32 Burst results for "Arlen"

Vinturas  finished vehicle supply chain on the blockchain

Insureblocks

08:56 min | 6 months ago

Vinturas finished vehicle supply chain on the blockchain

"We will be discussing into us. Finished vehicle supply chain on the blockchain. And I'm very pleased to have John Cooper. Ceo US. John. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners cooking deduction on yourself? Yes thank you very much. My name is Sean Kapoor. And since one year she of Fin Tunas Beck around in Finnish vehicle just as a CEO of one of the leading logistics service providers in this industry before this worked for many years in corporate jobs in mostly operations and supply chain great great. Thank you very much for that. So could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work? Yeah I'm sure many of your listeners have read and heard about blockchain and basically I can tell you what blockchain means means for us in our in our business segment of supply chain for finished vehicle. Logistics important for us is the book chain of course distributed. Let let your infrastructure but it allows us to create an infrastructure where we can truly collaborate with each other as logistics providers basically as all stakeholders in the ecosystem and through an in-depth collaboration define a single through some older transactional processes that are happening in the Finnish. Vehicle supply chain. I'll probably get your community from you to explain later. What exactly that means. But this is what blockchain technology means for us in a Finnish vehicles by chain drake. Thank you very much for that. So I read a study by the global market insights that value the automotive logistics markets size at over one hundred fifteen billion dollars in two thousand eighteen and it is estimated to grow to one hundred seventy billion dollars by two thousand twenty five. Could you tell us a little bit about the finished? Vehicles supply chain industry and some of the challenges it faces from a high level perspective. Lease happily do basically if you look to this very important industry segment. Of course you see the changes in your motive in the Swedish everybody sees the move to mobility services to move to electric etc and becomes more more about loving the brands than loving the product in in terms of mobility. Move to mobility services. And what you see that changing segment is a few key issues. Few key themes one. If the one is to structure lack of real time supply chain visibility can a dinner at least in Europe. Tell you exactly where that you've ordered from the factory on its way to the leader. You're the challenges. Of course. It's normal pressure on reducing the cost infrastructure for oems and combined the significant amount of inefficiency that we have because of scattered supply chain lots of paperwork etc and thirdly to challenge we have in Europe is the fact that he remarketing industry company selling cars. Let's say lease companies or rental companies selling cars after the initial us into Europe. This is really become a European market Europe market as a structural lack of collaboration transport capacity and end to end visibility for this specific industry segment. Great great let's. Let's take each of these three points one by one and so the first one by the structural lack of real time supply chain visibility. Now I understand that when new vehicle is generally distributed by three to four logistics providers also known. Lsp's before he had arrived at its final destination that most of these processes are executed via paper based ones. Could he tell us a little bit more about it? And what are the outcomes issues of that? Yeah indeed in the process from factory to dealer. There are multiple handover points between different logistics services provided to you think about officials to transport vehicles from for example a UK manufacturing site to European continent onto a terminal onto a trick of yet another service provider. Multiple handover points that are managed historically because Infortunately this industry suffers from a lot of legacy systems in suppliers but also in so for months standardized data exchange and also suffers from the fact that all these handover processes are done by paper. The result of that is that. Oem's don't have real end to end real time visibility auto supply chain and result that is also that dealer when he's ordered from the factory often knows when it is manufactured that not when will actually arrive for the customer and as a consequence of that data. Kennel plan to the last mile processes like adding towbar ordering formats. Most important more important telling the customer wind equal arrived can use it when he goes on holiday so this is pretty crazy because in a sense you know most customers are are used to an Amazon shopping experience. Where you can trace you know. Virtually by our where your product is is not a big issue with regards to logistical problem. And how the GUZM receptionist of it you can almost. It's unacceptable that in this industry. This service does not exist yet. Where Technology of course enables this And it's not. It's not rocket science to implementers a structure like this industry. So we thought this is to start off interest and we'll talk about later we need. We need to move the needle here. We need to do with. Technology enables and to provide to our customers exactly and now. I also understand that. Oem's original equipment. I factors along with fleet owners have tried for decades and to improve their cost base by tendering for activities in a logistical process. Why has why has that been a success? Yeah you're right. And certainly when when like everybody we are looking for breakthrough cost reductions further tendering and tendering basically asking every company who can drive as at the lowest cost from eight to be just not really create value in industry. And of course if you tender you do not optimize your networks. You do not take out wasting the process you just pushing on the same bits. And all the time they'll the margins are so low that it cannot investing in technology solutions. You never got the breakthrough solutions that you're looking for And and the third challenge the explained is the one around the European remarketing industry. Now what do you mean by that Remarks basically of course since Internet's is available for everybody in everywhere in the market for selling used vehicles? Let's say he actually vehicles for years old. This market has become truly European. It means you can sell a folks wagon Polo in Poland at a better price. Then you can in Spain so this leads to a lot of transport requirements and a lot of cross-border traffic and especially in this traffic a lot of issues with fraud on used vehicles. Most of his notice seems mild Florida's most. Most people are familiar wits. If you buy a used car you also need to be careful. That the Marlins is okay but also a lot of issues and throw it in cross-border traffic as importer import taxes. Importation you had high fell U S. It's so generally speaking throat delivers a lot of value for people want to act fraudulently. Now when when we're talking about remarking are we talking like you know Consumer to consumer where I can sell a car my car just someone arlen or someone in France or are we talking. More like bb name where its fleet? Managers selling their cars to two other companies. It's basically a B. Two B. companies selling their used vehicles to other companies other other parts of European countries of Europe and basically all these companies after objective to act interior to have just could business but many of many things many processors that are running are invisible in other words. If I sell to somebody in another country you accept my offer for car I sell. I can get my money. I cannot see the fraud that is behind his like for example the mileage for fraud so many B. to B. Companies in Europe. In general terms are looking for really solutions eliminate fraud in these processes.

Europe CEO Fraud John Cooper OEM United States Sean Kapoor Fin Tunas Beck Marlins UK Florida LSP Infortunately Spain Amazon
Atlanta Falcons likely to cut running back Devonta Freeman this offseason

WAOK Programming

03:27 min | 6 months ago

Atlanta Falcons likely to cut running back Devonta Freeman this offseason

"CBSSports dot com as an article talking about house bobbins running back with Montee Freeman who would it be a crap casual T. this is Jason but of the athletic reporting that the falcons are looking at potentially letting go of the running back with just a couple years ago signed a five year forty one point two five million dollar extension yes No guarantees left on his deal if you work cut it that would clear out three point five million dollars in twenty twenty cap space but it go you do it right with like the view wait long enough I should say as high as six and a half million dollars in terms of free cap space this off season I would be very surprised very surprised the fathers do not go ahead and let go of the Monte Freeman who would get had a really really great twenty sixteen and honestly not bad twenty seventeen as well the only missed two games twenty eighteen we played into and this year he played in fourteen two rushing touchdowns three point six yards per rush six hundred and fifty six for your this is not the type of numbers that you need from your number one right back I think you cut out the freemen and then if you do what we've been preaching here are ready might Marshall just that in my you're my producer you go get a running back Dion race with Jonathan Taylor JK Dobbins doesn't matter who you want of all the good running backs in the draft this year there's a bunch of them so spend your third round draft pick maybe spend a second round draft pick you're gonna have to get someone who's going to come right in and produced in the modern NFL there are very few positions we can come in and immediately ball out running back is one of the but you mean very rarely get a real star on the defensive line who's not a top three pick like you can get a good pass rusher well then he becomes a good pass rusher but you're one not a lot of flash corners a little bit if the wide receiver is very it be very rarely do rookie wide receivers absolutely ball out Odell Beckham junior is the only one in recent memory who has dominated since his rookie year office of line that yes they can play well quarterbacks yes they can play well but running back time and time again as rookies get out massive impacting sake one Barkley and I was his best your big bile Sanders who led the total I guess yards from scrimmage record by a rookie in twenty nineteen a huge upper Philadelphian get a running back like Sanders in the second round if you're at Lana and add instant impact going forward in the twenty twenty season I am okay with the report from the athletic chastened by that they are deciding on ten truly letting go of the body Freeman having it be a cap casualty I think that'd be the smart move by Arlen about and we appreciate Freeman radically to focus on getting better in terms of the running game because as your quarterback ages just like just like that rise doing still great still leak but aging you got to help me out with the running back with the patriots day was suddenly showing Tom Brady they had not gotten a hot first round draft pick the patriots had not been a first round draft going to running back I think ever I can't remember the last time is there a first round draft a couple years ago the first round Brady third age but he was shot in Georgia and its work but shells not super good he's not with the top five running backs in the league we could make an argument a top ten top twelve running back the opposite of policy with their aging quarterback in Matt Ryan go get a running back I don't care if it's Dobbins I don't care if it's Taylor I don't care if it's with any of those three will be just fine by need going for here and the twenty twenty season

Montee Freeman
"arlen" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

15:30 min | 7 months ago

"arlen" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"A reporting GIG for the Special Olympic World Games that were that we were kind of the first year that we were doing it and so that was ultimately my tryout and Until I was twenty training I went to this crash. Course on how you reporter how to hold the microphone. How ask yourself health and and And just kind of dove in and had some really cool people just believe in me and and you know helped me believe in myself and then it just kind of started me on this this path that that I I just couldn't couldn't even begin to imagine at the same time I'm just I'm just so grateful and it just ignited something completely different and and so Yeah Kinda how it started and then now I can tell you now. I know how to hold the microphone. And you look at some of my early gigs. Like I think my birthday on the job at Michael Phelps and he knows how to hold the microphone and I just looked like lollipop but I love that because so many of us that got started got to get started somewhere where he'd have to really look to find the footage and you're like no I think I'll just start at the worldwide leader at age twenty so I have to ask the so you started out doing I think Special Olympics coverage right. Yes okay so at some point were you. Were you thinking okay like sports and presumably since you caught up on your cooking acknowledging what was going on in the world you also kept up with sports. That was on the news while you were but you're still only twenty years old and you hadn't dedicated yourself to that. So how much did you. You have to just learn about the teams and players in. Because now you're doing much more than just covering Special Olympics. Now it was kind of all around I just I just honestly became a a bit of a sponge and just I kept shadowing people and then kept asking questions and I kept kind of immersing myself in it and then really just ask questions and I was. I was very fortunate. I think being you know kid on campus as some would say A lot of people took me under their wing. And so I really got to learn from people and listen I and and see okay. This is how this works. This is how I should. This is where I should go and kind of learn about this and so for me it was just it was like schooling for me like we. My boss always joke it's like it's like ESPN university. He knows me it was it was not just my job. I was also kind of learning and and going to school too so for me. It was just kind of diving diving living in kind of like what I did with swimming where it was just an all in like I had to just jump in and go for it so I really kind of did the same there and continue to do so and and I just hung unclassified recently. I'm like I think I'm out of elementary school now. Middle School Nice and just continue to grow and evolve and find my voice so it's April of two thousand sixteen it's been I don't know six or seven months since you. I felt a flicker of a muscle in your leg. Which really inspired you to say okay? I'm getting out of this wheelchair. This therapy is gonNA work. And by April of two thousand sixteen you were able to walk but with no sensation in your legs and that's still how it is right. So you're walking out being able to feel your legs like if someone kicked you in the locker you stub your toe or something you know and my my foot was run over by a golf occurred over the summer and I had no idea. Oh my God I had a phone conversation with someone and then I was like excuse over my foot my road like wolves and I was like well. Okay right okay. So but how does that work. It's it's just like it's sort of like when people have a per static and there exists candidates muscle memory. I think yeah yeah. I don't know that I give the worst answers with them like they just work. I don't no. I think it's just muscle memory. I think I just learned how to walk without feeling so I think to be more foreign to feel my legs than not you start out with with you in traction action and other people are moving your legs. Yeah and then and then we just kind of tried to find make those connections again like with the talking and everything else too right so then you go on dancing with the stars which is hard enough for people who can feel their legs and just have bad rhythm but you go on and you get fifth in the competition petition. What's crazy is I've seen every season of dancing with the stars and you and I met before you were on that show and I still have no idea why that's the only season I haven't watched? It was very strange. What I think you uh-huh and it's really weird because I've seen like every season except for two I think and I yeah? I was so bummed afterwards when I realized you were on it was like what was I doing with my life. I think it was like I was deep deep deep into this story that I was reporting on that spent. I spent many months on and I think I just didn't have time to like even see the commercials where they said who was on it because I remember it was like six or seven episodes. And I'm like wait. Victoria's on this that's amazing. I got a lot of like wait. You're doing yeah yeah okay so quick and dirty because we're running out of time and there's a couple of things I want to get to but tell me about the incredible amount of press that you did the physical work. What was it like? Yeah it was a lot I mean I think the one they asked me to do the show my my agent called me and you can you. Can you even do this. And I don't think yeah sure let's go for it and then my first day My partner like twirled me and I fell over and I was like okay. You do this. It's really really hard to dance when you don't know where your feet are not only been walking without any support for about just over a year so it was a very quick turnaround but I just kind of went for it and I was very fortunate. How a really fun partners? who was very much like all right? Let's figure this out. Let's come up with a system and it was really fun I mean it. There's a lot because it definitely put me in a whole different level of notoriety and just being my little turtle shell anymore But at the same time gave a lot of people I hope and I got to meet some incredible people but also here incredible stories as well and it was so much more than than dancing if you will but but the physicality is is rough but I mean like I broke ribs you you you know your knees go and everything Kinda went. 'cause I I really hadn't used like that ever. No one moves like that happened then when you sit in a wheelchair for ten years and then just decide. You're going to dance for six hours. A day takes a toll but it was fun. It was amazing. It was such an incredible experience. You Remember Amy. Purdy was one of my favorites because of the creativity around what she couldn't do with her prosthetics. And the beautiful finale. They had with the sort of sheets that she was like flying in the air and didn't even need her legs so that showed us some really remarkable things in sort of elevating. The stories of people like you so you did tons of press. Then you're talking to me again. There's so much conversation for you about what happened when you were eleven. Now you're only twenty five. You're still a kid like I can't even believe all the things is that you're doing when I was twenty five. I still WANNA be like. We're my drinking today But you have to revisit that trauma and it's ultimately intimately story that you came out of and it is incredibly inspirational and your attitude. Seems remarkable about it but you acknowledged and being able to work through what it means is to have to revisit and talk about it all the time. Yeah I had to. I had to take some time after that to just kind of process all of it and also adapt to this new normal and be more out there So I think my family really rallied around me and also said hey we gotta we gotTa make sure you're good But I also oh I think it's all about perspective so for me. It was learning to embrace all of that and kind of find the good and find the purpose for the pain and and move forward with it. So it wasn't wasn't I mean it wasn't easy but at the same time it was it was worth it and it was something that needed to be done. So I think processing it but also being being more opening honorable to and knowing doing that. Look your story doesn't define you define you get to defy it and make it your own and so I think realizing not an embracing that was really really crucial. Yeah have you been in therapy at all after coming out. I tried and it just it wasn't it. I spent the whole time kind of explaining planning it and then as I'd be explaining well this why appealing this land and this is. Why feeling that way? I'm very fortunate that my mom and my grandma are are kind of my rocks Fox and people I can talk to you and and process it with so I found that was really helpful and finding kind of my little my my tight circle that I could process an and talk about to I on that way to be way more productive than you're trying to explain it to someone else well and it's amazing that you have those people because then you can sort of work your way through it at your time and with people exactly yeah what are the lasting effects to this day other than you know the lack of sensation in your likes physically. Are there things that pop back up as a result of damage that was done to your body during that stretch from time to time I'll get little neuro flare up but it's really mainly just not feeling my legs and then sometimes they'll stab them or act but knock on wood. I'm very very fortunate that I'm I'm pretty pretty in in the clear and not done so I can kind of move on and move forward without really any super significant lasting effects. Have they used used anything. Relating to your case especially now that it's so high profile and you've done so much media to sort of inform how they treat similar things or even you know I I would imagine the hospitals. You're in the people that you worked with. There might be a reckoning for how you treat patients that are in that state. Yeah I mean I definitely have been unable to have conversations and and there's definitely a lot more knowledge about the conditions and also about treating people just with respect to in those situation so I I think so. I think I've I've found that very productive and and my story has definitely helped in that sense and I think it's still an evolving anything The people are getting definitely getting treated quicker and I think people are getting treated better care which is really all that I can ask for. Yeah there weren't any issues news of abuse or anything. It was psychological or mental or just language essentially when you were dealing with the doctors and nurses. Yeah it was kind of all all the above but there weren't there wasn't physical abusive. You because of of you not being able to speak or because I mean there was. Yeah if you if you spot God. I'm so sorry to hear that. That's just awful and I understand you not wanting to dwell on that but the farther away from it that you get the more are are. You may be inspired to on a speak out about it or or do something so that that doesn't happen in the future. They think I've done a lot more of that behind the scenes. Okay that's had a lot more conversations on that behind the scenes I think revisiting the past publicly is not my favorite thing to do right But I things behind the scenes. I've done a lot of work behind. Not In fact one you know Costal Care Center got actually shut down So it's been a lot behind the scenes But that's not something I I you know. I put out in the public but I think behind the scenes my family myself and people around me. We've really worked on trying to create more awareness but also just give people respect and and support in a voice who don't have one so that's been something I've done more behind the seems Not necessarily in in the public eye while in your story the book that you wrote locked in and actually vow chmerkovskiy Makovsky your partner from dancing with the stars wrote the forward which I love that. I'm sure is a great resource for people and Inspiration to people who are dealing with something similar or their loved ones dealing with something something similar So you wrote a book which again you're twenty five. I mean can we leave some stuff for later and clothing line with jockey. You're the face of Jockey. Tell tell me about this. Yes that was a very crazy Crazy phone call but yeah Jackie. It's been incredible. It's never really fun. Partnership with them..

Olympics partner Michael Phelps reporter ESPN Middle School Costal Care Center Victoria Jackie Purdy Amy Fox
"arlen" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

11:06 min | 7 months ago

"arlen" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"They can't have a dog and I want a dog but it might travel schedule for them from having coffee okay. This is a tough one because I definitely don't want anyone getting a dog if they don't have the time and money and love to give it a great life of course most rescue dogs would be happy to just have a bed sleeping an and a best friend to snuggle not to mention that opens up space in a shelter for another dog to be saved. But I get it if you're alone and you travel all the time and you have no one to take care of your pooch maybe now is the right time. But don't wait too long because I think sometimes getting a dog is just the thing to teach people responsibility unselfishness and commitment back when Brad. It was just my boyfriend. We got our first dog. We learned about that. You know we couldn't be away from home as long had to go outside in the cold to walk and pick up the POOP. Get the medications that but but one dog turned into to turned into three now. I'm just officially crazy dog lady and I miss them if I'm out of town for like one day so don't wait too long and when you do make sure you adopt. I don't shop. Thousands of amazing dogs unfortunately are dying every day so go be a hero and get a rescue dog and they will repay you a million times over in love I promise does. The Commission has spoken my guest. Today is Victoria Arlen and ESPN host actress speaker and author. She's also the face of jockey and a former gold gold-medal-winning Paralympic swimmer on a few of the recent episodes. Here we've talked about stuff like setting goals changing your habits. Not letting self-created barriers keep us from achieving achieving things you remember Lizzy Cutler talked about finding the thing inside you that. Has You convinced that you can't quit the job you hate or start marathon training or find love. What have you put put in your own way? Because you're too scared to put yourself out there and go for it well. This is another listened that I think is going to move you towards change and belief in yourself in fact I hope it's what former guest Gretchen. Rubin called a lightning bolt moment. I hope when you hear Victoria Story and her resilience and recurring. You'll kind of snap out of your days. It'll inspire you to stop making making excuses. Remind you that you're in control of how you react to what happens to you. And what's in front of you. Because Victoria was eleven years old when she fell ill with to who rare diseases. She lost the ability to speak eat. Walk move she slipped into a vegetative state and doctors told her family she would not be saved but meanwhile she could hear and see everything she spent four years in a locked in state in her own body completely aware of what was going on but not able to move or communicate so so in this. We talked about the abuse that she suffered at the hands of doctors and nurses while she was in that state her frustrating but inspiring battle to relearn how to eat and talk and walk how how she became the youngest host at ESPN and then did dancing with the stars just a year after learning how to walk without support and how that experience changed her life. Victorious doesn't interview. If you're ever having a bad day just scratch your nose and imagine how frustrating it was to not even be able to do that. Yeah that stuck with me. Her incredible unbelievable achievable stories should move. Anyone who hears it and hopefully make them stop making excuses. Start dreaming really big like she was and then take the first step toward breaking down those barriers that they've put in the way of success and happiness. I promise you guys are going to love this interview. That's what she said. So full disclosure. I've been trying to have Victorian this podcast for at least a year and a half I think now I have been hounded and she's so busy she's writing books and working with jockey and working for ESPN. But I finally tracked her down and actually the timing thing is perfect because I love her story of reinvention her inspirational fight back and think anybody out there who has a tendency to you fall into the lowest category or feel like things are tough and they can't fight through them will be greatly served by this and anybody really hearing her story and the amazing things that she's is doing now so I'm excited to finally get you on Victoria. Were have you need this year. Yeah you've been very very busy busy so I don't blame you at all and I know we could spend like a full hour just talking about your love of donuts but I will try to let them know that yes. Focus on other things. You've told your story of growing up so many times but for those who haven't heard it. I think it's so necessary to give it the time that it needs and and really get into a but let's talk about before before the illness so use regular kit your triplet with two brothers so tell me about what you like as a kid. Yeah so I'm I'm a triple. I've got to have an older brother WHO's six years older than me. Still I was growing up I was always trying to keep up with the boys and very competitive have And just I love. I had this passion for sports and the passion for just kind of kind of just going for it Even even at a very young age five years old. I've very matter of factly now. My mom that I was going to win a gold medal and he was like Oh okay and just was like okay and then just use like you literally just walked out the room and then drew it on a piece of paper and through some glitter on it and put it on your door and so I think growing up I always just had this a lot of dreams and goals and aspirations that I also have three brothers that I had to keep up with as well so I really just I loved. I loved being active. I love kind. I mean it's hard to say 'cause it's like up until eleven eleven but I'd say pretty normal childhood just very competitive and and I was really the kid that never got sick. The ironic thing so But yeah just pretty normal Kiddo. With a lot of energy my mom was like we always just had to try to contain you at night. 'cause I just wanted to like go constantly. Was Your family into sports quartz. Is that how you got those big dreams of the Olympics early on. Yeah Yeah my dad. My Dad was very involved in the in the hockey world and then Both coaching and playing so he. He was big into that. So like at the age of three all my brothers we all learned to play and got certain staff and my mom was so both. It's my parents were collegiate athletes and my mom was was a swimmer. And so I in order to like steal her away from the boys. I took up swimming in the. I love the water from a very young age region so swimming was kind of our thing her and I and so I think we we. We're from your you know kind of brought up where you just play different sports and you see what you like and and And sports where huge part I think for for all of us and then even when it wasn't necessarily an organized sport my brothers and I were still going out and just kind of moving and being active. Yeah we're through. Definitely a huge part of my family's life explains de tremendous success that you had later okay. So you're just living a normal life. Keeping up with the brothers is tons of activity and tell me what happened at age eleven. Yes so we just come back from a trip to Disney and And I woke up and I just was feeling off but I had been having this whole the whole year prior I'd been having had been having different random symptoms I developed. Asthma is my I started having These random painting sells and I would get the flu or pneumonia so I was constantly kind of something coming up every couple of weeks but no one really saw so anything of it. Because I was still you know doing long sports doing one school and I just kind of get set back a couple of days and then bounce back and so this went on for good eight eight or nine eight or nine months almost a year and then And then we came back from a trip to Disney. You know look like something. Something's wrong and so they thought they had you know a little tummy bug and then couple days go by and the pains on my right side. So they're like okay. I think he might have decided so. We went to the hospital and they thought it was appendicitis undecided and then they took my panics and that kind of was the catalyst that started kind of storm if you will and then Within a couple of weeks anything I lost ost like speaking. I lost a significant amount of weight so I was very kind of became very frail and not super energetic and then my legs very quickly started it giving out as well so everything just kinda started dwindling. I went from completely healthy to us in three months completely unresponsive so it happened very quickly but no no one really knew what was going on and so The doctors have I. If you can believe this I thought I was doing for attention and actually miss a very crucial crucial treatment window for these two rare conditions. At the time. Those they weren't they weren't very talked about so it was kind of one of those. You Know Roulette Games if you will. But what we learned is that if doctors don't know what's going on they tend to kind of throw the blame back at you and then it wasn't until I was completely unresponsive John so that they're like something's seriously wrong and then eventually put the pieces of the puzzle together and then it was kind of it was the the kind of the the ending result adult was this was a lost cause there was really nothing they could do before the diagnosis. Did they give your family any reason to say that they thought you would be faking aching and did they talk to your family at all about who you were as a kid and a person and if there would be a reason to believe that you would be faking this know like they try to dive in and say you know. Does she have any issues and stuff and my mom's like well no she afraid of thunderstorms so they. They really were kind of pulling strings at that but they're really just didn't know L.. What was what was going on? And and especially now as as I as you know going going and sitting down with doctors. They're like unfortunately that's it's kind of the cop out is to say that. Oh they're just doing it for attention and so and there's a lot of kind of you know we're we're dealing with these big name hospitals with With doctors who was significant egos so they really didn't want to admit that they didn't know what was wrong And then like wait and later on admit so So so yeah I mean there was no reason like my mom was like there was literally nothing like she's like they they couldn't there was no grounds for but at the same time they also didn't know what was is going on for everything. Yeah so yeah I said there was a there was a possibility that they could have administered a steroid early. John had they been able to tell what it was which they're clearly doing their best to try to figure out what's going on with you on but there was a missed window that could've avoided everything. Yeah the The there is a missed because of the so we didn't and we didn't find this out until twenty fourteen at all because I've been avoided so we ah the the window of when The initial onto the paralysis to to vegetative state was a crucial window where a single round. The steroids probably could've stopped completely They didn't they didn't instead of sending me to enroll just got sent to the psychologist so it really wasn't. It wasn't if it was if it had happened. Now there's so much knowledge on these different neurological autoimmune conditions that you kind of know that's the first thing to do but this was back in two thousand six so it wasn't super known on and super acknowledged either But yeah the. Steroids could've could've prevented it entirely. So what are the two conditions that you ended up being.

ESPN John Victoria Story Brad gold medal Victoria Victoria Arlen hockey Lizzy Cutler Disney Gretchen appendicitis Rubin Olympics flu Asthma
Making sense of the Brexit confusion

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:55 min | 10 months ago

Making sense of the Brexit confusion

"Turn now to today's top story you'd be fooled into thinking that you k. was in full campaigning mode by this weekend papers depending spending which paper you picked up the Conservative Party was going to promise you the moon or destroy civilization labor either had the beginnings of a pasta victory or already dead and unburied and Nigel farage from the Brexit party isn't going to stand for parliament but he's not going to go away so Vince macaroni. UK correspondent for your news joins me in the studio here to make sense of a rather messy weekend welcome back to the Vincent the the thing that everybody's talking about this weekend is that despite the fact that it is brexit has brought brought us to this general election in the United Kingdom everybody is determined not to be an election about brexit overseas are trying to shift the focus back onto domestic guess used as the feeling in the country too much of the national broadband has been taken up the bandwidth being taken up five brexit for years and years is now and they want to hear the party's plans for other services they want to hear about education any chest police because there is a feeling that after ten years of parity these services are very much at the point of collapse and so I think my understanding is Labor will try very much to in the next two days to get the brexit part of the election done do do that big speech and then try to move on from that and talk about other issues the Denver through interesting of surprise that they actually put brexit in their in their main party slogan last week they are very much thinking that if they hone in on the Brexit message that that could be there rock wall like it was in the two thousands that got them under Charles Kennedy and Nick Clegg up two numbers kind of approaching sixty and if they have a very clear simple message and they will to other policies but if they are the anti brexit party that will give them a huge boost in numbers and along with the SNP it could be those two parties that decide the course of what happens at the end of this election indeed the political world at the moment is shifting to the point where we have how many people now who have left their respective parties to join the Liberal Democrats in order to buy into this this anti brexit ticket we've seen an awful lot of people who would say with Bush sort of Brexit moderates have moved over quite a few figures moved over this weekend as well didn't they yes we had more switches happening but also the big thing as well to watch as the number of resignations that's taking cases is pretty extraordinary you're seeing kind of root out of women in parliament something that Theresa may too low touched to help get in but you're saying on the conservative side of moderate women like Nicky Morgan who currently sits in cabinet it is going Margaret James was a successful businesswoman also algae bt woman she says that the abuse and talk nature parliament's got too much she is going You need likes Angora Justine greening you're seeing real kind of carve out long Ken Clarke as well of the kind of the the Severo file centrist camera night position in the party just suddenly being kind of removing themselves from it one of the key voices in that was dominic grieve is a former attorney general here in the United Kingdom them kicked out of the Conservative Party voting against Boris Johnson a now making a very strong point which suddenly places a British election or other international personal life is called for the publication of a report on Russian meddling in the democratic process in the UK to be published before the general election. Boris Johnson has said no it Trumpian echoes it it does embarrassed I mean the the problem is you know report tells you what went wrong it doesn't help you set up the procedures you need to change and protect for tech something for future so whilst it would be handy to know I mean I think all of the parties will be taking you know improve security measures to make sure that they're not oh getting hacked as we've seen other elections being where you know the DNC and the US was hacked but yeah there is a question mark about social media we know that twitter has decided it won't Muskrats I mean that wasn't a massive issue here I think in in the UK you know the numbers on twitter actually quite small when you step outside of Westminster bubble it's not it's not the whole population but yeah we all uh-huh very curious to see what it is that is happening on facebook because the problem is that you or I are not seeing the APPS that certain people James and Scunthorpe and Tom in Wales and and Julie Danas brightness saying because of this micro targeting that is going on in that still hasn't been cleared up it would be interesting to know especially with the kind of talk now the pressure being put on facebook iceberg and other countries in Europe having blocks facebook from running class I think Arlen and France with the two in recent elections that have blocked whether the UK should've said until this this problem is cleared up we do this but at the moment all the polls looking so tight and I think all the parties will be worried by the poll numbers at the weekend especially going towards possibly hung parliaments parliament's that they're all keeping mum on their social media activties thing that was raised this weekend was the the Joe Promise it Boris Johnson in had given been given the gave rather diner dej then stay in the European Union post the thirty first of all I'm currently unite currently sitting in London were still part of the European Union check my calendar country disappointed around the country expressing the defections Liberal Democrats there was he gave even into yesterday for the first guy and the interviewer asked him if he was if he would apologize for effectively breaking a fundamental promises miss that he had repeated and repeated and repeated and this is what he said this study I do I do and I'm deeply deeply deeply disappointed and I had to consider sorry yes absolutely right then do we consider that to be an apology or is this is someone who's sort of off off record half acknowledging the problem I think as far as half ignoring the problem and I think this might come into the four of this election Boris Johnson have a line for decades that his personal life private life is personal and he's not going to discuss it and he's not someone who stands on election and preaches family values I use but when it comes to this issue of trust and the scrutiny of someone's personal life that is fair game in a general election when you're trying to become the Alito country his election the Tories was only around one hundred forty thousand in the end his electric this time is millions and millions of people and they have a right to know the character the person that is leading country I think Boris Johnson is going to struggle struggled in that interview particularly the sort of talk to sort of he had to four times say he wasn't he was asked four times about ruling out to this Scottish referendum for independence and he wouldn't do that because he knows he might have packed with the SNP and then later on clarified obsessions Shinzo did rule out because the interview was very it was very boris trying to office gate trying to dither and trying to get away from things I think he's going to face in the coming weeks some pretty harsh questions about his almosty his relationship with truth the people that he has misled recently a court found her majesty the Queen and the way that he's conducted his personal life we're in different world though now and not many people actually care about such things it would in the old days have hats it's on quickly booted out of number ten you say that then of support for Johnson but I'm not I'm not saying that the conduct itself is what will turn people off I think it is putting a question mark above his head that he may not be someone to trust and the way he is treated family and friends uh-huh means that believing what he's saying is very hard and when he's giving interviews like that one yesterday to say for Ridge on sky in which he seems very evasive I don't think about will help is 'cause neither will Nigel farage who the leader of the brexit party and someone who keeps appearing on television screens an awful lot despite the fact that he isn't actually a member of parliament is and nor does he intend to be an an MP this timer I mean first of all a very curious decision he'd he'd obviously looked at the polling and brexit party had dipped down over the weekend in the polls he's someone who's previously run for parliament seven times and been rejected five elections to buy collections and being an MVP There is a lot less scrutiny than being an MP but an MBA in this country means that you have to declare your finances you you had to declare your interest you will say are accountable to constituents I mean I I for one cannot envision Nigel farage running Friday constituency surgeries and trying to help other people people have problems Nigel Farraj is probably a broadcaster these days first and foremost as well as a kind of media figure and I think it's very interesting how can you I'm I'm an send the latest say they're going to release their sort of six hundred fifty candidates they're gonNA run up and down the country they have given Boris Johnson is two weeks window to drop his deal and then they could form an alliance Donald Donald Trump is once again over the weekend probably frogs etchings toll bars you know do deal with this Guy Nigel but for Nigel how can you say that you're launching a national national domestic policy and not want to be the leader of it in the House of Commons how can you how can you be doing that how come the public you you seriously as a political force when you yourself are doing it and I think they did sweep the MVP elections earlier in the year I went to one of their events in the candidates some optic strong one referring to Africa as a country rather than the continent on stage not being corrected not correcting herself and I think the scrutiny that comes by being an MP is far more the running for an Emmy Pena's country and the caliber of the candidates might not be as strong they might not be as well vetted and I think think that some of them will be sort of par local hustings did some macaroni from urine you thank you very much indeed for journeys monocle twenty

Boris Johnson Conservative Party Nigel Farage Brexit UK Vince Macaroni Trumpian Ten Years Two Weeks Two Days
"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

07:47 min | 10 months ago

"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

"But what would I mistake a big Mac for a stake. Peter Luger's consider the best New York state. No I love love both. I love a great steak and I like big Mac but I would never claim a big Mac is as great as Peter. Luger's stay yes. It's great as a big back but you know what I mean. It's still a big Mac. It's not a great state and yes a great state doesn't have the entre. It's of a a big Mac. A great baked potato is not shoestring fries. They're both potato. So you got to draw the stations. We can't mistake our love for comics superheroes to cloud our judgment which is basically what's happened with fan boys declaring airing avengers endgame. Oh I cried at the end when Robert Downey died. Like I didn't see that coming as David. Letterman used to say coming down Fifth Avenue. You know it was coming. It's there's no surprises. You only get great drama when it hits you when you didn't expect it to you. That's great storytelling. You know we all knew going into it arrived down I I mean that John Mara. That's not great art. That's not great film. Cool he cl eating including living thoughts well specifically about the joker the reason why we're having this discussion. It's because and I thought it's ironic. Because not only was Scorsese. I think involve that he was like a a silent partner in the film or something but the whole film is an amish to his. What I believe is his masterpiece which is King of comedy in Nineteen Eighty two? It's not goodfellas. This is not as you know gangster movies and if you've never sinking of comedy I mean it's such a brilliant film because it lays out the themes of our age alienate all the themes that the joke was about. It paid homage to King of comedy with a lot of taxi driver. Obviously so for score says they'd come. I'm an say. Competent movies are not real cinema. I thought was a kind of a very sly way of promoting the joker film because the joker is it is a great film because Todd Phillips basically sat down with code with Scott silver somebody like that and basically I think. The premise was in the real world that we live. In what circumstances would create a psychotic Khattak murderous villain like the joker these are things that heath ledgers performance hinted at what Brian Boland's Poland and Alan. Moore's killing joke hinted at with a more realistic version of jokers origin. But with Phillips and silver did with but this one was sit down with Joaquin Phoenix who should definitely Oscar for this performance. And basically say we're going to try to show show the world how a character like the joker if he really existed which is really again the bottom line premise of the watchman. The last thirty plus years we've been living in the genre of what if superheroes existed in the real world. which by the way those back to the Revolution Marvel Comics? It's which was the first realistic take on superheroes. We're spiderman decides the minute he gets powers. I'm not going to fight crime like those. DC Comics. It's I'm I'm GONNA make money. He goes on. TV was reality TV fifty years ahead of its time. But I digress. The point about joker is it's so brilliantly lays is out what circumstances would create a joker in a way that makes you feel something because of what finally me. A great actor is in a calm of movie and makes a great performance because it transcended John Nra and became a great film about a character. Study of a murderous lunatic but why he became a murderous lunatic. What does art do? It makes us understand Dan. The human condition it gives us insight into what makes us it makes us reflect. Are we a little bit of the joker. I I mean I gotTa tell you there were moments in the joker where I was reflecting on my own life and how g their times I feel isolated and alone you know and things like that I mean. That's what great art does. You're supposed to look at a painting in a museum and feel something make it reflect back wire great songs. A Song writer writes a great song. Once it goes out on the airwaves listeners. Take it and they inject themselves into into it. That is the process of art itself that's the Arctic processes of art. That makes us feel things so to sum up up. Yeah most super movies if not all of them. Don't really do that. But the joker ironically about a villain now can they do good. Can't they do a movie like the joker about a hero and really make us feel what the hero feels. That is the challenge Allen Jr because face it a villain meteor. It's hard to the hero. And that's why Sean Connery was always underrated as a great actor because the hero it roll seem simpler to play. But it's not it's very subtle whereas resume villain can chew up the scenery a little bit. But I digress and of course here Plug my plug. She had never thought Well it a book on Competent History Silverado comprador which is treating the Ark of Comic Book Art Great Art and places I take out the word balloons and I put the artist talking about the art on his jokes. Hubert spread right. You go to my website. It's linked to my book site where you can order book directly from me aside and sketch veteran it so it's Arlen Schumer Dot Com. Make sure you spell Schumer like chuck. Amy H. E. R.. And my first same Orland and that's leaked to youtube channel from my homepage. Might twilight zone works my work somber springsteen they're all there and then in terms terms of selling stuff most of my illustrations of men. My Bruce springsteen illustrations are on my merchandise site which is called pop culture man dot Com. I secured that name like a dozen years ago. I never did anything with it because I consider myself kind of pop culture man and so that's where all my posters and t shirts of a illustrations are so as after a blood pretty so of course he dreaded if you liked what you heard and you want to hear a little bit more if you chips get some education I think the show notes on this absurd definitely GonNa be worth Lissette. Please checking out at Patriot dot com slash cheuse gross G._W. uh-huh and thinks for how things were coming on..

joker Peter Luger Arlen Schumer Bruce springsteen John Mara DC Comics Patriot dot New York Robert Downey Todd Phillips Sean Connery Scorsese Letterman youtube David Joaquin Phoenix partner Amy H. E. R
"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

14:58 min | 10 months ago

"arlen" Discussed on Webcomics Reviews And Interviews

"Hi It's Jamie Joking hosted Web Comic Union views today with Arlen Schumer pop culture historian so sit back relax. SBN AJ was. Thanks for having me on man. Okay and we used Heflin introducing yourself. Yeah by Arlen Schumer. I've actually illustrator. Oh straighter member of the society traitors in New York and I've work in comic book style at the same time. I have a sort of twin career here as a pop culture story. I just got my MFA. So I can teach this kind of pop culture college level hopefully and my three areas areas of interest. That are like my three children. You can't decide what you love more. But is comical art history. I run three facebook groups. COMP regarded artistry the twilight zone we just had a sixty th anniversary celebration rod sterling hometown of Binghamton and I give a kind of multimedia era lecture on the twilight zone that pases posits it as the Middle Ground between twentieth century surrealism that preceded it and modern art popular culture that followed it. I consider the twilight zone. The father of American popular culture and then my third area of interest is Bruce springsteen. His music is life as career. I was art director of his first fan magazine. When I was Solit- road Design China a graphic design major in the late seventy S and. I've recently lectured on all three subjects. In New York City at a beautiful cabaret theatre theater the triads theater and if people go to my website and my youtube channel all of these Recent lectures especially our have all been captured on video. And I'm assuming at the end of the show you give certain lengths and whatever but basically all of my work is pretty much out there on my website recite cool. I'm GONNA backtrack Mentally going somewhere differently with this interview. But commissioned twilight zone as the border ground between And the pop culture well cycle deleon. Modern our popular culture television movies. His you name it you know why I can connect any modern science fiction. Fantasy are the product. I can trace it back to twilight zone in less than six degrees of sterling as I like to Pun on six degrees of Kevin Bacon right but I truly believe that. And when we we talk about it in depth like I said you know all of our modern fantasy and science fiction and our a creators whether it's Steven Spielberg George. Lucas David Lynch J.J. Abrams Lindelof all those guys. All are surly metaphorical children. You know he dies in nineteen seventy five thinking. He was a failure thinking that the twilight zone didn't matter five is the year Spielberg does jaws. It's the year Stephen King does carry. It's you know David. Lynch Lynch was in Philadelphia shooting. A racer head is surly had only lived literally a handful of more years. He only died at the age of fifty from all. Oh cigarettes you smoke grey. You would have seen what I call his metaphorical children come to the pop culture. Four with the influence of the twilight y light zone you know Stephen King wrote a nonfiction overview of the science fiction fantasy and Horror World Danse. Macabre came at nine hundred eighty. Three really really good. And he has a whole chapter twilight zone and he talks about house. Erling lit the fires. Like a spark. Plug the imaginations of that generation all those guys Spielberg Lucas. They were all teenagers when the twilight zone hit the perfect age age to have their minds blown and expanded by the twilight zone. And like I said you can look at all their works and trace some back the twilight zone nearly as a comic Mickey Finding Adventure. Seen It. The Sci Fi shows were taking off just as Run A win. Book Seduction of the innocent was actually killing off ally the comic book sort of Lincoln to really ranked in well to twilight zone now. The itchy horror movie a concrete example. Now I do a whole lecture on the twilight zone you know. Maybe the the single most was famous episode of the twilight zone. Is I the beholder with a pig faces. And there's an EC comics story called the ugly one published seven years earlier. Nineteen fifty fifty three. That's basically the same story now was in the war. They all read comic surly was into science fiction fantasy so I guarantee you. He read comics and is wife his widow who I interviewed years ago. She didn't say specifically but she kind colluded to it because member in that era reading comics is not something a celebrity likes hurling would promote it. But the bottom line is you can't deny that these e science fiction stories which I'm sure he read because they were adapting Bradbury's stories and comic form so let's assume surly read them seven years later. He does. I the beholder amongst other episodes. You know the half hour format of the twilight zone with the surprise endings is equivalent to the eight-page e. c. stories that had their little surprise endings. So the total carryover but then in turn in my lecture complex in the twilight zone James I talk about how then after the twilight zone Sanley and steep it goes start are doing those amazing adult fantasy stories which are five pagers. That are probably audit. Goes ideas that Stanley just dialogue right but all also there are direct knockoffs of twilight zone episodes. There's a ghost story about the mannequins living statues the last man on earth Earth time travel so again the twilight zone and by the way last issue amazing adult fantasy is a twilight zone version of a superhero superheroes story. And that's that's Spiderman because the twilight on twist at the end that he did not use superpowers to save the one that he loved the most is the ironic twist that they Bertha Spiderman when every other superhero before him. You know the me that they got powers. I'll go fight crime. You know so. Dicko and lead put that highlands head but basically Spiderman is the influence of the twilight zone on comics and E C had an influence on the twilight zone so once again the twilight zone is the middle ground between what what came before it and then how would influence. What's come after me? Shirley Sifi how much everything dovetails really nicely actually into each other and just goes to the play all our all history you name. It is building on what's come before you know. The layman considers original is really just the AL chemical combination of two previously existing. This thing things I call it. The reese's peanut butter school of creation. Butter existent chocolate existed until res fraud them together you didn't have Peterburg Cups Right. The definition of surrealism is by Andrea. Bertone the French poet who founded the movement surrealism starts out as a literary movement way before it became a visual art form and they want people to step back from their reality and look afresh after the horrors of World War One but one of his definitions and he wrote manifestos about surrealism was surrealism was as beautiful as has the unexpected meeting on dissection table between an umbrella and a sewing machine now while that sounds totally totally ridiculous or even data what he was saying was surrealism as the result. When you bring two different realities as together that have nothing in common and by bringing them together you create a third reality a new reality? It's like one. Plus one equals three. Not Two and by doing that. That's what but when I read that description of surrealism James. That's the definition of all art of of anything created you bring to things together amongst other elements of course that have never been introduced properly and when you do it and you add that little. Bit of substance acts as professor x would call the power puff girls when he missed something into the concoction. You like how I'm going from the sacred British Profane. That element of yourself is the kind of spice that makes the brew turn into something quote. New Right yeah already all over the place where you basically teach you. You know some of the the two things always gonna be greeted in some other parts right. So which is saying is surreal. The definition of surrealism is the definition of all the art. Or anything that's created right. Yeah she started weird. We actually start looking at how all the pieces connect throughout the history even something something simple assailant twilight zone. Yes and yeah. I think he'd be surprised to see how popular it is. I mean knowing. It's gone into syndication pretty much. Every time. If PRESI got his challenger voted to it and it just keeps coming back one way or another either directly as the twilight zone in fact CBS Just recently tried to Redo that series or watch not it really is just. I don't know I I had to see him so I can talk about him but have you not watch them not to current ones now. Yeah yeah well we should. You should watch him and then we can have another podcast discussing by. I think they're going to say. was there the direct influence sees light. Obviously the all the twilight zone iterations of the last thirty plus years and then. There's the interrupt one's like Charlie brokers Black Mirror which which is actually a better Armitage twilight zone then the new twilight zone on. CBS All access by Jordan. PEELE which to make a long story short I was you know and I think I speak for many other twice when we were all a little disappointed with. I think you're actually going to be more pleasant versions of that. So what meaning. What do you make a lot? More people have gotten a lot more Flaming church what didn't aggressive lot more insulting Asu. It I listen to. I'm trying to be nice case. Georgia veal is watching this podcast. But like I said once you've watched them and then we do another podcast S. where we talk about the new twilight zone which I think would be a great thing dog back a little nasty because there are a lot of bombs like Ed Black Merit. Have you seen the black mirror episodes Yeah fact I've caught up on that series. Even in the worst black mirror episodes I think are better. They show more originality more Again because Charlie Brooker writes most of them. They're coming more from an individual sensibility. which is what we all thought the Jordan peele thing was going to be and maybe some degree it is but if this is the sensibility I got some problems with it but right Brooker is paying better amish to the twilight zone some through Black Mirror because the concept of Black Mirror that is all stories dealing with technology in the sort of near future and usually technology run a muck that by giving it a very clear concept and even though there's a lot of variation Asian obviously within that concept and by creatively taking on the challenge of writing Most of the episodes himself off. I think it's again. It's better amish to the twilight zone. Then any of the new twilight zones have been. Oh yeah definitely yeah I mean. He's very plus. He's in felicitous. You're like watching the little details. There's a lot of details at least every all the stories. Yeah it's a very Korea should thing. He didn't have to do that but I thought it was interesting. As I watch more episodes that he was referencing. So it is sort of Charlie Charlie brooker future world sort of which like I said is more. Listen David Lynch's career has been more of a homage to the twilight zone than the new twilight zone in Mulholland drive. which I believe is his masterpiece and was recently voted by by the same people that vote in a whatever the AFC top one hundred lists? They voted the best film of the twenty. Th Century is Mahala and drive and Mulholland drive is basically Lynch's take on the twilight zone and again I can trace it back. It's the classic episode. Oh called shadow play with Dennis. Weaver as a guide being executed for murder but from his point of view he thinks it's a recurring occurring nightmare. He's having where the moment he gets. Electric Unity wakes up and then he repeats the nightmare again to the people in the jail. He's a prisoner is gone on nuts. So this dual reality. And then you get to the end of Spoiler alert the end of shadow play and it turns out he was right. The scene begins again. You're in the courtroom. He's getting sentenced the deck except all the people are slightly different..

Lynch Lynch Charlie Brooker New York City Steven Spielberg George Arlen Schumer Lucas David Lynch J.J. Abrams Stephen King Binghamton Heflin Bruce springsteen Kevin Bacon Spielberg Lucas pases CBS James I Bertha Spiderman Solit- road Design China Erling director
Not Ready to Dismount

In The Gate

11:54 min | 1 year ago

Not Ready to Dismount

"Great american golfer of the early twentieth century bobby jones remarked after you're watching jack nicklaus win the nineteen sixty five masters nicklaus played a game with which i am not familiar you could say the same for jockey frankie dettori tori who is having a year with which most racing observers are unfamiliar twelve group one wins already at the time of this recording and more than four months still left in the the year. Epa ties is now getting a split. He's running back while they on the outside. Brando has moved up advertised seeks to advertise takes the lead eight again and advertise came away to win advertise man of the mind that frankie dettori yet again dettori just four group one wins away from his best ever season two thousand one when he took sixteen considering what he's been through in his career and his age forty eight frankie's performance this year has been absolutely lutely remarkable. We'll get into all of that. As we welcome in a man who's had a pretty good see to watch several of dettori's group on wins this year veteran race caller richard hoiles oils who joins us once again here on the gate. One is struck you the most about the year that frankie has put together well to totally is confidence right. He's he's one of those. I'm sure you have the equivalent in in the u._s. When things begin to go well tori whether it be on a single card as in that day when he read the seven winners <hes> alaska ascot and when he had the first for the role meeting this year <hes> he really does seem to be able to ride to a different level. It's exactly the opposite when things go badly you know so you get the the trembling lip and the psyche so slightly sulky demeanour they just appears at this period which which really started with an awareness victory in the oaks has just laid to an astonishing level of performance in in the top races. Just okay the numbers. He's any twenty i in the junkies table in the u._k. In terms of number of winners he's any ash britain's thirty three winners in the u._k. And yet nine of those have been group one successes and if you were to rearrange the table on prize money he would be taught by over if a two million so. I think it's partly overseas writing very good horses which i'm sure we'll come on but it's also that innate competence which seems to be so important to the way that he rides well. That's a question that comes up both in horse racing and automobile racing is how much of his success is the writer and how much is the set of horses. He's been writing like enabling arlen stratovarius. I think that's a that's a fair now that he's not stick anyone in a nice call for you and certainly for me to one for europe you know most people you could win a mercedes for me the one guy lining up on the grid in that particular race there are a few races which dettori has one through pretty instant star catches is victory and the irish jokes where you stack them up and then ran away from them was was one of those but that he needs to be honest in the king george the thing too frank is he's not someone want to travel the length and breadth of the country looking small winners so it was important to him to have a big retainer. I used to be godolphin when he lets godolphin. Most people thought that would be the end of things and he's stumbled was good enough to get the cats at job at the right time when that sort of began to drift away is really the association with john gosden. That's taken things things to a new level. If you look at the twelve group one sees success these had in europe since the oaks in early june right the way through to the march instigate with advertise you'd go stratovarius as you mentioned you'd go to enable you had to dawn halts. He finally came to the party and won a couple of of group ones and and then scattered around you'd go go to coronet. You've got the ones that are still can't shoot. It's probably only gonna win one so yes it's definitely underpinned by having a good stable and but really able stratovarius the two that are underpinning success old. She's that a finding. We haven't got the younger who's coming speech then then so they're running runs heidi like it continued particularly with the naval your next week if she goes yorkshire so you could conceivably be talking about dettori writing fifteen fifteen group one winners twelve of them in the u._k. So it is already his most successful season for group one successes domestically. I was just looking okay again. Some of the numbers and if you had up the period between two thousand nineteen and twenty eight so in two thousand eight nine in twenty five seasons he only and he wrote in group one winners in total in that period and yet for many people that would have been almost successful period for me as a whole that it would be now in terms of winners but knowing at this late stage career is forty eight is quite astonishing. He did many sipping longtime ago nineteen ninety nine. There's no record ryan more trump top fifteen and seventeen but i suppose the other point to make his you made the point about the the top table eight named brian hasn't visited often often he often does in this country good three year olds and mike mcgraff is the anthony van dyck samosas happened gone on to be superstars and as a result the door has been left more than for for the golden rule is to sort of through so maybe that's the other side of the coin. Is that eight no brian. He's had a reasonable season but he hasn't dominated to the same degree as yes. He did the year when he record for the number of group one successes in in in twelve months right around the globe. I wanna go back to what you were saying about the the frankie dettori and godolphin for those of our listeners who don't remember frankie dettori had written exclusively for godolphin since nineteen ninety four when sheikh mohammed had started godolphin a dolphin that arrangement ended in two thousand twelve when to tori tested positive for cocaine. What thoughts did you have at that time about. Whether dettori would not just returned to the sport but returned to the pinnacle of the sport. I think many people thought that it was entirely questionable and to be fair if he founded for quite debates around the the twenty thirteen fourteen periods he was really saved by the introduction of because he was never going to cool boy he had the occasional ride but he wasn't certainly certainly going to have the quantity of rides that he'd he'd had through godolphin. The saving grace fahim was probably the beginning of the association with cats because he made noises about yeah. I'm gonna come back. I'm gonna compete for the title but those that know frankie no he just would not put in the miles and the dedication that's necessary. It's not like your system. You know in the estates where you based at the the one place period of time. It's the travel kills championship ambitions in this country. It's done by the number of wins so as a result the prize money honey. That's he's guiding through the big. Success is largely irrelevant. It's just one win of the same as it would be on a wet windy monday. Nights were hamilton dettori would never go for those sort of rights so i think many people felt that it would be a slow demise and probably the end <hes> but he stumbled across good horses at the right time and that that was important particularly i think old it was quite important in putting him back on the map with another dumpy win and a very very good ride in in new york and of course he was involved with other decent. These these cats are like travel initially even though that ended in tears as regards his association with her so he was saved really by his ability to put out big race successes but that period we mentioned twenty ten thirty two to twenty fourteen was really his barren spell in twenty-fifty things have really picked up a say go on how to do with that but obviously association with john gosden which came through likes the golden goose have been particularly significant and to your point. He's started just about a quarter of the number of races that ashim murphy has and yet as you say way ahead in the money total. We're talking with veteran british. Just race caller richard hoiles here on the

Frankie Dettori John Gosden Europe Richard Hoiles Godolphin Jack Nicklaus Bobby Jones EPA Arlen Stratovarius Alaska Brando Britain Writer Ashim Murphy Brian Coronet New York Sheikh Mohammed Frank
This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:05 min | 1 year ago

This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives

"Thousands of women especially black women experience pregnancy related complications and about seven hundred women die every year from them according to the centers for disease control now Williams threw her firm Serena ventures has invested in mommy it's a start up working to help women during the weeks and months after they've given birth with the goal of reducing maternal deaths still Melissa Hannah is one of the co founders mommy and she joins me now hello hi there and she is here with her mother Linda Hannah Linda is also a long time nurse and lactation consultant hi hi this come about what did you see a need for this it came about from watching my own mom work in this field and realizing that there was a limited set of tools available to professionals like herself to really create the impact that she wanted to have on mothers and babies lives and we started talking about what could be done in the outpatient setting when patients are home with their families will give me an example what are some of the complications that new mothers might face and how could this app help them well just in the past twelve months we've had patients who experienced severe blood loss and postpartum hemorrhaging we've worked with families and and with mothers that are experiencing prenatal anxiety we were the first responders in a case of a patient who is experiencing suicidal ideation and hadn't reached out to anyone for help yet wasn't sure if this was a normal part of being a new mom she had a two week old baby and reached out to talk to someone to the platform after taking the bus from depression survey that was available to her on her patient dashboard scored really high and immediately flagged for additional assistance and some money was able to step in and engage with her verify the symptoms and immediately escalate this to the OBGYN detention who had no idea she been struggling Linda I mean as someone who works in the space that sounds like it's incredibly helpful it is there's a huge gap between a mother delivering her baby getting discharged from the hospital oftentimes in a very quick fashion and then not being seen again for significant number of days often trying to manage many times on their own so we're trying to fill the gap between their last visit or their last time with the physician until they're seen again the next time Celinda speaking of that gap those studies have shown the women of color three times more likely to die of childbirth complications and white women in the US can you remind us why that isn't well mom is trying to do and closing that gap there is a huge gap in a population of people who do not either have access to the health care or that they don't believe anybody's going to listen or actually care and that is the hardest part for us to try to get across that we actually are paying attention we actually do care we want to know how you're feeling we want to be able to step in when somebody even reports just a feeling that they're having that we don't tell people that's normal you're allowed to feel like that that's a common feeling but actually addressed what they're feeling immediately we don't let the days go by your time go by we want to talk to them we reach out to them and we want them to also know that they can reach out to us and that nothing ever is going to be a problem yeah it just to speak directly to the stats the mentioned when we look at reports around pain management and support and care that's provided to black women in particular there's a huge discrepancy in how patients are cared for I think that it's very important part of this whole story that often gets overlooked is how broken the overall system is you got your be taking care of mom the pediatrician taken care of baby and a number of other professionals who are often out of network for new families and then you add into that a layer of really sort of systemic racism and bias in the way that we listen to the concerned and the challenges that black and brown families are facing and it just becomes these insurmountable odds for these families obviously because of what happened to her you came to her attention how did you connect with Serena Williams we connect with Serena Williams through Arlen Hamilton who's a longtime investor and advocate for mommy Arlen had been working with Serena and sharing some deals and and some money as something that might be of interest her so this is Linda I insisted that I wouldn't actually take money or have anybody investing who didn't really understand myself and Melissa first and I'd like to meet everyone and so she agreed and she saw us on the screen we were doing a video call and she saw that I was a Caucasian woman and my daughter was a mixed race girl and she almost started crying so that's kind of how we originally met her then we get the privilege of meeting her in person which was incredible and just getting to know her a little bit was really wonderful that's Linda Hannah and Melissa Hannah the co founders of Miami that's spelled M. A. H. M. E. a new maternal health care platforms supported by

Williams Twelve Months Two Week
How tardigrades were secretly smuggled to the moon

All Things Considered

03:50 min | 1 year ago

How tardigrades were secretly smuggled to the moon

"In April a failed lunar mission crash landed and spilled its cargo a few thousand tardigrades tardigrades are tiny adorable to some and one of the toughest creatures around Daniel over house wrote about the field lunar mission for wired magazine welcomed All Things Considered thank you for having me I'm embarrassed to say I'd never heard of a tardigrade before the story what are they so these are micro organisms there a little under a millimeter in size they have four legs I'm a lot of people think they look like bears hence the name out water bear they are found everywhere on earth from jungles to the top of the Himalayas to the Antarctic and as you mentioned they can survive pretty much any sort of environment I'm extremely hot temperatures to extremely cold temperatures they can survive in the vacuum of space they're pretty much indestructible and how did a few thousand of them potentially and up on the moon a nonprofit organization called the our commission foundation sent a lunar library to the surface of the moon with the air she lander she lander this is an Israeli mission yes and on the slander there is a desk about the size of a DVD made of several ultra thin layers of nickel and sandwiched in between those layers of nickel are hi in layers of a proxy that contained DNA from humans in the form of hair follicles and blood samples as well as several thousand tardigrades so the idea here was to in addition to all the digital information stored on the layers of nickel was to preserve our biology from earth and if the tardigrades did survive this crash landing are they still sandwiched in this kind of DVD type thing that's the hope no one knows for sure they did some mathematical month modeling after the crash and determined that in all likelihood this this was actually probably the only thing that survived the crash so there's a pretty good chance at there are tardigrades on the moon does that matter I mean are they gonna like breed and take over the moon I I mean is is it some kind of moon pollution like what what's what's the importance of this yes so there's no reason to worry about tardigrades becoming Arlen our overlords anytime soon they are they're in a state of it's called crypto biosis which is where they actually I showed all the water in their cells they talk in their legs and they almost turn into a glass and they can last for decades in this form but they can't reproduce their metabolism all but stops so they're they're they're kind of live depending on your definition of life but and tell someone were to bring them back to earth they're not going to be moving around or do anything like that element okay so this seems relatively harmless but this was a privately funded lunar mission what's to stop some other billionaire from rationing something on the moon that's not as harmless as a tardigrade that could actually you know do real damage I think that's a concern for a lot of people the fortunate thing I suppose is that the moon is considered a relatively low risk for the sort of thing when the Apollo astronauts went there fifty years ago they left dozens of bags of human excrement on the surface of the man so they were the first to actually leave DNA there but I think looking to the future this is something we need to discuss with private missions to places like Mars where introducing DNA into environment could potentially contaminated I the science that they wanted you to perhaps find traces of life so you know I think it's a great entry way for this discussion about who I get to determine what is placed on other celestial bodies well you know compared to bags of human excrement I think I would prefer a few thousand tardigrades reported in all over how speaking with us on Skype he wrote about the possibility of tardigrades on the moon for wired

Fifty Years
President Trump Remarks At Photo-Op With Irish Prime Minister

Business Beware

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

President Trump Remarks At Photo-Op With Irish Prime Minister

"President Trump in Ireland, the prime minister's intestine. Fringe over the very short period of time. And grid relationship to Arlen I think is good as it's ever been. Maybe better Trump's visit comes between commemorations for the seventy fifth anniversary of the day invasion. When event was Wednesday in England second Thursday in Normandy, France,

President Trump Prime Minister Arlen Normandy Ireland France England Seventy Fifth
Brazil's Natura cosmetics takes on the world

FT News

06:07 min | 1 year ago

Brazil's Natura cosmetics takes on the world

"Notre the Brazilian cosmetics company, that owns the body shop recently agreed to by Avon products in an all stock deal that values the US group more than two billion dollars Vanessa holder talks to Andrew Japan about the man behind the tour and his plans for the company. Andras you interviewed keenly, L, Nietzsche's, billionaire chairman, after the format precision, did he ten you why he decided to acquire? Here's a they began seriously to consider it with the decision to acquire the body shop in two thousand seventeen from loyal. Last. Gene was gonna key in days percent, Lamerica, dune. Novem. And in this clip, he told me one day he realized that the company was president his company was president ten percent of the world's market, but it was another ninety percent. And as a long-stablished company with a good reputation, links to the rainforest Tura, who they well-placed to expand worldwide what the details of the on acquisition and most of the benefits for each side, which we know it was a two billion dollars. All stock deal to buy Evan and Tudor will learn about seventy percent of the combined group while the remainder would be owned by Avon shareholders. And in the deal has been in the works for few months, but in a to expects that would yield more than ten billion dollars in annual growth for the combined group and this mainly, thanks to access to more than two hundred million clients, worldwide Avon, pioneered, the direct selling modeling cosmetics embodied by its doorstep Avon lady sellers. But it has lost market share at the rise of social media marketing, how does this compare to new? Chirs business model. And one of the main differences is not is very focused on the environment in the sense what you were saying about the latest sellers. They're quite similar. I mean to also use direct sales they call them consultants not sellers. But they say now that after the deal together, they will have six point three million of then where would Mr. Neo formed a close relationship with body. Shop's, founder, Neath Roddick was an environmental campaigner. What kind of character is he and what did they have in common but his quite awful? And he c in Brazil, they friendly phases capitalism match like an eater audibles in the UK. He wants told me he grew on vanita Roddick, because both were looking to build a new capitalism were companies help to build a society. So in the light of that, what's the company's relationship with the Amazon day. And what a mystery house ecological credentials. Well, the relationship is quite strong. The comp. Resources some of its room materials from the Amazon seeds plants fruits, whose oil and sense can then be extracted for beauty products. They are has been an environmentalist for quite a while. And he was even the running mate to environmentalist candidate. Marina Silva in the two thousand ten presidential thing deserve. Always throw. Now keep it as advocate. Go. See year produce sound vessel. He told me the company was more committed now than ever to help save causing JAMA's and in view of the growing threat, and it is facing under the presidency of jailable scenario to what extent does not terrorists still use Amazon purchase like Arlen sense. Knits, beauty products. It's about twenty percent of the products. Use Amazon was ingredients at the moment. Why is the Amazon? Particularly important for him, personally his father was from the Missourians state of. But I when I saw him, he told me that actually he developed his environmentalist credential in this passion for the environment later in life. But seeing how many wonders that resume have specially when he came to the environment as you mentioned misleading has also been involved in Brazilian politics. Does he have real influence? And could he play a role in persuading, the both narrow government cherish its forests rather than cutting them down? Well, there was something very hard to do, especially because he doesn't want to get involved in party politics ever again. He told me he said, he's very concerned about the threats posed to the rainforest by the current administration. And so he's raising awareness through business in the civil society me, he's a board member of the Brazilian found for biodiversity the worldwide are funded in Brazil, and he also founded something called least tour you which focus on promoting the. Green economy as colon Avon isn't known for its eco friendly products. What's the chance that this will be an attempt to spread this ecological nature of the neutral brands? I mean, there could be a spillover effect problem is, I mean now the four companies have as that they bought from this trillions in two thousand thirteen the voter shop and Tony seventeen and now wave and although Avon will be the bigger brand is probably going to get something from both mature and the body shop in its, let's say DNA sometime in the medium-term said, both companies even an insurer big operations in Brazil how's that game to work what we have to think that the tour group now they own full brands between those, you pretty much have all the segments because as is quite high end the voters shows like let's say wants to down below that. And so there's no Tudor. Plus, Tuesday's let's say they have they ABMC covered bridge in the first three brands and now with Avon they will cover the. See entity so pretty much. We'll have the whole vertical chain, no, no, Brazil. But what are they go and Avon's faced lot of challenges? Do you think Notre will be able to turn that around? I mean they manage to more or less do so with the body shop. I mean it was quite a bumpy road with even is much bigger companies, manage their really focused on expanding into Asian markets with all the brands, especially with mature neighbors. So they mentioned specifically they were looking at Indonesia, and India. So those are very big markets. They had a good chance of and

Amazon Avon Products Brazil Avon Vanita Roddick Andras President Trump Gene United States Marina Silva Chairman Vanessa Holder Nietzsche Indonesia UK Jama
Frank Lucas, 'American Gangster' Drug Kingpin Played by Denzel Washington, Dead at 88

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Frank Lucas, 'American Gangster' Drug Kingpin Played by Denzel Washington, Dead at 88

"One of America's most notorious drug dealers as passed away, Arlen, heroin, kingpin, Frank, Lucas was for trade, Denzel Washington in the two thousand seven film, American gangster. Somebody. Nobody a family. Member says Lucas died on the way to the hospital in New Jersey on Thursday night. Lucas rose to power in nineteen sixties. New York infamously selling heroin smuggled from southeast Asia in the caskets of dead. US servicemembers mustard in nineteen seventy five. He was released from prison in five years after turning

Lucas Rose Heroin Denzel Washington Arlen Southeast Asia New Jersey New York America United States Frank Five Years
Peacekeepers in Cyprus push for safe and secure environment across whole divided island

UN News

09:31 min | 1 year ago

Peacekeepers in Cyprus push for safe and secure environment across whole divided island

"This is Matt wells you a news, establishing goodwill between Greek and took a sip rates through activities that involve children, women and the elderly blue helmets with the UN peacekeeping force in Cyprus or unforeseen, a working towards a BI zonal bi-communal, federated state to ensure a future where the whole of the island can live in a safe and secure environment, says force commander, Major General, Cheryl, piss the mission was established in nineteen sixty four to prevent fighting between the two communities on the Mediterranean island. And in the absence of a political settlement continues to maintain ceasefire lines into buffer zone. Just ahead of the international day of peace. Keepers monks on Wednesday may general Pierce spoke to Julia dean from the UN information center in Australia. Well, for us in Cyprus where we made our polls just either thousand personnel will one of the smallest pacekeeping missions and all of that, just either eight hundred military for which I'm the fourth commander, I work to the special Representative of the secretary general and together we knew. Stint that I ensure the security instability in the buffer zone and tonight, will I along lasting political solution to be addenda find. And when I talk about what is the buffer zone. It's really a nuanced in complex triple bland covers one hundred ninety kilometers from west to east seven Fisher crossing points is probably know why then a straight suites in some parts, and that's in Nicosia right up to seven kilometers. You now the areas we have very much like stone predicting billion SRI protecting pace. And we do that in a number of saintly, different wise and this one amaze oppose commander and also as mission is a hall to reduction Logan engagement, which is actually my mind if it is a force command, the we're in an armed force, and we have militarized opposing forces north and south on the north. We have the Turkish mainland army, and the Turkey Ciprian security, forces and on the southern side, we have the Greeks. Pre at national God. But the Orland is actually quite a militarized islands. I have a strong engagement plan. And with the commanders of the opposing forces in way, mate Neely every six weeks, and then this is mirrored again, by commodities on the ground across the sectors. It really are to, to ensure that way deescalate the tensions that are air. And we are the only why the two signs don't communicate we check which other way facilitate all the information from north to south and south to north. So then engage plan is significant, and that depends highly on trust, doesn't it? Yes, trust. We took about that every time we might and we took about from a military really thinks when we talk about mutual respect trust. Impartiality transparency and a really fi console net for both sides, because it is what we do is military that separates it from the political, we'll very. Careful to keep the divide separate of the wines. It can be we can get caught in the political environment, which undermines the trust and impartiality on the military sign so that's sort of be the case. And that happens right down to the lowest level. And now we have a man that we have to report my license, and so that engagement, we need to really hold on. When we when we have these violations violations to talk about that could be either manning of the checkpoints that could be moved forwards into the buffer zone night could be escalation with weapons biz in number of different activities, e this on could do that would create a violation and then way report out through to New York on a daily basis and stopped to building to the secretary general's report, and we have a mandate renewal every six months. So the actions of the housing forces gets captured and reported, which. Then leads into the political dialogue and the opportunities for the sides to try and identify way going forward. What about the civilian populations does the ministry heavily as on with the, the civilians as well. Look, we do talk about protection side. I as we talked about my time security and stability in order to return to normal conditions L actual, Botha's Zayn here on the island is not ice sterile office. Sign like between north and South Korea. It's actually used for farming and some of its permitted, we do it through a payment system, but a majority is not permitted farming, which creates esscalation and ferocity to try to defuse that we got to the actual physical protection. We escort we have pilgrimages gun coming into the buffer zone. They have they seek to do these Puga midges back to the mosques and churches to hold religious services on a regular basis in for that we school. Them. We escort the mean and we provide that support to them. But when I talk about supporting civilians, we have a lot of communal and a lot of activities. Karen, the buffet Zayn unbound, establishing the goodwill between the great secrets and Turkish Cypriots in the intent of trying to work towards a, a Visayas by communal federated state and for that to occur. We have to mind time and really work towards creating bottom up swallow a bike mean like TV's and for that what actively involved in creating a sense of the side, insecure environment for which for the is to occur Anaya care in the buffer zone, quite regulate that will plan, we, it's dumb with us as force. We have the ample the place. But also, we have civilian staff, we do the facilitation with municipalities north end south to coordinate, the diplomatic community also actively gets involved sponsors, a lot of these activities, these activities with children's side. They EM's Watson children's activities fundraise for the very young and for their parents and then through to mainly through sport on all of the school. But now there's a lot to do with science and stem, and spice and an educational activities. And then we will say by Pistone. It's a focus on the next generation really trying to that younger community, working together because it curriculum by signs is actually justed to make their I narrative, and so coming together through ball community allowing them to engage provides an environment where it's not by what is said, but is by the actions and working with your position on the old Lee we do a lot with the elderly. But also, we do a lot with the women giving them a voice and trying to generate opportunities where that can be a voice for chine Jin. They do a lot through women's walks. We get together in charge them. You. UN copy lading. It's about Priscilla touching both sides to find ideas and wasteful. Would you have an example of what inspires you with the people that you weekly space Capers, but grind berry? What spies may that Ahmad force? It's here unite that trained in their own national army air force on ninety and trying to say their country, they're not been selected by the country represent the UN. And it says we come together as an international community to, to serve the UN and to support the outcomes in Cyprus to ensure that they have a future where the whole of the Arlen can leave in I in a secure environment as Cypriots is a whole, and of course the day, the peacekeeping dies Edyta reflect on those who full them. What are your professional and personal reflections on this very similar very similar to that of what Tom and spies me about my forces that you try and all of your career, to be country? And then you. Elected by your country to at the UN, which is writer than a national outcome meets it's global response to, to conflicts around the globe, where we are coming together to support the country that wearing end to represent the UN is rule privilege. And I certainly don't take lightly and the bar is that we work in and this is, you know, towards the budget of fallen environments. We work in our complex, and the is it applied the ultimate sacrifice. My heart goes out today to their families. You know, we try and for these environment, we understand the risks it's families that a left and, you know, Laura people think the UN is only as now is less than one the environment that we work in is benign. It's not it is complex. It is risky. And we continue to fight Kosonen trying to create stable environments for the for the host nation will continue to work. The UN is working in action for pacekeeping and women. Stikes missions in my focus is on the continual, nip professionalization of the force training environment, which we work in and end to lead by example with good command and that's to ensure the way, reduce the deaths where possible in missions. They'll always be environments, wherein, but might show that there are no unnecessary deaths through poor training or actions. But inherently, you know, we said country we serve the UN and the and the environments. We in our risky and complex.

UN Commander Cyprus South Korea Australia Matt Wells Major General Mediterranean Island Julia Dean Nicosia Pierce Orland Representative Kosonen New York Chine Jin
Alabama Governor signs bill making abortion criminal

Anderson Cooper 360

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Alabama Governor signs bill making abortion criminal

"Alabama's governor signed into law, the most restrictive abortion Bill in the country, and your total ban on all abortions in the state under the new law. Doctors who perform abortions could face up to ninety nine years in prison. The reaction from democratic presidential candidates has been swift and fierce one of the laws, most vocal opponents is New York, Senator and twenty twenty presidential candidate Kirsten gillibrand. The tweeted that the abortion bands recently passed an Alabama and Georgia represent. And I'm quoting the greatest threat. Reproductive freedom in our lifetimes. Senator gillibrand is heading to Georgia tomorrow. But I you joins us here on three. Sixty Senator thanks for being with us. You wanna fight this. But what exactly can you do on the congressional level? I mean, this is solely decision for the courts at this point, isn't it? I think I can lead a movement, and a fight across this nation for women's reproductive freedom. This is an all out assault state after state over thirty. Nine efforts in this country to undermine women's reproductive freedoms, President Trump intends on overturning Roe v. Wade, he's made it clear, not only in his campaign, but as president, and that's what these Republican legislatures are doing across this country. This is something. We're gonna have to fight back on. And I will lead that fight Justice Cavanaugh during his confirmation hearing, he said that he would respect the quote important precedent of Roe v. Wade do you believe he'll do that? If and when this case and cases from other states make their way to the supreme court because that a lot of times, people who are waiting to get confirmed. Give a statement that kind of oblique it could be read in different ways. I think his statement was dishonest and disingenuous. But the American people are watching, and if he lied under oath in those hearings that's gonna be problematic. So I hope the American people and American women everywhere will hold this president accountable, and we'll protest these extreme. Decisions by legislatures and governors being signed into law there. Criminalizing a woman's right to make a decision about her body her. Reproductive freedom. How many children, she'll have when she will have children, and it is literally turning back the clock on settled law. This is not something, the American people support over seventy percent of American American people support, reproductive freedom and support the precedent of Roe v. Wade, the fact of the matter, as you said, is that this is not any surprise. President Trump made it very clear as a candidate. He wanted to overturn this. He won the presidency in part because his supporters wanted him to appoint conservative justices to the supreme court, potentially peeling Roe v. Wade if it came down to it. So I mean couldn't win argue that this is the will of the people at least to a certain degree. Well, Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by three million votes. So I wouldn't say that. And if you ask. Ericans today. Do you believe in the precedent of Roe v? Wade and giving women basic human rights and civil rights to make decisions about their health their wellbeing their bodies and life or death medical decisions. They believe women should have that right? So we know where the American people stand on this, and that's why we have to lift up the voices of people in Georgia people in Alabama, women who will suffer under these new laws and make sure that their voices are heard, and I will lead this fight across the country. If I'm president, I will make sure that there is not a judge or Justice, who was appointed by me, a who will not Opole the precedent of Roby row. We've Robie Wade, and the truth is, I will guarantee that no matter where you live in this country in all fifty states, that a woman will have access to safe legal abortions and other reproductive care services. That Republican legislators are so intent on denying one litmus test for supreme court justices and Roe v. Wade would be one of those limits does I do. And I do because President Trump and Senator McConnell, have changed all the rules when it comes to appointing justices, when Mitch McConnell decided that President Obama was not entitled to his supreme court Justice, where America Arlen was denied a hearing vote. They changed the rules. President Trump has made clear. He's had a litmus test, and frankly, I believe in precedent settled law.

Robie Wade ROE President Trump Supreme Court Senator Georgia Kirsten Gillibrand Justice Cavanaugh Alabama Senator Mcconnell New York President Obama Hillary Clinton Assault America Arlen Roby Ninety Nine Years
Why Game of Thrones is the first and last of its kind

The Big Story

05:11 min | 1 year ago

Why Game of Thrones is the first and last of its kind

"Today with a recording of a language that no human civilization ever spoke yet. Most of you are going to understand some of them as Bruce Dadis cost out. She finally that negate Dianetics Jen Massimo entered Gary Arlen and bolero Kohana Godich, son. The card is. See if you want to get a handle on why we're spending a Friday talking about a TV show. Remind yourself that game of thrones created a language that people who snickered at dragons in highschool can speak. The show's final season debuts this Sunday night at nine PM. And that in itself has significant in a world where we're used to media being delivered on demand to each of us whenever we find the time to watch him on one hand game of thrones has been the first of its kind a blockbuster fantasy epic adapted not to film, but to television that broke the mold for these stories and brought adult fantasy to a very lucrative global audience. It has changed that industry and on the other hand, it has also the last of a species the television event that the world watches and talks about together, and that doesn't really happen anymore in that sense. Emma, thrones is a dinosaur and the industry has changed around it. So what happened eight years ago when this show debuted that? Made this possible. Why did it happen with this story? What will be left behind in the world of television. When it's over. How has it changed? Both the stories that we tell and the mediums that we used to tell them. Oh, and who's going to end up on the damn iron thrown. Jordan, heath Rawlings. And there's only one war that the great wall. And it is. Andrei Dmitri's is a writer for various publications. He's one of our favorite guests here on the big story knows a little something about game of thrones. Why did game of thrones of all shows changed so much? I think your frame of reference if you happened to be ten generally into the fantasy genre your frame of reference was most likely the Lord of the rings, or Harry Potter and regards to the fact that both Lord of the rings, and Harry Potter had very wide fan bases and people really loved it enjoyed both movies. And maybe people less enjoyed the Lord of the rings books because let's be honest. They were pretty dry. There was at least an understanding that this was not necessarily meant with an adult audience in mind. Dickey ruling did not write the Harry Potter books for a Dulce. They were very clearly kids books Gerald token, even though you could say that it was you know, a very mature high fantasy series. It was also written with young people in mind. A game of thrones comes from that the post nineteen seventies dungeons and dragons Jonah where this these are very mature stories, the it it involves mature themes. Blood and guts and sword and sorcery and all that stuff for a cult audience written for an audience of twenty-something guys that would get together around somebody's kitchen table on a Saturday afternoon and drink beer and play a role playing game. Like, that's sort of the the culture that it's bonds out of. So I think that people were looking for a more mature fantasy product to you know, to to just watch and enjoy and game of thrones really really hit that Mark people when they were describing the show early on weren't talking about a game of thrones and reference to other fantasy series. There were talking about how different game of thrones was from other fantasy series that they'd ever heard of to the extent that they were saying things like, you know, this is the sopranos with sorts or this is the wire, but with magic my partner hates fantasy stories and hates magic and dragons and stuff, and I knew that this was going to be something different. When I essentially told her, look, I know you don't have to watch this with me. But this is an adaptation of a book I love so I'm going to. It down and watch it. Anyway, you're welcome to join me or not and she joined me for the first step aside and has watched every single episode multiple times. And that's when it became clear that this was something else. The fact that people will spend time re watching them, and it's not just happening in the run up to the last season every season that comes out I see people on social media, and I know people that will simply rewatch the entire series. Just so that they can be caught up. It's I mean, it is a very complicated story with a lot of moving parts and a lot of different characters. But I don't think they would actually do that. If they didn't really really really enjoy the show, and I think it's so enjoyable like the idea, so the fact that you would watch five or six different seasons just to prepare yourself for the upcoming season. That's I can't think of another toward the sun. Then when did it become clear that this was going to be the defining television show of this era? I think it was probably around the red wedding in the third season. My king has married and I owe my new Queen wedding. Give.

Harry Potter Andrei Dmitri Bruce Dadis Emma Jen Massimo Kohana Godich Queen Wedding Gerald Token Gary Arlen Dulce Dickey Jordan Partner Writer Heath Rawlings Eight Years One Hand
During Shutdown, Farmers And Others Lack Critical USDA Reports

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:52 min | 1 year ago

During Shutdown, Farmers And Others Lack Critical USDA Reports

"Support for NPR and the following message. Come from HBO while everyone is talking and no one is listening. Bill. Maher is ready to get real watch. The all new season of real time with Bill Maher Fridays at ten pm only on HBO it'll be cheaper than therapy. Or at farmers have been hit by the government shutdown in a different way. They are struggling to get information. The US department of agriculture usually publishes, the price sales numbers and inventory for many agricultural products. But now some of those reports are not happening. I will public radio's Amy mayor explains why this matters. Here's an example of why reports matter the government launched some of its crop and livestock reports as a response to the Soviet Union's huge purchase of US grain in the nineteen. Seventies commodities. Economist Arlen superman says the quiet purchase worth about a billion dollars at the time came as a shock then when it became known. We suddenly realized that much of our known inventory was. Sean in the markets reacted very violently commodity prices soared with that in the back of his mind Sudirman says he's now thinking about whether China could pull off a similar trick during this lag in public reporting while not likely it is possible. Superman's company relies mainly on proprietary research. But he says they use USDA figures to fact check their own. He's concerned there could be some surprises when the government reports resume particularly of wants a report start we find that. There is information that we missed that the market needs to adjust for and that's the greatest risk more immediately. Farmers. Don't have all the information. They count on in Dallas county, Iowa Marvin Shirley has been farming since the nineteen sixties and uses USDA reports to guide his decision making so Cao's sometime January, but were those give pro. Projections on ideals and the mount of cattle around without them. He may put off that sale at this time of year his family's also thinking about the amount of corn and soybean plant in the coming season. But they don't have the information. They need to make any adjustments. Shirley, says the shutdown and last year's tariffs on many US products. Create new problems for struggling farmers pros little. Pros little creating the problem is they're using taxpayer money or some other Mames to solve the problem. He created them. It just. Of very unsettling. Tar to these sure some Trump supporters in farm country don't feel unduly burdened by the shutdown. One cattle feed lot owner in Iowa said he could get by without the reports for some time and was embracing the politics of the moment saying he's quote tickled to death with what's happening. I was state university livestock. Economists leash Scholtz says the missing data means he can't put out his January reports, and he's already hearing chatter from worried farmers the longer. This goes some of that added uncertainty in the market, you know, may cause producers to not make decisions they normally would have daily price reports are still being published but January is a big month for other data a world supply and demand estimate last year's totals for US crop production and the number of cattle in the country. A USDA spokeswoman says the agency's intent is to publish them all once the government reopens. But by then staff and farmers will be playing a game of catch up for NPR news. I'm Amy mayor in Moines. Amy story comes to us from harvest public media reporting project in the midwest and plains support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast.

United States Government Arlen Superman Amy Mayor Bill Maher Us Department Of Agriculture HBO Usda Marvin Shirley Comcast NPR Iowa Scholtz CAO Sudirman Soviet Union Moines
"arlen" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"With my bachelors and then all summer long. Even save money, and we finally deposit down on her first. That's exciting. Yeah. Really good thing. Have you found the apartment? Yeah. We're gonna be looking at we're gonna turn Arlen Irving forward. Have you checked a parking on the street? We have. What is it ten? No. Okay. I have one in the first place, I moved into ocean park. We had three roommates one spot three cars, and it was a tandem. So we'd have to rotate one was on the street, then two of us will get the tenement. But it was always like the you're always blocked we need to go somewhere. And you always have wake up. Yeah. Yeah. And then there was that awful rotation where you like God, I gotta find street parking today. It's almost easier on street parking. Because then you have to move the your. Now his whole permit. We now have the permits it's a reasonable single. Yeah. That's the reason because you couldn't get out. You couldn't go out if you wanted to there's no over back then. Oh, that's right. Call one eight whatever cab. Old. I'm with you. I had to call Cavs. Do Amanda you're the best. I'm glad all that. Good stuff. Haven't you take care? K thank you. Remember being like parking outside was never good because you couldn't get the spot per like the street permit was a nightmare. That's why you couldn't meet people out to have a relationship. Excuse time ready for the call today. Yes. Secrets are like margarine easy to spread but bad for the heart and margarine technically is what Tanya it is an invitation butter spread. Yes. So don't if you're gonna do it you butter or Ye. He he gay. Yeah..

Arlen Irving Cavs ocean park Tanya Amanda
"arlen" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

Jim Beaver's Project Action

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

"And with that, I'm going to roll right into this amazing interview with Victoria Arlen. All right. I'd like to welcome guest Victoria Arlen to the show today. Thank you for taking the time to come on the show Victoria. How's everything with you? Great. It's been a little chaotic, but really, really good. Thank you for having me today. I was doing my research. I think we actually may have a mutual friend somebody that's actually a really good friend of mine Elissa Roenick their ESPN I saw. No, she did peace with you. I think on ESPN w, but just one of those. Whereas like sometimes I could connect the dots with different people and things like that. So. Yeah, we weeded skiing together and actually just saw her after he has been Eliot. I'm it. She's amazing. She actually her kind of pseudo sister-in-law, Jillian van view is is actually one of my partners in my race program Alissa actually came to a race last year and co drove with me and my racecar for like fifty miles. So yeah, it was awesome to have her in the car call notes and things like that. And off road car was just a ton of fun. She's like, she's game for anything. Yeah, she, she seems to be to be minute an incredible storyteller, and that's cool. I got to do that with their. No, it was. It was a ton of fun. But yeah, no, welcome to the show. We got a ton to catch up on everything from your past at ESPN now and everything that you're doing. But I guess the big one is kind of go back to the start, but you've you recently have your book locked in that you know that came out, you know this about your story, and I think that's where we should start off on. But I guess going back to the beginning, I mean, and you know, kind of take us through this process because now I see the interviews with you and things like that. You're very positive. You want to, you want to help people. And I think that's what's amazing about this whole story. A lot of people, you know, it's like they wanna just kinda push that part of their lives away and you've kind of embraced it and it's like, hey, how can I help people learn from this. You know, I think I had to learn to break thing. I think a lot of reasoning reinvest help, but I need for a while. It was really hard to to talk about it and I think writing about it and then kinda telling my story way when I did dancing on the air, go helps me and brace it in home. These bear the bigger impact. Gosh, it's like I kind of this is really it's. I don't wanna say, hits home to me, but my daughter's ten and I absolutely love her to death. And I note eleven this thing, kind of, you know, kind of happen with you. And so I look at her and I, I see her almost at the same age when this whole thing hit with you. And I'm like, wow, like such a kid, a young kid you were at eleven, and that's such a big part of your life in those years right there. And you know. I mean, you guys have any before this happened. I mean, obviously it was just out of left field. Right? It wasn't like you were born and they thought, oh, this is something that could happen eventually. I mean, this was just kind of out of out of nowhere. Right? Completely out of nowhere. I would kid that never got sick. I think the most the most I ever dealt with one ear infection. So to go kind of out of the blue and then eventually become catatonic was was unheard of and for my family would it made no sense..

Alissa Victoria Arlen ESPN Elissa Roenick Victoria Eliot Jillian van
"arlen" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

Jim Beaver's Project Action

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"arlen" Discussed on Jim Beaver's Project Action

"For another addition of the anything goes podcast. We're in the sports and recreation category, but we cover any and all people that ide- Morad whether they are from action sports, regular sports, motor, sports gaming. I dunno, celebrities, movies, may you never know what's going to happen here on project action. And today's guest does not disappoint. We. We have a very special today. Victoria Arlen Lada you may know her from ESPN. She's a host over there, but she also has an amazing story that the definitely definitely is remarkable sees this way to put it, and she goes into depth on her story. So also got a book out. She's been on dancing with the stars. She's also won gold medals. In swimming, just an amazing human being and it's so special her on and be able to tell her story today. I think you guys are definitely gonna. Enjoy this one. Thank you guys for tuning in if this your first time. Thank you if you've been here since the beginning. Thank you. Thank you. You never know who is going to show up on on project action, that's for sure. Next couple of weeks, we've got my good friend, Eddie Braun. He is a stuntman just had a movie about him called coincidentally stunt man, but he is the guy who decided that he wanted to recreate evil knievel snake river canyon jump and launch himself in a rocket over the canon canyon. Yeah, that is right. That Eddie broad. There's a movie about it. Obviously, I mentioned stuntman, but he's my guest next week. We've also got my friend, Matt Di, Andrea, you know.

Victoria Arlen Lada Eddie Braun Eddie broad snake river canyon canon canyon Matt Di ESPN Andrea
Astros, Margie Maldonado and Arlen Gonzales discussed on The Savage Nation

The Savage Nation

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Astros, Margie Maldonado and Arlen Gonzales discussed on The Savage Nation

"All right. We're back here in Cleveland for the bottom of the seventy Indians are in trouble. They a to lead the Astros scored three times near the top of the seven with some help. But the Astros another big hit from Arlen Gonzales. Who's out a bunch of these three games? Houston is nine outs away from finishing office. Sweep of the Indians four to two two score. Margie Maldonado comes into catch as we would expect after Tyler white bid for Brian McCann McHugh is still in the game on the mound. Although the Astros have two pitchers of the bullpen. What is their only

Astros Margie Maldonado Arlen Gonzales Brian Mccann Mchugh Cleveland Tyler White Houston
"arlen" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

StartUp Podcast

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

"Before the break i brought up the fact that arlen and i are treated pretty differently out in the world in large part because of how we look let's jump back into the conversation at gamla fast i'm a white woman you're a black woman there is no way i said it's raise just race was is just baked into this project and one of my favorite parts of this project from start to finish was being able to have these very open and straightforward conversations with arlen about our differences and about how they were affecting not just the line of questioning but like our experiences in the world like this is something we talked about a lot you know like travelling together make it on the roads because maybe that would have added context i mean i feel like it did make them while win when did it i mean when we talked about the fact that i was a white woman talking about your business expenses in episode three and how you were sensitive to the fact that you were being portrayed by you know depicted by a white woman i you know it's interesting there's this great moment of tape that we didn't use that i wanted to us where we're in the airport and arlen and i kind of got separated as we're going through security and there were two people remember you're ahead on there were two people in front of us so white privilege showed there took took by punchline so anyway now you know it's not black privileges are you i'm gonna tell you anyway i know i know i try anyway so there's these people in front of us and i you know i want to be with arlene because i've got my mic and we're travelling together and i said to these two people do you mind if i go ahead of you to join my friend and they said sure go right ahead and i get there and i'm so happy and i was rolling on this whole thing and and arlen says like white privilege right there really was because it wasn't like lady is this off it was totally would never have occurred to me not to do what i did i absolutely understand that that is because my experience in the world is generally that people don't question my right to be places that's super interesting to me in the conversation we had in west hollywood we were talking about i can't remember what we're talking about it was the same day where i told you i was going to end all if we if you ask the right person we were standing we were standing at the kitchen and airbnb remember what we were talking about but i said something you said that happens to you and i'm like it doesn't happen to you and you're like never i don't remember what it was but it was somebody to sound like somebody checking id's like you described being like ma'am may i see your va little things like that at the time i get checked that like every like this is probably the first conference and like five of them where i wasn't asked if i'm supposed to be here i will also say though that we are a business show we are a show about people starting businesses and the essence of business is money in money out i want to check in with the audience do you want me to open this up for audience questions if so i don't clap or yeller or do you want us to keep talking up here there's tape to what i do there is more tape because we can listen to them i mean there is the one moment that arlen does get emotional if we want to hear that bag yeah let's hear okay let's just go straight to that tape hit clip three please i was on the program at school where you get.

arlen
"arlen" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

StartUp Podcast

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

"Think it was both honestly arlen yes do you think it was an asset that the journalists following you around didn't know much about venture capital or do you think it was an obstacle personally i would have used the opportunity in a different way i would have i should be a politician yes specifics please i think that some listeners may have gotten the impression this is just me thinking about it but may have gotten the impression maybe that it was easier than it really is or that some of the decisions i make as a leader of the company are willy nilly i think that a couple of episodes being dedicated to talking to a wide array of other venture capitalists who have the most important part raised their own fund would have gone a long way all right do you want amy yeah i know i've been i've been following this critique because everyone's been talking about it on her reaction podcasts and get one point you said like why didn't you guys spend an episode with another venture capital firm to see how they do it and see how how we look in comparison to them but then i also get the sense that you feel like what you're doing and what you have done is unique so there's not really a good kind of if you still and you're not a gp general partner you more than likely had nothing to do with raising the fund raising the fund is just building the house and you were talking to the painters and so it's hard to compare it not to say the patriots weren't needed but you know what i mean as you can hear arlen has no qualms telling amy what she thinks and push back sometimes and there are a few points in the season arlen where you're like amy i know what you're after here i'm not going to go on i'm actually let's just listen to clip two okay can i interrupt you i felt you're talking a little bit you are excited about this and i think it's making you talk a little bit about this like you're giving his speech or something do you know what i mean like you sound talking no no it's not i know you are i know you i'm i guess what helped me is to know what you want like what do you want me to do i'm not gonna do it i would just be serious i just wanted i like i don't understand how after two or so mum feel saying that i'm not reacting away that normal people this is how i talk nuno this has nothing to do with your reaction i'm not saying like oh you're not excited enough or anything like that not at all okay i just i wanted to why i asked what i thought it was just like i was trying to ask this straight for question of hey can you just give me a really like.

arlen
"arlen" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

StartUp Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

"A lot of people would find this discouraging the problem seems structural intractable but arlan something else a way to make money and to me this marks the real beginning of arlyn's career as a venture capitalist i thought what an interesting off twenty because the did take a tenth of the resources is it fair to say that if we give her the same resources she can do ten x the return and that soon as i had the question my head own i go this is the genesis of arlyn's thesis the thesis is a thing in venture capital you have to have one if you're going to be a vc is your philosophy it's how you decide what to invest it arlyn's thesis is that women and people of color have an edge on hustle and that vc's investment the return will be huge other vc's she felt were overlooking this crucial fact arlen believed her future was in silicon valley but she was still in texas she needed away in so she sent more emails this time potential employers asking for jobs at startups at vc firms she even offered to work for free and all she heard was no arlen had been at this for nearly a year trying to find her way in when she read about a contest being put on by a man named george zachary zachary is a partner in a big vc fund his biggest win was twitter and he was looking for someone to be his apprentice to arlon this was the ticket that could get her out of parallel in texas and california where she could learn investing from the pros so she sat down on her blow up mattress and she made a video on her phone george by arlan hamilton and i was going to email you but i thought i'd make videos did video looks very homemade all you see is arlyn's head against a white stucco wall and she just lays it all out as you can see i probably don't.

arlyn vc arlen george zachary zachary partner texas arlan hamilton twitter california
"arlen" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Door to matinez easy arlen for a year says the teen's mother was clearly upset when the fbi arrived shoes sitting crying and weeping we we're not exactly at the time we didn't know why the fbi says as easy was indoctrinated by isis propaganda online and hope to join the fight in afghanistan before deciding to focus closer to home texting an undercover agent he thought was a fellow supporter the teen wrote in january quote i read article from isis they say it's better to attack them here he even discussed targets school is a perfect place for an attack and there is a hindu temple i want to shoot up by late march he settled on this mall and scouted the location multiple times he wrote the attack would be during the muslim holy month of ramadan to avoid muslim casualties his weapon of choice would be an ar fifteen the federal law bans anyone younger than eighteen from buying it on their own over two months he wired more than fourteen hundred dollars to undercover agents pretending to be in on the job he said my rifle needs to be pretty and cool looking put an i love america sticky on the side of the teen is being held on three million dollars bail according to an anti defamation league report more than half of the individuals involved in his law mic extremist plots in the us were born right here the first death has been reported in a national food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce california officials confirmed the death that are not releasing information about the person cbs news correspondent jerry could duncan says that one hundred twenty one people have gotten sick in half the states in the country that's twenty five states now and at least fifty two been hospitalized fourteen with kidney failure the romaine lettuce comes from the yuma arizona region inspectors are still looking at about two dozen farms in the area as well as the entire supply chain meanwhile the advice from the cdc is still the same don't buy or eat any lettuce unless you know for certain it is not from yuma arizona yuma farms provide most of the romaine sold in the us during the wintertime and california officials say about one hundred people statewide have contracted norovirus in the.

arlen fbi us jerry cdc norovirus afghanistan america duncan yuma arizona california fourteen hundred dollars three million dollars two months
"arlen" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"And the republican party lost me he no next question for you senator if we could move on senator hold on ahmed i'm still answering the question i think which in the case of john casick and arlen specter is not true both of them have i mean case basically a democrat and arlen specter became the same thing he he went from the republican party to the democrat side they're just liberals so later in the conversation he casick insinuated that he might run in twenty twenty isn't that exciting here in my state we have balanced budget surplus we're up half a million jobs and then people say well case it's not a conservative what does that mean is that i have to be anti immigrant antitrade sh in favor of what party come on home come home to where we basically live where proimmigrant we're protrade we're pro growth we worry about that we should care about people from top to bottom not just those at the top and everybody i can bring that party back that's what i'm going to do in one way or another what does that mean what does that mean being conservative does that mean i'm anti immigrant that is exactly what a progressive would say that is exactly what democrat would say anti immigrant this guy's not a republican in any way shape or form no it doesn't mean you're anti immigrant and means that you're pro legal immigration doofus man i john casick sucks republican democrat it doesn't matter he sex and lever pablo can part.

republican party arlen specter senator ahmed john casick
"arlen" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

StartUp Podcast

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

"She clearly wanted to frame this event for me somehow i turned the recorder back on you know before like two years ago year and a half ago i'd have to big to to be in this room now i get invites all the time because you know i represent something that is a very easy plug and play henry trying to check marks you got three of them with me and maybe more if you wanna diversify your conference arlen checks a lot of boxes lack female gay and she had given this some thought it reminded her of an old tv episode she'd seen a lot of things remind arlen of old tv episodes i don't know if you're old enough to know this one but i am ever watch designing women it's like thirty years ago or something there's an episode where anthony is invited to join a country club that had historically been white owned good morning latest so i'm late but i had to swing by the club this and he is wearing the outfit and just feeling himself right and over time over the episode the ladies realize he's being used as a token they pull them to the side and the you know very very sad way you know they say you know and they're just using you and he looked at them and he said you know how smart i am you know that he did not just off the turn of truck he said that's why in every picture i smile real big get real country on though i'm going to every potty i'm going to dance everybody but you and every time a group pictures taken on be sitting there on the front row go.

henry arlen anthony thirty years two years
"arlen" Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

Edible-Alphaâ„¢

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on Edible-Alphaâ„¢

"I didn't really know what that man but to try to take everything that you know we have learned from arlen business from harland past experiences and that we were seeing these businesses go through and try to catalog it each it trying to remove things at work right amplify that were great a lot i was learning failure look at ourselves and what we got wrong don't do this or looking at what other people did right or wrong they do this don't do that and it's amazing you know you can't google things no you can't and so we're are these all your tenants at this point like a base leases or how does that work there a member of union kitchen okay yeah okay so are you set up as a member organization legal members idea we're all where you're paying a be you're coming in your spe rocking coming us this build a business so legally you're not like a member llc are co op you are a just a business to regular old el regular and they pay a membership just to pre the kitchen jim okay and then you so then you're watching a lot of failure because they'll i'll that that's ubiquitous i think in a lot of shared use kitchen facilities in incubators around businesses period but certainly food on that that the failure rate of the businesses and the churn rate is really pretty high so so you jumped in and decided you try to do some technical assistance essentially to solve that.

arlen google
England's Eddie Jones apologises 'scummy Ireland' Wales remarks from video footage

Today

02:00 min | 2 years ago

England's Eddie Jones apologises 'scummy Ireland' Wales remarks from video footage

"And whether the company's hedging its bets it employs about seven thousand five hundred people in the uk so it may lose its footsie100 status if it doesn't have a primary base in the uk let's hope it doesn't start to affect uk jobs as well thanks very much rusty mold from aj bell we're hoping to speak to paul polman the chief executive unilever on this program just after seven o'clock thank you all the time is not twenty seven minutes past six in his guardian of the sport john michelle good morning to you the first test between england and new zealand start so we today and england the currently involved in the warm up match in hamilton and i've been struggling just little with the bat let's cross to the ground and get the latest from simon man good morning well let's be good morning guys been unusual day's cricket england bowled out for one hundred ninety five but under the rules for this practice match their batting on the scoreboard says two hundred forty the thirteen you don't see that very often the only batsman to impress lancashire's liam livingston on his first senior toy made eighty eight before being caught behind in the first over after dinner break mark stoneman is body twice and being dismissed for one and two hours to cook act twice today for thirty and fourteen no one else has made it past thirty there been so many loose shots spins and route batting for a second time at the moment two hundred and forty four thirteen thank you very much chelsea will beaten three nil in the champions league by barcelona more on that match an our arsenal is women team defeated manchester city one nil to win the league cup for fifth time england face highland in the six nations on saturday and ahead of that match england coach eddie jones has apologized for comments he made about ireland an also wells at a sponsors talk chris jones reports although jones made these comments at a private event in july twenty seventeen it's still an embarrassing episode this full of england head coach who's apologize unreservedly fourth of disparaging remarks while they are a few say they will also polish is to the welsh and irish rugby unions joneses feeling the heat after back to back defeats and this will ramp up the pressure with grand slam chasing arlen coming to twickenham this weekend's jones is out to.

Arlen Twickenham Joneses Chris Jones Ireland Manchester Simon New Zealand Paul Polman UK Eddie Jones England Chelsea Mark Stoneman Liam Livingston Lancashire Hamilton Chief Executive Unilever Twenty Seven Minutes Two Hours
"arlen" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on WLOB

"Go to arlen who is an alabama arlen share with us your advice hey todd nurse crew of excuse me a producer christain you need to move down to hattiesburg mississippi okay great schools uh y'all can broadcast from their todd can come in new can you know do ever i'm close to his home state oh by the way i thought she was from south haven saad well yes but i was born and mep is so we're right there on the state lied you know how it is all a kolea thigh close enough back close enough but uh the food is great uh we can find somebody debate to cook you a good bagel to your tasting and we'll get you eating like a southerner in no time and you know there there are some good italian places down in embassies sippy they've got plenty of olive gardens producer christine oh now is much better knowledge guard now here's a couple of of mom and pop italian restaurants down there oh golly they're so good now arlyn i have to i must confess that i'm surprised you're from alabama but you're suggesting that too we move to mississippi well now when i call before i was traveling through alabel all i saw mississippi all right that makes perfect sense i am from the hattiesburg area just a little bit out of town and go close enough to the gulf coast you can go down it's been a little on the beach in an hour in thirty minutes you can be in your chair at the beach posting now arlyn you'll healing you you'll appreciate this arlen ah i spent many evacation down there on.

alabama mississippi arlen producer hattiesburg south haven saad christine oh thirty minutes
"arlen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's ella fitzgerald harold arlen saw johnny mercer lear i'm sure that many of you are familiar with two the g discs during the second world war and after the second world war these were records uh either made specifically for our our fighting men all over the world or they were records that had been put out in the united states but whatever the whatever they were they got to where they wish to post go sinatra made a number of discs crosby chew and many other singers and there's a v disc that he made of a song if you did not record and two nearly the end of his life many many many decades later the song we've just in an one long conversation with him i said to him you you said in a magazine recently the truths recorded all the great soul would you give me sixty seconds to speak at you he should shoot yes and i was going through songs through the composure said redwood the hit on porter would hit on rogers i would hit on kern i would hit on berlin and of course harold arlen and i would just name soul wchs statutory could he was sitting eleven no that's too far i would say five or six feet from we were in a room by ourselves bennett serfs house sixty seconds of lexington between lexington and park and out of my out of my mouth came my shutting our obvious but to continue and i said you made aviv discotheque then i continued on but the very fact the mention of the v disc i could see a little blinken his guy he had pink promo were and he got it and many of his his his pace got he never said anything about but he did later ron shake something about he made a record of this will be my shutting our so in the trilogy i'll the he is the v disc performance rare thing indeed sinatra harold arlen johnny mercy's this will be my shining whoa.

harold arlen johnny mercer lear world war united states sinatra porter rogers lexington ella fitzgerald berlin ron sixty seconds six feet
"arlen" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"arlen" Discussed on WLOB

"Seven you're listening to one hundred point five fm debbie davis the author of a hundred things doing portland maine before you die bob witkowski and the author of the main golf report heard on the big jab at seven or eight arlen anatolia and you know i i really don't brag about being hurt on wlob but he does brag about being hurt i love how he's going data the very white voices legal yet well you know when we talk about golf you gotta you the golf club why did you dumped ahead says i wasn't hearing anything out of him oh that's not go try this why don't you tell me that man wheat will that because you don't want to miss this it's uncle dave shula cup day i noted will go on there i we're fabulous dave shula the host of the hr power our earlier saturday mornings ten to eleven am the head of career management associates and dale carnegie main but known to all of us in our hearts as uncle dave yeah let me it's a good thing i am everybody's doing well the good to have a couple of things well you ribbons wearing a good question for me to give a couple of rican out while you're much more interesting than i am to go ahead no worry for you probably all know the the the main department of waiver attitudes in regard to child labour walked on basically have a go the will come out and said that a fourteen yearold are now able to work in a more place that they were while before for example he can work and movie theater thick network member permanent museum park thick work a bowling alley they have clarified the.

maine bob witkowski wlob dave shula debbie davis portland dale carnegie