35 Burst results for "Arlene"

"arlene" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:16 min | Last month

"arlene" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Legends Arlene Phillips and oti mabuse tell us about a new musical touring the country and we meet Kylie more Gilbert and Australian British academic who spent 804 days in an Iranian prison. But first, a major apology ten years late on Tuesday afternoon the chief constable of Greater Manchester police Stephen Watson met and personally apologized to three victims of grooming gangs in Rochdale for failures in the investigation of the sexual exploitation of children. The apologies which have now been published online come a decade after the trial that resulted in some, but by no means all members of these gangs being convicted for crimes that took place between 2008 and 2012 against children as young as 13. These three women now in their 20s have also received what's been described as substantial damages. While the case was brought against the police by the center for women's justice, former detective constable Maggie Oliver, an officer who worked on the investigation, resigned from Greater Manchester police in 2012 to publicly speak out against what she recognized as gross failures to safeguard these victims. While Emma spoke to Maggie earlier this week and started by asking, is this apology too little too late? Yeah, better late than never is what I would say. And I am grateful that finally we have a public acknowledgment and apology for these three young women. The harm that's being done Emma can never be undone. And when I sat there yesterday with these three young women who have become like my own children over this ten year period, I felt vindicated, but I also feel really angry that it's taken ten years to get this apology. The previous two chief constables refused to engage or even consider that anything was done that was wrong. But these girls, these children were victims. They were vulnerable. They were failed. They deserve protection and right from the day that I began to speak out about this. When I was a serving police officer and I was just saying, what they apologize for yesterday..

Arlene Phillips oti mabuse Greater Manchester police Stephen Watson center for women's justice constable Maggie Oliver Kylie Rochdale Gilbert Emma Maggie
"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

04:37 min | 8 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"They had. Reinvented themselves. and i've talked to some Saturate people people who have made me cry talking to them. They they've been so honest It's helped me so much. So i always feel like i'm getting more than i'm giving you know like i listened to the nagel allow yank. I've just learned so much from this person and reinvention was trying to help other people figure realized that just because somebody look successful doesn't mean they haven't had to go through the reinvention of their own life and figure out how to manage a navigate through bad times. Arlene always end my podcast with three things. I've learned what your dad gave me and we just recently talked about. You're responsible for yourself. Society doesn't owe you society. And i think if that was embodied in more people not only with candidate be the greatest country in world but maybe canadians could do a big part in helping. Solve some of the biggest problems. I think the second thing is when you talked about resilience and resilience is just your permission to fail because that resilience is really where you learn. And i think the most important thing is you as a human being saying. I can't pretend to be who. I'm not the flaws. The wards looking tired one day looking glamorous the other that's just arlene dickinson and for that you matter so much not just to me but for everybody absolutely doors you and canada and around the world so thank you for joining me out of the matters. Thanks tony i always like to say that every should all reserve the right to get smarter when we reserve the right to get smarter. We have a lifelong desire to learn. And we can always get better as humans and i. I appreciate you very much. I love this podcast. Thank you so much for those kind kind birds. And as i said huge fan of you so thank you joining me now. Sharia bernie if you've founded the podcast. You know that. I've had her on before. She's an incredibly talented bank of rbc vice president of commercial services. Thanks for joining me again. Thank you very much for having me. Tony it's great to be here. Arlene was very open and honest and actually quite raw the interview when she talked about finding yourself under twenty's as a single mom didn't have a lot of education very little prospects and a year later. She she became an entrepreneur. And i have to imagine a lot of people. Listening right now are looking for a major reset. Really rethinking. what they wanna do with their life. How would you approach. Someone like arby's see knowing that you're vulnerable in some areas because you don't have all the answers but at the same time you have this excitement or energy about wanting to do something different. Those done relationships of trust we. We are hoping to build with them in entrepreneurs canadians rates. So you know. I always tell our clients. Come lewis early transparent. Tell us kind of where you're going. And what you're thinking because You know a lot of times entrepreneurs come to the table and they have a very specific idea for the kind of support they need. But in a of cases they may not even realize the waste they're back gives support them to what we call our beyond banking solutions that can help entrepreneurs with various that it's incorporating a best assortment of simplifying their payroll and there are so many different elements than bring to the table. And that's a big focus for is to bringing these value-added solutions that going. Just one sorry packing functions. we would say definitely. there's a lot of people rethinking their businesses. They're thinking differently about rather business committed the so. My advice would be pump to us and have an honest conversation. Is that your role at our help with the choreography. So that people know seeking the right advice from the right people at the right time. Yeah i mean that's one of the big big roles that are commercial. Account planners are our business and commercial. Managers is being the quarterback in helping the business owner navigating all the resources that are available to them so far loara different forms. We have a lot of different partners that be quiet but every business owner would have a dedicated dunker like a relationship manager helps make sense of it all and bring the right partners to the tape bernie. You have such a passion for women entrepreneurs. I thank you so much for being part of the arlene dickinson Episode and. I hope i can call you absolutely no. Thank you for having me tony. It's always a pleasure and you're doing some really good work in helping them in office. Interest achieve axis flopportunity. So thank you for doing chatter. That matters with tony. Chapman has been a presentation of our bbc. Fridays join. tony chapman for chatter. That matters on the iheartradio. Canada talk network..

arlene dickinson Arlene Sharia bernie bank of rbc nagel tony arby canada Tony lewis bernie tony chapman Chapman bbc Canada
"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

06:40 min | 8 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"Hi this is tony chapman. You're listening to chatter that matters. Special guest is arlene dickinson. dragging extraordinary. We come back. Arlene talks butter. Third book reinvention and why lessons applaud you. I'm gonna do this. Because if i don't do it now. When will do it. If i don't go now when i'm gonna hold and i've always lived with believes that you should not live a life of full of regrets looking back and saying i wish i had. I wish i had done that. Because i knew that the worst thing that could happen was that i would fail. I was okay with that. I was okay with ailing. I was okay with trying to not leading. this happened. But i wasn't going to be okay with not trying. And i think that's how you turn the improbable into the possible by asking yourself. Are you going to look back on and say. I wish i had and we all do that even today. People will look back on this pandemic and say. I wish i had worked out the last year. Twenty four years old. I had three children. And no money. And i did a business. Let's say to somebody you need to try it yourself. You don't know what somebody has done. I'm not judging you by your age. Narrow university i've judging solely on your business yeah okay. I deserve a little more credibility than what you're giving giving you full credit for the social stuff. I'm not giving you full credit for the business. You're listening to chatter. That matters with tony chapman presented by rbc. Welcome back each of the battles. My guest today is arlene dickinson. Arlene wrote reinvention. Changing your life in career in twenty one thousand nine hundred. But i have to be honest when i first picked up your book. I surprised by the picture you chose. You are stunning your press photos. You're one of the most. You're just. I'm not allowed to say anymore but you are beautiful woman and in that picture you look tired. You look like there was no gas left in the tank now. I know you're control of your brand. Why did you pick that picture. I had just come off of of a reinvention of a very difficult time in my journey. And what. I wanted to demonstrate in that picture is was not the glamour but was that it is about being able to look at yourself and see yourself and in. That picture was really about kind of me being raw. You know not a lot of make up. Not you dressed fancy there are moments in time where we have to just be true to who we are and so i just wanted it to be real tony. I think it was just the right picture for the book. So somebody that reviewed your book. This is what they said about you. At fifty seven arlene dickinson's life was turned upside down. Her company was on the brink of disaster. Her sense of herself as a strong confident. Leader was in tatters. She's overwhelmed by feelings of loss. Fear and shame if five years later. Her businesses booming. She's never been happier. More excited about the future actually raised tens of millions of dollars and built a whole ecosystem to help other entrepreneurs. How did you find your way back at that age. I mean you've kind of almost at a point where set myself up for life and now you have to reinvent yourself. And what lessons can you offer people. Because there's a lot of people listening. Maybe you're out of a job at age fifty that they weren't planning or having to rethink what they're gonna do the rest of their life. I never thought about it. In terms of my age. I thought about it in terms of what i wanted to accomplish. And so i had for years tempered. My ambition i had for years wanted to do something so much bigger than i was doing. But i kept hearing other people's voices telling me i couldn't and maybe it was my age without thinking about at the time but maybe it was the stage in my life i went. I'm gonna do this. Because if i don't do it now. When will i do it if i don't go now. When am i going to go. And i've always lived with the belief that you should not live a life of full of regrets looking back and saying i wish i had a. I wish i had done that. Because i knew that the worst thing that could happen was that i would fail. I was okay with that. I was okay with sailing. I was okay with trying to not letting it happen. But i wasn't gonna be okay with not trying so we all the time are reassessing ourselves in terms of. Why didn't they work out today. And then we have this I'll do it tomorrow and then tomorrow comes. You don't do it again. So this is a life of regret where we're constantly telling ourselves we will one day and then we look back before we know it. One day has passed. I would say to everybody. Ask yourself if the worst thing that can happen is you will fail. That is going to be far better than the worst thing happened that you didn't even try. You had a quote. Recently linked in success is not measured by what you accomplish but by the opposition. You've accounted and the courage with which you have maintained struggle against overwhelming odds. We've touched on that quite a bit today. But it's a powerful quote. I feel successful in having lived a life that is full and i feel successful in having lived a life with purpose but i still get up everyday and think i should do more. I should do more. What else can i do to help. You know like not doing enough to help community and people and i. I think it's age now that i'm starting to turn to philanthropy more and thinking about legacy and wanted to make sure i leave a mark and realizing that in a life is fleeting. All of these things go through my head so successes. I think believe in mark leaving the world better than you found it to a lot of my giving these days on like go fund me sites and places where you know like where you don't let tax receipts but you're trying to you can help people who have these really meaningful things that they're trying to do. I've given more quietly to families in need and things like that than i have two big organizational charities and i hope you see somebody who continues to enjoy life Being canadian as honor to participate and wants to stay relevant as i become less relevant. Because i wanna make room for others. One of the things that you and i and everybody who's older has an obligation to do is is make room and make room for the next generation of successful people in the next generation of people that are going to change and to leave a legacy through as you said mentoring and coaching top of everything. You're doing you decided to do. A podcast called reinvention extension from your book in some ways. What are you hoping audiences will get from listening. Thanks for that twenty. That podcast is so unstructured. It's it's similar to what you do. I just wanted to have conversations with interesting canadians and talk about how.

arlene dickinson tony chapman Arlene Narrow university rbc tony sailing
"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

06:41 min | 8 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"This is on you. This is not on anyone else and when we tell ourselves we will fail when we look at others and think they're better than we are. When we compare ourselves to the norm we end up harming our own opportunity when you take the importance of time and you multiply it by courage and perseverance of the human spirit. Your own spirit. You will find that you are capable of doing anything. You're listening to chatter. That matters with tony chapman presented by rb. Rbc welcome back to china. That matters some chatting with arlene dickinson author veteran. Coppola's entrepreneur and dragon sarli. Your next book is titled all in. And i like to picture in this book. You're looking confident. You're more of a teacher willing to give back and i love. The fact is so much honesty in this book that you really talk about. There's a wake-up to becoming an entrepreneur and that means you might sacrifice a lot of things that you're gonna regret down the road which is your personal life your relationships with people because when you go all in there's very little left tell us a little bit more about what you were hoping to get across at this book. I just found it such a refreshing read tell you that book was all about the journey of entrepreneurialism being such everybody talks about a how lonely it can be at the top but as an entrepreneur. It's not just about being lonely at the top. It's about kind of reconciling who you are as a human and how that shows up with everybody else in your life and for me entrepreneurialism is. It's like being when people say well at five o'clock you should turn it off. You should just put it away while entrepreneurs like it's who we are. We can't just put it away at five o'clock and we get up every day and we go to sleep every day and we make up a midnight every day as on. I just like It'd be like saying to an athlete. You know at five o'clock. Stop being an athlete. But could you like what or an artist outfitters. I wanted a book that talked about the messy ness of how your Who are both personally professionally. Is one thing. I wanted to to normalize this this type of individual so that they didn't feel like they were outcast and somehow like everybody else is like they were along but there was actually this notion of this tribe of entrepreneurs and who we are and how we think and how we operate and talk about how hard we can be on our relationships as entrepreneurs how hard we can be on ourselves how how difficult to journey. It is and i wanted to it. 'cause we are all in there. There is no half-measure. When you're not here. You know what i recommend for people out there. That are either. Entrepreneurs are an extension of an entrepreneur. You know relationships family stuff. I think it's an incredible book to read. Because as you said you do get all in and it's almost impossible to pull away and people are trying to tell you something really important. Your brain's wiring something else. And i think that it's important for people to recognize and i think at times. Being an entrepreneur is a bit of an addiction. As well. I love it i i think true and i didn't know it was an entrepreneur until i was thirty one i really and i didn't really become entrepreneurial tony until i was in my fifties. I thought it was an entrepreneur. But i wasn't truly an entrepreneur like was running a business. Yes i was investing. But i really wasn't taking that big risks that's associated with entrepreneurialism in the true sense of the word and didn't do that until i started venture parkin's created the funding did all the Like wanted to reshape the way. Marketing works in the context of helping business. That's when i became a true did to publish his challenge. You when you were writing this because delay up would be you know tale some the dragon or you could just. You could have just sort of fed anything in and they would have been a best but did they challenge you because this was again arlene being very personal about What matters as opposed to being what might have been quite exploitive because you just happen to be one of the most well known celebrities now in canada all in was there was a lot of stories that i used an interview and other entrepreneurs to see what their journey was like and in hindsight i probably would have written that a little differently because the challenges that every entrepreneur has a different version of what it means to them and i wasn't. I'm not sure i read the same. And they end the publishers. Did want me to have the other stories in there. So i'm not sure i the Awesome harpercollins has been an amazing publisher to work with at the editor's been phenomenal. They always pushed me to kind of put myself out there. But in a in a way that i was comfortable with so i i think it's always a journey of beachell respect and mutual kind of push and think book did it is so personally won't on the beach. That's for sure you talk about the three rs of an entrepreneur. Resilience roadblocks and rejection. But what you're really saying is resilience is key does not. They're not equal footing. Tell me why resilience is such an important attribute. If you're trying to push forward with an idea or adventure well we talk about persistence and tenacity but resilience is that iron will that lets you kind of get past your mistakes and to me. It's that ability to take the challenges and not internalize them to the point that they actually cripple. You'd and so resilient says about saying okay you know that was hard and that was difficult. But what can i do with it next. How do i come out of that. I mean the flood. In calgary that i experienced are almost what my business out of business. mcquay resilience to rebirth the organization. And it's not as you as you've done yourself you know when you when you have to reinvent your businesses when you have to go through things personally toward their divorce whether it's illness whether it's death in the family whether it's loss of a job all of these things are challenges that we get in life and the resilience is the ability to take them and not let them stock you but let them be part of your learning as a human and this is something we sometimes forget that we start our next part of our journey fed off because.

tony chapman arlene dickinson Coppola Rbc china Awesome harpercollins parkin arlene canada mcquay calgary
"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

08:09 min | 8 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"And i knew i couldn't possibly do it all and i in particular. I was hearing from a lot of lemon. Who were struggling with trying to find their place in the business world and trying to understand how to navigate the personal and professional side of being an entrepreneur and and and the messy -ness of that as as also while being a female and it struck me that the best way for me to try and reach a bigger audience was to write a book about a persuasion and this came out of the notion. you know. We're both in the marketing industry. Tony you know how sometimes you see marketing as a very The pursuit of evil it's manipulative. It's it's it's all about trying to get somebody to do something they don't wanna do. And i didn't like that i didn't like that business was perceived as you know. It was a doggy dog world and you had to be kind of ruthless unfeeling in order to succeed and that marketing was you know world where it was all about kind of manipulating things. So i i wanna show right about ethical persuasion that you you can actually build a business and do things in an ethical way. You can persuade somebody to do something that you can both win at Win-lose can be a win win and so the book came from a place in a desire to share the story so that people didn't feel so alone and that so they could understand that there is a blueprint and there's there is a way forward that they could follow perhaps themselves and i get that and i get as a dragon. That's something that people would be very eager to hear but you also talked about things like marriage in trouble running into an affair. Put yourself outside of a community evaluate the mormon church and all that came with it. I mean that's that's quite risky. Isn't it when they're thinking you are this. I've seen you on stage phenomenal speaker and you walk onstage and people are so excited but that book showed the works of arlene as well. Your confidence your belief in yourself and your ability to succeed in life this. Is you semi. What gave you the courage especially that early and building your brand to offer that to people and what were you hoping they would get from it. I don't think. I have the energy to show up as somebody different than who i am and you know one of the things that tv taught me. Is that a a lot of people. Want to be seen as somebody different than who when the lights and the cameras are off than they actually are and for me the easiest thing in life was to just be true to who i was and not have to spend the energy in time trying to pretend that with somebody else in it also came from a place of kinda still wake up every day shocked that i'm where i am because i i am who i am and realizing that invulnerability and this don't want to say something trade at all but this is very true a truism that invulnerability you gain strength that when you talk about these things have impacted you. Knowledge of people relate more to you. But you actually feel free. You actually feel less burdened by trying to pretend you're something you're nod or that you have struggled in some way or that you're somehow perfect and so i started. Just talk about it. And i it's funny. Tony found it easier to talk on stage in front of thousands of people that i did in an intimate conversation with one on one with a person i found it easier because i was in control of the conversation. I could talk about it. Put it out there. But then i don knapp to kind of unravel it and analyze with anyone else. I'm making you do right now. I love a quote when you say that you never buy into this concept. I can do it. Anyone can tell us why you feel that. Because that's one of the easiest do it you can do it too. And you're opposed to that. Why because i don't think it's true. I think we all have different gifts and different skill sets different talents. And there's things that you know. There's things that i can't do i. I will never be a supermodel. I may want to be a super model. But i will never be a supermodel. There's physically i will never be one. There's a whole bunch of reasons. i won't So if they can do. It doesn't mean i could do it in like that's it's there are certain things i i'll never be a brain surgeon. I've got a little bit of a tremor my right hand and had had for decades. I can't be a brain surgeon so just because i want to doesn't mean i can be and i think the notion of i can do it you can do. It says if hard work gets you anywhere. I'm hard work can get you what you want to accomplish. But it can't make you something that you are not able to be. We're all good at something we can you know. And there's lots of room for all of us at the top. There's there's room for everybody. Don't try and be what somebody else is. I guess so. Let me build on this concept. There's room for everybody. You join dragons den. I believe in the second year and kevin o'leary was trying to run the table and be the dragon the personality. How did you make room for yourself. And over time in fact win over the audience. there's always room for a villain. A mega heroin in every story rate and for me i'm a bit of a justice warrior. Tony and so. I couldn't help myself. You know when when somebody would put out an opinion that i felt that matter which of the dragons that i felt really opposed to discuss from a moral ethical kind of just a treatment humans perspective. I couldn't not say anything away. You've done business for the past twenty five years because you're the old way of doing business and if we don't start thinking about stuff like this shame on us business people not combatants check. It's good business right richer. I'm thinking about it and so it was. It was an accidental clash of personalities. That turned into i think a microcosm of the business world is is like there are different types of people out there that you can do business with than i never thought of myself as the only woman on stage. I only thought of myself as myself on stage. And i was unafraid to have the debate. I never felt intimidated by it. I never was afraid of it. I i could give it out as well as i could take that. I think i don't know it's quite. I don't know if the word is ironic but the girl that was scared to go to university that hidden in books because she felt she was always outmatched is now the person on television. Not afraid to give her opinion as quite a quite a journey that happened in quite short time from a professional perspective. And you'll you'll appreciate this a lot. I used to be so intimidated. When i would go to like. Ics mediums and for people. Who are listening to your podcast. Which is instituted canadian advertising agencies. They used to go to those meetings. And i'd feel so intimidated by people. I feel like i didn't belong there. I usually was the only female everybody was running multinational shops. And i'd sit there and think. Oh i don't know anything and then it took and then after western wait a minute. I'm ready my own shop just like you. I'm an independent i. I jon stuff day. Haven't done like. I have a different perspective on. It's okay that it's not their perspective. Just because they are hired guns for big companies doesn't mean that they're smarter than it took me some time to really kinda get comfortable with that. Which was this notion that we all have something to bring to the table and when you talk about kind of i am still incredibly insecure when it comes to personal things like i am so insecure. I'm insecure about my body shape. My my way. I look the way All of that stuff but professionally. I'm incredibly secure. I know what i know. I know what i don't know and i'm not afraid to an. It's an odd thing. I'm not afraid to stand but don't put me in a social setting where gotta walk into a room and everybody's is gonna turn towards me because i just like i'd just so everybody listening arlene and i were in the same industry when i first heard her name and this shop and who are these people and then the client looked me in the eye and said this company has purpose. This company understands social justice. That was fifteen years before it is now the dna of being a great advertising. You were so far ahead of.

Tony don knapp mormon church arlene kevin o'leary jon
"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

08:18 min | 8 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"Throughout my career. I've been called a hustler and each time. It raises the hair up in the back of my neck. For some reason i take great exception. I have no idea why might have come from reading death of the salesman in highschool or those horrible boiler-room movies like glengarry glen ross wall street but also might be my ancestor. The word chapman is an english. Name that identifies career. Baker is baker or smith for blacksmith. In our case our name comes from cheap map. My ancestors were heavily. Cheap goods and i guess when i think about it. The apple hasn't fallen not far from the tree. When i was in my late teens. The chunk of my car. You'd find pack with hairdryers and jim socks. The latest inventions things like digital calculators and watches often had a box of gold neck chains with pendens. About all of this in the wholesalers in montreal and then pedal to the people i knew as a family. We didn't have a lot of money before. Maverick that i drove was the first car family owned need gas. I wanna to do my part to help at home thursday nights. There's a special night and had to take my mom grocery shopping. I remember one night telling you that the washing machine had broken. Had no money to replace it and a family of six creates a lot of dirty laundry. Proudest mona. my life was my ability to pull three hundred seventy five dollars out of my bank account so she could buy new having money to draw on the bill from as always been important to me so call me a hustler. If you must. But i prefer to see my wiring. This being opportunistic and the one lesson i've learned and might be an important lesson for you to focus a chasing the opportunity or the idea not the political over my lifetime. I've learned that true lasting reward is when you find a place where you're intellectually enriched and emotionally stimulated. You're in that place. Rewards will follow might be job security or job advancement force an entrepreneur when you have shining eyes and excited and energized. I promise you you'll find the capital in marketing. You're listening to the iheartradio. Canada talk network. And this is chatter. That matters with tony chapman presented by rbc first of all as an entrepreneur. You need to learn how to take criticism than a make a ton of money because this is the future and you guys need to get your heads out of the sand. Alsop my perspective on it. It's very cool. It's a very good idea. You weren't ready to go to market went to market. You've got see because you came out and you took a gigantic risk. Try to give you. What i thought was really fair offers. I'm sorry i'm out. My guest today is arlene dickinson. Many of you will notice the quarterback on dragons den. I knew her before television days. Gifted entrepreneur with a spirit and competitive drive arlene. Dickinson is what defines my show ordinary. Who do extraordinary arlene is humanity at best. She's carrying a courageous fearless but not afraid to admit her fears. She's empathetic and competitive and unabashed and unashamed when it comes to promoting what she believes in which includes women. Led businesses entrepreneurs not for profits and charities at work to erase the disadvantage. Arlene is also an entrepreneur bestselling author and the host of one of my favorite podcasts. Reinvention arlene welcome to china. that matters. thanks. Tony it's always a pleasure to talk to you. Normally when i do this show. I kind of it flow. But i'm doing something very different. I'm gonna take your three books written over the last ten years persuasion in two thousand eleven all in in two thousand thirteen and your latest reinvention in two thousand nineteen to kind of build the lessons. That i hope you can offer the people that are listening. I will take one deviation though before we get into where you first started writing books. I think everybody's a little bit curious to know arlene. Dickinson is a child before she became this ferocious entrepreneur. Tell me a little bit about your background. Immigrant to canada. Lee came to canada from south africa. When i was not quite three years old tony end. Came here with literally nothing. I had to sell what we did have in south africa or to emigrate to this country. Emma childhood was a mixed bag of you know being an immigrant a country in a culture that we didn't quite understand in a in a land. We didn't quite understand and kind of navigating through that and going through these challenges of poverty and the challenges of not fitting in started school. You know young. Five years old. I accelerated a year and that always put me at two years younger than everybody else. So i found that. I was constantly dealing with people more mature than i was And also feel again. Like i didn't sit in very very introvert As a kid very much a feeling a little bit. Like i didn't belong and also just kinda sticking to my my books like i was. I was book-driven. I read. read voraciously i. That's all i did was read. You know i was the kid that probably very few people would remember from school. I think i was voted in my high school yearbook. And they say you know most likely to be the president or most likely to go and run the world. I think they said in mind. I was most likely to become a candlestick maker. Imagine how many people from that high school now talk about dating you and hanging out with you. And i knew arlene and all this other stuff you know. My wife was from south africa and she immigrated here and she describes your timing candidate by winters. I've been here thirty two winters because she's never quite come to terms with the weather here and my mom too fast. Forty eight thirty one. I listen to an interview which was so raw and you described yourself as stranded recently divorced clutching a high school diploma. No savings and no clue how to feed your for young children. That must have been a tough place to be. It was a really hard place to be. I guess you know people ask me. How did it. And i always say you know you do. What you have to do is not like you have choices. You don't sit there and say don't you know i'm not gonna go and try and put food on the table today. You have to put food on the table today. So i think i was overwhelmed but i also had a very fortunate in that. My father in particular had instilled in me a sense of belief that i was responsible for myself and that it was up to me to change anything. If i didn't like what was happening in my life that it was up to me to change it into circumstances that were better and he always said to me. That society didn't owe me anything. But that i owed society everything in other words were part of a community and we have to give back and we can't expect people to take care of us If we are able if we're capable enable and he always said if you have two hands and ahead you get out there and work great lessons in life but it was curious. You only had your high school diploma. Sounds like your dad's warring you for greatness. Why stop there. When i was thirteen my parents got divorced and we came from a fairly dysfunctional family. There was a lot of fighting. A lot of dysfunction in our family and i was graduating high school when i was sixteen years old and my parents had sold the family home as part of the divorce and there was really nowhere where to go because i had kind of sailed through high school without having to study or work hard at it. I knew i had to work in order to find a place to live. That didn't have at home to live in. I was sixteen without a home. I knew that i had to you know. Go and kind of take care of myself. And i also was very afraid that i wouldn't do well at university tony. I was really nervous about it. I have good study habits. I didn't think i could pass. I didn't have that kind of instill belief in my intelligence i. My dad was just mortified with me because he has a phd in education and my sisters had degrees in education at my stepmother at the time by then had appeared in education so they were all educators. He kept saying you have to go to university of. Never make anything of yourself if you don't between the fear of going to school in sailing and then the desire to kind of put a roof over my head and the need that was at sixteen and then at nineteen. I fell in love. And i got married and started to have children so my life completely changed. I really wanted to do is be a.

arlene jim socks Proudest mona tony chapman arlene dickinson Dickinson south africa Alsop chapman rbc Baker baker montreal Arlene smith canada apple Canada Tony
"arlene" Discussed on Raising Christian Kids

Raising Christian Kids

04:22 min | 9 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on Raising Christian Kids

"That got loves them to teach the truth of god's word to be service to the community etc so that's a little bit of time that their church but a lot of time they're at home and so that can be very intimidating. Because you feel like oh. But i'm not a pastor of a teacher or what do i do you know and so you can keep things very simple but have that idea that i as a parent. I am the main disciple of my child and sometimes that is the thing we need as adults to get us to go. God i depend on you got i need you. I need to grow in my faith. So that i can give something to my child right and god is so willing to meet you and to be like i want to fill you up so you can feed your children so this looks like reading a bible story to your to your young child every night. I remember those days of the toddler bible. And it's just two or three pages and you're reading to your child and that's such a beautiful thing because they're ending with the word of god they're ending with that experience of sitting next to you and and listening to read. They have a for reading at a young age. So if you have young kids you end the day with a bible story. Begin the day with a prayer..

"arlene" Discussed on Raising Christian Kids

Raising Christian Kids

05:33 min | 9 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on Raising Christian Kids

"Jesus so let's dig deep and raise strong christian kid. Hello and welcome back to raising christian kids. I am so happy to have arlene pella kane on the show. Today are lena's speaker and host of the happy home. Podcast and author of several books including parents rising thirty one days to a happy husband and screen kids. She has been featured on the today show fox and friends..

arlene pella kane lena fox
American Victory in the Men’s 4x100-Meter Freestyle Relay

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 10 months ago

American Victory in the Men’s 4x100-Meter Freestyle Relay

"Make it seven gold medals for the USA as Monday's events at Tokyo twenty twenty wrapped up what was highlighted by Blake Pieroni and his teammates finishing the top the podium in the men's four by one hundred swimming freestyle relay all of us love the hundred freestyle we don't really attention a who's on the relay from the other countries or anything like that really just worry about ourselves and Arlene and putting the four fastest splits up that we can Americans also took gold in women's and men's skeet shooter amber English at fifty six of sixty targets to finish on top Vincent Hancock knocked down fifty nine of sixty targets at Olympic record on route to becoming the first skeet shooter to win three Olympic gold medals I'm John Murphy

Blake Pieroni Tokyo USA Swimming Arlene Vincent Hancock Olympic Olympic Gold John Murphy
Posey Comes Through in Return as Giants Defeat Dodgers 7-2

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 10 months ago

Posey Comes Through in Return as Giants Defeat Dodgers 7-2

"In his first at bat off the injured list buster Posey hit a two run Homer and the giants went on to beat the Dodgers seven to two manager Gabe Kapler was impressed see a problem step up to the plate and and had a big problem for us is doubly impressive about it great at bats throughout the night San Francisco put up a four run seventh inning to break open a close ballgame Tiro Estrada having key two RBI double the Dodgers got first inning homers from Max Muncy Justin Turner off Kevin Gausman Gusman won only three innings but the bullpen put up six scoreless frames Arlene Garcia picked up the win mark Myers Los Angeles

Gabe Kapler Buster Posey Dodgers Homer Tiro Estrada Giants Max Muncy Justin Turner Kevin Gausman Gusman San Francisco RBI Arlene Garcia Bullpen Mark Myers Los Angeles
Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Baker in Same-Sex Wedding Cake Case

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:18 sec | 11 months ago

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Baker in Same-Sex Wedding Cake Case

"A right to refuse services for same sex wedding ceremonies. This case involves Arlene's Flowers in Richland, which refused to provide flowers for a same sex wedding argue waited, arguing it violated their religious beliefs. The high court is declining to take up the appeal to a lower court ruling crew members are safe after a Boeing cargo

Arlene Richland Boeing
Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

Can We Talk?

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

"Judy. Human is a legend in the disability rights movement. The fruits of her labor everywhere. Sidewalk curb cuts accessible public transportation. Equal access to public services from fighting for the right to live in her college dorm. To leading major initiatives at the world bank and state department. Judy has been a lifelong activist. Her activism often includes telling her own story her book is called being human an unrepentant memoir of disability rights activist. Judy was born in brooklyn in nineteen forty seven. She got polio when she was eighteen months old and it left her. Unable to walk we spoke over zoom about her activism. In her early years growing up in a world she had to fight to be included in. She started telling me about the time when she first realized that people saw her differently. It was an incident that happened. When i was about eight years old in my neighborhood and at that point when no motorized wheelchair so that's why people were having to push me and my next door neighbor arlene and i were going to the store to the candy store and on our way to the candy store some boy came over and asked me if i was sick and that incident really made me feel quite undressed in as much as i really had not seen myself until that moment as being consciously different from other people and the word that this boy used with me was are you sick and so the use of the word sick still today And now we're talking sixty. Some years later is still. I think a prominent where that people think about and use his

World Bank And State Departmen Judy Polio Brooklyn Arlene
What's Behind the Recent Violence in Northern Ireland?

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:48 min | 1 year ago

What's Behind the Recent Violence in Northern Ireland?

"The violence on the streets of northern ireland. This week is the worst thing. In years the unrest has largely come from unionist or loyalist factions. those in favor of unity. With great britain were loyal to its crown night after night mobs targeted. Police officers with bricks and molotov cocktails more than fifty officers have been injured politicians including the country's leader. I minister arlene foster of the democratic. Unionist party held an emergency meeting yesterday. Calling for calm injury tree. Frontline officers victims terrorized. How much to people's property the harm to northern ireland image. In our centenary year us take us backwards. A new brick no bottle no patra bone thrown has shaved or ever cheese anything but -struction arm on the scale of that destruction harm and fear has brought to international attention. Prompting a statement from white house press secretary jen psaki. We are concerned by the violence in northern ireland joined the british irish and northern irish leaders in their calls for calm rioting on northern. Ireland's streets is uncomfortably familiar with roots in sectarian divides that go back centuries in nineteen ninety eight. The good friday agreement devolved the government and put an end to the decades of brutal clashes known as the troubles. What's happening now is fueled by more. Recent events represents appointed threat to that hard won peace. Really we've had several nights of pretty consistent and quite serious violence across northern ireland. This has been going on for more than a week annoy. It has spread from londonderry to belfast. To some of the smaller provincial ballymena carrickfergus etcetera.

Arlene Foster Ireland Unionist Party Jen Psaki Britain White House Government Londonderry Belfast
Northern Ireland assembly meets after sixth night of unrest

Monocle 24: The Briefing

10:11 min | 1 year ago

Northern Ireland assembly meets after sixth night of unrest

"Edition of the briefing with me. Andrew mueller last night for the sixth consecutive night northern ireland witnessed scenes of the kind of violence likely to prompt considerable agitation in observers with long enough memories. More than fifty. Five police officers are known to have been injured in the last week and considerable damage done to buildings and vehicles. The worst of the most recent disturbances occurred around one of these so-called peace walls which separate nationalist and loyalist communities in west belfast. The northern ireland assembly has been recalled for an emergency session at stormont today on joined with more on this by lord. Peter hain former secretary of state for northern ireland lord as you would know better than most people the good agreement did not end sectarian tension in northern ireland. There has been sporadic tension and violence over the decades since but measured against that scale. How bad is what we're seeing. Now was nothing like as you indicate the level of bombing and assassination and horror at the said. He has also troubles brought to northern ireland. Whistle the terrorism but It is serious and it needs to be addressed not just by northern ireland's leaders who displaying frankly a lack of leadership which is really disturbing but also by trade minister boris johnson and state for northern ireland who've been pretty absent from the scene in northern ireland now full quite a while and especially over this. What's your read of what's behind this because there is always the trap of reading significance which might not exist into what might just be a bunch of board young men looking for trouble. No this is that there are elements of that and they're a variety of other factors but the main problem has arisen over frustration amongst the unionist community the protestant community over the fact that there are checks and controls in for businesses doing trade. With great britain with england scotland or wales across the irish sea northern ireland of course is on an island with the republic of ireland to the cells and also within the united kingdom and within the united kingdom the rest of the united kingdom there are no barriers to trade of any kind between scotland. And or between wales and england for that matter scotland wales but they're on house result of brexit across the irish sea between england scotland and wales to northern ireland for the first time and that is the reason because the type of brexit that boris johnson. The prime minister pursued which was to break any real alignment with the european trade and customs arrangements and to go for at entirely separate of great britain but in order to make sure that the good friday peace process and the stability which has brought since ninety nine hundred was maintained. The irish border had to be kept open. Let's say the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland to itself as it has been now for decades and has become invisible with all sorts of human activity. Crossing it in their efforts not had the toxic role played a toxic role. Because it's been invisible it did in generations gone by and that's that's also the good if however that's it become the external frontier customs frontier of the european union. Then it could have ignited all those old problems that had beset and an bedeviled northern ireland. So instead what boris johnson agreed to was to keep the border open that men the northern ireland remained in the european union's customs union and it's trading markets but that's Inevitably because the united kingdom was leaving Great britain would be outside those arrangements so they have to be checks across the irish sea between northern ireland and great britain. of course. The prime minister denied this in his normal airy way At the beginning on the unionists and loyalists in particular who some of the most hardline involved feel betrayed. Because he didn't he wasn't straight with them way. Do you save in the causal connection between that dissatisfaction with the post brexit arrangements. And what we've seen in west belfast. Is it possible that there are people who are or were associated with loyalist paramilitarism. Who are leveraging that discontent to cause trouble. Yes there are and they're also criminals amongst them who drug. Traffic is and so on who've presented a police crackdown which has been quite effective in their communities to try and get rid of this drug trafficking problem and bought ignited. Not because of that so much though it's fit into it but also but primarily because suddenly loyalist protestant unionists suddenly found that Country what boris johnson told them. There are actually checks and controls strangling a lot of northern ireland businesses in a mountain of tape and naturally they see that as a break within the united kingdom because which puts northern ireland in a different place from say england scotland or wales and so they feel that their fundamental beliefs in the the union of the united kingdom northern ireland. Being within that is being threatened. And that is what ignites it. There was none of this until that issue suddenly arose around new year because the prime minister frankly say told a lot of porky's on us and didn't level with the unionist community and they suddenly found themselves in this predicament and had created Insecurity and understandable anxiety out of which these other factors criminality usa Vandalism and so on out of which that's fed you mentioned earlier a an absence of leadership both in northern ireland and in the united kingdom what would a constructive response from especially northern irish politicians. At this point look like presumably not like the one We saw her on twitter from arlene foster who went and it is a a term with which you will be familiar. Full water battery Suggesting that the violence will die quote. Take the focus off the real lawbreakers incheon. Fine that's probably not the most helpful into intercession. She could have made at this point. Is it well when you become first minister which is effective northern ireland as she is Although it's an unusual arrangement that she has joins us with the deputy minister. Michelle neil who's a shouldn't fain leader when you reach these positions you've got to speak for the whole of the community promises and president presidents naturally have their own party agendas to follow in their own party members to satisfy in any country in any democratic system. But you're trying to speak for the whole nation and that for the whole nation as well once you assume those positions and what has been disappointing about both of them and especially in recent days. Me aline fosters utterances. She's not adopted that role. She's effective acting as a party politician. A democratic unionist party rather than speaking for the whole of the the the the community across northern ireland and across the religious and political divides that have bedeviled for so many generations. And i think that's the kind of leadership we need. And we have gossips equally across the water London has been virtually silent on northern ireland. Now full rarely ever since David cameron and the conservatives came to power in two thousand ten under make this point on a on a party. Basis is a leave a politician and also it was labor secretary of state for northern ireland. A because it's traditionally been a nonpartisan issue between both the major parties. I make it. Because i'm genuinely an i've being hugely critical of the the absence of of number ten downing street of the prime minister in a way. That's attorney blend. Gordon brown were in vogue. John major's conservative prime minister before them. playing an honest broker role effectively. What they've done is said will not you know the the good friday process the peace settlement that i helped to negotiate in two thousand seven that brought the old enemies to share power together. That that's all done and dusted and therefore we can concentrate on the other pressures of government and that was fatal So we only seen a couple of sentences from the prime minister over the last few days when parts of belfast up in flames and a couple of tweets from the northern ireland secretary of state. Frankly that's not good enough. They should be convening all party. Talks in person to try and resolve these as labor shattered secretary. St louis hague has called for And they should be on the case all the time instead of effectively absence without leave as has been the case over northern ireland now sadly for a number of years lord haein. Thank you as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing. Here is markle's ailing goffin. With the days of the headlines. Thanks andrew in the serum institute.

Ireland Boris Johnson United Kingdom Wales Scotland Irish Sea Andrew Mueller England Republic Of Ireland Belfast Northern Ireland Assembly Peter Hain European Union's Customs Union Stormont Britain United Kingdom Northern Arlene Foster Michelle Neil European Union Great Britain
EU Reverses Move To Restrict Export Of COVID-19 Vaccines To Northern Ireland

BBC Newshour

04:36 min | 1 year ago

EU Reverses Move To Restrict Export Of COVID-19 Vaccines To Northern Ireland

"A mistake. That's how British Cabinet Minister Michael Gold is No describing the use sudden decision. To impose vaccine export controls of the Northern Irish border. The European Union quickly reverse that step after was loudly condemned as a violation. The key clause in the E U's Brexit deal with Britain, in other words, that there would be no hard border on the island of Ireland, but this crisis isn't over yet. Northern Ireland's First minister, Arlene Foster, Vehemently criticized the U. What's absolutely incredible act of hostility towards those of us in Northern Ireland. It was nothing to do with making sure that Northern Ireland was in a peaceful state and all to do with the European Union's vaccine, embarrassment and mismanagement. The prime minister and I need to act very quickly to do with the real trade flows that are being disrupted between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Arlene Foster with you more, but that vaccine makes management shortly. But Mrs Foster also called on the British government to abandon and replace the existing post Brexit protocol for Northern Ireland. Agreed with you up until now. We've been trying to deal with these issues on individual bases, but the protocol is unworkable. Let's be very clear about that, and we need to see it replaced. Because otherwise there is going to be real difficulties here in Northern Army, Alan Foster again with us get more details on this. Richard Morgan is the BBC's business report. Hurry Northen Ireland, he explained the background to this reaction. This Roy is really as a result of the European Union looking to trigger what is known as article 16, which is ah clause within the Brexit agreement, the Northern Ireland's protocol. That essentially change is hard up protocol works and what was going to happen here is that if article 16 had been triggered, it was to control the supply of vaccinations. Throw it the EU and there were real concerns essentially that vaccines arriving in the Republic of Ireland. Could basically get into great Britain using Northern Ireland as a backdoor because Northern Ireland is still part of the EU single market for goods and there would be no checks, but one article 16 would have done Is created a hard border on the island of Ireland when it comes to vaccines. The whole point of preventing that hard border was to protect the good Friday agreement and to protect the peace process on this island. So, of course, it has escalated as you mentioned beyond vaccines. With Arlene Foster, now, basically calling for replacement of the Northern Ireland Protocol. Is there any chance that that would happen? Well, I think unionists it's worth saying or absolutely furious. They view this as Brussels about to hit the nuclear option. They already here the Northern Ireland Protocol because it has essentially placed a border die in the Irish Sea, requiring goods arriving in Northern Ireland. From Great Britain to undergo some checks and processes to prevent those checks happening on the island of Ireland, where the border currently is, and I think, essentially unionist, they're saying, Well, look, what process was willing to do At the first sign of any trouble of any problems on this was to do with vaccines. What could happen down the line? I has this set a precedent and could we see Article 16 being triggered for anything on any concerns that arise on what uncertainty will this create for businesses and for Northern Ireland's economy Because we'd already bean been seeing pictures of empty shells and Northern Ireland Linds supermarkets, So this comes at a time where there already were growing trade issues. Yeah, Things haven't been smoothed over the last couple of weeks. As you say Supermarket shelves have bean empty. There have been issues around getting certain goods across the Irish Sea Jew to those new checks. We have retailers, well known high Street stores, who have simply stopped selling goods to Northern Ireland on the online retailer Amazon. It's currently drawing up a list of products that it will no longer offer to customers in Northern Ireland's and this is really concerned business on politicians, particularly unionist politicians, who have been calling on Boris Johnson, the British prime minister, and the U. K government. Trigger article 16 themselves in order to ease the supply chain issues on. Many are saying that if solutions aren't find that tree, a disruption is only going to get worse as we get further into this

Arlene Foster European Union Republic Of Ireland Michael Gold Mrs Foster Alan Foster British Cabinet Britain Great Britain Northern Army Richard Morgan Northen British Government U. ROY BBC Irish Sea Brussels U. K Government Amazon
"arlene" Discussed on hitmen, deadites & Me

hitmen, deadites & Me

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"arlene" Discussed on hitmen, deadites & Me

"Cav. Yeah. then. He puts on the shock thing when he turns it all the way up remember that part. was I mean that was the part where I felt like You know the? Actor for Andy. Look. Fairly. Terrified. He's. Lay us about the. Like Have About a fucking breakdown and. Yeah it goes from. That because I think there's only. If I recall there's only three main kills chucky does. If. We. Lost Arlene had to call her back..

"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

Horror Soup

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

"And say <SpeakerChange> by earlene <Speech_Music_Female> by everybody. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Getting. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Back. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> then. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Look. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Guy <Speech_Music_Female> Big said. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Watch one. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> Off. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Separate T <Music> C.. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> Band. Dog. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> One A <Speech_Music_Male> TC. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> ploto Mahmud <Speech_Music_Male> TV <Speech_Music_Male> yet a mom. <Speech_Music_Male> Of <Speech_Music_Male> My digs <Speech_Music_Male> in A. <Music> fucking. You TC <Speech_Music_Male> with <Speech_Music_Male> my dig <Speech_Music_Male> now <Speech_Music_Male> claw mob <Speech_Music_Male> balls <Speech_Music_Male> in your ass <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> urine ammonia <Speech_Music_Male> ask hair like <Speech_Music_Male> some grass. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Bob Balls <Music> still <Speech_Music_Male> in your. <Speech_Music_Male> Now. <Speech_Music_Male> Walking <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you <SpeakerChange> in your <Music> <Advertisement> bushy.

"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

Horror Soup

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

"Up happens like nine times in the movie. Yeah. The always just fallen asleep. But I guess that could be another time. Lobstein whatever. And the dude. The Dude lifts up this chick shirt had let it was so funny because she has this shit carved into her back at it just says hello. Yeah like what? Who you say hi to first of all. I think her own them I guess not her she. Oh my gosh. I just thought that was so fucking like of all the things that you can carve into someone back home. Imagine like just like a slow I guess this little kid on. Die. Just hello. Hello. Hello like what kind of ghost is just writing a how low on someone's back what the homey no I get it now way arlene me out I get. It was a lobotomy patient is. Yeah he was made like fucking retarded in the brain from his lobotomy and they're like he's just like aloe just tried to say. Don't fucking ghost he died dumb he died. And just wanted to say. Hello That's all they want to do is just like family, but you know carbon a low fred's I guys. You've Devi. Hello. Dick like screaming and freaking out..

arlene Dick
"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

Horror Soup

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

"Not okay. Hold on. He was on his own vibe though. I am now on that. Loved it. Audio doesn't know what's going on, but it's one I'm feeling the. Shades. He starts feeling out the plays Nigga. This bath and he's like red water blood blood. She died here she died out. She's Oh my God. She slit her wrists. In the TUB. Oh my God, and then they cut the cameras like. Joey. Got Him. So I. Thought He. Yeah fucking posers do you the legit? fucking wrong and then the movie unfortunately starts turned found footage with the dude with shitty hair and beard going. Yeah. The camera only. Get to this next scene was really cringe. Dude. That I. This is what I kept going back and forth. Okay that they do they do know what they're doing but. I don't know. There's movie really confused me like generally yeah I don't know how to feel about getting the answer's. No didn't interest single fucking thing. Automatically go to hell or Tunein dimension when they were locked in that building or. or or what? I. Can't see these fucking glosses. So This is when the movie started found footage. Already. Yeah you guys didn't hear that Yeah. So the next scene and There's plenty of these ghost things that really like anyone that's ever seen any kind of ghosts movie or show or anything knows exactly what all these ghosts instruments are like you know you got like the ghost sound. Bobber, you got the the ghost Sierra and the the ghost electric? Box everyone knows exactly what it is down to the last detail and they showing us all of it but I mean like they're really showing it. Like three minutes of just going yeah. One point you've brings. Is things bad ass like if I wanted to know what's up with all those gadgets, youtube it. Yeah. If I really want to know I can find out with these things are at least like maybe just say the names let go emt fucking. Those showed reader. showed reader can look that stuff up. It's not that big of a deal. You'll be fucking fucking child. So then they make the album cover for their new metal album. Remember that shot. All my God. When they're doing those really ugly poses. The camera turned around all standing next to each other Clint Eastwood Guy, his face was like the best expression and the. Best I love it was definitely the unclean vocalist growling. fucking. Two. Kids that are like showing on his lawn. Touch his fucking grant around. It shows fucks. Is Pretty great though you know I liked album I, I would listen to that band. What do you think? Would you called graven calendars? Screaming counties what the band when I think of it. Even know the name would just be grave accountable would be given counties. Then and then, and then the the font for the logo of the brand whatever go sex. Yeah. Go sick sex goes. Yeah. Yeah it'll have like the typical lake though the phone will have the typical squiggly like branched out. Ways like the metal bands have for their logos. Likes that likes. Nettle music is going to be pissed that not only I just said that the you're just like Oh. Yeah. The little metal swivels. squiggle. That's exactly what I recalled it right. Let me what else would you call it that what the fuck else is a Ridiculous Grow Up. Metal People. What are they like being called metal heads at allow? Stupid. Texas tag the big old dumb Texas. Well, we all stupid Texas. So they start trying to call it a spirit and then ethnic are Clint Eastwood. decided there's probably a ghost till left of them. So they go to the left. The the is just he added this gray line. He's like, Oh, you know there's a ghost behind me we will know. Until later. Easily, one of my favorite lines, the whole movie. Is Good. You know it's just. It's still. A little bit later like no begging you. Don't act like this. It goes behind you even if they might be. Going like, Oh, I'm really creeped out in. Year. They had out in these tunnels and I tripped over some uh, some noises and some smells I. Pretty sure ship themselves without point. Yeah. It's actually just rats. while. Shit themselves probably so much. Let's just say so much it themselves. The host he's he's been a real fucking pussy about these rats. Everyone else is gonNA find with they're like Oh yeah. Rats David deal on this guy's like. I'd be the only Gada pursue. Surrounded by rats, hell Ya it's just lower out. Missile Buddy. He went so crazy. He'd freaking read. Your singing about eating rats earlier. Is this. About it though. We. Were they four shattering? Is that what this was? The just showed a rat foreshadowing. He's going to eat around later. Maybe Ha. Oh. This is only source of food or whatever it is. He's is going fucking crazy. We'll both actually because they were in there for days. You're right. But if that is the foreshadows awash fuck and foreshadow in the world trail so ectoplasms gets discovered by the grave encounter. Teams might be ges but the host decide that they need to get some floaty hallway shots and then a points out some glory holes find a wheelchair in the middle of the hallway. nope. nope. Paraplegic though and gets a call from his girlfriend, his daughter and he sets the camera down and this is a really missed opportunity to fucking murder him. True. But I'm also upset because I was TC. To. As my man I fucking love easy. He says the camera down starts talking to his girlfriend wife whatever in his daughter and the wheelchair. Slightly moves like Justin inch like just ever. So fucking slightly, and it really pissed me off with thirty minutes and and that was the first ghostly thing of any sort that happened I was like really does that you gonNA move it a little bit that could have been a gust of wind. As fine. So Adore ends up shutting next time right after this gets on film and stuff. So the other people wait you got it on film you like. Yeah. So they're like I got some in this ghost by screaming at him. He's.

Texas Clint Eastwood Guy Joey murder Clint Eastwood. Justin inch Gada David
What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

Her Turn

08:11 min | 1 year ago

What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

"Judiciary Committee hearings in full swing this week. Arlene's outta wrote this report. For many feminists, it is the most painful, outrageous and sad irony that the Supreme Court seat once held by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, one of the most staunch supporters of women's rights and civil rights, will soon be held by another woman. But one who seems to be the mirror opposite of R B, G and all her views the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings this week on the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court. But her views on full display despite the fact that she repeatedly refused to answer questions about her opinions, questions on such settled issues as the right to birth control and the right to vote, including a peaceful transition of power. As the result of that vote, all got I cannot comment answers. When asked about her view opposing same sex marriage, she offhandedly used the term sexual preference when referring to the LGBT plus community, even though many activists say the term is offensive. One after another Democratic senators tried to press her on her record, such as the fact that she previously signed onto an ad describing abortion as barbaric and calling for the Roe v. Wade decision to be overturned. Her two dissenting opinions and abortion related cases, one of which involved allowing minors to get an abortion without notifying parents by way of judicial bypass, and another that would have required fetal remains to be formally buried. Observers say 17 cases related to abortion are one step away from the Supreme Court and three including a 15 week abortion ban from Mississippi could be taken up as early as its next session. And her only nod to any progressive opinion. Barrett seemed to support the idea of desegregation by calling the Brown v. Board of education decision a super precedent that isn't likely to ever be overturned. The Judiciary Committee is set to vote to approve barrettes nomination next week with a vote of the full Senate by the end of the month. Bang. With the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the U. S. Supreme Court. Questions about her ties to the religious right have raised concerns about the fate of Roe v. Wade and a person's right to reproductive choices. Her turn. Reporter Ellen La Luzerne spoke with Karen Garst, who author to anthologies about the impact of religion on women. Women beyond belief, and women versus religion. Last received her PhD in curriculum and instruction from UW Madison and is a current resident in the state of Oregon. 2016 you published a book Women Beyond belief. In the book's introduction, You stated that you wrote the book after learning of the 2014 U. S. Supreme Court decision regarding Hobby lobby's denial of reproductive care for their employees. Your reaction was to question why a corporation can use its religious beliefs. To dictate the healthcare a woman could receive. Fast forward to today when we're witnessing the Supreme Court nomination process for a woman who is a valid Lee, a member of an extremist religious sect that believes that women should submit to their husbands What was your reaction when you heard about the nomination of Amy Clooney Barrett for the U. S Supreme Court. First of all, I wasn't surprised because Trump has already appointed people to the Supreme Court. I didn't watch quite a bit of the confirmation hearings of his previous nominees, so I wasn't surprised that he appointed someone who's conservative. He vowed when he was elected that he would appoint justices to the Supreme Court who would overturn Roe v. Wade. If Connie Bear is confirmed, What is your opinion about the impact that this might have for future cases such as the Affordable care act and a woman's right to choose? Well, I think it's going to have very dilatory ous impacts because now we're going to have a Supreme Court. That is considered very conservative. I believe six of the justices will be considered Catholic, and there are going to write decisions as they have for that have a conservative bent. I think it's very unfortunate that the Supreme Court has become so politicized. If we look in our history. One of the things that I was doing some research on was previous decisions and Brown vs the Board of Education. Which desegregated schools was fundamental change to the way this society was operating was a 9 to 0 decision, and people saw what was happening in society, and I talked to a friend of mine who is a lawyer there. Who said, you know, there's this public sentiment. That's how culture changes. And people were attuned to that, And now we're not appointing people to the Supreme Court who have an open view. They're very, very one sided, and I think it's totally tragic that she's going to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. What do you think the consequences will be for Roe v. Wade and access to freedom of choice? An abortion? There will always be abortion. The question is whether it's going to be safe and whether it's going to be legal. There has been throughout time before Roe v. Wade. It was back alley abortions, and I think younger women today they don't know what it was like before then Roe v. Wade. If it were completely overturned, I think would have a revolution. It might take a while to put it together. Rather, I think what they'll do is just approved all these restrictions on it, making the doctors who on abortion clinics we associate with the hospital, whether it's making AA lot regulations on the clinic itself and what it can have and what it has to have delegating more. The authority of states and people are going to have to say I don't want to live in a state like this. If they overturn it completely and make abortion illegal. I just Hey, I'm ready to start the revolution. I don't think they're going to go that far. But who knows? What do you think, drives the women who are supporting people like Coney, Bharat and Support these types of efforts to keep women as subservient to men, such as the belief system of Annie Cockney Barrett. Religion is an indoctrination in a set of beliefs. I'm 70 when I was growing up in the fifties in Bismarck, North Dakota. Every person I knew went to a church or there were three Jewish families who went to a synagogue. But it was part of everybody's life. So you're indoctrinated in that It's your family. Everybody else around you is like that. Unless you're exposed to something different. This shapes who you are. And we know that Trump was elected by conservatives by people who identified as religion, particularly fundamentalist religion. That's too he appeals to, and it's unfortunate that the religion hasn't changed enough to deal with our society today. What is interesting to me? Is that this woman, Amy Cockney Barrett is very intelligent. She is ah, Notre Dame professor. She's an appellate court judge, and she has seven kids. I can't imagine trying to balance all that. But in spite of that conservative religion, it is pretty hard to say, Well, she's helped meat of her husband because she is Ted her own career. In your

U. S. Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett ROE Wade Ruth Bader Ginsburg U. S Supreme Court Judiciary Committee Senate Judiciary Committee Annie Cockney Barrett Brown Arlene Senate Hobby Lobby Mississippi Donald Trump Bismarck Ellen La Luzerne
Northern Ireland will lock down for four weeks, as England begins new restrictions

News, Traffic and Weather

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Northern Ireland will lock down for four weeks, as England begins new restrictions

"Northern Ireland, introducing the tightest Kobe and 19 restrictions in the United Kingdom. These are your world headlines from ABC News, Northern Ireland's first minister, Arlene Foster. A lot of these decisions will make a huge impact on people's lives, but they are for four weeks were very determined that this will be a time limited intervention. The plan includes the closing of schools, pubs and restaurants to slow the spread of the virus.

Northern Ireland Arlene Foster Abc News United Kingdom
Prosecutors charge 3 with threatening women in R. Kelly case

Dave Ramsey

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Prosecutors charge 3 with threatening women in R. Kelly case

"Have been charged with harassing alleged victims. Of singer R. Kelly. ABC is Aaron Carter Ski with more federal prosecutors in Brooklyn, said R. Kelly's longtime friend, Richard Arlene offered a woman 1/2 $1,000,000 to keep her from cooperating. Another friend, and now Russell allegedly threatened to reveal sexually explicit photographs of a second accuser if she did not withdraw her lawsuit against Kelly. Ah third man, Michael Williams set fire to a car in Florida that prosecutor said was part of a campaign to harass, intimidate, threaten or corruptly influenced the alleged victims in the racketeering case against our Kelly, defense attorney said the singer who has pleaded not guilty, had nothing to do with this. Aaron

R. Kelly Aaron Richard Arlene Racketeering ABC Michael Williams Prosecutor Russell Brooklyn Florida Attorney
"arlene" Discussed on hitmen, deadites & Me

hitmen, deadites & Me

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"arlene" Discussed on hitmen, deadites & Me

"Podcast. It would mean so much to me, your host Nathan Hopkins and thank you to my guests arlene. Garcia for reviewing. Toxic, Avenger with me. I. Hope You had fun. We had a little mix up at the beginning like. It's all right I. Think. I'm not added a little something for. Listeners at that. On my own. That should be little fun part but. Actually, you've given the opportunity to. Ask do a fake commercial. You GotTa just wants you mentioned that your data do it now I know I'm never mentioned it and then be in there, and then it's GonNa be at the end of this where we're talking about now, it'd be like a weird like whoa moment. Anyways, thank you and I had a lot of fun in. Maybe. We can do a ninety is one or We can try to find another movie 'cause like I need. I would also like to guests and As, crazy as this may sound. Maybe even a perfect stranger, but that might be little in. Little Bit outside of my comfort zone right now. But. Maybe. Just maybe if you're a big fan and We. We can figure something out how to do it because we're doing everything. Via Phone No. No. In person thing as we all distancing. And covy and Pandemic and all the other ship I'm trying do. Not. Talk about on this. Yeah get you away from I'm trying to take yard. Trying to take you away from all. Releasing their an hour. Then, you can go back to it in like maybe I need to hear another. Yeah. anyways. Enough pandemic talk go out and. Okay you've already pretty much go out and watch toxic avenger or maybe any other drama film. Yeah again, how you enjoy it. Yes if you haven't watched it already. And Yes Again Someone please tell me which came first..

Nathan Hopkins Pandemic Garcia arlene
Solving the mental load  update

Ladies, We Need To Talk

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Solving the mental load update

"When we first spoke about the mental load on this podcast, there was a fringe cartoon cold. You should've asked that was going viral. It explained the mental load with such clarity that when I first saw it, my reaction was fury. I wanted to. Shift to the ground. It showed a woman with a baby and a hapless male partner who was kind, but needed to be told how to help and it so familiar. So common. So exasperating and so profoundly unfair. Journalist, Tracey spicer new. What I was talking about. It was an absolute lightbulb moment for me, I sir, Clementine, Ford's facebook page. I share with everyone and I knew that went viral swear words and it happened in the time when I realized that my life with my wonderful husband who's fifty fifty with the housework fifty, fifty with the childcare, but it was just the little things. I'm always the one who organizes school holiday care or who takes the time to look after the kids or rangers everyone's Christmas presents or birthday present in his extended family and my extended family. So after reading that I, decided to go on strike in the household so he had to do it drove him Berserk. He said this is crazy. Such little school holiday cared Australia. I said now you know my pain. Jenny talk about the mental load in your life. I think when I saw the catching was like, oh, no added that to my mental learn. About. How often I think about the mental load? That's Jenny Leong amp in New South Wales Parliament I was very lucky and I consider it to be like that. My partner was able to access paid parental leave. So he was the primary care for a significant amount of time and in that case he did take the mental Lloyd and a lot of that was then there that the what's interesting is once we're both Both. Back at work where the default position falls back and the expectation of WHO's supposed to know those things to me. Then you feel like part of it is also all of my being bad feminist because of that because I think then adds another level to it to how much you should make a deal of this or not I noticed the gender dynamic with my. Friends that are in. Relationships, they're both men they quite comfortably into stereotypes, gender roles that old without all of the challenges and the. Doctor Leah. Repent on a lecturer in sociology at the University of, Melbourne. She racist as domestic labor, and this idea of the mental load is her field of expertise. I'm going to start and say a little bit controversial. Say That everyone actually carries the mental load. So some portion of your mental load may go to thinking about your career. Some portion of it may go to thinking about your family and some portion of it may be going to thinking about your personal life and the differences, the balance across men and women. So you could imagine men are spending a lot more of their mental load thinking about how do I advance my career thinking about the day to day challenges of work. That is a very different mental load than who is going to pick up the child from daycare. or WHO's GonNa Organize School holidays or who's doing the housework wise. House a mass. And one leads to economic outcome, career mobility and one is just unpaid sometimes recognized sometimes not recognized labor. And I think that's really the difference. How do we shift the ratio? Definitely does seat more with women the. Yeah, I, K-. So we're all in agreement about that. Absolutely. Absolutely, the balance in terms of unpaid in terms of thinking about the experience is disproportionately shouldered by women. Yes. Absolutely. Once, you get your head around the idea of the mental load. You start seeing it everywhere in the lives of your friends, colleagues, your mother, your self. It. Happens to women in all walks of life and age and six urology, but it seems to hit hardest when there's a baby. So. Now, we have a name for the mental load. But. The problem is naming, it doesn't make it go away. As I was sobbing thinking. I used to be able to manage employees teams. And now I'm too overwhelmed to even manage a grocery list. And more importantly. How did I become the default for every single child care and household tasks for my family? It wasn't supposed to happen to me. This is a road ski shades La, and she's written a book called Fairplay, which is all about fairly distributing the mental load aves marriage nearly ended when her husband center, it takes saying. I'm surprised you didn't get blueberries. She was furious at the assumption that she had gone from high powered lawyer to full-time Default Blueberry shepper. Eight. Knew she had to do something about it? She says, there are a few ways to look the mental load. My favorite was a term from nineteen eighty-seven and American sociologist named Arlene Kaplan. Daniels. coined a term called invisible work. In why like that term so much is because that's the only one that had a modicum of a solution in it. Because I kept thinking to myself. Maybe. Maybe if I can make. Visible all the invisible things I was doing from my home and family for my husband, Seth? Maybe then he would value what I did.

Jenny Leong Partner Tracey Spicer Australia Arlene Kaplan Ford Lloyd Facebook Seth Lecturer New South Wales Daniels. Melbourne LA
"arlene" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Is board certified in pediatrics and emergency medicine's welcome already, doctor get to talk to you again. Someone. Thank you. Yeah, well, this this yesterday we had Dr Arlene Marty from ify you on and you know, she's she's highly respected infectious disease and consults with Mama Did County W H o a lot of different groups. And she said something that really caught my attention. I said What is the one thing you want people to know? She said. Well, young people who study out that says that young people who may be asymptomatic may have long term lung damage if you read this day. I have Scary and Yeah, There's been a couple of well along that point, there's more. But along that point, there's already been a couple of Persons in their early twenties who required lung transplants in the Chicago area. And although that may be extreme, the fiber Roddick changes in your lungs will be like Like long, like somebody within the FEMA or somebody with COPD, and you're in your twenties doesn't go away. So you know, Jimmy, while the virus is infecting more people in their twenties, which we know is contributing to our Are now out breaks. You know, we do hear the point of view from those young people that continued isolation is a much greater risk to their mental health. Then Coben 19 so I would say Hold on young Americans start of the pandemic, it has become increasingly clear that stars could be two is not just a turbocharged version of the virus that causes the common cold, which is how they're thinking. It's a number of quirky, unusual and sometimes really terrifying, long term effects like you just Mentioned and the health risks do differ by generations. However, the long term effects aren't are hitting the mall doesn't matter how old you are MBIA beyond heart lung. I'm actually picking care of patients now who are having neurological additions, and it's scary. It's confusion. Severe fatigue. You know, they asked me when I am I going to feel my energy again with aloe severe headaches that don't respond to, you know the usual ibuprofen. Tylenol. Ali. Whatever. You've got trouble focusing. You can't focus. You feel like you're in a fog. It's called brain Fog. And so of note, the CDC just removed the specific age special from the older adult classification. Now they say, it's not just over age 65 who are at risk for severe illness to your point. I mean, if I could mention Jimmy. I couldn't believe..

Dr Arlene Marty Jimmy lung damage MBIA asymptomatic COPD ibuprofen Roddick Chicago CDC Mama FEMA Ali
Supreme Court rules federal civil rights law protects LGBTQ workers

Her Turn

05:21 min | 2 years ago

Supreme Court rules federal civil rights law protects LGBTQ workers

"For people I know that a lot to of remain people right non now partisan are looking for something and to do we I think all feel this decision that this is a moment gives where we us all need to come some together hope that and that will so Monterey in fact is be the case a space for Capstick that and I want to invite might people look to at come this to decision our website and at Monterey say oh dot yeah org they're throwing the and ball learn about ways but you can wait support the till work that we're doing other hot with button grassroots issues women come all up over I the mean world we're still waiting sign up for to the our mailing decision list and thank on you very the much abortion for the opportunity right Hey that was Diana Dewart we gonna come Crowder down is next director week of policy maybe on and Monday strategic engagement so maybe speaking this is with Arlene that soldier throwing from her us turn a bone because on Monday they're going to take away a woman's right to choose I actually don't think that it's going to be that extreme but I'm not feeling very hopeful that we're going to get a great good liberal decision out of this report I'm at okay that was pines in market tourney Temer Packard speaking with Richard got reporter loose ski is sandy the state genitals treasurer for Wisconsin she took office in twenty nineteen and has been diligent performing the many duties of her office welcome return back reporter everyone sandy jungle welcome recently back talked you with Sarah were listening to Sarah Godlewski her says infinite the Wisconsin varieties state treasurer celebrating has many responsibilities women in music she talks culture about the things and that have been arts accomplished just here this on year W. one O. of my R. roles T. eighty is nine to be the point chair nine of FM the school trust fund in D. and beautiful that is Madison a fine I'm that your has host one point two billion Meghan infectious flowers dollars disease and here with you on what the third we do is through Sunday our of every investment month earnings and we are we provide well on money our to way all public schools through in part Wisconsin three to of biotechnology our three part series and box all about so women things and are really electronic critical music resources for you've our been kids listening to learn to the in greats this year as the queen's chair the presidents we provided of Detroit the largest distribution in the history Detroit of the fund techno which is in over particular a hundred years over thirty before eight million that dollars we went heard to public schools this year to a buy divinity technology and books divinity for is original kids mix before that but it's we heard not just DJ about mix distributing the money with it's DJ also mixes thinking meltdown through how we doing mix one of the both things that really great we artists called have been it working struck together in back the Detroit in March scene for I remember of Colleen a school backlash librarian probably in the last northern thirty Wisconsin years in talking DJ with minx her about was how one of she those doing first you know how out is there she feeling as about things in techno what were her concerns in the techno scene in her work for with teachers women she said look making there at waves the end of the day and she we are doing really everything helped to we lift can other women to who DJ support our in kids but that scene it sometimes and by just incredibly starting challenging her because own record kids label don't have the you know resources she was like available raising kids to them and to going learn to school remotely got her business degree and so started in women kind of having on that wax conversation and we really were able to created provide a public schools platform in April of this year over for five promoting million dollars looking recording to address the digital artists divide concerns women who throughout Kobe DJ so providing and schools and with hot DJ spots divinity so was we can use those tools one of the for kids people that might who not have she really access to internet helps lift it or up ebook and they and so yeah they that still was play something that together was really important all around for us to all step over up Detroit and do that United quickly States in this cold environment music when the need was really great in addition to that venues it's really all talking over about the world even our and investment policy we DJ minx last month and passed the our divinity updated investment can policy still be and there were two big changes to that policy found one is that whenever recording possible actually we pretty are focusing and on Wisconsin pretty regularly investments and also because hosting one of the things a that radio is prior a radio to station being state shows treasurer impact in investor Detroit in really both value of them the ability to do have these when been when featured investments pretty and regularly so keeping along with money Stacey in hot Wisconsin wax hill whenever who possible heard before whether on it's investments Deep Space in real estate radio are which supporting is all music curated other by some local of the greatest venture minds and so in Detroit that was techno one piece that we added to and our policy that's how statement a lot of was the Wisconsin women based who investments DJ got the started other big so piece that we're we added as to there our were investment policy is how a we lot look of men at in risk the scene at the time and we in the now in the late evaluate nineties mid what's to called late nineties ESG risk who were factors starting these which collectives are environmental a lot of the women were really social and make governance it issues and with regards and to the our radio investment stations in corporations and then really and that's really important just because moved if out you think and about and the environmental develop peace their sound and we're and actually the clubs looking all at over companies Detroit that value and so climate welcome change back everyone we that we that are looking was are at going their heaven CO to keep two by movin emissions K. that are hand looking through at deforestation also stereo known are actually as Kelly taking hand and that into we're gonna consideration check got her out start if in you look at the the social Detroit some peace within techno of our scene our risks the that's looking at the women two companies who one DJ of provide the queens today like in this of cold who environment were deeply I would influenced say our Detroit companies that by we're techno investing and are they where providing it really by honestly their employees the techno house health care and techno it's got are its they start providing scene of them Detroit he simply you where know it moved out because to these techno Berlin are all important and has came become back factors synonymous that in companies in with the United need States to embrace and you know because a lot not of only leg are they so good we're policies full gonna get into of and that they're multi good a little for employees billion bit dollar but but they're electronic good for us and music right industry help now with we're the supply crap going to chain and meeting demand listen the and so massive to these are things drug that fuelled we one have festivals updated a and new with DJ has this our because idea investment DJ just holographic sort policy of you know there are no who critical part is of how Europeans we a native look in ecstasy at Detroit our portfolio she and calls party herself and so a all that's this just one stuff within and my role funk techno as an investor at least as changes I was machine learning and about this I think important is and things that really she we are have born delivered amazing and raised in to Detroit and Wisconsinites beautiful music to hear just that within twenty twenty at its she's root got the it's beyond slate uniquely that creek midwestern really one of the great things uniquely that musical I ran Detroit cuisine on it's it's that like I thought was really beautiful house missing beats it's black from the conversation delicious that it's as the chief got financial its unreserved sound officer we should in new be the talking early disco about is the economic security R. to N. mid B. D. eighties treasures across and the she developed country we're in yeah really the nineties talking she's got about this a and and lot this as was of great something dishes that was next answering seen Detroit to check in what techno out we one and have of hers Chicago been doing called house with economic diary was security at its height is really of looking a whose at Detroit start it in was even two then perspectives center in the early today nineties starting one and to get is packaged this is homeownership all about presented as I as kicked it is off the a smiley lot the of treasurer's retracts face of its like Berlin her homeowners speaking and task Manchester to herself force to build about a minute originally music her scene diary I'm our not mission as trying a black to was hit to on woman the look music at in but a how black woman can you know Detroit's we a lot help of that so Wisconsinites let's check achieve the that this American one out dream by buying by a home DJ USAAC that but holographic also start got started staying in Detroit in their home just and addressing that the beautiful foreclosure unicorn crisis emotional since sound Coleman just we have kind of got a shift a bit white in our wash priority to be honest and and we so are now hearing developing about a techno pilot as program it was originally conceived to keep people in their as homes a reaction because to with inner city decay unemployment as a byproduct and under

Some people are making bread in quarantine. Others are making TikToks

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:15 min | 2 years ago

Some people are making bread in quarantine. Others are making TikToks

"The short video platform tiktok was already a big hit before the pandemic but since so many people have been stuck at home since march a lot. More people are discovering it and even though tiktok is in the news for its new. Ceo kevin meyer. Who was poached from disney and for record labels who think the service should pay more to publishers and artists for using their songs and for actual calls to ban it in the us over its chinese ownership and security and privacy fears. Well people like marketplace own. Hey super alvarado are finding that in quarantine. It's just kind of fun. More than three hundred million people downloaded tiktok in the first quarter of this year. That's fifty percent more than last quarter and total two billion downloads. Laura pearson a student at usc who happens to be my roommate started hearing huge buzz about tiktok ride before her spring break. Her friends were sending her lots of links sketches and dance videos. So she downloaded the out thinking. Yeah nice easy way to kill some quarantine time. It's like this cute little app. You can record videos. She started to spend more and more time on tiktok when she wasn't zooming into her classes soon enough. She started producing. She recruited arlene. Pereira are other roommate. She's of course also home from her teaching job at el camino college here in southern california. They chose zico's any song. So we spent the whole night trying to figure out how to do the dance and have a certain level of swag arse it out of the way in the living room wall. My roommate's discovered how much time it takes to perfect tiktok dance and that just gave me a whole new perspective on tiktok that you see these super silly videos but boy is it quite the production darlene. Then we all decided well. Let's do this. We invested in a really nice phone Tripod with a Cute Little Bluetooth control on Amazon. You can even find bundles. Called Tiktok kits including a ring light tripod and some other fancy stuff with prices ranging from forty five sixty and even up to ninety bucks. My first tries to sketches not amazing but still funny right now. Almost two thirds of tiktok users are under the age of thirty four. It's especially popular with eight hundred. Twenty four year olds. Yup that's us. Talent agents are getting in on the action managing famous tiktok trying to get work in Hollywood and connecting social media. Influencers already making big money. Laura is showing the TIKTOK universe for crocheting wizardry and as for our lean. She has a few dance. Talks and droughts including one two the song wannabe by the spice girls and for me keeping my day job for now that was marketplace

Laura Pearson Disney CEO United States Kevin Meyer Alvarado USC Zico El Camino College Pereira Arlene Hollywood California Amazon
Adam Greenwood and Dr. Arlene Astell discuss alleviating loneliness in care homes

The Voice of Healthcare

04:23 min | 2 years ago

Adam Greenwood and Dr. Arlene Astell discuss alleviating loneliness in care homes

"So we'll get started here The audience wants to know what we're talking about today so I'm going to give each of your chance to describe the product and say this is what we're doing. This is the advent of it and this is why it matters so adam go ahead started for us last year when I watched a tedtalk. Khuda what makes a good life by Robert Loading and he said a Hob- professor and he was talking about the Harvard Study of Adult Development I'm sure you guys are aware of it. Seventy five years seven hundred plus men and then about two thousand that children where they were looking at the work the hung life and the health people from lots of different socio economic backgrounds For for an unprecedented length of time and the. I suppose what the amazing results were that it wasn't about upbringing. It wasn't about health or money. It's good relationships. Good relationships keep us happier and healthier Social connections all good for us and ultimately loneliness kills and I was doing some research And I came across a piece by a UK charity Kool aid UK and they said that around half a million older people. So that's sixty five plus you can go as long as a week without speaking to another person We as an agency is digital digital agency have been looking at ways that we could use voice. Tech- Lots of different Scenarios over the last two years and this is something that I felt really stormy about And so we wanted to find out if we could use voice tech- to help to tackle the problem of loneliness. In order people excellent Arlene so my interest in this has come from working with older people and trying to get technology into their hands to make lives better The this many existing off the shelf devices and APPs we can download really have functions that can benefit people but often the pros has tried to connect people with the technology trying to find the people who will benefit has being challenging particularly came to us with some work. A few years ago is set to pay 'em a network of Ph D. students who are looking at Health and wellbeing in later life. And how technology could help and one of them was very interested to work with the the people who are really hard to reach people who are lonely. The people who are isolated who may be not having contact with services but sitting in their own homes with Shrinking social network shrinking an ability to to make contact to make new contacts. And how could we stop to to look at where they emerging technologies could could assist them and particularly things like Anything would make new social connections so I was up to see delighted to To be connected with with Adam and Greenwood Campbell when they wanted to start looking at putting boys technology to to tackle loneliness excellent. So what is the product do? And how do you deploy it? And what's been the response what we wanted to do with this study. First of all was just find out if the if the acts of talking to voice assistance would help in in tackling learning us so what we did is So we've been working with an organization called Abbey Failed. I'm here in the UK they They have a bow About four hundred retirement living homes around you can't about seven thousand residents so We all stem if we'd introduce Alexis Google assistance into some of the residents rooms so that we could start to do some qualities studies about the Their effects on loneliness. And that's that's when we start to work with Arlene to help us to try and understand initially how to gauge loneliness in order to people And then often the study we could find out if it made any Tackled it in any way

Arlene Adam UK Robert Loading Harvard Study Of Adult Develop Hob- Professor Abbey Greenwood Campbell
Arlene

PODSHIP EARTH

08:05 min | 2 years ago

Arlene

"Dr Arlene Blum is a biophysical chemist and author a mountaineer and Executive Director of the Green Science Policy Institute. The Institute Scientific Research and policy work with government and business has contributed to preventing the use of harmful chemicals including flame retardants and fluorinated chemicals like pizzas in children's sleepwear furniture electronics and other products worldwide. Arlene blum received a PhD from UC Berkeley and has told at Stanford University and Wellesley College. But that's only a fraction of Alino story arlene the first American and all woman ascent of an opponent. One considered one of the world's most dangerous and difficult mountains. She Co lead the first women's team to climb. Denali completed the Great Himalayan traverse across the mountain ranges of Bhutan the Pollen India and height the length of the European Alps with her baby daughter on her back. She's the author of Ana Pana a woman's place which was named one of the top one hundred best adventure books of all time by National Geographic. She also wrote the highly acclaimed book breaking trail. A climbing. Life. In two thousand eighteen bloom was inducted into the California Hall of fame. She was chosen by the Guardian as one of the world's one hundred most inspiring women. Dr Bloom is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. And if that wasn't enough Eileen was elected to the whole of mountaineering. Excellent Hey uh keep me from getting. You remember the day where we're sitting right now. I mean we're sitting in Tilden Park on. Trail called seaview with a wonderful view of the bay. While flowers greenhills Gorgeous California. And why so many people on the trail today? Well it turns out that everyone has been ordered to stay home or go outdoors and everything's closed so there are a lot more people outdoors than usual. Which is a good thing and you walk every single day. Tell us about that routine and and how you got into it. Well I do pretty intense work and I work really hard because I have so many opportunities and I've discovered that if every day I take a walk with friends or colleagues or sometimes even the chemical industry executives with whom I do not see eye to eye. It's extremely good for my physical health. My mental health and my work. You have an incredible history of climbing of mountaineering. Have you always had a passion for climbing and mountaineering? How did that start? I was raised by incredibly cautious and conservative Orthodox Jewish grandparents in Chicago and was not allowed to do anything and I push push push to just be able to take swimming lessons and so I guess I started early with coming up with things I really wanted to do and then pushing to be able to do them. When I was a Grad student at Berkeley I heard about an expedition to Denali Mount McKinley. The Highest Mountain in North America. And I'd been climbing a lot with my friends from Reed College and had climbed higher than Denali in Peru and apply gone the trap and was told that women could go as far as base camp to help with the cooking. And when I called to say well I've climbed higher than Denali. They said. Yeah you were the only woman. You probably didn't do your share you know. Women really can't time high mountains. I wonder if a team of all women could climb high mountains and I found five other women and we went and kind to Nali ourselves. All women were the first all women's team and indeed not only. Did we climb it? But our leader had altitude sickness and became unconscious just below the summit and at that point. I was twenty five. I was the deputy leader because I'd organized and suddenly I was in charge of our Denali expedition with an unconscious person at twenty thousand feet and a big Arctic storm. Coming in and We actually made a stretcher dragged her down the mountain and it was really empowering to me. I mean I'd had a lot of negative messages in my childhood about what I couldn't couldn't do and I thought wow we got grace down from Denali Alive. We can do anything. We dream up so that was really inspiring for me to realize sick. We can all do things and we believe possible when we have to then. You just kept going though. That wasn't the end of your mountaineering. No I love being in the mountains. I love being outdoors. I love being here. I seem to like challenge. I was on a nineteen. Seventy six expedition climbed Everest. We were the second American expedition in those days. Hard to believe we have the whole mountain to ourselves and I climbed to nearly twenty five thousand feet and on the way back. I thought at that point all the world's highest mountains over eight thousand meters. That's kind of a magic height They all had been cleaned by men but no woman had ever climbed eight thousand meters and people were saying maybe women couldn't and I thought well we climbed. Denali got twenty four Everest. Let's give him a chance. So on my way back from I I applied for a permit for Anna Purna one and it was the first eight thousand meter peak ever climbed. It has the highest fatality rate. And it's now considered the hardest climb and we did not know that and so In nineteen seventy eight. I did organize an an all women's expedition and we were successful. We were the first women and indeed the first Americans to climb out of that reinforced my belief that we can all do seemingly impossible things and I'd say now is a good time for all of us to be doing seemingly impossible things because it's it's tough right now. Your experience shows me and the tough things that I've done in my life is that you can move past them that they're not insurmountable and even if they are to continue moving forward with with those challenges. I've never been above eight thousand meters. What what is it like? I mean the physicality of losing that oxygen. Do you get addicted to that. It feels like a very rarefied club of people that understand and know something that the rest of us don't well first of all it's the most beautiful place ever being above timberline with clouds on your feet the extreme beauty and peace and so it is so beautiful. But you know being here until the park is so beautiful to you. Don't have to be on top of Anna Perna and there's a huge amount of focus. You have a goal and you get a great team and everybody shares ICAL. But I'm always kind of looking for family and a climbing expedition is like a family but perhaps better family dynamics and some families have so you have a family of people all focused on a goal. And you're in a beautiful place using every bit of your physical energy but your mental energy problem solving. So it's it's super focused. Every since I became a mom didn't want to risk my life because if you know this but the chances of dying about one in ten climbing those mountains so it seriously dangerous so for me as a mom. I don't want to risk my life on the other hand what I'm doing now which is reducing harmful chemicals that are in our bodies and our products and our planet so it's got a very similar similar feeling of of getting a great team family of people who share a common goal and then persevering through avalanches and storms and Yetis. And what have you

Dr Arlene Blum Highest Mountain Denali Mount Mckinley Denali Ana Pana Great Himalayan European Alps Alino Green Science Policy Institute Institute Scientific Research Executive Director Guardian Anna Perna Stanford University Reed College Dr Bloom Wellesley College Tilden Park Berkeley
Coronavirus Aid Package Is In Turmoil In The Senate

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:58 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus Aid Package Is In Turmoil In The Senate

"What is the best way for? The United States to spend almost two trillion dollars are negotiating over. Exactly that question as they try to help the economy endure the hit. It's taking because of the krona virus. Pandemic Senate Republicans say they know what they want but then yesterday Senate Democrats blocked vote to proceed on a bill NPR. Susan Davis has been following. All of this morning sue. Taniwha would happen last night. Exactly well. It's important understand. It wasn't on an actual piece of legislation itself. That's still under negotiation. What Senate Majority Leader Mitch? Mcconnell was trying to do was fight the process in the Senate and those negotiations so they could get to a bill in the coming days. Democrats blocked it because they didn't like where the status of the underlying negotiations are as long as you have that leverage you can keep negotiating but that delaying tactic was really infuriating for Republicans. And this is Senate Majority Leader Mitch. Mcconnell on the Senate floor. After that failed. The American people are watching this festival. I'm told futures market is down five percent. I'm also told that. That's when trading stops so the notion that we have time to play games here with the American economy and the American people is utterly absurd. Mcconnell concern obviously when the markets open later this morning that they will look like a Washington isn't responding system fears there although Cinnamon Arlene Minority leader. Chuck Schumer said. He still believes they can have a deal. It's important to know. Negotiations continued early into the morning hours Secretary Treasury Steven Mnuchin up on the hill. Talking to Schumer and other Democrats so things are still moving. Yeah it seems like Democrats and Republicans would be equally worried about the economy given what we've seen in the markets over the last week so when it comes to this bill. Where does the difference of opinion lie? What are they disagree about? Important to know that they do agree. On the main structural parts of the bill in two of the main things are small. Business loans gloom guarantees and direct cash payments to Americans one of the big hold ups that first of all Democrats just want more. They want more money for unemployment benefits for workers. They want more money for hospitals and they want more a language in the bill. That would clarify how it's going to help corporations they they don't want to quote unquote bailout. The current draft would give the treasury secretary a ton of discretion on how to spend that money so they're essentially saying they need to know that the money that's going to go to corporations is going to go to the workers themselves And this is a sticking point. That's probably the main sticking point before they can get a deal and this is becoming more urgent sue because there are now some. Us senators who are self quarantining right. Yeah I mean the current viruses already come to Capitol Hill. There was already to house lawmakers who have said they tested positive for the virus. Senator Rand Paul. He's a Republican from Kentucky announced that he did two yesterday. There were already two. Republican senators in quarantine to additional senators have had to go into self quarantine because of contact with Senator Rand Paul. There's also you know that's a very clear public health concern on Capitol Hill where senators are still gathering. There's also just a legislative math reality that Mitch. Mcconnell now needs even more democratic votes to move forward with a piece of legislation because he's down five of his own people who are self quarantining quickly. They can't vote from afar. They can't there's no rules or infrastructure in the House and Senate to allow lawmakers to vote remotely and You would have to change the rules of both chambers arguably it might be unconstitutional. So it's not as simple as many people believe it would be vote remotely so interesting Assu. I guess the big question now is what happens next well. Negotiations are ongoing minority leader. Chuck Schumer spoke last night. He said that he was Had plans to meet with MNUCHIN. He said he was optimistic. They could announce a deal as early as this morning. However House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi says if they don't make any progress she's looking to put forward a bill of her own and if that happens that does mean that negotiations are going to drag on NPR congressional correspondent. Susan Davis Sue. Thanks so much for your reporting on this one you're welcome.

Chuck Schumer Senate Mcconnell Senator Rand Paul Mitch Secretary Treasury Steven Mnuc Susan Davis United States Susan Davis Sue NPR Nancy Pelosi Washington Kentucky
The evolving photography industry, with Arlene Evans

Photofocus Podcast

08:11 min | 2 years ago

The evolving photography industry, with Arlene Evans

"Our topic as it will be how conferences and major photography magazines are changing in the industry. Now before we do that. I know you're an amateur photographer. So how did you get involved like this. Whole photography conferences in mm-hmm magazines? Well I was living in Los Angeles at the time which is where. WPI was headquartered in the mid. Two thousand cents and I was friends with the gentleman you know named Skip Cohen. He was he was president. WPI at the time and the director of WPI's left and he asked me if I would be interested in taking the position because he wanted someone on who wasn't really involved in the professional photography industry sort of a neutral party to come in with fresh eyes and little little. Did I know that fifteen years later I would still be in this industry but I said yes. So was you know. SKIP SKIP incredible judge of character. So that's a lot for you. Thank you know. And he always has a way of thinking outside the box and try to bring somebody in in a position. Bishen that you have that doesn't that's not a full-time professional photographer. I think speech volume. There's no ego involved old. You're looking at it with a fresh set of eyes. And I. I just think it's a great. I'm out of time. So congratulations for that. Well thank you very much I. Yeah that's great so let's talk about the events that are happening now. I'm you guys just announced a major bomb show. What was that? Yes we announced announced that the PDF brand was going to be retired. And with that was We were discontinuing the publication not not only magazine but range finder. As well you'll still have range finder the digital format. That's correct where we're we're going to be creating all the content now on range finder online dot COM We are actually in the process of redesigning the website to better. How's the information that we want to put on there now? We want to expand coverage we WANNA cover industry trends gear and not only what's happening in the wedding portrait world but other areas of photography as well so that we can better her serve our customers the photographers who have been very faithful to the range Finder magazine since the nineteen fifties. So that's a really exciting. You know it's funny because some people look at that as a negative. Oh my Lord. I can't believe this. PDF when they're no longer having print publication will think of all the major Magazines not just the photography world but outside of the photography world that are switching to digital. Just it makes sense. It's cheaper you can make changes to it immediately And we get things out to the public faster so I'm looking at this kind of a positive step. How do you as a content creator yourself? How does this? How does this affect you were were were you? How are you looking from your perspective? Well it it's going to be a big job because as you know putting putting out. A monthly magazine is very different than creating content on a daily basis. Where you're going to keep photographers will want to come? I'm there and learn the latest of what's going on in the photography industry and We really try to on top of that with both magazines. But now we were. It's GonNa be a fresh look. It's going to be fresh perspective we've discovered through surveys and you will know this as well younger photographers take in their information from social media or online whether it's youtube or the looking at facebook to see what other photographers they're doing the reading their news on CNN dot com. So we're just trying to be not cognizant of what our readers want and they want to get their information online hole that makes sense to pdf N.. What shift to different magazines yet? PD had range finder. That's what was the difference between the two well. PGN was focused more on commercial. Fine Art Photographers. It was a very different. There was Assam overlap but it was more Commercial photography whereas range finder started as a wedding republication then expanded into wedding portrait and as you know. Portrait now has really taken off a so many different genres whether it's boudoir pants. It's just not the typical family portrait anymore that you think they're just so many different areas in portraiture sure so range. Finder has also got along with those trends as well so it really was a different focus than PD N. Gotcha that makes sense. And then that's where you have the different groups which you have. WPI as a conference and then photo plus so you had WPI on the the west coast of the United States and then you have photo plus the east coast of the United States so did try do info plus on the west coast once a long time ago and they did at work so they is definitely the best place to have federal plus Gotcha Crepe I so without Canadian with that part of the publication gone. Where do you see the what you see that being integrated with range finder or other things? You're doing well. The content is not going to go away way What we're going to do is look at all the content we've had over the years from pgn and we're going to take what was meaningful meaningful from that and disperse it to the other side so whether it will live on photo plus dot com range finder online or WPI VPI that content will still be there as because it's still relevant and we WANNA make sure that people still have access to it? It's interesting you go back to twenty cornell for example you go back to some of his books he saying the same thing he said all all those years ago but he's saying the different and a fresher with a fresh voice and people are like. Wow I didn't know that in here thinking really. He's been talking about this. A how many years but but Tony has that way of taking the knowledge and disseminating it to a new generation as a a little bit. He's he's great at it and I think that there's something to be said for the teachers that have been around around for years and they have such an expanded knowledge base. And all they're doing is cultivating a new audience. The younger photographers is who may not necessarily have access to season photographers. Who have worked in the industry for years at know how to to apply these concepts and ideas that they're teaching? You can't get that necessarily from a youtube instructor. Who is going to talk about? Things is that they've only had experience with for two or three years.

WPI Range Finder Magazine Youtube Skip Cohen Los Angeles Content Creator United States President Trump Monthly Magazine Tony Assam Facebook Director CNN Instructor
'Reckless and selfish': Huge climate protest looms amid extreme fire conditions in Australia

BBC World Service

03:31 min | 2 years ago

'Reckless and selfish': Huge climate protest looms amid extreme fire conditions in Australia

"Protest as a set to take to the streets of Melbourne in the state of Victoria to Dimond urgent action on climate change amid this extreme bush for a season the protest organizes the university students for climate change say they will go ahead despite being urged to rethink the plan by police and some politicians say it will drain resources on a day when fire activity is expected to flat across the state let said totally protested now Annika d'amato LA welcome to Newsday the thirties urging you to re think clearly they have a hands very full at the moment well I won't say our system for university students to climate jump not the credit check I'm sorry my mistake no problem well I think that this is a false argument that artist is our trade on racial says you should try each they are very strange in society are in Australia and the fuel companies they get twenty nine billion dollars of subsidies Hey yeah it's a political I'm about a practical argument is today of all days when bush fires are raging and we are going to have extreme temperatures and the authorities and knocking on people's tools to try and evacuate them get you get them out this is the wrong time first place to be sent to your demonstrations to to police them to put out a statement saying that they will not be diverting resources away from the bush by side they put out that statement I morning sorry it's pretty clear that actually is a I thank my they should well let me give you this car than acting assistant commissioner Tim Hanson H. fan minded Victorians to reconsider attending these climate demonstrations he says that listen to this what you saw we see frontline police returning from the fire ground returning from fires and they'll fatigue they need a break this is now another open it operation that we need to resource and what I've said is that the police are welcome not to attend the demonstration all the police usually don't write yet they demonstration by could guide the five nine started actually many things that the great the other day intimidated away having demonstrations Arlene Victoria they made when they are warnings intimidation or is it just a practical concern that they're giving up if they say they the they say they've been working with other groups to move the plan protests from January they've been having some headway they can't understand why you're not meeting them half way that saying don't protest you know don't know protest just protest at a different time well I think that's trying to make people feel consent to add about expecting a democratic fry the purchase I'm pretty sure that a demonstration that is calling for more resources it to push five right it's a pretty important demonstration we want a levy on the crime and criminals to pay for the next I have created when writing money for a five or grade eight eighty thousand dollars for a truck before I can even get government funding quickly for more resources and ran up the race of trying to I know lots of people will be sympathetic because they've seen the drain and the strain is put on the firefight as many of the volunteer firefighters very briefly that you're not losing sympathy through this demonstration I don't think so I think people if you want climate action that pretty aware that ed tactic to try and make people feel concerned about protecting that never you're right time to cry test in the eyes we will have to leave any cut DeMolay thank you for joining us here

Melbourne Victoria Dimond
"arlene" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Today call six one five five six five forty two hundred that's six one five five six five forty two hundred so you know before I get into this thing let me let me hit something right here and and and Arlene in here with me today and that didn't just coaching show live in the studio okay so question about every you are you deal with a lot of our you've you've dealt with and and have some knowledge about college you know some people are dealing with college education funding and and see our ships in those types of things I want to ask on behalf of a client what are some of the the ideas some of things that you tell people to think about regarding any got a kid going to school yeah yeah all that junk but you know one of the one of the earth the things you really want to do is think about it earlier than you think you have to think about it and I don't mean just saving for college that's you know that's a whole different conversation in the days are warm kind of deal right but really if you have someone that's entering their junior year that's when you really want to start looking at some of this whole financial aid calculation unless you already have you know other students that are in college excuse me but you want to be aware of the integration between your ten forty your tax return in something called the facts of the free application for federal student aid and sometimes things that makes sense for tax reasons can hurt you for financial aid sometimes things that don't make sense for tax reasons can help you for financial.

Arlene
"arlene" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"It's about a baby this is Arlene Smith in the Shan tells the first ladies of vocal group harmony of true do op rhythm and blues recordings of the nineteen fifties and may be from nineteen fifty seven great song her okay here's another one summer of nineteen fifty seven boy this one the request we get for this here the charts hello gorgeous gorges backseat ballad entitled simply Desiree the.

Arlene Smith Desiree
"arlene" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on KCRW

"Marlene Martinez SunGuard Arlene is not what you might think of as a typical NASA engineer. I remember my first field was beans, and then I worked in sugar beets, and then we potatoes. She's the daughter of migrant workers from Mexico starting at age thirteen for the next three summers. Get up at four o'clock in the morning, we had to be in the field by five o'clock, and we would just start working we'd be working for the next nine or ten hours from the potato fields to JPL here. Ston zeal has Marlene story. Now, you're gonna see where other really good toys are the real insight. Lander is a robot on Mars down here, Marlene works with an exact replica. It's about five feet tall the same size as she is the Lander stands on three stilts. It speak dome is covered in gold foil. It has up panels and along with claw on the end nearby. Our size, meter and the so-called mold built to hammer deep into the Martian surface. This is where all the good stuff happens, and we actually get to use our hands and, and do things that we're going to do on Mars and actually see how they're going to come out as close, as we can replicate. The, the systems Marlene is a thirty five year old engineer her doc hair falls over the white lap code, which almost reaches her ankles, she's very jeans, and white sneakers underneath. To simulate the red mar surface Marlene moves gray gravel in the sandbox. She is not surrounded by the vast of space. But by measuring instruments caution tape cameras, and lights, I would love to go to Mars. I know it sounds crazy, but ever since I was a kid, I've just always wanted to go to space. I've always wanted to look back onto the earth wanted to just go. And explore Marlene stream of space exploration started.

Marlene Martinez Lander engineer Arlene JPL NASA Mexico thirty five year five feet ten hours