35 Burst results for "Arlen"

Justice Department Sues Texas Over 6-Week Abortion Ban

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

00:50 sec | Last month

Justice Department Sues Texas Over 6-Week Abortion Ban

"Today. The justice department under merrick garland they sue texas over the texas's new law that essentially bans abortion in their lawsuit. Doj accuses texas of passing. It's abortion ban quote in open defiance of the constitution the constitution under current supreme court precedent protects woman's right to get an abortion in this country. No matter what state. She lives in their argument. Here is a direct echo of the same argument that the oj used in twenty ten to great effect in that arizona case that argument that legal protections enshrined federally forest all by the us constitution trump state law that tries to get around those protections because the texas abortion banned ignore ignores those federal constitutional protections miracle arlen and the biden justice department. Now say the court should strike down the texas banned altogether.

Merrick Garland Texas Justice Department Supreme Court Arizona Biden Justice Department Arlen United States
Bryan Newland Snags Senate Approval for Indian Affairs Role

Native America Calling

01:38 min | 2 months ago

Bryan Newland Snags Senate Approval for Indian Affairs Role

"On saturday the. Us senate confirmed the nomination of brian. Newlyn to assistant secretary of indian affairs. New england is a former president of the bay mills indian community based on michigan's upper peninsula. A major step. Recently in advancing the may t- people's of manitoba right to self-government is dan carpenter Reports the provinces mateen federation signed a recognition and implementation agreement the deal recognizes the matey of manitoba people's right to self government it also recognizes the federation's authority over citizenship leadership selection elections and the running of their government on behalf of the matey of manitoba. It's a step that lays out what happens next to recognize the f. As an indigenous government under canadian law david charter on the president of the says justices now being achieved. And it's something people have fought for. We've always been a government and no one will ever take that from us. We are the only truly recognize government province-wide in this country of canada. That is a powerful statement being made by canada. This is a legal legitimate document. And i hope. I hope that every party listening odor i ask you now. If you're going to challenge agreement challenge it now but not all are as satisfied as chartrand. The assembly of manitoba chief says ottawa did not consider the implications to the inherent and treaty rights of first nations as the original treaty partners of the crown. They argue first nations. Have yet to be given the right to self-governance chief. Arlen duma says canada's now clearly signaled it prioritizes the may t- over first nations people who claim rights and land that have existed long before the may t- came to be for national native news. I'm dan carpenter.

Manitoba Bay Mills Indian Community Dan Carpenter Mateen Federation Newlyn David Charter Upper Peninsula New England Senate Brian Michigan Chartrand Canada Assembly Of Manitoba United States Arlen Duma Ottawa
CurlMix CEO Kim Lewis on Transitioning Between Product Lines and Creating Sustainable Business

Side Hustle Pro

02:47 min | 4 months ago

CurlMix CEO Kim Lewis on Transitioning Between Product Lines and Creating Sustainable Business

"Tell us a little bit more about the transition from like subscription box company to signature products to dabbling in different areas again. Like tell us how you decide your product mix. We started chromos a diy curly hair so think of like blue apron but for curly hair. And we did that for like two years and that was my interview on south. I think my goal at the time. Half a million for the year. Neither we didn't think we'd have to. And i was like salty or whatever and i was like i had gotten pregnant. And how twenty seventeen and i was just like you know. My business is growing. The way i feel like you should be growing emphasis subscription. Box right And i talked to a few people. And i found out that the margins on my box way too small and what i have learned for anyone who does a subscription box if you are not getting products for free or if you are not Making it yourself. The margins aren't there for sustainable business. Usually and so we thirty percent margins for thirty dollars bucks whereas a typical hager company will have like seventy to ninety percent margins for the same price for one bottle. And i was like oh this even if i could scale this. I shouldn't because the math doesn't work. And so i was at the point where i really wasn't sure what i was going to do. With my business. I was like mcdonagh pivot. Close clothes pregnant. I started g. mat. I was figuring out of the nba. And i met my adviser I got a twenty thousand dollar arlen from backstage capital and she didn't give the money yet but she said basically said that like she wanted to invest in us in the meantime she will participate in all the backstage capital events But didn't have the money yet. So it's okay that's cool and i met my adviser who has a I always say this. He's a bald asian man but he's so nice and he is so smart. He's an engineer. Worked at as you tech companies early on and got shares and all that and he was like. What's your best selling box. It's our flexi gel manufacturers will make it for us you know they. It's it's too much like food. I got a boil real flat seeds. Extract the joe and he was like they just won't do it and he's like well. Why don't you figure it out and i'm like br been trying. It's not working. I'm seven months pregnant. What do you mean he was like figure it out. Never stopped selling your best product. And i was just like okay so i spent a monday my kitchen seven months pregnant. I may fifty different badges of lexi jail like found one that i loved it every time people will flag me down like what is in your hair l. me now. Don't go anywhere. And i'm working on it. So we've relaunched. We lost our audience with pre orders. Because he has launched a nut stuff to know that you do not just go out and buy bunch of inventory and figure out how to sell it later. You sell it. I even though the

Mcdonagh Pivot Arlen NBA Lexi
Samra Habib on Being a "Queer Muslim"

Chosen Family

01:25 min | 7 months ago

Samra Habib on Being a "Queer Muslim"

"Our guest today as samra habib. She's a writer journalist and photographer based in toronto last year. She released the critically acclaimed. We have always been here. Acquire muslim memoir and it was the winner of. Cbc's canada reads twenty twenty. I love this book so much. I think i cried at least three times. She's a leading voice in canadian. Literature for writing and photography has been featured in publications like the new york times the guardian the washington post and vanity fair. We spoke to her at the beginning of the year. I actually saw an astrologer a month ago with a seven arlen session not yet to take a bunch of breaks and she told me that When i was born my father was having his saturn return so he was going for law was really released of inches bow. How was gonna support a child and we just moving from basically but a new kid would arrive you know. That's kind of like a consistent theme through meisters for home I think that is very much shaped by the fact that growing up. I didn't really have this stable home way.

Samra Habib The Guardian The Washington Po CBC Toronto The New York Times Arlen Canada
Merrick Garland pledges to pursue equal justice if confirmed as attorney general

All of It

00:58 sec | 8 months ago

Merrick Garland pledges to pursue equal justice if confirmed as attorney general

"Confirmation hearings for President Biden's nominee for attorney general are underway this hour on Capitol Hill. NPR's Windsor Johnson reports. Judge Merrick Garland Open his testimony by Pledging to restore integrity within the Justice Department after years of turmoil. In his opening statement, Judge Garland stress that the role of the attorney general is to serve the rule of law and to ensure equal justice under the law. Speaking before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Garland also pledged to combat the resurgence of domestic terrorism and hate crimes. We must do everything in the power of the Justice Department to prevent This kind of interference with the policies of American Democratic institutions, and I plan to do everything in my power to ensure that we are protected, Arlen says. If confirmed, he would supervise the prosecution of white supremacists and others who stormed the capital building on January 6th, calling the riot a heinous attack. Windsor

President Biden Windsor Johnson Judge Merrick Garland Judge Garland Justice Department Senate Judiciary Committee Capitol Hill NPR Garland Arlen Windsor
Highlights from President Joe Biden's history-making inauguration

NBC Nightly News

04:49 min | 9 months ago

Highlights from President Joe Biden's history-making inauguration

"Witnessed the birth of a new presidency today despite a raging pandemic the threat of domestic terror. Joe biden and kamala harris took the oath of office becoming president and vice president. The peaceful transfer of power completed president biden sworn in the very capital platform scale just two weeks ago by a seething mob the president in his inaugural address calling for unity and for the end of what he called. America's uncivil war day draped in rich history of not only the extraordinary circumstances but also the swearing in of the first woman and first woman of color to become vice president. The biden administration wasting no time charting. Its course tonight. The moment so familiar. The new commander in chief taking the oath joseph robinet biden junior do solemnly swear but virtually everything else today unprecedented so much of the pageantry race by the pandemic. No crowds just a field of flags after the riot. Thousands of soldiers guarding dc. And for the first time in over a century the outgoing president skipping the ceremony aac goodbye we love you. We will be back in some form. President trump speaking earlier this morning. It is my greatest honor and privilege to have been your president. I will always fight for you. I wish the new administration great lock in great success. Mr trump boarding air force one for florida but not before leaving behind the traditional note for his successor in the oval office desk then our first glimpse of the incoming president joe biden and his wife. Jill at church with bipartisan leaders from congress at the capitol former presidents arriving along with outgoing vice president mike pence his successor there to escorted by eugene goodman the capitol police officer who fended off those rioters and then joe biden president of the united states. Joseph r biden after nearly fifty years in politics those last few minutes before taking the oath following lady gaga singing the national anthem that barrier breaking moment comma harris kamala harris do solemnly swear carmela davey harris sweat. That first woman of color the first woman ever to become america's vice president and at age seventy eight the oldest man to take the oath joe biden sworn in as the forty six president. Congratulations mr president. Then president biden's message to americans. This is america's day. This democracies day day of history and hope of renault resolve blasting the attack on the capital arise of political extremism white supremacy domestic terrorism that we must confront and we will defeat and taking subtle shots at former president trump. Did you have a duty. And a responsibility. As citizens as americans especially as leaders to defend the truth and defeat the lies president biden acknowledging country hopeful about vaccines but still reeling from a pandemic. Let's say a silent prayer for those who lost their lives and those left behind and for our country and this call to unite a deeply divided america. we must end this uncivil war. The pits read against blue rural versus arlen are rural versus urban conservative versus. Liberal can do this if we open our souls instead of hardening our hearts and if we're willing to stand in the other person's shoes as my mom would say just for a moment standing there shoes reactions from watching parties across america and this powerful message from a standout star today twenty two year. Old poet laureate. Amanda gorman there is always lights if only were brave enough to see it if only were brave enough to be

Joe Biden President Biden Biden Administration Joseph Robinet Biden President Trump Kamala Harris America Mr Trump Eugene Goodman Joseph R Biden Harris Kamala Harris Carmela Davey Harris Mike Pence Capitol Police Biden Jill Mr President Lady Gaga Florida Congress
"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"Don't you run back inside darling? You know just what I'm here for. Year floor. So you're scared and you're thinking that maybe we ain't that young any more show little say there's magic in the night. U. N. of beauty. But Hey, all right and that's all right with me A. You can have any the're covers in study your pain, their crosses in their lovers through roses, rain, waste your summer praying in vain for. These streets will I know hero that's understood. All their adaption can offer bays. This old who'd with one last chance to make it good somehow. And what else can we do now except roll down the window Within blue back your hey air. Will the nights Burston Open these two lanes we'll take us any way. We've got one last chance to make it real. We're going to trade in these wings. Zone we'll. Climb in bed. His weight and down on the tracks. Who will now try hard Cressida you understand. RIDENOUR nights a case. The promise land will baby. If you're born we enough your hands will he it's your only chance. Well, it's lying there like a killer in the sun. Hey. That, we can make it if we run. Who Wish you'd come. So leave what you've lost leave what's grown old.

RIDENOUR U. N. Cressida
"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"I've often said when I was on. you know eastern radio does that be the boss where you pick five songs? Like a two thousand nine. Yeah I got lucky to be on that. Once in one of the songs I picked was girls in their summer clothes and I said because it's it's it's it's Bruce springsteen band channeling Brian Wilson and the beach voice. It is his version of a beach was songs on that. That's a me. Is I, think his greatest. Album of the twenty. Th Century is magic. I think there's a handful of songs on magic. Like girls, summer clothes, and the the style production trying to do a kind of pet sounds. Yes. You know to me I mean that's one of my favorites, but then you. Know you'll be coming down and your own worst enemy i. mean you know there's just a couple of songs on that album that and ironically hardly has ever played any of these lie. On their summer clothes so whether he feels he needs this orchestration I don't know what the reason is but I mean you'll become inbound and your own worst enemy to Bruce's greatest songs like I said in the in the twentieth century and he never plays them live. But again, this gets back into my criticism reuss their songs from human touch that would be born burners they would break out at all or nothing at all he's never played. all or nothing at all as a great rock and roll song never plays I. Actually got to hear that worries. No but I mean, I know it doesn't pay much but he was in Houston and. He played it and it's on my. List. Art and he played all or nothing at all. Are you kidding me? No I got to hear that and it was amazing. Only play that it's got to be less than one handful of it was and I I. Got Lucky enough to see it and he was like I think it's going to be a hit I. think it's a sleeper I think it's a sleeper and yet so I'm saying my biggest criticism Bruce Guess is all about what he chose to put on and what he chose to put off. Yeah. And again. This was all covered less than anybody misconstrued I. Say. I in the end, you adore the man. The man but that doesn't mean that 'cause I'm aware those outtakes. Yeah. Let me tell you something. When future civilizations or aliens discover these outtakes, thousands of years from now when they're researching get greatest rock and roller from Earth named Bruce Springsteen. You think they're gonNa care whether the version of restless nights that I think is one of the greatest outage on the river. That's better than any song on the released river restless nights not the virtually put out on tracks because he screwed around it, what I call the original outing. By her gift go ahead. My point is you know that is one of his I. Forget what my point is. Where was I going with this? You GotTa remind me sometimes I go off on tangents. You're talking about that song being The. Context. Just about that in the future if they're exploring, they're going to go this now. This. Is like in films. You know you need a script girl track a continuity lying line. Yes I point is. You know the fact that he released certain songs that became art this and that he didn't release others or that he didn't release the single album called ties that bind but put out the double the river do you think future historians? Or aliens are GonNa Care Now? All that's going to matter as the existence of that music. They're going to hear restless nights. They're not gonNA give a flying you-know-what. Whether Bruce chosen not it's going to be. So my point is bruce in actual existence in his life wrote a bevy of songs during the darkness recording sessions that would have been an incredible double album that would have done what he claims. The river did two years later. You look at the outtakes imagined aren't as he could've still had his relentless darkness album but there would have been this other album of songs like action in the streets and songs like Frankie, and I mean I could go on and on. Well, you know the thoughts he wanted to do off album by the way just to put a button in it according to my boss time. With the database that the of yeah. Man Yeah all or nothing at all has been played eight times. Okay, well, I can use. That my answer. Yes. Exactly you that's I was I was verify I was I was saying you correct. Right, you are correct sir. All Right? To questions. Couple songs that if when he tours again, you hope you can hear him play live. Okay. To me. Like tubes great songs he again hardly ever played live. I've one of my all time. Favorite songs is New York City serenade is probably the song that I play for newbies who think Bruce. Only, the sky that screams born there was a a are usually play the studio version from the second album, which is brilliant. But then there's the great definitive live version is from nine, hundred, seventy, five at the main point that he that was a radio broadcast whenever Bruce did radio broadcasts, he knew he was making a defacto live album. And there's a seventeen minute version of New York City serenade that might be his single greatest live performance of anything. That particular version serenade so I always hope he's GonNa play New York. City sereny, and then ironically since we're talking about the river. One of my favorite songs from the released album, and of course, he's got outtake versions that are better than the version he put on the album. But, he never plays it live is. Price you pay. You mentioned you saw show where you know the river were up years ago he finally had to play price. You pay that to me is one of like a sequel thunder. Road. Are Promised Land I mean yeah and you know it's one of his great size great vocal and like I said there's a couple of outtake versions of it that are even better than the version he put on the album but he literally never plays price you pay. I don't know whether it's the vocal. He can achieve because there's that very distinctive harmony and I don't know what it is. But when he had to play a couple years ago, he played it, right? Yeah, he did. So those are two songs off the top of my head I always think about can cause and yet the amount of times he's played New York. City serenade. Compared to price you pay makes near city serenade look like born to run I mean I guess. But. But yeah, I always I always hope. And then there's you know those classics that we all wish he he plays incentive fifty seventh street. You know I'm a big backstreets fan. You know when?.

Bruce Bruce Springsteen Bruce Guess New York New York City Brian Wilson reuss Houston Frankie
"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"Darkness should have been this incredible double album. That what he ended up saying about the river. Oh, I needed the party songs and the Syria songs. Well, if you listen to the incredible outtakes from darkness, he some incredible love. Songs. Darkness, in other words I understand and respect Bruce's final decision that doesn't mean that I can't be sort of critical decisions while at the same time, the release darkness album is still a masterpiece. That's how great this guy is. Talking about Mozart it's like I'm sure if Mozart had a fisher releases and then he had outtakes, they're all break. And here is the second half of my discussion with passionate and opinionated fan but great guy. Arlen Schumer. I always like to talk to someone who's been a fan during your this long as you have. taught me about the dark years? What did you feel when after tunnel of love and they broke the band broke apart what? What was your feelings as a Fan Well. Number one he listened to sting on the human rights through saying, Hey, Bruce. If you want to expand your yourself, man gotta leave the East St bad behind. Now looking at what's thing did he left the police benign? He teams up with all musicians has his great solo career but what is Bruce to? He leaves these rebound behind, but he kind of keeps Roy bitten as like a crutch death, and then you know whereas thing I think shows really great musicians. I mean I'm not a big fan of sting's Solo, work. Here but my point is you know I don't think Bruce. necessarily. Did that although to tell you the truth. I saw a couple a couple of shows on that I. Call East. Street light to our allies ee and man I. Think it was at the meadowlands when he played born USA, even with that each street light ban. I remember member, we were talking about sense memories. Yeah. I had the feeling that the roof of the random burner re arena was being lifted off another say raise the roof. So. This is bruce with the East street light band and he's raising the roof. Play born in the USA. So that's just the test. The Bruce but when you say the dark years for me, so you as a fan, what were you feeling? Okay. So, as a creative person myself that understands or tries to understand and introspective about what it takes to create art. You have to allow Bruce. You know his his music has always been autobiographical. It's always reflective tunnel of love ironically when that came out, which is a brilliant record. If, you knew Bruce's life. The fact that his lyrics were always reflective in his experience. The minute you read those lyrics in the fall of one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, I remember getting that when the minute the album came at regional going. This guy's marriages over. And the media which always said, Oh bruce writes about tyrod Taylor. He doesn't write about himself. They all miss the point and they didn't understand about Bruce's marriage situation till the following spring of eighty eight when he was infamously photographed in Italy I on the terrorist with Patti Scalper, and then the media finally had dirt on Bruce for the first time in his career. But that's a whole nother story. The point I'm trying to make is Bruce. I loved Bruce but I'm also very critical of Bruce. I'm I'm super into his outtakes and unreleased material. The river is one of my least favorite bruce albums but it's many bruce fans favorite. But when you hear the river outtakes many of which he hasn't really release in their proper form, but that's a whole nother story. But my feeling is I can name single outtakes on the river that are better than the entire released river album put together. You sent me a link and I'm glad you brought that up because you sent me a link in prepping for the show that had a you had a list of Of Of out takes that you argue restraints greatest hits you've never heard. Yeah, and really really great article. Wonderful. Click on IT I. I listen. Yeah I read it. It's like a radio program with all the ear on PBS it's. On the Bruce Page of my website Arlen, Sharon and I will. Show you're. GonNa post all the links. For People's. Insert them. Off The cuff optel will do that and. You. I made you smile because I said, you had HBO hot boss Opinions Hot, Bruce Opinions, you have hot opinion you. Finished you love the man. But, you can be pretty hard on some of his artistic choices and songs. All the things that I love that are on my website that have separate pages are like I have three pop culture children, and in the same way you don't know Sean you love the most, I love all of them equally. But in the same way, we discipline our children. Yes. In E for instance, twilight zone the one, hundred, fifty, six episodes I think half of them are dogs, dogs half. And then you're left with seventy five episodes. I think fifty of them are what I call. Good to. Great. And then you're left with twenty five half hours and those are what I would give to the aliens if they had room on their spaceship only one earth television show. That's what I'm going to give him. Comic Book Are Complex History I'm a major neal Adams Fan. I. Run a Neal Adams Group, but I'm as critical. About a you know a large portion of his career as I wax poetic Ad Nauseam about the other part of his career that I honor and respect and continue to lecture on. So my feeling is as a critic you know I feel like I can prove by the things I've written and published and presented that I'm as critical of the things I. Love as I am Rhapsodic Li. Honoring them. Literally at the same time like almost like a Yin Yang. So when it comes to Bruce. Yeah I can be very critical of many of his artistic decisions especially in relation to what he chose to put out. In the great part of his career, which is really from his first album. Including four in the USA. That is his hall of fame years so to speak SCHERF. The amount of incredible songs from that era that he left off. In relation to things he put on..

Bruce Opinions Arlen Schumer Mozart USA. Syria USA neal Adams Rhapsodic Li Roy HBO Bruce Neal Adams Group tyrod Taylor Sean Patti Scalper Italy Sharon
"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"I saw Max, give a drumstick to someone in the audience. And all of a sudden bruce picked up his guitar. and. The band started looking around and like he wasn't ready to finish and they did Bobby Jean. Max Drummed with one drumstick. Good I'm sure someone got him another drumstick, right but that moment stuck with me because I could tell he just wanted to do one more when you think of however many bruce shows you know and the I guarantee you that you have just select memories like little flashbulbs that. But it's like you know when it comes to Cowan books I could name you specific issues that Neil Adams drew a Batman. That I can remember I was sitting on my bedroom floor in a one bedroom garden apartment. Guess eating humans Baloney, Sandwich with mustard and lettuce on a seeded hard roll drinking a hot chocolate cream soda. The brand cod is not even around anymore the slogan was it's got to be good. But they combine my two favorite flavors, cream soda and chocolate. You Know Cream Sodas Essentially Vanilla Fota right. So if I making chocolate cream but my point is when you show me that comic book. I can immediately second sense memory, but this is where marsal proves biting into the Mana Line and ends up writing remembrance of things pass. It's it's these sense memories tastes smell the smell of an old comic brings people back. But you know you mentioned Mike, I said, Arlen. What was Bruce's first experience and I can recall the impact born to run hat on a car radio. You know when I was seventeen, just beginning to enjoy the thrill of driving. Yes, the power. Radio I mean it had all the elements like my own American graffiti. I still have plenty more to do with Arlen. So I'm going to stop it here, and if you come back later this week, you'll hear the second half of the interview where he talks about. springs, things dark years. He talks about out takes his love of outtakes and his criticism of Bruce. Sometimes and choice of songs he picked for his official releases its a great discussion plea. Hope you come back for now take care of yourself be safe wearing FM mask. You know I love you. Thank you. Doing a podcast at times can be a one way conversation and I hate that. So. Please let me know what you like and don't like about the work. I'm doing. You can reach the podcast via email at settling bruce, gmail.com. The show is on twitter at settling Bruce, and my personal twitter is at Jesse Jackson DFW WE HAVE A website www set listen bruce dot com. From there. You can find links to other springsteen podcasts as well as other music themed podcast. We have a page devoted to our own Sob all star band..

bruce Arlen Max Drummed twitter Bobby Jean Cowan Jesse Jackson Neil Adams springsteen DFW Mike official
"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"It's like the difference between Eddie Van Halen's guitar playing. And Neil Young's who's my favorite electric guitars. I like the single note when it's bent. I'm not interested in the facility of somebody like Steve Vai and always guitar heroes that by the way all place ahead Bruce on the top one hundred's. You see what I'm saying I do see what you're saying. Playing in three seconds. It's how each note is making. You feel yeah, and that's a sub tax bruce's entire. Career that's why everybody plays when you see that version of prove it all night in the capital. When Danny FEDERICI EASY Gets to do that Solo at the end of the song. It might be the greatest rock and roll organ Solo of all time. Now, how can I make such a claim where I'm purposely going over the top with my voice to try to cross the BBB listening that I mean what I'm saying That, you listened to that Solo, you watch the video that's on Youtube. You see the emotion and commitment. That that Danny plays that Solo. In those thirty five seconds he has for that, sole? Right. And that is exactly what I'm talking about when yeah. The Bruce East rebound the the total is greater than the. The. The the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Yes. Well, let's not. Not realize that the parts like Max Weinberg is the Greatest Rama Rock and roll period, and now defend him to the debt. So let me step in. If you're on a roll, I, get you what I was going to say is I had a of a bass player on the show just a couple months ago Yari Allen Talked about he said that the people that know. He said other bass players know the the way he he is the bay. The is the the the bed rock of that band that he is not showy. He just brings it out in his brilliant every night. So all the foundation of the East Street and again. US W talent absolutely, and you listen especially you don't hear them as as much up front in the mix. You listen to some live versions like nine, hundred, seventy five when they did go in back from the proxy in California and you listen to Gary space playing going up and down the scales and these melodic are Peggie owes that'll just take your breath away. Absolutely. I wanted to ask you arlen. Can you remember? The first night. Oh, we got a little. Learn curves blend. You did hear Bruce What about him spoke to you. Okay. I think I sent you this essay that I wrote you did but. Well, you know. The same way Jon Landau wrote that essay the night that Bruce blew his mind and he went home and wrote the real paper article in Boston. And that had the famous line. I've seen you know rock'n'roll future in its name is Bruce springsteen. and. If you know that article which is really an essay went on for pages and he only mentions Bruce in the last six inches of the call. What we're all those other pages about he was drawn Landau taking through a reminiscence of his story and rock and roll itself. What Made Them Love Rock wrote made him become rolling stones. Pop Records, review editor critic. Jon Landau in nine hundred, seventy four was the man and rolling stone. and. He sees Bruce springsteen opened up for Bonnie Raitt at the Harvard Square. Theater may whatever ninth seventy four and he just happens to debut this new song. It's been. We're GONNA go born to run by the way. And that's the show Bonnie rates. So Love Bruce you let him do his whole ninety minutes set. To open up for her, and that's the that's the show that Landau. His mind was blown. So. What I have to say about my first exposure to Bruce and the fact that I have written about and talked about it over all these years is because it was as profound. In my own life. Because I had just turned seventeen in the summer. I is a major. Elton John Fan. From Elton John from seventy to seventy five, that's his golden age you know and and early seventies there is there was hardly any real rock and roll. I mean, you know Elton John was at least doing things like Saturday. Night's all right for fighting and crocodile rock when everything on the radio in those days I'm talking about am radio I an AM radio kid I didn't get a stereo to away later. So I I was. The heavy albums of led Zeppelin deep purple last pass you by arms and am radio get goes. My mother had a car. The only had a radio. So I'm Jay am radio and in the early seventies, it was totally dominated by soft rock and. Singer songwriters, Cat Stevens, and James Taylor and not that I. Love a lot of that stuff I'm saying nobody was playing what we nobody was even using the term rock and roll in the early Seventies. So imagine is the summer seventy five by the way the New York deejays I was living in northern new. Jersey. They didn't play bruises I two albums on FM radio 'cause I got that Stereo Nine, hundred, seventy, three and I. I was listening to FM radio the year Bruce's first came out and yet because Mike Appel Bruce's first manager. was so aggressive and zealous in his in his devotion and vision for Bruce that he alienated the New York deejays. Ball they sort of didn't play his first two albums. The New York market did not hear Bruce until born to Ron whereas Boston. PHILADELPHIA CLEVELAND. They were on Bruce from the GECKO. But I'll never forgive those New York deejays because in those couple of years when I was a major Elton John Fan. I have been approved fan. I'm not forget that goes missing years but I digress. So it's the summer seventy five. Elton John's captain. Fantastic. Just come out as a big fan someone saved my life. Tonight you know a Great Song Right Summer Seventy Five, his last great single that fall was island girl. and. That to me is the end developed John's golden period and it just.

Mike Appel Bruce Elton John Jon Landau Bruce East Bruce springsteen Elton John Fan Bruce springsteen. Eddie Van Halen Steve Vai Danny FEDERICI Landau Boston BBB Neil Young Max Weinberg New York US Yari Allen Youtube
"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"In. The same way I've described Bruce when I describe what I call the four pillars of rock and roll. The four pillars are Elvis for the singular magnetic presence. Then comes Bob Dylan bringing lyrics into rock and roll songs and making them. You know musical poetry in an art form that you get the Beatles with that electric band energy. When they burst on the scene, the American scene in early sixty four, and then you've got Jimmy Hendrix, the ultimate guitar hero Bruce is not one of those four pillars but like Captain Marvel. Who is made up of the individual separate powers Bruce is not one of those pillars but what he is, he's the roof built over those pillars. With Him. It is a gentleman. Fans of the podcast fans of Bruce springsteen around the world tonight I have an expert in not one but not two but three. Fascinating pop culture topics. If we WANNA talk twilight zone, this van is here if you WanNa Talk Silver Age comics and we will be talking. So Legion of superheroes you he is the man to talk to and finally. If you WanNa Talk Bruce the boss springsteen. Arlen Schumer is the man to visit with an Arlen is kind enough to join US unsettling bruce tonight's welcomed his show Arlen. Jesse thanks for having me on man that was a great introduction I'm honored and humbled to be here with you. So now I'm GonNa have to I'm going to have to put the beginning as post credit just for fun. All pressing the erase button. Hey. seriously. Thank you. That's appreciate I am a week before we hit record we were talking a little bit. I am just ecstatic to talk about you talk with you because you do I I guess my first passion growing up was comic books. I. I. was born in fifty nine. So, you know your elders. One. You're under pressure I always wanted a number. And so you and I right I In fact, I told this story, a couple of times My Grandmother was the other way you look so much younger than your. Thank you sir I appreciate. Your want hear apart. Yeah. So my grandmother managed to post exchange, which is like a department store on a military base and and I would go to work with her when I was young young and I would go to the spinner rack. Take all the comics I want brought them, bring them back to her. She would rip the covers off so that she could get credit and would give me all the comics. So I grew up reading comics without ever reading the cover seeing the cover. and those that is my. Memories of Comic Books Survive when you finally discovered covers it was amazing. It was like yeah I was like Oh wow there's this whole thing. Now. WE'RE GONNA get to Bruce in a minute but are you a DC or marvel guy I grew up totally DC I I call it the Banal simplicity of DC, my older brother Steve a year and a half older. We both grew up with comics and he was the marvel guy he liked the Jewish Schwartz DC super heroes but that was it for DC he was basically a marvel Jack Kirby Day boats yeah and and we would have these. But I gravitated towards the bananas simplicity of DC in the silver age. Whenever I looked at my brother's Marvel's they looked too busy too many words. DC had this banal simplicity. The Superman titles by editor wise girl had a children's book like simplicity. Almost. Like like like yeah. Like like primer for children well. You're saying in a different way than I always explain it Arlen I. As I grew up, you know in you know came nine ten eleven twelve and you did not have a steady flow of comics. You re you were waiting dependent on the kindness of your parents right and so if you bought a decent move, really how allowance on I I got my comics but I don't remember having to beg my mother to Let. Me Get comics. Oh i. in fact, my first my first experience with with inflation was comics used to be twelve cents. So you could get to comics for quarter and then when they went to fifteen all of a sudden, you can only get one comic with a quarter and my still worth get over it was but you only get one comic with the. Hiding all that. I am Arlen over o-man. Let it go. But if you bought a DC book, you knew you get a full story. But if you bought a marble book dryers a good chance that there was it was going to be continued. So therefore, also the beauty, the silver age that companies had their styles in a way you are had the Jack. Kirby. House. And then eventually, the other great artists who kind of you know. Got More dynamic like June Cole and John Semen Romania all those guys. But DC, they had separate editorial feifdoms. So Julius Schwartz books which rather I like the most of the DC stop you know they all had a tone in a feel and look to them and Schwartz the Cadillac of artists he ends like the number one and then Weisinger in the superman books data look feel and a style to them curt swan drew every cover. And then there were you know can during the war books which I never read I was a Superhero Zombie but you know so that was DC and there were both pluses and minuses about that of course, and marvel in a sense by having more homogeneous approach that also ended up being deleterious once Kirby left moral and then it became this sort of super successful commercially. But again, this kind of house style where DC always seemed to foster individuals get like Walt Simonson could have only broken in to DC comics in one, thousand,.

Bruce springsteen DC Arlen Schumer DC comics Jack Kirby Captain Marvel Bob Dylan Beatles Jimmy Hendrix Julius Schwartz Elvis June Cole Walt Simonson Jesse editor John Semen Romania US Weisinger Steve
"arlen" Discussed on Shit Songs Off Great Albums

Shit Songs Off Great Albums

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on Shit Songs Off Great Albums

"Right here little little rain. Yeah now the beautiful. I mean the thing we've left out here is that Tom. Waits is O- on every album? He has beautiful little piano ballads. Yeah yeah and it's just really dark but beautifully recorded. Yeah I think this album or the song. Sorry came up as one of the first optimistic songs on the album and like this is great like a falling something that could work with. But he's added ended you off dances with the bushes. All rain. Never hurt no-one. Not this gave you optimism. She says she was fifteen years. Take the music was like what uplifting for me when I first heard it and then when I started listening to the lyrics was like he's fucking with me he's fucking fucking with me. It's a really sad ending to the song. I did some research on this as well. And Hey and he's off traveling through Arlen Kathleen and they read about a kid in a van then when out of control over cliff and they all died and this. This song was written about that. And so that when you read that lost law and it's like end end. She's and the last thing she said was. I Love You Mama Slack Alpha Fox. Wow that's bad. I think that's a song also just to change the subject where he uses and I sleep with my little and my leather gloves.

Arlen Kathleen Tom
Vinturas  finished vehicle supply chain on the blockchain

Insureblocks

08:56 min | 1 year ago

Vinturas finished vehicle supply chain on the blockchain

"We will be discussing into us. Finished vehicle supply chain on the blockchain. And I'm very pleased to have John Cooper. Ceo US. John. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners cooking deduction on yourself? Yes thank you very much. My name is Sean Kapoor. And since one year she of Fin Tunas Beck around in Finnish vehicle just as a CEO of one of the leading logistics service providers in this industry before this worked for many years in corporate jobs in mostly operations and supply chain great great. Thank you very much for that. So could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work? Yeah I'm sure many of your listeners have read and heard about blockchain and basically I can tell you what blockchain means means for us in our in our business segment of supply chain for finished vehicle. Logistics important for us is the book chain of course distributed. Let let your infrastructure but it allows us to create an infrastructure where we can truly collaborate with each other as logistics providers basically as all stakeholders in the ecosystem and through an in-depth collaboration define a single through some older transactional processes that are happening in the Finnish. Vehicle supply chain. I'll probably get your community from you to explain later. What exactly that means. But this is what blockchain technology means for us in a Finnish vehicles by chain drake. Thank you very much for that. So I read a study by the global market insights that value the automotive logistics markets size at over one hundred fifteen billion dollars in two thousand eighteen and it is estimated to grow to one hundred seventy billion dollars by two thousand twenty five. Could you tell us a little bit about the finished? Vehicles supply chain industry and some of the challenges it faces from a high level perspective. Lease happily do basically if you look to this very important industry segment. Of course you see the changes in your motive in the Swedish everybody sees the move to mobility services to move to electric etc and becomes more more about loving the brands than loving the product in in terms of mobility. Move to mobility services. And what you see that changing segment is a few key issues. Few key themes one. If the one is to structure lack of real time supply chain visibility can a dinner at least in Europe. Tell you exactly where that you've ordered from the factory on its way to the leader. You're the challenges. Of course. It's normal pressure on reducing the cost infrastructure for oems and combined the significant amount of inefficiency that we have because of scattered supply chain lots of paperwork etc and thirdly to challenge we have in Europe is the fact that he remarketing industry company selling cars. Let's say lease companies or rental companies selling cars after the initial us into Europe. This is really become a European market Europe market as a structural lack of collaboration transport capacity and end to end visibility for this specific industry segment. Great great let's. Let's take each of these three points one by one and so the first one by the structural lack of real time supply chain visibility. Now I understand that when new vehicle is generally distributed by three to four logistics providers also known. Lsp's before he had arrived at its final destination that most of these processes are executed via paper based ones. Could he tell us a little bit more about it? And what are the outcomes issues of that? Yeah indeed in the process from factory to dealer. There are multiple handover points between different logistics services provided to you think about officials to transport vehicles from for example a UK manufacturing site to European continent onto a terminal onto a trick of yet another service provider. Multiple handover points that are managed historically because Infortunately this industry suffers from a lot of legacy systems in suppliers but also in so for months standardized data exchange and also suffers from the fact that all these handover processes are done by paper. The result of that is that. Oem's don't have real end to end real time visibility auto supply chain and result that is also that dealer when he's ordered from the factory often knows when it is manufactured that not when will actually arrive for the customer and as a consequence of that data. Kennel plan to the last mile processes like adding towbar ordering formats. Most important more important telling the customer wind equal arrived can use it when he goes on holiday so this is pretty crazy because in a sense you know most customers are are used to an Amazon shopping experience. Where you can trace you know. Virtually by our where your product is is not a big issue with regards to logistical problem. And how the GUZM receptionist of it you can almost. It's unacceptable that in this industry. This service does not exist yet. Where Technology of course enables this And it's not. It's not rocket science to implementers a structure like this industry. So we thought this is to start off interest and we'll talk about later we need. We need to move the needle here. We need to do with. Technology enables and to provide to our customers exactly and now. I also understand that. Oem's original equipment. I factors along with fleet owners have tried for decades and to improve their cost base by tendering for activities in a logistical process. Why has why has that been a success? Yeah you're right. And certainly when when like everybody we are looking for breakthrough cost reductions further tendering and tendering basically asking every company who can drive as at the lowest cost from eight to be just not really create value in industry. And of course if you tender you do not optimize your networks. You do not take out wasting the process you just pushing on the same bits. And all the time they'll the margins are so low that it cannot investing in technology solutions. You never got the breakthrough solutions that you're looking for And and the third challenge the explained is the one around the European remarketing industry. Now what do you mean by that Remarks basically of course since Internet's is available for everybody in everywhere in the market for selling used vehicles? Let's say he actually vehicles for years old. This market has become truly European. It means you can sell a folks wagon Polo in Poland at a better price. Then you can in Spain so this leads to a lot of transport requirements and a lot of cross-border traffic and especially in this traffic a lot of issues with fraud on used vehicles. Most of his notice seems mild Florida's most. Most people are familiar wits. If you buy a used car you also need to be careful. That the Marlins is okay but also a lot of issues and throw it in cross-border traffic as importer import taxes. Importation you had high fell U S. It's so generally speaking throat delivers a lot of value for people want to act fraudulently. Now when when we're talking about remarking are we talking like you know Consumer to consumer where I can sell a car my car just someone arlen or someone in France or are we talking. More like bb name where its fleet? Managers selling their cars to two other companies. It's basically a B. Two B. companies selling their used vehicles to other companies other other parts of European countries of Europe and basically all these companies after objective to act interior to have just could business but many of many things many processors that are running are invisible in other words. If I sell to somebody in another country you accept my offer for car I sell. I can get my money. I cannot see the fraud that is behind his like for example the mileage for fraud so many B. to B. Companies in Europe. In general terms are looking for really solutions eliminate fraud in these processes.

Europe CEO Fraud John Cooper OEM United States Sean Kapoor Fin Tunas Beck Marlins UK Florida LSP Infortunately Spain Amazon
"arlen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nancy Lamont finds deep emotion in the song cooked up by Arlen and harbored for bloomer girl introduced in the early forties by Jimmy Dorsey's orchestra would roll on through the years to become one of the cornerstones standards right as the rain Steely Dan through with buzz and now Bryan Ferry with one from the sixties song book that we think of as being a woman's song because Janis Joplin quote on quote kills it in the modern parlance but Bryan Ferry does a good job too with piece of my heart thank you for that everything the engine so all came to this and so he thought she should dancing.

Nancy Lamont Arlen Jimmy Dorsey Bryan Ferry Janis Joplin
Making sense of the Brexit confusion

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:55 min | 2 years ago

Making sense of the Brexit confusion

"Turn now to today's top story you'd be fooled into thinking that you k. was in full campaigning mode by this weekend papers depending spending which paper you picked up the Conservative Party was going to promise you the moon or destroy civilization labor either had the beginnings of a pasta victory or already dead and unburied and Nigel farage from the Brexit party isn't going to stand for parliament but he's not going to go away so Vince macaroni. UK correspondent for your news joins me in the studio here to make sense of a rather messy weekend welcome back to the Vincent the the thing that everybody's talking about this weekend is that despite the fact that it is brexit has brought brought us to this general election in the United Kingdom everybody is determined not to be an election about brexit overseas are trying to shift the focus back onto domestic guess used as the feeling in the country too much of the national broadband has been taken up the bandwidth being taken up five brexit for years and years is now and they want to hear the party's plans for other services they want to hear about education any chest police because there is a feeling that after ten years of parity these services are very much at the point of collapse and so I think my understanding is Labor will try very much to in the next two days to get the brexit part of the election done do do that big speech and then try to move on from that and talk about other issues the Denver through interesting of surprise that they actually put brexit in their in their main party slogan last week they are very much thinking that if they hone in on the Brexit message that that could be there rock wall like it was in the two thousands that got them under Charles Kennedy and Nick Clegg up two numbers kind of approaching sixty and if they have a very clear simple message and they will to other policies but if they are the anti brexit party that will give them a huge boost in numbers and along with the SNP it could be those two parties that decide the course of what happens at the end of this election indeed the political world at the moment is shifting to the point where we have how many people now who have left their respective parties to join the Liberal Democrats in order to buy into this this anti brexit ticket we've seen an awful lot of people who would say with Bush sort of Brexit moderates have moved over quite a few figures moved over this weekend as well didn't they yes we had more switches happening but also the big thing as well to watch as the number of resignations that's taking cases is pretty extraordinary you're seeing kind of root out of women in parliament something that Theresa may too low touched to help get in but you're saying on the conservative side of moderate women like Nicky Morgan who currently sits in cabinet it is going Margaret James was a successful businesswoman also algae bt woman she says that the abuse and talk nature parliament's got too much she is going You need likes Angora Justine greening you're seeing real kind of carve out long Ken Clarke as well of the kind of the the Severo file centrist camera night position in the party just suddenly being kind of removing themselves from it one of the key voices in that was dominic grieve is a former attorney general here in the United Kingdom them kicked out of the Conservative Party voting against Boris Johnson a now making a very strong point which suddenly places a British election or other international personal life is called for the publication of a report on Russian meddling in the democratic process in the UK to be published before the general election. Boris Johnson has said no it Trumpian echoes it it does embarrassed I mean the the problem is you know report tells you what went wrong it doesn't help you set up the procedures you need to change and protect for tech something for future so whilst it would be handy to know I mean I think all of the parties will be taking you know improve security measures to make sure that they're not oh getting hacked as we've seen other elections being where you know the DNC and the US was hacked but yeah there is a question mark about social media we know that twitter has decided it won't Muskrats I mean that wasn't a massive issue here I think in in the UK you know the numbers on twitter actually quite small when you step outside of Westminster bubble it's not it's not the whole population but yeah we all uh-huh very curious to see what it is that is happening on facebook because the problem is that you or I are not seeing the APPS that certain people James and Scunthorpe and Tom in Wales and and Julie Danas brightness saying because of this micro targeting that is going on in that still hasn't been cleared up it would be interesting to know especially with the kind of talk now the pressure being put on facebook iceberg and other countries in Europe having blocks facebook from running class I think Arlen and France with the two in recent elections that have blocked whether the UK should've said until this this problem is cleared up we do this but at the moment all the polls looking so tight and I think all the parties will be worried by the poll numbers at the weekend especially going towards possibly hung parliaments parliament's that they're all keeping mum on their social media activties thing that was raised this weekend was the the Joe Promise it Boris Johnson in had given been given the gave rather diner dej then stay in the European Union post the thirty first of all I'm currently unite currently sitting in London were still part of the European Union check my calendar country disappointed around the country expressing the defections Liberal Democrats there was he gave even into yesterday for the first guy and the interviewer asked him if he was if he would apologize for effectively breaking a fundamental promises miss that he had repeated and repeated and repeated and this is what he said this study I do I do and I'm deeply deeply deeply disappointed and I had to consider sorry yes absolutely right then do we consider that to be an apology or is this is someone who's sort of off off record half acknowledging the problem I think as far as half ignoring the problem and I think this might come into the four of this election Boris Johnson have a line for decades that his personal life private life is personal and he's not going to discuss it and he's not someone who stands on election and preaches family values I use but when it comes to this issue of trust and the scrutiny of someone's personal life that is fair game in a general election when you're trying to become the Alito country his election the Tories was only around one hundred forty thousand in the end his electric this time is millions and millions of people and they have a right to know the character the person that is leading country I think Boris Johnson is going to struggle struggled in that interview particularly the sort of talk to sort of he had to four times say he wasn't he was asked four times about ruling out to this Scottish referendum for independence and he wouldn't do that because he knows he might have packed with the SNP and then later on clarified obsessions Shinzo did rule out because the interview was very it was very boris trying to office gate trying to dither and trying to get away from things I think he's going to face in the coming weeks some pretty harsh questions about his almosty his relationship with truth the people that he has misled recently a court found her majesty the Queen and the way that he's conducted his personal life we're in different world though now and not many people actually care about such things it would in the old days have hats it's on quickly booted out of number ten you say that then of support for Johnson but I'm not I'm not saying that the conduct itself is what will turn people off I think it is putting a question mark above his head that he may not be someone to trust and the way he is treated family and friends uh-huh means that believing what he's saying is very hard and when he's giving interviews like that one yesterday to say for Ridge on sky in which he seems very evasive I don't think about will help is 'cause neither will Nigel farage who the leader of the brexit party and someone who keeps appearing on television screens an awful lot despite the fact that he isn't actually a member of parliament is and nor does he intend to be an an MP this timer I mean first of all a very curious decision he'd he'd obviously looked at the polling and brexit party had dipped down over the weekend in the polls he's someone who's previously run for parliament seven times and been rejected five elections to buy collections and being an MVP There is a lot less scrutiny than being an MP but an MBA in this country means that you have to declare your finances you you had to declare your interest you will say are accountable to constituents I mean I I for one cannot envision Nigel farage running Friday constituency surgeries and trying to help other people people have problems Nigel Farraj is probably a broadcaster these days first and foremost as well as a kind of media figure and I think it's very interesting how can you I'm I'm an send the latest say they're going to release their sort of six hundred fifty candidates they're gonNA run up and down the country they have given Boris Johnson is two weeks window to drop his deal and then they could form an alliance Donald Donald Trump is once again over the weekend probably frogs etchings toll bars you know do deal with this Guy Nigel but for Nigel how can you say that you're launching a national national domestic policy and not want to be the leader of it in the House of Commons how can you how can you be doing that how come the public you you seriously as a political force when you yourself are doing it and I think they did sweep the MVP elections earlier in the year I went to one of their events in the candidates some optic strong one referring to Africa as a country rather than the continent on stage not being corrected not correcting herself and I think the scrutiny that comes by being an MP is far more the running for an Emmy Pena's country and the caliber of the candidates might not be as strong they might not be as well vetted and I think think that some of them will be sort of par local hustings did some macaroni from urine you thank you very much indeed for journeys monocle twenty

Boris Johnson Conservative Party Nigel Farage Brexit UK Vince Macaroni Trumpian Ten Years Two Weeks Two Days
"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

"But what would I mistake a big Mac for a stake. Peter Luger's consider the best New York state. No I love love both. I love a great steak and I like big Mac but I would never claim a big Mac is as great as Peter. Luger's stay yes. It's great as a big back but you know what I mean. It's still a big Mac. It's not a great state and yes a great state doesn't have the entre. It's of a a big Mac. A great baked potato is not shoestring fries. They're both potato. So you got to draw the stations. We can't mistake our love for comics superheroes to cloud our judgment which is basically what's happened with fan boys declaring airing avengers endgame. Oh I cried at the end when Robert Downey died. Like I didn't see that coming as David. Letterman used to say coming down Fifth Avenue. You know it was coming. It's there's no surprises. You only get great drama when it hits you when you didn't expect it to you. That's great storytelling. You know we all knew going into it arrived down I I mean that John Mara. That's not great art. That's not great film. Cool he cl eating including living thoughts well specifically about the joker the reason why we're having this discussion. It's because and I thought it's ironic. Because not only was Scorsese. I think involve that he was like a a silent partner in the film or something but the whole film is an amish to his. What I believe is his masterpiece which is King of comedy in Nineteen Eighty two? It's not goodfellas. This is not as you know gangster movies and if you've never sinking of comedy I mean it's such a brilliant film because it lays out the themes of our age alienate all the themes that the joke was about. It paid homage to King of comedy with a lot of taxi driver. Obviously so for score says they'd come. I'm an say. Competent movies are not real cinema. I thought was a kind of a very sly way of promoting the joker film because the joker is it is a great film because Todd Phillips basically sat down with code with Scott silver somebody like that and basically I think. The premise was in the real world that we live. In what circumstances would create a psychotic Khattak murderous villain like the joker these are things that heath ledgers performance hinted at what Brian Boland's Poland and Alan. Moore's killing joke hinted at with a more realistic version of jokers origin. But with Phillips and silver did with but this one was sit down with Joaquin Phoenix who should definitely Oscar for this performance. And basically say we're going to try to show show the world how a character like the joker if he really existed which is really again the bottom line premise of the watchman. The last thirty plus years we've been living in the genre of what if superheroes existed in the real world. which by the way those back to the Revolution Marvel Comics? It's which was the first realistic take on superheroes. We're spiderman decides the minute he gets powers. I'm not going to fight crime like those. DC Comics. It's I'm I'm GONNA make money. He goes on. TV was reality TV fifty years ahead of its time. But I digress. The point about joker is it's so brilliantly lays is out what circumstances would create a joker in a way that makes you feel something because of what finally me. A great actor is in a calm of movie and makes a great performance because it transcended John Nra and became a great film about a character. Study of a murderous lunatic but why he became a murderous lunatic. What does art do? It makes us understand Dan. The human condition it gives us insight into what makes us it makes us reflect. Are we a little bit of the joker. I I mean I gotTa tell you there were moments in the joker where I was reflecting on my own life and how g their times I feel isolated and alone you know and things like that I mean. That's what great art does. You're supposed to look at a painting in a museum and feel something make it reflect back wire great songs. A Song writer writes a great song. Once it goes out on the airwaves listeners. Take it and they inject themselves into into it. That is the process of art itself that's the Arctic processes of art. That makes us feel things so to sum up up. Yeah most super movies if not all of them. Don't really do that. But the joker ironically about a villain now can they do good. Can't they do a movie like the joker about a hero and really make us feel what the hero feels. That is the challenge Allen Jr because face it a villain meteor. It's hard to the hero. And that's why Sean Connery was always underrated as a great actor because the hero it roll seem simpler to play. But it's not it's very subtle whereas resume villain can chew up the scenery a little bit. But I digress and of course here Plug my plug. She had never thought Well it a book on Competent History Silverado comprador which is treating the Ark of Comic Book Art Great Art and places I take out the word balloons and I put the artist talking about the art on his jokes. Hubert spread right. You go to my website. It's linked to my book site where you can order book directly from me aside and sketch veteran it so it's Arlen Schumer Dot Com. Make sure you spell Schumer like chuck. Amy H. E. R.. And my first same Orland and that's leaked to youtube channel from my homepage. Might twilight zone works my work somber springsteen they're all there and then in terms terms of selling stuff most of my illustrations of men. My Bruce springsteen illustrations are on my merchandise site which is called pop culture man dot Com. I secured that name like a dozen years ago. I never did anything with it because I consider myself kind of pop culture man and so that's where all my posters and t shirts of a illustrations are so as after a blood pretty so of course he dreaded if you liked what you heard and you want to hear a little bit more if you chips get some education I think the show notes on this absurd definitely GonNa be worth Lissette. Please checking out at Patriot dot com slash cheuse gross G._W. uh-huh and thinks for how things were coming on..

joker Peter Luger Arlen Schumer Bruce springsteen John Mara DC Comics Patriot dot New York Robert Downey Todd Phillips Sean Connery Scorsese Letterman youtube David Joaquin Phoenix partner Amy H. E. R
"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

10:17 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

"That happened to be about Batman. I don't think Hollywood yet has made a movie. That is a great great movie that happens to be about superheroes whereas the boys is that the boys is great drama. That happens to be the about superheroes. And that's what we need to see more of I don't think we've seen it in the film's again with maybe a handful of exceptions. You know what I mean where where I really felt. Something was one of the major complaints about the excellent movie says bins. There's been than the football. Football Games was that the it was infamous for the x men comics in the eighties. Nineties was every so often he'd have the X.. Considering just play football well that comes from Kirby the X. Men uneven four Kirby would always these have a quiet moment of storytelling after his big end of world ethics. Right so maybe the greatest fantastic four story of the sixties of of the Marmalade is considered this man this monster F F number fifty one which followed Kirby's Galactic Silver Serpent trilogy which is considered the apex of the Marvel of silver age nineteen sixties. He follows that epic where he creates. galactosyl silver surfer with this is quiet little story again. It may be would not make a great movie because it's just a story but it's like a one hour drama on television and it's all about you know the bad guy that turns to version of the thing and he wants to kill the Oreos envious Elyssa Ban Blah Blah Blah. Glad the end you know. He sacrifices his life to save them because he repents that arc is a classic arc of the bad person at the beginning of the story that goes through redemption and turns good. It's a great story by Kirby that lead League dialogue. That happens to be about the fantastic four. That is how you transcend genre. What what Shakespeare? Say the play's the thing it's all about the story. What makes you feel? I watch these superheroes movies out. Out of my duty to the Jonah but am I feeling anything no am I getting an insight into the human condition. No is it doing for me. What art should be doing? And by the way which brings us to the joker movie. Which does that the joker movie transcends the Genre Genre of being a movie about Batman Villain to being a great movie about a guy that happens to be Batmans rate is villain right right? So it's a simple formula pun intended of how you transcend genre and I don't think any of these superhero movies With the again. Why do people talk about the first half of the Christopher Reeves First Superman movie so many people remember that why I'll tell you why not that you? US But I'm gonNA tell you why you've seen the first superman movie that Chris the first one I saw it in the movie theater now the first half of the movie up until lex Luther and it no Otis or introduced which brings that kind of Batman TV show goofy villain. But we'll talk about that another time up until that point the origin of Superman. It's like it's like the stations stations of the cross. You know all. The stations of the cross of Superman's origin are and the filmmakers had a had a hard job. Everybody knows the story suit. Matt how are we going to tell it. In a fresh way that will transcend genre. That moment happens when Clark. Ken has asked to leave Smallville. Why because in the comics for decades if you're compensator the way that was always pictured was super? Super Boy in costume was flying in the air holding two suitcases. CH- with tears in his eyes and back on the ground. The townspeople blow of smallville made a giant cake and it was always paying in comics. Rustling was always think and one of its say on it. Thank you super boy for your years of service. Never forget a small bill with all the townspeople around and that was one comic book panel. You you know so. I remember watching the First Superman movie in the theaters. I saw ten times in December. Nineteen seventy the eight and it was all because of this scene. So you're kind of wondering in the back of your mind. How are they going to do that? Station of the Cross when when Clark and s alleged logo all of a sudden we get this amateur Wyeth Christina's world come to life with Clark standing on one side of the screen and you know the old mock hand on the other side and I'm sitting there in the theater hitter by mind is being blown the cinematography the drama of the moment the idea that he has the leave and and they're standing apart meaning again. That's how you design visually if you're talking about separation the great director director. Richard Donner in the Scimitar. For Geoffrey Unsworth they create this tableau of separation and and and leaving your parents and everything that represents a life and then the camera when they're done talking. The camera swirls and moves around the wheat fields and goes up over their heads into the horizon. Have I have I have I recreated that scene. Yeah enough for you James. Definitely the point is is at that moment. The Superman for men movie transcending its genre and became a great film. Even if the rest of the movie you know became a Hodgepodge Aug- of whatever for that scene alone it will be in the hall of fame or my personal hall of fame of Great Moments and in movie history. A lot of time to think I think what we're missing from. A lot of the superhero movies is and we see a lot in Shane or any of the classic movies is that there's a definite stakes there you're definitely with stakes are and goes doing shows. What what could you possibly want or could be possibly lost and it just isn't? That's where I go back to the X.. Men Football Games. You know you guys these people you need together. They're having fun they're interacting his actual people and you actually see wider pay so much resort. What you're basically saying? Is You have to treat superheroes like people they are people. Yeah so so. Look at Dr Strange. You know out of that. Tragedy was a surgeon that lost the use use was hands and he becomes doctor strange. You know that's such a rich story that such a rich of mind to explore and with a great actor Benedict cumberbatch had the same todd. Phillip Style that they did the joker ochre with Ben applied the doctor strange we would have gotten a doctor strange movie that transcended John Nra but we did it. We got a good doctor. Strange I will be with a great actor playing John Maral but did I feel anything. Do I remember anything yet. Tilda swinton was cool as the ancient one. And you know again. You've got these great actors but you don't have a script you don't a great movie takes chances. It takes you where where you know. You're going versus the stations of the cross idea. And by the way. Same thing with James Bond you. We know that the first girl that is going to be with is going to die because they have to follow the pattern. A great filmmaker Quentin Tarantino wanted to make make a bond movie set in the nineteen sixties. Now that would have been a great five movie to it but they didn't. My point is get stuck in genre when it follows the formula. When you break out of the genre formula and surprise people title it transcends the genre you know? People Thought Sky Was a great film again. Maybe a couple elements but breath again. The problem with the bond movies is they feel trapped and constrained by the genre and Dan all of these superhero movies. You know I was hoping wonder woman because was directed by a woman starring a woman. Maybe we would get a movie that refused to play by the rules of the Superhero movies. No it ended up following pattern and I know why because there's so much money they have to do with this. Look people want. There's a cynical attitude. Give people people like to the have their buttons push. It's going to McDonald's you know every now and then I treat myself to a big Mac. You can't have a big MAC everyday everyday. You'll kill you once in a while you get a craving and you get a big Mac and it's great. It's exactly it tastes..

football Kirby Clark James Bond Smallville Hollywood Christopher Reeves Jonah Dr Strange Geoffrey Unsworth director Richard Donner Tilda swinton Benedict cumberbatch Quentin Tarantino Shakespeare McDonald League Matt
"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

15:27 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

"But I'm looking like three or four years between the season basically I mean it was like the first one he wanted. Its quality and Red Dwarf definitely has that I mean the last couple seasons. Haven't been as great but it's got through everything you've ever wanted to be made fun of an aside by setting they go after it hard core sounds like mystery science theater it actually for a little a bit better budget that an actual plot to it okay. So but Yeah issue sort of interesting. All the trivial controversy. When it comes uh-huh decipher SCI FI? Comic Book Art when it comes to comparing it to actual real art I. How do you feel about them easy? I know how you feel about it. Just trying to get a little bit more conversation on that. Well as much of a McConnell of fan I grew up with comics they made me become an artist. Done books on comic is three Etcetera Etcetera Etcetera Cetera. Scores says he is totally right. How any COM- fan obviously hasn't seen enough great movies because was how any but it can say that these comic book movies are Great Films? Like I said my management Bosa in your head examined. I love a good cop of movie. I mean they're only been a handful like the first half of the Christopher Reeve movie you know maybe may be may be wonder woman You know I'm very critical. The COP movies in terms have they transcended the genre to become great films and this to me is the key thing. I Hate Westerns. I am not a Western buff at all I. We're up with superheroes. Everything was about the future. When I was growing up Westerns? Where like the pass and yet they were so big in America that at the time violent zone on every other show on? TV was a western. So I hate westerns. But you know something. I love the movie Shane. Why because I think shane transcended a the genre of Western and became a great film? And in the history of the film. When a Jonrowe film becomes a great film it transcends Adjara so two thousand one space Odyssey thirty is not just a great science fiction film it so transcended Adjara that it is now considered one one of the greatest movie ever made? I consider the greatest movie ever made in color and citizen Kane is the greatest movie ever made a black and white but to me. That's what that's meant when you say transcending Giambra King Kong was the first monster movie. Let's say but but it's a great film because it transcended what became the kind of popcorn monster genre. So you know. So when we look at films or Giro films like Superhero films you know when does a superhero film become. I'm a great film. When does it transcend the Jarrah? Now the problem is fan boys who drool over these specifically. The marvel movies at because cost is like Robert Downey in great actors are now acting in them. They foreign over these movies endgame. Oh brought me to tears of the are you kidding me these movies I call them endurance tests. They follow the numbers. That's part part of the problem of genre and I used to work problem in quotes. They have to hit their marks. There are no surprises. A Great Work Kovar. A great film will a great director will take you somewhere grade sports. You start out. See the the agrees with me. Apparently a great book you know they always say at the capacity first hundred pages. Why because the writer is taking you from from your present reality into the reality of the book and the story the writers trying to tell you and you didn't know until you got past the first hundred pages and all of a sudden you can't believe how fast you turning the pages when you get caught up in the story right? A great movie should take you you somewhere. You didn't know you were going but genre movies and these superhero movies. They don't do that and I don't mean Fassel. Surface surprises prizes. I mean truly surprising you the audience in the way the story is told look at a movie like Christopher. Nolan's Poland's Memento. Why is that a great film and Better Than Is Dark Knight trilogy which these Fan Boys WanNa hold up over? These are great movies. It just happened to be about Batman. No they're not. They're Batman movies but memento was a great film because the whole convention of even though it might be called the genre fill. It was actually a detective story. It was a who done it really but did it transcend genre online absolutely because the way of told the story was way you had never seen a Tory story told quite like that before and it challenges challenge us to keep up with it and to follow the director on this journey. I think one of the greatest films of the twentieth essentially for me is Hollywood. Land which is underrated. Maybe Ben Affleck's greatest film which is a backhanded compliment. But I don't enough. You saw that. But it's the it's the story of George Reeves and the Guy Played Superman and baptists. But was he murdered that he commit suicide. Given in all of our conspiracy theory Itis you went into that movie thinking based on everything. You've read the last fifty years that oh he didn't commit suicide he was shop by. Eddie Mannix the Hollywood enforcers because he was having an affair with mannix his wife and Baba what but what was brilliant about that movie. And why it's it's a great work of art is that you went into film thinking. That's the story we're going to be tall and you know the director writer. They actually told that story but they told other stories within in that. And by the time you've got to the end of the movie you invitation on a journey where we went in thinking the movie was GonNa go one way and you came out out of it going holy crap. Wow and you came around believe it or not thinking. Oh what. Maybe he did commit suicide and that is why it's a great film. None of these marvel movies superhero movies. Do that because they all have the follow that formula the word formula is a the definition of why. It's not a great film. No great film follows a Formula Mula. Well maybe I take. That back. Genre is a formula but when you transcend the giant. Rewi Shane for me. The thinking man's western Western. Wise Shane for me. A great film. A guy who hates westwards because it's the perfect example of the white handed hero zero against the black hat villain the gunfight at the end. That's the greatest gunfight in western history. Show me a better final gunfight than that sorry sorry. I'll defend that final gunfight with Jack Palance as the greatest gunfight. It's got the greatest saloon fight which is another genre convention the Western. Show me a better saloon fight than the one in shame but the greatest thing about Shane is the hero Alan Ladd. He's the in weird way the anti hero he's gentle. He's almost feminine. Now you know our lab might have wrestled like a lot of actors with being a closet homosexual James Dean patterns his acting style more on. Alan ladd Shane than on Marlon. Brando's Stanley Hausky. Right and James Dean also was probably bisexual as well so this idea of the hero. WHO has shooed violence? Who and while he was the expert gunfighter didn't want to use his guns and he's only pushed to fight after he first turns turns the other cheek in a Christ like way out lads performance he? Shane is so is so immortal. thinking about it but I only use that and I'm raps impolitic on Shane. Because that is the greatest example of Genre camera film that transcends John Ra and becomes a great film the Love Triangle Between Shane and the wife of the homestead steadier and the home stutter. Are you kidding me. And yet he never. Once touches Maureen O'Hara's hand or whatever. The actress name was and in the end. They shake hands. They don't even kiss. Today's filmmakers would have had them having sex in a bar and outside but in Shane you can tell she loves him. And he's in love with her and they never consummated at all. You see me getting passionate about this and it certainly isn't hard enough yet passionate about 'cause there's a lot to that I mean is a lot to unpack from that movie. I mean it's also his these superhero movies. They don't do that. Let them do that. And the fact that some people feel they do they. They just haven't seen enough movies like Shane. They haven't seen the great films. But but for any real thinking intelligent comp of fan who knows his movies to claim that any of these superhero movies are great films. You've got to be kidding me. They're not cinema. You know in terms of great films as art. They aspire to be sort of but none of them have done it none of them yes. They've done it in bits and pieces. You know wonder woman with Gal Gadot I thought at moments made me feel like wow. This is really great gray light like you know it you know it. It's make it's all about getting you to feel real feelings when movies when I say their endurance tests when everything follows the pattern and then they got the big end of the universe scene. At the end you know I said to my facebook. Put a review about this some of the when Hollywood realize that some of the greatest superhero stories are quiet small stories. They're not all big end of the world stories. And by the way this is what killed the James Bond Franchise. They always feel like they have to one enough the previous movie and make the explosions bigger. And that's the death of action. They gotta keep doing that right. So these superhero movies. You know none of they WANNA make a quieter story a smaller story. That may be on television. The boys you know. The new series that was on Amazon Azzam Prime. I thought was brilliant and I thought it did Trent transcendent genre of a modern take on superheroes and became gray eight trauma if you saw it the the build up to the final scene with. What's the actress The blonde actress. I just I forgot her name. That played the female lead. Man I just blanked on her but the lead actor and her have a scene Zien at the end of the series. That's really breathtaking and should win them both. Emmys I think but you know so. That's the first comic book series. I've seen again maybe with television. You can get more of the of the great art that you can a a big movie with all that money. Hollywood you know they feel like you have to have all the explosions and the end of the univer seen to justify the budgets but to me maybe television will make complex stories. Better because complex stories are more episodic and maybe in the smaller vines look look. Great Television's been the last twenty years since the Sopranos Right. We are in a new golden age of television which borders into twilight zone. Because I claim that you know the greatest half hour twice in episodes are great. Art The art of television storytelling. So you you know maybe. This new watchmen by J.J. Abrams or is that donors a Damon Lindelof. One of those he has Abrahams Spent Abrams. You know maybe watchman will have some episodes that will be like the boys that will transcend this kind of recent genre of you know. Modern modern takes on superheroes which has become since. The original Watchmen Dark Knight. A genre onto its own you see and then there's like hi come out of the silver age this more innocent time of storytelling where it wasn't about the dark side of superheroes and nobody's really made aide a kind of a movie television version of that. I think the closest one was big hero. Six not the television version but the movie life. I thought was a great superheroes story. And I'm watching it thinking to speed dumper Superman Batman that Batman agitated series by Bruce in which I've lectured on written articles on the greatest episodes of that series did transcend genre and and become great stories. That happened to be about that. You know. I wrote one of the first major articles about that series when it came out in one thousand nine hundred eighty two as a graphic designer. I was also working with print magazine. A trade magazine. The graphic design field and the series. So blew my mind. I was talking about it to the editor print magazine and I said you know graphically the series is brilliant. Let me do an article about `bout that aspect of it and I got to fly out to L. A.. Interview Bruce Timm in Eric and I wrote about the series. So you know that that because it was just great storytelling..

Rewi Shane Hollywood director Christopher Reeve Dark Knight writer Alan ladd Shane James Dean McConnell Scores Ben Affleck Bruce Timm Adjara George Reeves Jack Palance America Eddie Mannix Gal Gadot Kane Robert Downey
"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

13:57 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

"The guy that was a prisoner prisoners now the judge and the guy who was the court reporter is now a juror. Well again if you know Mulholland drive. That's the basic concept that Lynch played with when he rescued the story from a failed TV pilot into this accidental masterpiece yellowhammer Bad pilots nate. Great movies all right trying trying to get this in the current controversy. Which of course is the when we were discussing? Yeah I've got. I've actually got theme this month. which is it seemed Tober cobres? So what's at this is in Kober the month wise right right. Which is I've got to get serious about? I've got like four. Drawings he's done inside the fifteenth Nuts I'm not an illustrator by any stretch of the imagination I'm a photographer. That's my Arco's so what do you mean you have to four illustrations. No one thing. Is that within Kobe. Winning trying a day that's the entire is one of those Big Art things every other is supposed to spur people going. You know. Spur people's imagination and get them going in artistic erection really and it's just speaking with you drying your day while Galley for done for the months of each hct is how see now I thought in Tober was purely about inking it is it is I can. Yeah Yeah I see that on facebook. People Post that all the time Tober. So you've really you're you're you're taking part in that. I usually do pretty well. I mean I'd like you said I don't I'm not an illustrator and you can show me actually got them on my facebook facebook page. But I mean can you show me right now. Sure she really bad WanNa get it on cue seconds a great stuff. I bet you're better than no. Yeah Yeah that's me. That's cool so that actually got him on my evacuee. Got Him on my dresser right now yes listen. Most people cannot draw anything you know. I can't draw a straight line. You know most people just don't draw but I like anybody that draws that's cool is that like your sil- cartoony sort of style and me trying actually copy and actual abdominal snowman's on my dresser right. Now what is your natural drawing style. Is it realism is a cartoony joining us. I want I don't really have one. I mean sort of cartoony. Realism Islam Volcano. You saw your real simple you basically it's to the point and I tried to Being too crazy and then what and then. What's your photography? Light is advertising commercial for at this point it's mortgage mortgage dodge more me just going out and grabbing pictures right so more yet more more art photography right so you like you know a we buy do like a rose Bush. I wouldn't look at the roads. Allocate the Rose Bushes a hall and they start getting focusing on various parts of that Rosebush so so the job of an artists is to make people stop and smell the rose bushes. He some Just like you're going back to the Martin Scorsese Fun. What is the history of the higher low art thing? I mean international one or are you just starting got into you mentioned high art low art because there was a famous exhibition at the Museveni minority in one thousand nine hundred ninety two called high and low ed or the first time the Museum of Modern Art which is the Church of modern art basically basically which by the way has never had a comp art exhibition so in future historians or aliens are going to look back and save themselves g was comic art ever anointed true real modern art. Let's check the Museum of Modern Art. And guess what they're gonNA come away saying no. I guess not because the never been exhibition but in the high and low show which was all about the Museum of Modern Art basically officially saying there are no more. The lines have been so blurred between high art and low art which is really what pop art began. That was the revolution of Pop art in the late fifties early sixties. I just lost my train of thought there when you got up I was the museum. Modern Art basically saying there's no oh more distinctions between high art lower so comic regarding is now in museums and you know marvel comics movies. Movies have taken over. Hollywood are making billions of dollars so So as somebody that grew up with American popular culture and loving loving it and I come from a generation we always knew Norman Rockwell was a great artist not just an illustrator but the fine art world only anointed him. In this century right around two thousand the Guggenheim New York had a major rockwell retrospective. And I think that was the the moment that Rockwell made it in it a Frankfurt's Xetra Robert crumb. Maybe Moebius you know. There's a handful of comic artists. Is that have you know really made it in the museum. Art World's so but when I was a kid and growing up as an adolescent and going art the school we always knew presente was a great artist not just an illustrator and by the way nothing wrong with via great illustrator as as is a great art is so even though you know we still have a long way to go in terms of getting the pop culture that I love fully accepted as the great art it is. It is a big difference between you know fifty years ago at say. Yeah I would expect that they would have gone rockwell logger. I mean certain art like the little the little black girl for little rock for example then image Some of his art is actually defined various theories and seeking but Rockwell's critics and by the way I just had a recent discussion about this there are critics such still don't accept Rockwell. They still say like what they would say about in the little black girl is hey it was still an editorial illustration and magazine or whatever it was it was rockwell being a quote illustrator traitor being told what to draw. You know. What's a pain you know? And that has the the basic nutrition our of the fine art world. Now it's funny. I'm an illustrator working in a complex and I'm a member of Cybula streeters but the society excitability traders for decades never accepted anything that had a black outline around it for decades. The Society of illustrators traders only accepted artists who were painters. Why because the raiders always begging the art world above it? Please accept us. Look where painting too so if you had a comic style. They never accepted that. But again the last ten fifteen twenty years and especially since the last ten years when they merged with the Museum of Comics and Cartoon Art k Xiv illustrators is a major sure bastion of comic art. They just had a recent exhibition about eighty years of Batman. So ironically comic art was always always the low man on the totem pole then came illustration and then fine art on top. All those lines now have been blurred right or destroyed completely makes you wonder what they think of Alex. Toss but you don't see it's funny you say that by all rights and if I could be the curator that the Museum of Modern Art would choose to mount its its first major retrospective on comic art. There would be Alex Toth Room where I wouldn't I would not only show the original Florent but the whole room would be black and white room. That would look like you stepped into and Alex. Toth drawing right you go into the next room and will be filled with Kirby machinery like you were stepping into the middle of a Jack Kirby fantastic four. You Know Phantasmagoria Fight Viking alliterate thanks the Stanley he who shall not be named by the way. But I digress. Sorry Yeah Years I love visual thing where you basically how the heck we do a Kirby esque machine in real guy but you know well but I'll tell you how you do it literally. Just follow his art. Hit some of that. Machinery are like moebius strips in reality -ality they couldn't really made a work but a lot of it can is just. Nobody's actually tried the last four movie. Ragnarok they they have a lot of Kirby influence but no Hollywood's set designer has yet taken. Kirby's actual are Dr and turned it into three dimensions once again Janus if somebody annoys me gives me a two hundred dollar budget. And let's bring a Kirby world to like. You'll finally see Kirby Machinery Kirby Jack has we call it. You'll see Kirby crackle you know no way. Kirby drew energy fields. Nobody's really been faithful to that and using computer. Graphic technology really transform the look of Kirby crackle into three dimensional special effects. I E I can just see the art director. It'd be like he wanted me to you know seriously you make this in. Yeah I'm out here. See it would be the exact opposite it would be if you can give me the money. Listen the last doctor strange movie. The last the first doctor strange movie we were hoping pink would have the look of goes magical effects and things but it didn't it had it had a little bit of that but it really had the art director and designers doing their own thing. It tastes just as much money and effort to do bad art as it does do good art or design so if they had a budget to do the designs that they did you can take that same budget and just studied. Dick goes work and bring that to life. I don't see any difference. It's all about your will and what you actually decided to do. It was falling up that with these. I've actually seen some models of that from pilot. cheetos that would actually be Somalis from from Pinewood Studios. It'd be fun to see. Take that on a on a I love some of the substance. I've seen like Red Dwarf where they actually have tried to do some of the Kirby Stop What Is Red Dwarf at the British Scifi comedy show. It has the distinction of being the longest running show in production the longest running Scifi show in production ever. I've never heard of that is it on is A. I've never heard of was. I'm not a soccer expert by any means. So yeah something at like your touting I can Mike. Why haven't we heard of this? It's actually it's this one of the shows that you simply goes all over the place it vicious out doctor whose doctor who street communist seat now some like me. That's not aside by SCI FI buff. Obviously I've heard a doctor who I'm saying I've never heard of this red dwarf thing so it should also some of that on on facebook or something get people to know about. Probably well I just you. How hard core comedy goes when I see if you've got the longest running Scifi show? They've been around for like twenty five thirty years now and he's only actually produced ten seasons. Okay hold on a second. Hasn't talked to who've been around longer Yes right through and I start after throwing the comedy part but even then with Dr who you can actually argue this only been going for like what almost like only a few relative years now. But that's because yeah the division between the doctors and Blah Blah Blah. So he had to sort of surprising rejoicing around as long as it has but it has produced something like maybe eighty eighty episode or something like that it literally basically get Black Mirror. Black lack mirrors has gone on for five seasons is had nineteen episodes..

Museum of Modern Art Jack Kirby Norman Rockwell facebook Alex Toth Church of modern art Hollywood Rose Bushes Kober Mulholland Lynch reporter Martin Scorsese soccer Society of illustrators Museum of Comics raiders Galley director Tober
"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

14:58 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

"Hi It's Jamie Joking hosted Web Comic Union views today with Arlen Schumer pop culture historian so sit back relax. SBN AJ was. Thanks for having me on man. Okay and we used Heflin introducing yourself. Yeah by Arlen Schumer. I've actually illustrator. Oh straighter member of the society traitors in New York and I've work in comic book style at the same time. I have a sort of twin career here as a pop culture story. I just got my MFA. So I can teach this kind of pop culture college level hopefully and my three areas areas of interest. That are like my three children. You can't decide what you love more. But is comical art history. I run three facebook groups. COMP regarded artistry the twilight zone we just had a sixty th anniversary celebration rod sterling hometown of Binghamton and I give a kind of multimedia era lecture on the twilight zone that pases posits it as the Middle Ground between twentieth century surrealism that preceded it and modern art popular culture that followed it. I consider the twilight zone. The father of American popular culture and then my third area of interest is Bruce springsteen. His music is life as career. I was art director of his first fan magazine. When I was Solit- road Design China a graphic design major in the late seventy S and. I've recently lectured on all three subjects. In New York City at a beautiful cabaret theatre theater the triads theater and if people go to my website and my youtube channel all of these Recent lectures especially our have all been captured on video. And I'm assuming at the end of the show you give certain lengths and whatever but basically all of my work is pretty much out there on my website recite cool. I'm GONNA backtrack Mentally going somewhere differently with this interview. But commissioned twilight zone as the border ground between And the pop culture well cycle deleon. Modern our popular culture television movies. His you name it you know why I can connect any modern science fiction. Fantasy are the product. I can trace it back to twilight zone in less than six degrees of sterling as I like to Pun on six degrees of Kevin Bacon right but I truly believe that. And when we we talk about it in depth like I said you know all of our modern fantasy and science fiction and our a creators whether it's Steven Spielberg George. Lucas David Lynch J.J. Abrams Lindelof all those guys. All are surly metaphorical children. You know he dies in nineteen seventy five thinking. He was a failure thinking that the twilight zone didn't matter five is the year Spielberg does jaws. It's the year Stephen King does carry. It's you know David. Lynch Lynch was in Philadelphia shooting. A racer head is surly had only lived literally a handful of more years. He only died at the age of fifty from all. Oh cigarettes you smoke grey. You would have seen what I call his metaphorical children come to the pop culture. Four with the influence of the twilight y light zone you know Stephen King wrote a nonfiction overview of the science fiction fantasy and Horror World Danse. Macabre came at nine hundred eighty. Three really really good. And he has a whole chapter twilight zone and he talks about house. Erling lit the fires. Like a spark. Plug the imaginations of that generation all those guys Spielberg Lucas. They were all teenagers when the twilight zone hit the perfect age age to have their minds blown and expanded by the twilight zone. And like I said you can look at all their works and trace some back the twilight zone nearly as a comic Mickey Finding Adventure. Seen It. The Sci Fi shows were taking off just as Run A win. Book Seduction of the innocent was actually killing off ally the comic book sort of Lincoln to really ranked in well to twilight zone now. The itchy horror movie a concrete example. Now I do a whole lecture on the twilight zone you know. Maybe the the single most was famous episode of the twilight zone. Is I the beholder with a pig faces. And there's an EC comics story called the ugly one published seven years earlier. Nineteen fifty fifty three. That's basically the same story now was in the war. They all read comic surly was into science fiction fantasy so I guarantee you. He read comics and is wife his widow who I interviewed years ago. She didn't say specifically but she kind colluded to it because member in that era reading comics is not something a celebrity likes hurling would promote it. But the bottom line is you can't deny that these e science fiction stories which I'm sure he read because they were adapting Bradbury's stories and comic form so let's assume surly read them seven years later. He does. I the beholder amongst other episodes. You know the half hour format of the twilight zone with the surprise endings is equivalent to the eight-page e. c. stories that had their little surprise endings. So the total carryover but then in turn in my lecture complex in the twilight zone James I talk about how then after the twilight zone Sanley and steep it goes start are doing those amazing adult fantasy stories which are five pagers. That are probably audit. Goes ideas that Stanley just dialogue right but all also there are direct knockoffs of twilight zone episodes. There's a ghost story about the mannequins living statues the last man on earth Earth time travel so again the twilight zone and by the way last issue amazing adult fantasy is a twilight zone version of a superhero superheroes story. And that's that's Spiderman because the twilight on twist at the end that he did not use superpowers to save the one that he loved the most is the ironic twist that they Bertha Spiderman when every other superhero before him. You know the me that they got powers. I'll go fight crime. You know so. Dicko and lead put that highlands head but basically Spiderman is the influence of the twilight zone on comics and E C had an influence on the twilight zone so once again the twilight zone is the middle ground between what what came before it and then how would influence. What's come after me? Shirley Sifi how much everything dovetails really nicely actually into each other and just goes to the play all our all history you name. It is building on what's come before you know. The layman considers original is really just the AL chemical combination of two previously existing. This thing things I call it. The reese's peanut butter school of creation. Butter existent chocolate existed until res fraud them together you didn't have Peterburg Cups Right. The definition of surrealism is by Andrea. Bertone the French poet who founded the movement surrealism starts out as a literary movement way before it became a visual art form and they want people to step back from their reality and look afresh after the horrors of World War One but one of his definitions and he wrote manifestos about surrealism was surrealism was as beautiful as has the unexpected meeting on dissection table between an umbrella and a sewing machine now while that sounds totally totally ridiculous or even data what he was saying was surrealism as the result. When you bring two different realities as together that have nothing in common and by bringing them together you create a third reality a new reality? It's like one. Plus one equals three. Not Two and by doing that. That's what but when I read that description of surrealism James. That's the definition of all art of of anything created you bring to things together amongst other elements of course that have never been introduced properly and when you do it and you add that little. Bit of substance acts as professor x would call the power puff girls when he missed something into the concoction. You like how I'm going from the sacred British Profane. That element of yourself is the kind of spice that makes the brew turn into something quote. New Right yeah already all over the place where you basically teach you. You know some of the the two things always gonna be greeted in some other parts right. So which is saying is surreal. The definition of surrealism is the definition of all the art. Or anything that's created right. Yeah she started weird. We actually start looking at how all the pieces connect throughout the history even something something simple assailant twilight zone. Yes and yeah. I think he'd be surprised to see how popular it is. I mean knowing. It's gone into syndication pretty much. Every time. If PRESI got his challenger voted to it and it just keeps coming back one way or another either directly as the twilight zone in fact CBS Just recently tried to Redo that series or watch not it really is just. I don't know I I had to see him so I can talk about him but have you not watch them not to current ones now. Yeah yeah well we should. You should watch him and then we can have another podcast discussing by. I think they're going to say. was there the direct influence sees light. Obviously the all the twilight zone iterations of the last thirty plus years and then. There's the interrupt one's like Charlie brokers Black Mirror which which is actually a better Armitage twilight zone then the new twilight zone on. CBS All access by Jordan. PEELE which to make a long story short I was you know and I think I speak for many other twice when we were all a little disappointed with. I think you're actually going to be more pleasant versions of that. So what meaning. What do you make a lot? More people have gotten a lot more Flaming church what didn't aggressive lot more insulting Asu. It I listen to. I'm trying to be nice case. Georgia veal is watching this podcast. But like I said once you've watched them and then we do another podcast S. where we talk about the new twilight zone which I think would be a great thing dog back a little nasty because there are a lot of bombs like Ed Black Merit. Have you seen the black mirror episodes Yeah fact I've caught up on that series. Even in the worst black mirror episodes I think are better. They show more originality more Again because Charlie Brooker writes most of them. They're coming more from an individual sensibility. which is what we all thought the Jordan peele thing was going to be and maybe some degree it is but if this is the sensibility I got some problems with it but right Brooker is paying better amish to the twilight zone some through Black Mirror because the concept of Black Mirror that is all stories dealing with technology in the sort of near future and usually technology run a muck that by giving it a very clear concept and even though there's a lot of variation Asian obviously within that concept and by creatively taking on the challenge of writing Most of the episodes himself off. I think it's again. It's better amish to the twilight zone. Then any of the new twilight zones have been. Oh yeah definitely yeah I mean. He's very plus. He's in felicitous. You're like watching the little details. There's a lot of details at least every all the stories. Yeah it's a very Korea should thing. He didn't have to do that but I thought it was interesting. As I watch more episodes that he was referencing. So it is sort of Charlie Charlie brooker future world sort of which like I said is more. Listen David Lynch's career has been more of a homage to the twilight zone than the new twilight zone in Mulholland drive. which I believe is his masterpiece and was recently voted by by the same people that vote in a whatever the AFC top one hundred lists? They voted the best film of the twenty. Th Century is Mahala and drive and Mulholland drive is basically Lynch's take on the twilight zone and again I can trace it back. It's the classic episode. Oh called shadow play with Dennis. Weaver as a guide being executed for murder but from his point of view he thinks it's a recurring occurring nightmare. He's having where the moment he gets. Electric Unity wakes up and then he repeats the nightmare again to the people in the jail. He's a prisoner is gone on nuts. So this dual reality. And then you get to the end of Spoiler alert the end of shadow play and it turns out he was right. The scene begins again. You're in the courtroom. He's getting sentenced the deck except all the people are slightly different..

Lynch Lynch Charlie Brooker New York City Steven Spielberg George Arlen Schumer Lucas David Lynch J.J. Abrams Stephen King Binghamton Heflin Bruce springsteen Kevin Bacon Spielberg Lucas pases CBS James I Bertha Spiderman Solit- road Design China Erling director
Not Ready to Dismount

In The Gate

11:54 min | 2 years ago

Not Ready to Dismount

"Great american golfer of the early twentieth century bobby jones remarked after you're watching jack nicklaus win the nineteen sixty five masters nicklaus played a game with which i am not familiar you could say the same for jockey frankie dettori tori who is having a year with which most racing observers are unfamiliar twelve group one wins already at the time of this recording and more than four months still left in the the year. Epa ties is now getting a split. He's running back while they on the outside. Brando has moved up advertised seeks to advertise takes the lead eight again and advertise came away to win advertise man of the mind that frankie dettori yet again dettori just four group one wins away from his best ever season two thousand one when he took sixteen considering what he's been through in his career and his age forty eight frankie's performance this year has been absolutely lutely remarkable. We'll get into all of that. As we welcome in a man who's had a pretty good see to watch several of dettori's group on wins this year veteran race caller richard hoiles oils who joins us once again here on the gate. One is struck you the most about the year that frankie has put together well to totally is confidence right. He's he's one of those. I'm sure you have the equivalent in in the u._s. When things begin to go well tori whether it be on a single card as in that day when he read the seven winners <hes> alaska ascot and when he had the first for the role meeting this year <hes> he really does seem to be able to ride to a different level. It's exactly the opposite when things go badly you know so you get the the trembling lip and the psyche so slightly sulky demeanour they just appears at this period which which really started with an awareness victory in the oaks has just laid to an astonishing level of performance in in the top races. Just okay the numbers. He's any twenty i in the junkies table in the u._k. In terms of number of winners he's any ash britain's thirty three winners in the u._k. And yet nine of those have been group one successes and if you were to rearrange the table on prize money he would be taught by over if a two million so. I think it's partly overseas writing very good horses which i'm sure we'll come on but it's also that innate competence which seems to be so important to the way that he rides well. That's a question that comes up both in horse racing and automobile racing is how much of his success is the writer and how much is the set of horses. He's been writing like enabling arlen stratovarius. I think that's a that's a fair now that he's not stick anyone in a nice call for you and certainly for me to one for europe you know most people you could win a mercedes for me the one guy lining up on the grid in that particular race there are a few races which dettori has one through pretty instant star catches is victory and the irish jokes where you stack them up and then ran away from them was was one of those but that he needs to be honest in the king george the thing too frank is he's not someone want to travel the length and breadth of the country looking small winners so it was important to him to have a big retainer. I used to be godolphin when he lets godolphin. Most people thought that would be the end of things and he's stumbled was good enough to get the cats at job at the right time when that sort of began to drift away is really the association with john gosden. That's taken things things to a new level. If you look at the twelve group one sees success these had in europe since the oaks in early june right the way through to the march instigate with advertise you'd go stratovarius as you mentioned you'd go to enable you had to dawn halts. He finally came to the party and won a couple of of group ones and and then scattered around you'd go go to coronet. You've got the ones that are still can't shoot. It's probably only gonna win one so yes it's definitely underpinned by having a good stable and but really able stratovarius the two that are underpinning success old. She's that a finding. We haven't got the younger who's coming speech then then so they're running runs heidi like it continued particularly with the naval your next week if she goes yorkshire so you could conceivably be talking about dettori writing fifteen fifteen group one winners twelve of them in the u._k. So it is already his most successful season for group one successes domestically. I was just looking okay again. Some of the numbers and if you had up the period between two thousand nineteen and twenty eight so in two thousand eight nine in twenty five seasons he only and he wrote in group one winners in total in that period and yet for many people that would have been almost successful period for me as a whole that it would be now in terms of winners but knowing at this late stage career is forty eight is quite astonishing. He did many sipping longtime ago nineteen ninety nine. There's no record ryan more trump top fifteen and seventeen but i suppose the other point to make his you made the point about the the top table eight named brian hasn't visited often often he often does in this country good three year olds and mike mcgraff is the anthony van dyck samosas happened gone on to be superstars and as a result the door has been left more than for for the golden rule is to sort of through so maybe that's the other side of the coin. Is that eight no brian. He's had a reasonable season but he hasn't dominated to the same degree as yes. He did the year when he record for the number of group one successes in in in twelve months right around the globe. I wanna go back to what you were saying about the the frankie dettori and godolphin for those of our listeners who don't remember frankie dettori had written exclusively for godolphin since nineteen ninety four when sheikh mohammed had started godolphin a dolphin that arrangement ended in two thousand twelve when to tori tested positive for cocaine. What thoughts did you have at that time about. Whether dettori would not just returned to the sport but returned to the pinnacle of the sport. I think many people thought that it was entirely questionable and to be fair if he founded for quite debates around the the twenty thirteen fourteen periods he was really saved by the introduction of because he was never going to cool boy he had the occasional ride but he wasn't certainly certainly going to have the quantity of rides that he'd he'd had through godolphin. The saving grace fahim was probably the beginning of the association with cats because he made noises about yeah. I'm gonna come back. I'm gonna compete for the title but those that know frankie no he just would not put in the miles and the dedication that's necessary. It's not like your system. You know in the estates where you based at the the one place period of time. It's the travel kills championship ambitions in this country. It's done by the number of wins so as a result the prize money honey. That's he's guiding through the big. Success is largely irrelevant. It's just one win of the same as it would be on a wet windy monday. Nights were hamilton dettori would never go for those sort of rights so i think many people felt that it would be a slow demise and probably the end <hes> but he stumbled across good horses at the right time and that that was important particularly i think old it was quite important in putting him back on the map with another dumpy win and a very very good ride in in new york and of course he was involved with other decent. These these cats are like travel initially even though that ended in tears as regards his association with her so he was saved really by his ability to put out big race successes but that period we mentioned twenty ten thirty two to twenty fourteen was really his barren spell in twenty-fifty things have really picked up a say go on how to do with that but obviously association with john gosden which came through likes the golden goose have been particularly significant and to your point. He's started just about a quarter of the number of races that ashim murphy has and yet as you say way ahead in the money total. We're talking with veteran british. Just race caller richard hoiles here on the

Frankie Dettori John Gosden Europe Richard Hoiles Godolphin Jack Nicklaus Bobby Jones EPA Arlen Stratovarius Alaska Brando Britain Writer Ashim Murphy Brian Coronet New York Sheikh Mohammed Frank
This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:05 min | 2 years ago

This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives

"Thousands of women especially black women experience pregnancy related complications and about seven hundred women die every year from them according to the centers for disease control now Williams threw her firm Serena ventures has invested in mommy it's a start up working to help women during the weeks and months after they've given birth with the goal of reducing maternal deaths still Melissa Hannah is one of the co founders mommy and she joins me now hello hi there and she is here with her mother Linda Hannah Linda is also a long time nurse and lactation consultant hi hi this come about what did you see a need for this it came about from watching my own mom work in this field and realizing that there was a limited set of tools available to professionals like herself to really create the impact that she wanted to have on mothers and babies lives and we started talking about what could be done in the outpatient setting when patients are home with their families will give me an example what are some of the complications that new mothers might face and how could this app help them well just in the past twelve months we've had patients who experienced severe blood loss and postpartum hemorrhaging we've worked with families and and with mothers that are experiencing prenatal anxiety we were the first responders in a case of a patient who is experiencing suicidal ideation and hadn't reached out to anyone for help yet wasn't sure if this was a normal part of being a new mom she had a two week old baby and reached out to talk to someone to the platform after taking the bus from depression survey that was available to her on her patient dashboard scored really high and immediately flagged for additional assistance and some money was able to step in and engage with her verify the symptoms and immediately escalate this to the OBGYN detention who had no idea she been struggling Linda I mean as someone who works in the space that sounds like it's incredibly helpful it is there's a huge gap between a mother delivering her baby getting discharged from the hospital oftentimes in a very quick fashion and then not being seen again for significant number of days often trying to manage many times on their own so we're trying to fill the gap between their last visit or their last time with the physician until they're seen again the next time Celinda speaking of that gap those studies have shown the women of color three times more likely to die of childbirth complications and white women in the US can you remind us why that isn't well mom is trying to do and closing that gap there is a huge gap in a population of people who do not either have access to the health care or that they don't believe anybody's going to listen or actually care and that is the hardest part for us to try to get across that we actually are paying attention we actually do care we want to know how you're feeling we want to be able to step in when somebody even reports just a feeling that they're having that we don't tell people that's normal you're allowed to feel like that that's a common feeling but actually addressed what they're feeling immediately we don't let the days go by your time go by we want to talk to them we reach out to them and we want them to also know that they can reach out to us and that nothing ever is going to be a problem yeah it just to speak directly to the stats the mentioned when we look at reports around pain management and support and care that's provided to black women in particular there's a huge discrepancy in how patients are cared for I think that it's very important part of this whole story that often gets overlooked is how broken the overall system is you got your be taking care of mom the pediatrician taken care of baby and a number of other professionals who are often out of network for new families and then you add into that a layer of really sort of systemic racism and bias in the way that we listen to the concerned and the challenges that black and brown families are facing and it just becomes these insurmountable odds for these families obviously because of what happened to her you came to her attention how did you connect with Serena Williams we connect with Serena Williams through Arlen Hamilton who's a longtime investor and advocate for mommy Arlen had been working with Serena and sharing some deals and and some money as something that might be of interest her so this is Linda I insisted that I wouldn't actually take money or have anybody investing who didn't really understand myself and Melissa first and I'd like to meet everyone and so she agreed and she saw us on the screen we were doing a video call and she saw that I was a Caucasian woman and my daughter was a mixed race girl and she almost started crying so that's kind of how we originally met her then we get the privilege of meeting her in person which was incredible and just getting to know her a little bit was really wonderful that's Linda Hannah and Melissa Hannah the co founders of Miami that's spelled M. A. H. M. E. a new maternal health care platforms supported by

Williams Twelve Months Two Week
How tardigrades were secretly smuggled to the moon

All Things Considered

03:50 min | 2 years ago

How tardigrades were secretly smuggled to the moon

"In April a failed lunar mission crash landed and spilled its cargo a few thousand tardigrades tardigrades are tiny adorable to some and one of the toughest creatures around Daniel over house wrote about the field lunar mission for wired magazine welcomed All Things Considered thank you for having me I'm embarrassed to say I'd never heard of a tardigrade before the story what are they so these are micro organisms there a little under a millimeter in size they have four legs I'm a lot of people think they look like bears hence the name out water bear they are found everywhere on earth from jungles to the top of the Himalayas to the Antarctic and as you mentioned they can survive pretty much any sort of environment I'm extremely hot temperatures to extremely cold temperatures they can survive in the vacuum of space they're pretty much indestructible and how did a few thousand of them potentially and up on the moon a nonprofit organization called the our commission foundation sent a lunar library to the surface of the moon with the air she lander she lander this is an Israeli mission yes and on the slander there is a desk about the size of a DVD made of several ultra thin layers of nickel and sandwiched in between those layers of nickel are hi in layers of a proxy that contained DNA from humans in the form of hair follicles and blood samples as well as several thousand tardigrades so the idea here was to in addition to all the digital information stored on the layers of nickel was to preserve our biology from earth and if the tardigrades did survive this crash landing are they still sandwiched in this kind of DVD type thing that's the hope no one knows for sure they did some mathematical month modeling after the crash and determined that in all likelihood this this was actually probably the only thing that survived the crash so there's a pretty good chance at there are tardigrades on the moon does that matter I mean are they gonna like breed and take over the moon I I mean is is it some kind of moon pollution like what what's what's the importance of this yes so there's no reason to worry about tardigrades becoming Arlen our overlords anytime soon they are they're in a state of it's called crypto biosis which is where they actually I showed all the water in their cells they talk in their legs and they almost turn into a glass and they can last for decades in this form but they can't reproduce their metabolism all but stops so they're they're they're kind of live depending on your definition of life but and tell someone were to bring them back to earth they're not going to be moving around or do anything like that element okay so this seems relatively harmless but this was a privately funded lunar mission what's to stop some other billionaire from rationing something on the moon that's not as harmless as a tardigrade that could actually you know do real damage I think that's a concern for a lot of people the fortunate thing I suppose is that the moon is considered a relatively low risk for the sort of thing when the Apollo astronauts went there fifty years ago they left dozens of bags of human excrement on the surface of the man so they were the first to actually leave DNA there but I think looking to the future this is something we need to discuss with private missions to places like Mars where introducing DNA into environment could potentially contaminated I the science that they wanted you to perhaps find traces of life so you know I think it's a great entry way for this discussion about who I get to determine what is placed on other celestial bodies well you know compared to bags of human excrement I think I would prefer a few thousand tardigrades reported in all over how speaking with us on Skype he wrote about the possibility of tardigrades on the moon for wired

Fifty Years
"arlen" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on KPCC

"And you play a Scottish woman who's like enthralled with American country music, but your Irish were you aware of any this music? No, I had no relationship to country music at old more started this, and I thought I was I don't know my peripheral was that. It was like. When I found that in phone really good stuff. The lyrics really in the stories that exist within the songs kind of three minute movies. It's compete me stolen, my heart. It is quite like Irish music and ways. There's that kind of tradition. In Arlen of the story teller, they call it, they call it the Shanna key, which is this guy, he's a traveling storyteller who travels from towns town with box and goes into different pubs and stands on this box and recites stories about these different characters that he's met on his travels. And an and even within the music, there's a lot of resemblances with folk Irish music and folk country music, and even the Tennessee is quite simple. But it's very emotionally deep talking to Jessie. Buckley who stars in the new film, wild rose. Did you have any say did you have any input over what songs were used for the film from from other artists when I was, I kind of coming to terms with country music can learning it and figuring out what was Lind's voice? Was within this job. I would and other musicians like new McColl and Jack Arnold reserve music supervisor we all bottled up to this shed of north London every two weeks, and there is some songs, which I don't know, you're looking, I suppose within the film, the songs are an extension of the scene are sometimes not. But Tony you're looking for something which will tell a story or an emotional piece of what Rosen? Wants to say that she can't say in her real life. Right. And often it's just energy wise. Some songs we took like country, girl. The primal scream song, which is at the very beginning of the film, that was only which came kind of later but it was so. Right. And so, you know, their version is quite punk rock. Whereas we'd kind of arranged it more country. But it just had that irreverence and bowls Innis and you couldn't get like more like a better feel for the beginning of that film, because you have a sense of who this woman is in wear that frustration. And that drive is coming from within that song. Contry. But it's a thing that's kept growing organically, as we did all the music live. And so some the songs, which is take on their own shape within the scenes of roseland quest is to get to.

Rosen bowls Innis Arlen Jessie Lind Buckley Tennessee supervisor London McColl Tony Jack Arnold three minute two weeks
President Trump Remarks At Photo-Op With Irish Prime Minister

Business Beware

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

President Trump Remarks At Photo-Op With Irish Prime Minister

"President Trump in Ireland, the prime minister's intestine. Fringe over the very short period of time. And grid relationship to Arlen I think is good as it's ever been. Maybe better Trump's visit comes between commemorations for the seventy fifth anniversary of the day invasion. When event was Wednesday in England second Thursday in Normandy, France,

President Trump Prime Minister Arlen Normandy Ireland France England Seventy Fifth
Brazil's Natura cosmetics takes on the world

FT News

06:07 min | 2 years ago

Brazil's Natura cosmetics takes on the world

"Notre the Brazilian cosmetics company, that owns the body shop recently agreed to by Avon products in an all stock deal that values the US group more than two billion dollars Vanessa holder talks to Andrew Japan about the man behind the tour and his plans for the company. Andras you interviewed keenly, L, Nietzsche's, billionaire chairman, after the format precision, did he ten you why he decided to acquire? Here's a they began seriously to consider it with the decision to acquire the body shop in two thousand seventeen from loyal. Last. Gene was gonna key in days percent, Lamerica, dune. Novem. And in this clip, he told me one day he realized that the company was president his company was president ten percent of the world's market, but it was another ninety percent. And as a long-stablished company with a good reputation, links to the rainforest Tura, who they well-placed to expand worldwide what the details of the on acquisition and most of the benefits for each side, which we know it was a two billion dollars. All stock deal to buy Evan and Tudor will learn about seventy percent of the combined group while the remainder would be owned by Avon shareholders. And in the deal has been in the works for few months, but in a to expects that would yield more than ten billion dollars in annual growth for the combined group and this mainly, thanks to access to more than two hundred million clients, worldwide Avon, pioneered, the direct selling modeling cosmetics embodied by its doorstep Avon lady sellers. But it has lost market share at the rise of social media marketing, how does this compare to new? Chirs business model. And one of the main differences is not is very focused on the environment in the sense what you were saying about the latest sellers. They're quite similar. I mean to also use direct sales they call them consultants not sellers. But they say now that after the deal together, they will have six point three million of then where would Mr. Neo formed a close relationship with body. Shop's, founder, Neath Roddick was an environmental campaigner. What kind of character is he and what did they have in common but his quite awful? And he c in Brazil, they friendly phases capitalism match like an eater audibles in the UK. He wants told me he grew on vanita Roddick, because both were looking to build a new capitalism were companies help to build a society. So in the light of that, what's the company's relationship with the Amazon day. And what a mystery house ecological credentials. Well, the relationship is quite strong. The comp. Resources some of its room materials from the Amazon seeds plants fruits, whose oil and sense can then be extracted for beauty products. They are has been an environmentalist for quite a while. And he was even the running mate to environmentalist candidate. Marina Silva in the two thousand ten presidential thing deserve. Always throw. Now keep it as advocate. Go. See year produce sound vessel. He told me the company was more committed now than ever to help save causing JAMA's and in view of the growing threat, and it is facing under the presidency of jailable scenario to what extent does not terrorists still use Amazon purchase like Arlen sense. Knits, beauty products. It's about twenty percent of the products. Use Amazon was ingredients at the moment. Why is the Amazon? Particularly important for him, personally his father was from the Missourians state of. But I when I saw him, he told me that actually he developed his environmentalist credential in this passion for the environment later in life. But seeing how many wonders that resume have specially when he came to the environment as you mentioned misleading has also been involved in Brazilian politics. Does he have real influence? And could he play a role in persuading, the both narrow government cherish its forests rather than cutting them down? Well, there was something very hard to do, especially because he doesn't want to get involved in party politics ever again. He told me he said, he's very concerned about the threats posed to the rainforest by the current administration. And so he's raising awareness through business in the civil society me, he's a board member of the Brazilian found for biodiversity the worldwide are funded in Brazil, and he also founded something called least tour you which focus on promoting the. Green economy as colon Avon isn't known for its eco friendly products. What's the chance that this will be an attempt to spread this ecological nature of the neutral brands? I mean, there could be a spillover effect problem is, I mean now the four companies have as that they bought from this trillions in two thousand thirteen the voter shop and Tony seventeen and now wave and although Avon will be the bigger brand is probably going to get something from both mature and the body shop in its, let's say DNA sometime in the medium-term said, both companies even an insurer big operations in Brazil how's that game to work what we have to think that the tour group now they own full brands between those, you pretty much have all the segments because as is quite high end the voters shows like let's say wants to down below that. And so there's no Tudor. Plus, Tuesday's let's say they have they ABMC covered bridge in the first three brands and now with Avon they will cover the. See entity so pretty much. We'll have the whole vertical chain, no, no, Brazil. But what are they go and Avon's faced lot of challenges? Do you think Notre will be able to turn that around? I mean they manage to more or less do so with the body shop. I mean it was quite a bumpy road with even is much bigger companies, manage their really focused on expanding into Asian markets with all the brands, especially with mature neighbors. So they mentioned specifically they were looking at Indonesia, and India. So those are very big markets. They had a good chance of and

Amazon Avon Products Brazil Avon Vanita Roddick Andras President Trump Gene United States Marina Silva Chairman Vanessa Holder Nietzsche Indonesia UK Jama
Peacekeepers in Cyprus push for safe and secure environment across whole divided island

UN News

09:31 min | 2 years ago

Peacekeepers in Cyprus push for safe and secure environment across whole divided island

"This is Matt wells you a news, establishing goodwill between Greek and took a sip rates through activities that involve children, women and the elderly blue helmets with the UN peacekeeping force in Cyprus or unforeseen, a working towards a BI zonal bi-communal, federated state to ensure a future where the whole of the island can live in a safe and secure environment, says force commander, Major General, Cheryl, piss the mission was established in nineteen sixty four to prevent fighting between the two communities on the Mediterranean island. And in the absence of a political settlement continues to maintain ceasefire lines into buffer zone. Just ahead of the international day of peace. Keepers monks on Wednesday may general Pierce spoke to Julia dean from the UN information center in Australia. Well, for us in Cyprus where we made our polls just either thousand personnel will one of the smallest pacekeeping missions and all of that, just either eight hundred military for which I'm the fourth commander, I work to the special Representative of the secretary general and together we knew. Stint that I ensure the security instability in the buffer zone and tonight, will I along lasting political solution to be addenda find. And when I talk about what is the buffer zone. It's really a nuanced in complex triple bland covers one hundred ninety kilometers from west to east seven Fisher crossing points is probably know why then a straight suites in some parts, and that's in Nicosia right up to seven kilometers. You now the areas we have very much like stone predicting billion SRI protecting pace. And we do that in a number of saintly, different wise and this one amaze oppose commander and also as mission is a hall to reduction Logan engagement, which is actually my mind if it is a force command, the we're in an armed force, and we have militarized opposing forces north and south on the north. We have the Turkish mainland army, and the Turkey Ciprian security, forces and on the southern side, we have the Greeks. Pre at national God. But the Orland is actually quite a militarized islands. I have a strong engagement plan. And with the commanders of the opposing forces in way, mate Neely every six weeks, and then this is mirrored again, by commodities on the ground across the sectors. It really are to, to ensure that way deescalate the tensions that are air. And we are the only why the two signs don't communicate we check which other way facilitate all the information from north to south and south to north. So then engage plan is significant, and that depends highly on trust, doesn't it? Yes, trust. We took about that every time we might and we took about from a military really thinks when we talk about mutual respect trust. Impartiality transparency and a really fi console net for both sides, because it is what we do is military that separates it from the political, we'll very. Careful to keep the divide separate of the wines. It can be we can get caught in the political environment, which undermines the trust and impartiality on the military sign so that's sort of be the case. And that happens right down to the lowest level. And now we have a man that we have to report my license, and so that engagement, we need to really hold on. When we when we have these violations violations to talk about that could be either manning of the checkpoints that could be moved forwards into the buffer zone night could be escalation with weapons biz in number of different activities, e this on could do that would create a violation and then way report out through to New York on a daily basis and stopped to building to the secretary general's report, and we have a mandate renewal every six months. So the actions of the housing forces gets captured and reported, which. Then leads into the political dialogue and the opportunities for the sides to try and identify way going forward. What about the civilian populations does the ministry heavily as on with the, the civilians as well. Look, we do talk about protection side. I as we talked about my time security and stability in order to return to normal conditions L actual, Botha's Zayn here on the island is not ice sterile office. Sign like between north and South Korea. It's actually used for farming and some of its permitted, we do it through a payment system, but a majority is not permitted farming, which creates esscalation and ferocity to try to defuse that we got to the actual physical protection. We escort we have pilgrimages gun coming into the buffer zone. They have they seek to do these Puga midges back to the mosques and churches to hold religious services on a regular basis in for that we school. Them. We escort the mean and we provide that support to them. But when I talk about supporting civilians, we have a lot of communal and a lot of activities. Karen, the buffet Zayn unbound, establishing the goodwill between the great secrets and Turkish Cypriots in the intent of trying to work towards a, a Visayas by communal federated state and for that to occur. We have to mind time and really work towards creating bottom up swallow a bike mean like TV's and for that what actively involved in creating a sense of the side, insecure environment for which for the is to occur Anaya care in the buffer zone, quite regulate that will plan, we, it's dumb with us as force. We have the ample the place. But also, we have civilian staff, we do the facilitation with municipalities north end south to coordinate, the diplomatic community also actively gets involved sponsors, a lot of these activities, these activities with children's side. They EM's Watson children's activities fundraise for the very young and for their parents and then through to mainly through sport on all of the school. But now there's a lot to do with science and stem, and spice and an educational activities. And then we will say by Pistone. It's a focus on the next generation really trying to that younger community, working together because it curriculum by signs is actually justed to make their I narrative, and so coming together through ball community allowing them to engage provides an environment where it's not by what is said, but is by the actions and working with your position on the old Lee we do a lot with the elderly. But also, we do a lot with the women giving them a voice and trying to generate opportunities where that can be a voice for chine Jin. They do a lot through women's walks. We get together in charge them. You. UN copy lading. It's about Priscilla touching both sides to find ideas and wasteful. Would you have an example of what inspires you with the people that you weekly space Capers, but grind berry? What spies may that Ahmad force? It's here unite that trained in their own national army air force on ninety and trying to say their country, they're not been selected by the country represent the UN. And it says we come together as an international community to, to serve the UN and to support the outcomes in Cyprus to ensure that they have a future where the whole of the Arlen can leave in I in a secure environment as Cypriots is a whole, and of course the day, the peacekeeping dies Edyta reflect on those who full them. What are your professional and personal reflections on this very similar very similar to that of what Tom and spies me about my forces that you try and all of your career, to be country? And then you. Elected by your country to at the UN, which is writer than a national outcome meets it's global response to, to conflicts around the globe, where we are coming together to support the country that wearing end to represent the UN is rule privilege. And I certainly don't take lightly and the bar is that we work in and this is, you know, towards the budget of fallen environments. We work in our complex, and the is it applied the ultimate sacrifice. My heart goes out today to their families. You know, we try and for these environment, we understand the risks it's families that a left and, you know, Laura people think the UN is only as now is less than one the environment that we work in is benign. It's not it is complex. It is risky. And we continue to fight Kosonen trying to create stable environments for the for the host nation will continue to work. The UN is working in action for pacekeeping and women. Stikes missions in my focus is on the continual, nip professionalization of the force training environment, which we work in and end to lead by example with good command and that's to ensure the way, reduce the deaths where possible in missions. They'll always be environments, wherein, but might show that there are no unnecessary deaths through poor training or actions. But inherently, you know, we said country we serve the UN and the and the environments. We in our risky and complex.

UN Commander Cyprus South Korea Australia Matt Wells Major General Mediterranean Island Julia Dean Nicosia Pierce Orland Representative Kosonen New York Chine Jin
Alabama Governor signs bill making abortion criminal

Anderson Cooper 360

04:20 min | 2 years ago

Alabama Governor signs bill making abortion criminal

"Alabama's governor signed into law, the most restrictive abortion Bill in the country, and your total ban on all abortions in the state under the new law. Doctors who perform abortions could face up to ninety nine years in prison. The reaction from democratic presidential candidates has been swift and fierce one of the laws, most vocal opponents is New York, Senator and twenty twenty presidential candidate Kirsten gillibrand. The tweeted that the abortion bands recently passed an Alabama and Georgia represent. And I'm quoting the greatest threat. Reproductive freedom in our lifetimes. Senator gillibrand is heading to Georgia tomorrow. But I you joins us here on three. Sixty Senator thanks for being with us. You wanna fight this. But what exactly can you do on the congressional level? I mean, this is solely decision for the courts at this point, isn't it? I think I can lead a movement, and a fight across this nation for women's reproductive freedom. This is an all out assault state after state over thirty. Nine efforts in this country to undermine women's reproductive freedoms, President Trump intends on overturning Roe v. Wade, he's made it clear, not only in his campaign, but as president, and that's what these Republican legislatures are doing across this country. This is something. We're gonna have to fight back on. And I will lead that fight Justice Cavanaugh during his confirmation hearing, he said that he would respect the quote important precedent of Roe v. Wade do you believe he'll do that? If and when this case and cases from other states make their way to the supreme court because that a lot of times, people who are waiting to get confirmed. Give a statement that kind of oblique it could be read in different ways. I think his statement was dishonest and disingenuous. But the American people are watching, and if he lied under oath in those hearings that's gonna be problematic. So I hope the American people and American women everywhere will hold this president accountable, and we'll protest these extreme. Decisions by legislatures and governors being signed into law there. Criminalizing a woman's right to make a decision about her body her. Reproductive freedom. How many children, she'll have when she will have children, and it is literally turning back the clock on settled law. This is not something, the American people support over seventy percent of American American people support, reproductive freedom and support the precedent of Roe v. Wade, the fact of the matter, as you said, is that this is not any surprise. President Trump made it very clear as a candidate. He wanted to overturn this. He won the presidency in part because his supporters wanted him to appoint conservative justices to the supreme court, potentially peeling Roe v. Wade if it came down to it. So I mean couldn't win argue that this is the will of the people at least to a certain degree. Well, Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by three million votes. So I wouldn't say that. And if you ask. Ericans today. Do you believe in the precedent of Roe v? Wade and giving women basic human rights and civil rights to make decisions about their health their wellbeing their bodies and life or death medical decisions. They believe women should have that right? So we know where the American people stand on this, and that's why we have to lift up the voices of people in Georgia people in Alabama, women who will suffer under these new laws and make sure that their voices are heard, and I will lead this fight across the country. If I'm president, I will make sure that there is not a judge or Justice, who was appointed by me, a who will not Opole the precedent of Roby row. We've Robie Wade, and the truth is, I will guarantee that no matter where you live in this country in all fifty states, that a woman will have access to safe legal abortions and other reproductive care services. That Republican legislators are so intent on denying one litmus test for supreme court justices and Roe v. Wade would be one of those limits does I do. And I do because President Trump and Senator McConnell, have changed all the rules when it comes to appointing justices, when Mitch McConnell decided that President Obama was not entitled to his supreme court Justice, where America Arlen was denied a hearing vote. They changed the rules. President Trump has made clear. He's had a litmus test, and frankly, I believe in precedent settled law.

Robie Wade ROE President Trump Supreme Court Senator Georgia Kirsten Gillibrand Justice Cavanaugh Alabama Senator Mcconnell New York President Obama Hillary Clinton Assault America Arlen Roby Ninety Nine Years
"arlen" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

12:35 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"He heard her tale of sexual harassment by Clarence Thomas. But he previously told Senator Arlen Specter that it was clear her testimony before the Senate Judiciary committee included lies. Not only did I vote for Clarence Thomas. I believed her from the beginning. I was against a from not only did I vote for Clarence Thomas. I believe her from the beginning. I was against Clarence Thomas should meet not only did I didn't I vote for. Can we take three here? Okay. Not only did I not vote for Clarence Thomas. I believe from the beginning. I was against Clarence Thomas. I did everything in my power to defeat Clarence Thomas. And he won by the smallest margin. Anyone ever one going on the supreme court Biden told the views joy Behar, but in nineteen ninety eight Biden admitted to Arlen Specter that it was clear to me quote. It was clear to me from the way she was answering the questions hill was lying about a key part of her testimony. The exchange was published. Inspectors two thousand more passion for the truth from finding JFK single bullet to questioning Anita hill to impeaching Clinton. The issue is important as a media and other partisans rewrite the historical record about hill and her accusations of widely watched hearings revealed inaccuracies and hills various versions of events and ended with fifty eight percent of Americans believing Thomas. And only twenty four percent believing hill. There was no gap between the sexes in the results. In the intervening years activists have relentlessly attempted to change the narrative writing fan fiction about hill and bestowing honours on her and asserting that her disputed allegations were credible. That'll be interesting to see because that look that's a huge issue. And you wonder, you know, with Biden now in there. And I really there haven't been any polls over the weekend yet, but I checked real clear politics and since Biden has announced. And Biden in the last two polls before he announced a right that didn't include all the days after he announced. You know show that he is still in. He you know, he is still in the lead. And I did see over the weekend. This is special on social media. When is Bernie just gonna crumble again, like he did under Hillary when it's just gonna fold up and say, well, I can't do it. And then just let Biden rollover him like he did Hillary and a lot of these came from Democrats on social media saying this. And I just wonder eventually you're going to have to have look if you're running for president you want to be president. Right. Sure. I think that's the whole point. You've got twenty different people running. When is somebody going to take a shot at by? And a big shot at Biden concerning something like that in the federal dot com. Remember the story that came out during a creepy gate. The story that came out that it was Sanders. People that were behind it. Yes. Is that the most that Sanders is that as far as Sanders is willing to go, right? Is it or was it Sanders? Supporters and burnings not willing to go. Even that far. Because at some point you do have to take them on. You know, people forget this. But Hillary and Obama were debating in two thousand eight against each other. To the point that Warren Buffett decided to give them equal amounts of money in terms of campaign contributions and not choose the side. But they did have to debate each other. You've got a pool it's one we are light years from two thousand eight. You've got a pool twenty at some point. You're going to have to start taking your shots. But the risk is they could be a lawmaker in the future any of them that don't make it. He could be president. He being Biden. This is the generally speaking. So he becomes president. You're looking to be part of his cabinet. Do they soften the tone and just let the natural process? If there is such a thing in the political world. Take place. We said. To bernie. When he made the comment. Nobody cares about your emails. Well, well, you don't care about being nominated then and you're not going to get nominated. Because if you're not going to bring out the fire, if you're not going to point to the other person, and all the other people and say, this is why they shouldn't be in. This is why I should be. You're not playing the full game. Right. Then you truly don't why are you wasting people's times while you're wasting Democrats? If I'm a democrat. That's that's what I would. I mean, they were out of grassroots money into burning and one of the reasons I thought about this was just when I was reading the op Ed piece by Peter. Peter fund. Yes. Alan funt from candid camera who took over candid camera under the age of one hundred and twenty seven and candid camera and his but his op Ed piece in the in the USA today 'cause that hit social media over the weekend. I didn't see maybe somebody hit it at a campaign. Stop. I didn't see it. Right. But when I first saw that last week because I saw that. I saw the story and it went through my mind. Okay. Some liberal hitter fort, but again, not being a liberal. It didn't hit me as hard. And then when I saw the op Ed piece in the USA today. Whoa. What's going on? Here camera Harris owns a gun for personal protection. Democrats don't own guns for personal protection. Now, some own it because they're afraid of Trump that that came out we remember in November and December of two thousand sixteen when the increase in gun ownership was because Democrats. Believed that the second amendment applies because Trump would now be over the government and they needed to protect themselves from an oppressive government, which we went while only Trump could make liberals understand that what the second amendment to release about that they were laughing at just months later. But here is the op-ed piece, you know, prime time position in USA today stayed in Cabra Harris's out of touch with Democrats. You don't own a gun if you're a democrat for personal protection? No. You can't get away with that. Sorry. That is not allowed right? A handgun for personal protection. That's not allowed. You are bad. You are evil. You are immoral. And your here by disqualifying. And I'm thinking does anybody else attack that or do they realize mass? Are you can't say that? You can't say that you can't own legally a handgun for personal protection. If you're a woman you because remember he's a guy and he attacked a woman. So I that's what I was thinking. I said it's gonna go. Both ways is camera Harris going to be criticized for owning a gun for personal protection. Or will? They take on Peter funt. The the op Ed writer of that for daring to attack a woman who owns a gun for personal protection from possibly a man. Who would attack her and so all these sorts through my head because they have split the democrat party into so many victims and oppressors every time something like this comes out. You're like I have no idea what this is going to lead. Now, it's going to be fine. It's going to be entertaining. Well, and and it it's again, exactly what we spelled out. Because there's no other way because this is this is this is where it was going. This is what it was designed to do eventually, and that was to separate people even your own side. This is what the when we it years past years ago when we talked about the the Democrats in their philosophies looking to divide people. Well, that's the case for all people, including those that support that. Have you bring it together as a party? How do you make that work? What does a primary a when we get into the the Iowa caucuses that when we get into the the actual primary elections of next year. How does that play out man only a fool would try and predict now based on where it is right now it looks like burning in biting or going to be really strong. But you can't do that. Because even a storage safely, you go back, and you look at the we've done that. We've you look at who was polling in the year prior at at a higher much higher pace in often. It's somebody that wasn't pulling very well at all. And this is early. The Democrats have a lot of trolling time between now and the Iowa caucuses. It's officially trolling is. So we'll call it. Eight six six ninety redeye getting response on a variety of different topics including the mullahs report. We had mentioned that attorney general bar has said format doesn't change. I'm not gonna speak to to to congress. Let's go to Marquette in Chicago. Marquette welcome. You're on Red Eye Radio. Welcome to the show. Hi. Thank you, gentlemen. You guys a one of us spend this first of all. I'm sorry. It's not just a woman and a democrat who was also an AG and the prosecutor so by definition, she has to carry a gun has nothing to do with first the second amendment to the other Democrats Marquette, we don't have we don't have. No, no, no, no, no, don't stop. No, no, no. You made that one point let us address that one point. You don't get to make a point and move onto the next one without us addressing that. This is Dr argument, we're not arguing with her other Democrats. This is a democrat arguing with her not. I think I think of a bunch of win bagging. Because I don't really think that's an issue. I really don't think the people who write again again. That's what you think. That's not what other Democrats think understandable again. Don't accuse up, but don't accuse us of anything that's been doctors. We're not we're not spending anything. What did we spend? There we read the we read the op-ed piece. What did we spend? Okay. Then if I may speak my mind. What I heard was on the fact that that was a woman came into gun and Democrats shouldn't be talking about. That's what he said. That's the government that Senate democrat said that we didn't sink. No whip the Democrats saying is we didn't spend that woman, but she's not a regular woman. He said that tell that to him. Style with. Bending to him. In fact, Marquette what we read was he we address that we read the part of the editorial where he said, she used the she she said that she got rid of it after she was the AG, but she didn't get rid of it. She kept it. We didn't spend that we told you and read what he said. See what you're doing is. You're spinning what we said. You are you accused us what you accused accused us of doing exactly what you did. We're used to this from Democrats. You cues of something that you were doing putting words in our mouth. If you did it not us..

Biden Clarence Thomas Democrats president USA Hillary Senator Arlen Specter Sanders Marquette Anita hill Harris harassment Iowa Senate Judiciary committee Trump op Ed democrat party Warren Buffett
Why Game of Thrones is the first and last of its kind

The Big Story

05:11 min | 2 years ago

Why Game of Thrones is the first and last of its kind

"Today with a recording of a language that no human civilization ever spoke yet. Most of you are going to understand some of them as Bruce Dadis cost out. She finally that negate Dianetics Jen Massimo entered Gary Arlen and bolero Kohana Godich, son. The card is. See if you want to get a handle on why we're spending a Friday talking about a TV show. Remind yourself that game of thrones created a language that people who snickered at dragons in highschool can speak. The show's final season debuts this Sunday night at nine PM. And that in itself has significant in a world where we're used to media being delivered on demand to each of us whenever we find the time to watch him on one hand game of thrones has been the first of its kind a blockbuster fantasy epic adapted not to film, but to television that broke the mold for these stories and brought adult fantasy to a very lucrative global audience. It has changed that industry and on the other hand, it has also the last of a species the television event that the world watches and talks about together, and that doesn't really happen anymore in that sense. Emma, thrones is a dinosaur and the industry has changed around it. So what happened eight years ago when this show debuted that? Made this possible. Why did it happen with this story? What will be left behind in the world of television. When it's over. How has it changed? Both the stories that we tell and the mediums that we used to tell them. Oh, and who's going to end up on the damn iron thrown. Jordan, heath Rawlings. And there's only one war that the great wall. And it is. Andrei Dmitri's is a writer for various publications. He's one of our favorite guests here on the big story knows a little something about game of thrones. Why did game of thrones of all shows changed so much? I think your frame of reference if you happened to be ten generally into the fantasy genre your frame of reference was most likely the Lord of the rings, or Harry Potter and regards to the fact that both Lord of the rings, and Harry Potter had very wide fan bases and people really loved it enjoyed both movies. And maybe people less enjoyed the Lord of the rings books because let's be honest. They were pretty dry. There was at least an understanding that this was not necessarily meant with an adult audience in mind. Dickey ruling did not write the Harry Potter books for a Dulce. They were very clearly kids books Gerald token, even though you could say that it was you know, a very mature high fantasy series. It was also written with young people in mind. A game of thrones comes from that the post nineteen seventies dungeons and dragons Jonah where this these are very mature stories, the it it involves mature themes. Blood and guts and sword and sorcery and all that stuff for a cult audience written for an audience of twenty-something guys that would get together around somebody's kitchen table on a Saturday afternoon and drink beer and play a role playing game. Like, that's sort of the the culture that it's bonds out of. So I think that people were looking for a more mature fantasy product to you know, to to just watch and enjoy and game of thrones really really hit that Mark people when they were describing the show early on weren't talking about a game of thrones and reference to other fantasy series. There were talking about how different game of thrones was from other fantasy series that they'd ever heard of to the extent that they were saying things like, you know, this is the sopranos with sorts or this is the wire, but with magic my partner hates fantasy stories and hates magic and dragons and stuff, and I knew that this was going to be something different. When I essentially told her, look, I know you don't have to watch this with me. But this is an adaptation of a book I love so I'm going to. It down and watch it. Anyway, you're welcome to join me or not and she joined me for the first step aside and has watched every single episode multiple times. And that's when it became clear that this was something else. The fact that people will spend time re watching them, and it's not just happening in the run up to the last season every season that comes out I see people on social media, and I know people that will simply rewatch the entire series. Just so that they can be caught up. It's I mean, it is a very complicated story with a lot of moving parts and a lot of different characters. But I don't think they would actually do that. If they didn't really really really enjoy the show, and I think it's so enjoyable like the idea, so the fact that you would watch five or six different seasons just to prepare yourself for the upcoming season. That's I can't think of another toward the sun. Then when did it become clear that this was going to be the defining television show of this era? I think it was probably around the red wedding in the third season. My king has married and I owe my new Queen wedding. Give.

Harry Potter Andrei Dmitri Bruce Dadis Emma Jen Massimo Kohana Godich Queen Wedding Gerald Token Gary Arlen Dulce Dickey Jordan Partner Writer Heath Rawlings Eight Years One Hand
During Shutdown, Farmers And Others Lack Critical USDA Reports

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:52 min | 2 years ago

During Shutdown, Farmers And Others Lack Critical USDA Reports

"Support for NPR and the following message. Come from HBO while everyone is talking and no one is listening. Bill. Maher is ready to get real watch. The all new season of real time with Bill Maher Fridays at ten pm only on HBO it'll be cheaper than therapy. Or at farmers have been hit by the government shutdown in a different way. They are struggling to get information. The US department of agriculture usually publishes, the price sales numbers and inventory for many agricultural products. But now some of those reports are not happening. I will public radio's Amy mayor explains why this matters. Here's an example of why reports matter the government launched some of its crop and livestock reports as a response to the Soviet Union's huge purchase of US grain in the nineteen. Seventies commodities. Economist Arlen superman says the quiet purchase worth about a billion dollars at the time came as a shock then when it became known. We suddenly realized that much of our known inventory was. Sean in the markets reacted very violently commodity prices soared with that in the back of his mind Sudirman says he's now thinking about whether China could pull off a similar trick during this lag in public reporting while not likely it is possible. Superman's company relies mainly on proprietary research. But he says they use USDA figures to fact check their own. He's concerned there could be some surprises when the government reports resume particularly of wants a report start we find that. There is information that we missed that the market needs to adjust for and that's the greatest risk more immediately. Farmers. Don't have all the information. They count on in Dallas county, Iowa Marvin Shirley has been farming since the nineteen sixties and uses USDA reports to guide his decision making so Cao's sometime January, but were those give pro. Projections on ideals and the mount of cattle around without them. He may put off that sale at this time of year his family's also thinking about the amount of corn and soybean plant in the coming season. But they don't have the information. They need to make any adjustments. Shirley, says the shutdown and last year's tariffs on many US products. Create new problems for struggling farmers pros little. Pros little creating the problem is they're using taxpayer money or some other Mames to solve the problem. He created them. It just. Of very unsettling. Tar to these sure some Trump supporters in farm country don't feel unduly burdened by the shutdown. One cattle feed lot owner in Iowa said he could get by without the reports for some time and was embracing the politics of the moment saying he's quote tickled to death with what's happening. I was state university livestock. Economists leash Scholtz says the missing data means he can't put out his January reports, and he's already hearing chatter from worried farmers the longer. This goes some of that added uncertainty in the market, you know, may cause producers to not make decisions they normally would have daily price reports are still being published but January is a big month for other data a world supply and demand estimate last year's totals for US crop production and the number of cattle in the country. A USDA spokeswoman says the agency's intent is to publish them all once the government reopens. But by then staff and farmers will be playing a game of catch up for NPR news. I'm Amy mayor in Moines. Amy story comes to us from harvest public media reporting project in the midwest and plains support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast.

United States Government Arlen Superman Amy Mayor Bill Maher Us Department Of Agriculture HBO Usda Marvin Shirley Comcast NPR Iowa Scholtz CAO Sudirman Soviet Union Moines
"arlen" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"To be an entrepreneur of the broader sense of the term checkout soap net dot org site and go to the US chapters on looking at it right now, we've got chapters all over you got the capital chapter, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia New York, Orange County Seattle. I mean, I could go on and on there's chapters everywhere. And so join one of these chapters contribute to the conversation. You'll be surprised what you find there. It's amazing. What all in and his team are doing. I think that take advantage of this opportunity. It's a call to action. And if there's not a chapter where you live then by all means Arlen naked. How can they go about creating one? Yeah, we're happy to help them set all this up. But the bottom line is that if. You're interested in creating a chapter. The next step is to send me an Email, and you can you can get that off the website or my Email is Arlen dot Myers at UC, Denver dot EDU. And then I'll start you down that road fantastic. Really? Appreciate that. So, you know, I'll come back listeners. This is a man that is is welcoming an introduction to other physicians. Looking to be entrepreneurs, it is a great opportunity. I had a chance to connect with Arlen while we were at the Denver health IT summit, and was truly a pleasure. A very dynamic guy that I think you guys and gals will really enjoy collaborating with and so on this is the part of the show where I like to do a simulation. It's like a lightning round. We're going to build a one a one course on being successful in Madison. And so I'd like to write out the syllabus with you with some lightning round questions. There's four of them. And then after that, I'll ask for your favorite book to recommend to the list. You ready for that? What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes measure them, and we're not doing that? Now in some respects is a lot of organizations that are tempting to do it. But an example that I'm involved with is there's no reliable way to measure the outcomes and free standing ambulatory surgery centers. So if you really want to you get what you measure, and we need to do a much better job of creating valid reliable agreed upon outcome measures for all sorts of things not just quality. But experienced basically a value. What are the value factors that we need to measure, and how much do they cost? So we need to do a much better job of measuring the numerator, and we need to do a much better job of measuring the denominator, which is cost that is cost county for what would you say one of the biggest mistakes or pitfalls to avoid in physician? Entrepreneurship. Yes. Thinking that the letters after your name will get you where you. You wanna go? As an entrepreneur words, the knowledge skills and abilities that got you to where you are.

Arlen dot Myers Denver Orange County US Seattle Chicago Los Angeles New York Madison Philadelphia
"arlen" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"His name is Arlen Myers. He's a physician and CEO the founder of society of physician entrepreneurs. And he's also the emeritus professor of Ian, t at the university of Colorado school of medicine. Dr Meyers has had a tremendous amount of experience for decades in the healthcare industry, and he has made his own thumbprint onto the industry with changes and contributions. So what I wanna do is flip over the microphone to Arlen to round out that introduction a little bit more and fill in any of the gaps that I may have missed welcome to the show Arlen. Thanks for having me. No just going to say in terms of just filling in some of the blanks. Just so people know where I'm coming from. It might be useful to share. My story and fundamentally I went through a fairly traditional career pass after college medical school. I did my residency and your nose and throat surgery. At the university of Pennsylvania grew up in Philly got recruited to the university of Colorado out of my residency. I always sort of knew I wanted to be an academic medicine. So I started my first job in a city and county hospital Denver general and did knife and gun club for about five or six years, which was very useful experience, and then as my career path progressed, I basically wound up back working at the university of Colorado school of medicine where I basically spent my entire career. And as part of my climbing the academic ladder. I got involved in bioengineering specifically bio photonics and its application or potential application to head neck cancer, which was sort of my sub specialty between head neck cancer and facial plastic surgery and reconstructive surgery. So. That led to working with a number of people that resulted in us inventing again at that optically detects cancer, and that led to commercialization attempts tech transfer spin outs money patents that cetera. And that's kind of where I got the bug and that experience created certain problems or understandings that since has motivated me to do what I'm doing one was that the recognition that pretty much every health professional not just doctors has a pretty good idea. They just don't know what to do with it. Number two. It's unlikely they will learn what to do with it during their professional training. And number three. We felt there was an opportunity to fill that gap. And that's why we created the society a physician entrepreneurs that's a great story Arlen, and you got the bug early on you identify that there's some issues and now you you you develop the platform where physicians can come and bring their ideas to life rather than take it to the grave. Right. And my view, and we can get deeper into the weeds on this. But my view is that success in commercializing, a biomedical or clinical idea really has more to do with what I call the hidden curriculum versus the formal curriculum. In other words, what you learn in class while useful is not in my view, a critical success factor. What is our resources networks mentors experiential learning support groups, and a whole host of environmental mindset skills that I think predict success not the letters after your name had -solutely? And as you think of this hidden curriculum Arlen, what do you think a hot topic, you feel should be on every medical leaders agenda today? And how are you guys at the society for physician entrepreneurs addressing it? Well, I believe that the US educational system, including. The US medical educational system is fundamentally flawed and needs to be reformed and my initiatives not just with medicine. But also in education are directed to that end. How would you change it? Well, when it comes to medical school, the strut. I mean, if you just look at it from the standpoint of structure, process outcomes and business model in my view, they're all fundamentally broken and needs to be fixed. For example. You know, there's a lot of talk about value based care and creating value. And I think it's cruel and unusual punishment to expect doctors to create value and be measured by it. When we don't teach them how to do it to me. That's just wrong, I've referred to it as educational malpractice and the brave new world requires a very different skill set in doctors yet, we persist with some exceptions. There was a recent announcement that the recent medical school has abandoned lectures, and..

Arlen Myers university of Colorado school Dr Meyers US university of Colorado university of Pennsylvania bio photonics Denver Ian Philly six years
Astros, Margie Maldonado and Arlen Gonzales discussed on The Savage Nation

The Savage Nation

00:33 sec | 3 years ago

Astros, Margie Maldonado and Arlen Gonzales discussed on The Savage Nation

"All right. We're back here in Cleveland for the bottom of the seventy Indians are in trouble. They a to lead the Astros scored three times near the top of the seven with some help. But the Astros another big hit from Arlen Gonzales. Who's out a bunch of these three games? Houston is nine outs away from finishing office. Sweep of the Indians four to two two score. Margie Maldonado comes into catch as we would expect after Tyler white bid for Brian McCann McHugh is still in the game on the mound. Although the Astros have two pitchers of the bullpen. What is their only

Astros Margie Maldonado Arlen Gonzales Brian Mccann Mchugh Cleveland Tyler White Houston