nineteen Sixteen National Stage East that raisins season General post office in Dublin on Proclaiming Independent Irish Republic. The reisen is crushed. I by the British you X.. To its leaders including all seven signature is the declaration of the Republic. Arteries public opinion is outraged. Nineteen nineteen led by Ayman Develop the nationalist movement Shin Fain of we know Translates we ourselves sets up a W assembly dial remain which again proclaims Irish independence a guerilla campaign by Irish Republican Army or IRA against British forces begins with heavily covered shelters on both sides the Irish Free State so nineteen twenty one so the anger Irish treaty establishing the Free State an independent dominion of the British crank thank with internal self governing rights politician from Northern Ireland which remains part the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland nineteen twenty tape the Dublin Parliament ratifies the treaty despite opposition Civil breaks out in hundreds are killed nineteen thirty tate. Divinatory becomes head of government after previous administration files to deal with economic difficulties. Nineteen thirty seven new elections devoted Also prove new constitution which abolishes. She's the Irish Free State and proclaims ear Gaelic for island as a sovereign independent democratic state. Nineteen thirty nine outbreak of World War. Two era remains neutral. The Irish citizens joined allied forces. Nineteen forty eight develop loses loses election on economic difficulties John Costello become prime minister. Broad coalition exclude include excluded Fiona fail now nineteen forty-nine it becomes Republic of Ireland and leaves which is Commonwealth Nineteen Nineteen fifty-nine. Sean lemass becomes finale fail. Leader and Prime Minister Launches Economic Modernisation Sees Island moved from mainly agricultural base and eventually joined Economic European Economic Community. The e nine thousand nine hundred sixty nine thousand nine hundred ninety a conflict in Northern Ireland notice the troubles which occasionally spilled over into Republic of Ireland nineteen seventy three island. Silence joins the European Economic Community Violence Northernin intensifies relations between Ireland and Britain strained strained early nineteen eighties island faces severe economic problems. We've rising debt in an employment tree elections. Oh how in the space of less than a year nineteen ninety-three amendment constitution insurance right to life of unborn chart. The the eighth amendment is seen as laying the foundation for I'm strict anti-abortion laws nineteen ninety-five. Anger are Screaming Continues Continues Against the Republic Consultative Role in government of Nova Island. Nineteen ninety-one Island signs the treaty not of European Union at Maastricht and receives a guarantee they strict anti-abortion law will not be affected nine hundred ninety not to Irish votes approve. Loosening of abortion law will access to information guaranteed travel aboard for Brochure Committed Nineteen ninety-three Dining street decoration office talks on each piece overnight island to all parties if finances renounce uh-huh nineteen ninety nine divorce becomes legal under certain circumstances nineteen ninety eight. Good Friday Agreement Voters in Republican overnight. Island established cost Kyant Community Power Sharon assemblies in north and ending troubles. Two Thousand One June voters reject night needs treats block and expansion of your European Union into Eastern Europe two thousand to January euro replaces punt as national currency. Two Thousand Too much small majority devotes his reject. Government attempts to tighten already strict anti-abortion laws in constitutional referendum. Two thousand may may voted reelect fianna fail's but her as prime minister in Continuing Coalition with Progressive Democrats. Fine Gael the main opposition party loses over third of its seats in parliament. October voters endorsed niece treaty. But comfortable the margin in second referendum. Two thousand six December government launches a twentieth stretched eight Create Bilingual Irish English Speaking Society Two thousand seven June Birdie hearn forms a coalition with the Progressive Democrats several independence disagreements. You enter government for the first time Mr heard becomes the first prime minister to win a third term in office in two thousand eight or two steps down as Voting controversial over his financial fast seceded by deputy. Brian Cowen two thousand Acre June voters reject E. U.'s Lisbon Treaty in referendum September as the global financial crisis covers pace. The Irish government introduced a guarantee covering the debts of the countries banks. This move automatically syncs. The economy as island does not have sufficient reserves to cover its banks that two thousand nine February unemployment employment rate reaches eleven percent highest since nineteen ninety six so a hundred thousand people take the Dublin streets protests government's handling of economic crisis. Two thousand nine March island loses a debt rating as public finances Dettori amid a deep deep recession. Two thousand nine October islands. Votes in favour of European Union's Lisbon Treaty in new referendum November. A damning report criticized the Irish Catholic Church hierarchy for its hamlet of allegations of child abuse against forty six priests two thousand ten September. The cost of Beta now islands stricken Ben Consistent raises to forty five billion in. You'll rose pushing the country's budget deficit up around GDP Two thousand ten November government agrees age five billion euro package rescue with you in IMF in bid to tackle huge hosts in public licked finances government drafts of stores t program entire in Titan four years taxwise spending cuts two thousand eleven February Tayesh Cowan Coz early election. Opposition in Gal wins most seats. Lead Edna Kenny takes office on pledge to renegotiate terms of E. You I M S Bela. Two thousand eleven may Queen Elizabeth pays as L- facial visit to Ireland. I buy bitches. Monica since independence demobilizes new relationship you nineteen. I Take Good Friday Agreement. Two Thousand Eleven July ratings agency Moody's Moody's downgraded island that rating to junk status Fatkin recalls his ambassador to island amid tension over issues of child abuse or Paris. Two thousand eleven. October Michael D Higgins of late party elected president December. Two Thousand Eleven at Nikki Kenney unveils budget to begin cutting deficit of GDP GDP sorry by two thousand fifteen two thousand twelve. June otas approve European Union Fiscal Treaty by sixty percents of referendum endorsing awesome government's commitment to e. back distorting program. Two thousand thirteen February the European Central Bank capris deal to liquidate quitting the former opera. Spanked which was nationalized in January. Two thousand nine. This deal allows island to defer by decades the bill for its most controversial bank. Bela TEAC EDNA. Kenny formally apologizes for the Irish state's role in Dylan laundries. His host institutions which troubled women were force detained to work without pay between Nineteen nineteen twenty two to nineteen ninety. Six two thousand thirteen. June new government figures show. Oil is back in recession for the first time since two thousand nine July lie parliament passed legislation station for the first time allows abortion in limited circumstances two thousand and thirteen December arlon officially exits EU IMF Beta Program haven't fulfilled its conditions the first bailout euro-zone country to do so two thousand fourteen April president. Michael D Higgins makes official visit to Britain the first ever by an Irish head of state in June government says holds inquired into mother and baby homes operated last century by religious organizations after claims. That eight hundred children died at home between nineteen twenty five nineteen sixty one October two thousand fourteen the first post bailout budget introduces tax cuts unfolding criticism from us. E- ends a loophole that allowed foreign molten actual pay very low tax in other countries to fifty two thousand fifteen may referendum approved. same sex managed marriage by a large margin two thousand sixteen February election results seeing finger Labor coalition loses majority will then fingernail remains largest party. Two Thousand and sixty may the months of political deadlock of finding broken off the Reaches Accommodation Fianna. Fail allowed Edna Kenny to form a minority government Poneman T Two Thousand Sixteen August European Commission or island to recover up to thirteen billion in euros from the technology giant apple in back taxes after ruling. The Foam was granted. engy benefits amounted to illegal state aid. The government says it will pay against the ruling on the grounds implies. The island is a tax haven will harm job creation investment. Two thousand seventeen changing Leeann. Vanessa becomes prime minister after Edna. Kenny resigns citing Ki. Listen to this point side episode of brief history podcast. I'm your house. Andrew Knight. Harriet Nelson again provides the SAM. Music Does the attitude remember our special giveaway giveaway for anybody will for for the one person which we can drop the hat. Use less than five star rating review on Amazon or apple who On Apple podcast. Make sure leave. The review must be a five star. And you will get a hundred pound and gift voucher chat. If you put out the hats we got one available perfect time just before Christmas and were read out the winners closer to that time. So thank you again socials. Does facebook twitter instagram. Reach out that let us know what you think the show how we can do back to absorb listen to. Yeah so I have a very good evening. I'm will look out for suit. Don't get skype thank you and.

Island Ireland Edna Kenny European Union prime minister apple Northern Ireland facebook Irish government Dublin Michael D Higgins IMF Irish Republican Army Apple European Economic Community Economic European Economic Com Nova Island twitter
Episode 78: My best hunters

Dispatches from the Multiverse

18:42 min | 1 year ago

Episode 78: My best hunters

"To hi I'm Max. I'm the rival sterling and do you hi fi gear because okay. Okay Wilson. Just hang on Charles de I thought I muted you I just I haven't I wish I could immediate him. Yeah well okay right as muted. Okay just hang on Wilson. I'm Max Wilson. I'm an and I'm an engineer and inventor and this thing here is the Bagel Tron two thousand bigger thousand opens up portals to other dimensions which is where this version of Wilson came from high. Yep and the voice occurred earlier Charles. He is on my phone unfortunately a bit of a tag along on from the last dimension. Hi-fi I'm still trying to figure out exactly how to get rid of him but anyway Wilson came along from planet. Hi Fi northern humans there. So we're GONNA find him a new home maybe in this next dimension. We'll see so everything's all fired up. It's GonNa hop on through so I'm GonNa step through this thing and you just come along after me. Okay great why all all right. Well okay so we're on. Looks like a Savannah Plain. It's Kinda hot. Not at all like Seattle in November. Yeah no I okay. Hang on. I'm going to get Tan. Yeah okay there's no sign of civilization around here but who are those. There's some sort of large cats running right Addis who we are getting close real fast. Excellent Fast Oh boy. We closes Porto where those cats get. Here I hoof. ooh coming in fast. Yeah you're right okay okay all right good well. It's closed at least the bad times day. I'm allergic to cats boy. Yeah Yeah probably I mean I guess it does what they talk talk. You heard it too. I did hear that. Yes okay crazy talking cheetahs. I've never seen you before you food. Fresh fruits yeah are you. Are we food. I prefer not to be now. I don't know you very tasty. I kind of do look like all pop okay. Well I'm none of those cases. Either of us are food not tasty. Are there any other people people around. Yeah what is the people you look through. Oh no like people other other creatures like us two legs eggs to arms no not really four Fi. How only four footed creatures here? Okay Okay and then hunting all this pump or something tasty. That's not us no awful. I assure you raw. Hey guys what are you define. We didn't find anything but that we're still working on it or do these guys They're called the people people people tasty now they save their raw end inroads Especially your hunt now. No haven't found anything except for these weird things called people but they they are not tasting. Are you sure they're not tasty we have no. We're not tasty. That is the Max and I am not tasty that this is this is Wilson. Hi Hi listen. That's mining we so this talking Squirrel here is Wilson Dr King. Yeah Before I never seen this Guy King before what are your kings have blake like us but maybe a little taller and with crowned around Tyler without the right details no tails can rule without a tail. I guess it's just WanNa life's mysteries so Wilson Sorry how about can I call you. Squirrel Wilson King. Within you'll be fine. King Wilson King Wilson. Yes Wilson Ni- here Are just travelers from another land. And actually we're looking for maybe a new home for Wilson here nope pull up businessman and different land an artery. There she goes chasing. That search. ASTRAS are tasty so full roll up. No people. Are there really no people in this whole land. I've never seen anything like it before Well that might be a pro Wilson. What do you what do you think about this this place? I don't really. This seems kind of terrible. I really wanted to see some more people. Yeah actions and not getting. That's true I mean I have. I don't have much criteria but not kidding and people on the list came. Well I taught me to us. I didn't even realize that. They both run off after two different ostriches. They're efficient lavender in spotter. My centers. Yeah did you get the eggs. Yeah be bringing us over here bring over here. Wow that wow. That's pretty big one. I don't think we'll center. I WANNA WANNA end up like that. We don't taste good. I assure you ostrich tastes much better than people. That's what food would say if I could talk to the ostriches. Don't talk no they. Don't interesting only the captain. Dogs talk and squirrels L.. Hey spot yeah drug go over to that elephant. I see over there to baby. Babies are the best meat he Oh Jeez the baby elephant those tender beat do. Do you have any kind of a home or a town of some kind. Here is just wide open plains. Sarah Randy's a group of animals and we see McCain wants then we all make a castle very acrobatic. What do you make the castle out of? I don't see any building materials around here. We use ourselves is to climb on top of each other and build something what like some kind of I mean Cheetah Pyramid Texas out animals camels assemble commute as he comes home. There's like hundreds of and hiding where Oliver the point got great chemistry. I guess there's so many so many Keita's Oh boy yeah. This is really not going to be an acceptable. We'll place for you to stay. No I don't think I can't really I mean that's a pretty magnificent Cheetah castle but even if you were invited in I mean there'd be a number of problems at that the the allergies for one. Yeah I would probably just insanely high risk of being eaten Another least able daughter. Yeah I mean these cats are pretty cool. Cats they are. Are that pretty hip cats. But I it doesn't really seem like there's a lot to offer in this land. What are the land is better than my land? Kim Peterson you know. No I don't think I know. King Peter Hakin Peter Stupid Koala. It looks so cute. The jerks thinks is all that he just lives in a gigantic tree. It's worthless yes. He thinks land is much better than is because it's a giant island. Oh no water swirls different direction who cares weights. You've been all all the way across the ocean to Australia with Australia K.. What's the name of King Peter's Land Guelleh land while land? Okay but it is across the notion. Is it not Tonka water. Yeah yes how do you cross the water carefully okay. I just have the Cheetah's formula wait a minute. They can conform a boat. That actually floats on the ocean about a Herreid. That's that's gotta be something. Yeah I bet. If he wants ice cream we can make an ice cream parlor. He are drawn ice cream Brie. Of course you milked the calves. I've been the comes types Albertson's mccown Floridian nice cream. You know what no thanks. I think I'M GONNA pass. Ah Wilson you what do you think yeah. I think we're good that's Yeah ice cream. Is it's real tempting but Matt's down ice cream now I haven't had it in years and now I don't WanNa have it for more years. Yeah I feel Ellia all right well. King Wilson is. They're not I really think for me Just nibbling that's no no I got you you one year I have one in which Wilson here will sneeze on you Jay easy I guess sneeze. Yeah all right well that at least keeping Bay by slow death is keeping them away. Good news bad news situation there with the allergies I guess yeah so wait a minute. King Wilson You eat meat as a squirrel nuts Gorda due to nuts so you don't eat nuts now already that's jacker and trees back to hardly eat for advert. Oh can't eat way so climbing up a tree and grabbing a few nuts is too hard but chasing down that ostrich was easy these for me. Yeah you just seem to waver tiny little paw there and they just go do your bidding. Hunting averages is easy easy and fun. It's because sometimes they're standing still. Yeah and sometimes there's a slight go there whenever whenever they're facing away from you you can we then you land on then you just go right down the slide on them from behind. Australia's are pretty stupid attack. No they can't talk. We heard about that to be fair. We haven't given them a chance to talk usually killing pretty quick. It was attempted to accept him by. Who Don't get you going out? Wow well I'm glad that they at least didn't immediately eat US Wilson. Yeah that is I. Guess the fact that we look so different from anything they seem before. Yeah what imagine if you were like on our hands They would merely digging this down. Yeah or if I had put on my ostrich ostrich disguise before coming here I thought about it you have that. Yeah Yeah I do. I've never wanted to any other dimension but I don't know maybe one of these days. Let in your debate you well. It's kind of fun for Halloween. I guess Adversity Bay dressed up as options before when we when we get back I mean I guess you are coming back right. You're not you're not saying here. Yeah I guess when we get back I can show it to you okay. It's pretty cool. Headed custom made. This thing is when you sell your start up to Amazon and you make millions of dollars. I mean you've just sometimes you buy weird stuff and a custom-made realistic ostrich suit is just one of those things too weird stuff. What's Amazon design? Yeah it was Boy Okay you know what it's it's just stuff from our land. My land never mind. It's it's complicated. Jedi bad you get the control the Portland you do whatever you want. Well I guess there's not really much else for us to do here. I as the longer we stay. You hear the more afraid I am that one of these two. Cheetahs is GONNA decide to eat us after all very hungry he just killed like five edible edibles just in the time we've been here. I think you've hunted at least. Yeah five or six ostriches annexed that means we eat a lot of food cake. Wealth to try to tell you how to read your like kingdom in all but like this doesn't see very sustainable farming these ostriches. She's or something I if these two cheetahs have killed six and just the past fifteen minutes and you've got what I mean when they made that castle. which by the where the heck did they all go again? They'll just like kind of disbursed burst. When he started sneezing? There were like what at least a thousand Cheetahs. They're I think I don't even know there were so many. Are they all killing many ostriches. All the time. No no just these two now again my top hunters. Oh okay well that makes a little more sense. So they're sharing these ostriches with the rest. I guess I haven't actually seen them eating the ostriches right. They're just haunting them and then especially actually you know what I mean. They just kind of disappeared These cheaters are really good at camouflage that camouflaging and the ground sorry Cheetah I just stepped on you. Yes sorry and like you guys stick out like a sore pop. That is true. Well it's part of our natural defense to indicate how bad taste these bright colors that were wearing. Okay thank you we. Can we go. Yeah I guess we can breathe again all right. We'll have to try again to find you some other place and this is obviously not going to work. Okay let Quebec starting defender. Oh Wow yeah She's right there is a storm on the horizon. We better really get out of. Here is the rains down here. All right well. Thanks King Wilson for not allowing your Cheetahs to to Edith's do appreciate that and literally we're going to head out now so returned our land. Okay which is not computers land. No don't worry about that. NOPE NOPE nope no cheat about Teamdwayne. No Rachel plane. It's complicated airplane. Yeah wow that's another way. We get to King Peter. Peter is placed with dropping gigantic fruits on them that we don't like yeah. I guess but whatever fruits we know like he the guys like so we just bought it on his face dead. He thinks like that. Actually you know I guess there's no we're not gonNA the high this Wilson so let you know what just push the button here. That's that's how we darlene. It's a portal. Is it made of it. You know it is not made of Cheetahs. The Poor No. It's this thing right here and it's just it's a doorway back to Arlon. Is that it can i. I really you WANNA meet or different lab right. You wanted to meet a different land. No I don I just get away from this lightning storm just to worked for Wilson and I accept not not King Wilson just Wilson. I haven't gone tonight. I go. I've got to go yup. It's been great meeting you. Kim Wilson. Lavender spot thanks for your night eating us. Yeah you go back to work that out quite yourself. Some shelter shelter from really quickly approaching thunderstorm and had all right rows. Oh Air All right back much colder. Yeah it is our Amazon Squirrel down all right. Well I guess we'll try again next week. Find you somewhere to stay God. That was a kind of a blessed with people. Just the docking animals. Got Gold Becky. That was definitely something else. Wasn't it. Yeah a lot of blood though. Yeah so much. Yeah I've seen way more ostrich blood than I ever wanted or needed to. Yeah more than a lifetime's worth right. So usually I just take down some notes dimensions. I mentioned that I visit and we have to wait about a week to try this all again. Okay make sure that you know everything is good with machine so maybe next week. We'll be able to find you someplace you can stay the beginning. Yeah Greg Trump get eaten all right. So everything's all shut down and we'll try to greet from the multi source is produced by. Tim Ellis Soaring Scott Trap as discworld and Autry Wilson and Tim Ellis as mets with special guests Mara Trap and Maisy. LS As the Cheetah's lavender and spot theme music by Public Mobile. By David Schmidt. Follow us on twitter at dispatchers. FM and visit US online at dispatchers. Did you know Cheetos Chirp like a bird. It's true look it up. Despite can you come help me. Get this woodpecker. It's driving me nuts by flying. Okay I believe we can climb on threes. He kinda got one for you thank you we we.

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