19 Burst results for "Arlanda"

Globalization is ending. What's next?

TED Talks Daily

03:31 min | 10 months ago

Globalization is ending. What's next?

"We are at the end of globalization. We taken globalization for granted and as it drifts into history. We're going to miss. The second wave of globalization begun in the nineties and it delivered a great deal. Billions of people rose out of poverty. More impressively both prattled congress like vietnam and bangladesh increased by over six times in the last twenty years. The number of democracies rose in countries as diverse as chile malaysia. Estonia held free and fair elections. The role of women improved in many parts of the world. If you look at wages policy and companies like spain or access to education in countries like saudi arabia economically supply chains spread like webs around the world with car parts criss crossing borders before the final product. Coming into place is also changed the way we live now. it's changed our diets. It's changed how we communicate how we consume news. An entertainment how we travel and how we work but no globalization is on its deathbed. It's run into the limitations of its own. Success inequality a new record levels of business for example world to gdp is now pushing that was not seen since the polio wars. Two hundred years ago. Show us that. The advantages of globalization have been mis directed. The global financial crisis was the result of this mismanagement. And since then policymakers have done little but contain rather than solve the problems of our age. Now some highly globalised countries. Such as arlanda in the netherlands managed to improve income inequality in their countries by better distributing the bounties of globalization to higher taxes and social welfare programs. Other countries have not been as good russia. And especially the united states hub extreme levels of wealth in policy more extreme even during the time of the roman empire and this is convinced. Many people that globalization is against them and that the bounties of globalization have not been shared with the many a now in twenty twenty were confronted by the pandemic which has shaken the groaned under us on further exposed the frailties of the globalized world order in past international crisis. Most of them economic or geopolitical the hers usually ultimately been a sense of a committee to save the world leaders leading nations would come together but this time uniquely there has been no such collaboration against the backdrop of trade wars. Some countries like the. Us have outbid others for masks. There's been hacking of vaccine programs on common enemy. The pandemic has not been met with the common response to any hope that we might have a world vaccine or world. Recovery program is in vain. Snow worth the end over nira in history. An era that began with the fall of communism that set in train the flow of trade of finance of people under ideas

Chile Malaysia Arlanda Estonia Bangladesh Vietnam Saudi Arabia Congress Spain The Netherlands Russia United States
"arlanda" Discussed on The Derby City Betrayal

The Derby City Betrayal

07:50 min | 11 months ago

"arlanda" Discussed on The Derby City Betrayal

"Seen plastered all over the news but at that intersection on that morning as juliet. Hurry to make that right turn. No one knew a young woman was about to disappear. My morning began about six. O'clock am that morning because my husband had just been diagnosed with prostate cancer and he had an appointment at eight thirty so we began to leave out of our driveway. Lived on snowflake course at the time and we began to take so flake trouble door to mossy. Which is directly in front of Complex in i can tell you. It was clearly that morning between seven and seven. Thirty eight pm. This was around the same time. The jennifer typically left for work. So you were at that intersection. Which i've i've actually been to that intersection. And you're you're about to pull out from the intersection in across that two way road. You see a car that looks like jennifer is coming out of the mosaic apartments. And were you able to see what the driver looked like in the passenger. What did you observe. I did not because the car you can tell. The car was steering from side to side. There was some type of struggle going on inside the car. I see so. The car was more sort of toward the intersection. And it was moving in a in a way that erotic or correct that's correct word out use erotic. You make this observation in. What did you say to your husband. Or what did you to discuss. Actually my husband said it seems like somebody's fighting in the car. He said if we had time we would call. The police. And i said to him. We don't have time because you gotta go issue. I eight radiation. That's why we did not stay a stop sign to see which by the car turn because we was rushing to get on the other side of town. Where his first irradiation so when you turned to go on your way. Was the car still at the intersection. Didn't ask yes. Yes we may all right turn. The car was still in the intersection of the mosaic. And you're certain that it was a black chevy malibu one hundred percent surgeon but from where you were you were not able to see. It was a woman driving or man driving. I honestly could not tell sitting in the waiting room of the doctor's office. Juliet couldn't stop thinking about the swerving. Black malibu neither could her husband. Did you guys talk at all during the day about what you had scenery kind of. Just dismiss it. No we actually. We actually talked about it because we didn't know what happened. We were like a wanted. Somebody was hiding. Matter of fact i even pulled up on the news to see if there was any accidents reported in the area. There was no accidents reported in the area so we did often wonder what happened that day. How many people were in the car and total debt. I could not tell. I don't know. Have you ever been to the mosaic. But when you come out the mosaic there's a when you come out of the derogate and you pool towards the front. They're not actually up to the role yet. Light we were so they will are a little bit back as they were just coming out of the complex but we can still see the car. What kind of heart was but we could not see the people inside of the car because the distant it was from our stop sign. We'll be back after this short break. Did you hear the news now. You can with instant updates from fox news for amazon alexa. Just say alexa. Play news from fox in fox news. It's the latest when you need it on demand from fox news and amazon alexa from the fox news podcasts network download and listen to everyone. Talks delays fox business lists docks with entrepreneurs and executives about inspiring and motivational stories subscribing. Listen now by going to fox news. Podcasts dot com the next day on january twenty fifth. Juliet called their arlanda police department to report but she had seen bank. It was a very next day. Which would have been january. twenty fifth. Two thousand sakes Contact the police department. And did you get in touch with somebody directly in. You're able to tell them everything. I told them i was call lane. I had some inflammation of the gays. I see and then did they. Send officer to your home. Yes but not that same day. But it wasn't until a few days later that the couple realized the significance of what they'd witnessed a black. Chevy malibu was found abandoned in the parking lot of an apartment complex called huntington on the green about one mile away. The car was confirmed to belong to twenty-four-year-old orlando woman jennifer. Cassie today her. Two thousand and four. Chevy malibu was found at this apartment complex near her condo. The twenty four year old was last heard from monday night. Her friends passed out these fliers for a second day hoping that someone has seen her or know something. Please bring your back if you please give her back when you saw the picture of the car on the news. What went through your mind when i tell you. There is no doubt in my mind. Once we saw that car on the news we both knew that was exactly the car we had seen. Coming out of mosaic. My memories so clear. I remember their date. I remember the time are immobile. What kind of car. It was. And i remember the year several days later an officer with the orlando pd. Knocked on the couple's store according to juliet. When did the police knock on your door where they sort of canvassing the neighborhood and trying to speak with people acute be one hundred percents certain but when they did knock on the door they talked to me and my husband and we told them what had what we had seen and then when i guess the cassie family hot their own private investigator became an interview. Me i told him to sign story. I wanted to see for myself. How well juliet story held up was really possible to see what she did. From across a busy four-lane road. I asked mike toretta. The private investigator hired by the family to take me to that. Intersection goes way was calling from the stop. Sign at moxie boulevard and conroy road. I could see the entrance and exit of the mosaic condominiums with no problem. I observed a silver toyota rav. Four exiting the property and turning right onto conroy road. My line of sight was clear and unobstructed. I asked mike what he thought. How credible do you consider juliet as a witness. I believe very credible. I had the opportunity to follow up on it or not. It was october twenty eight. Th of twenty seventeen. I had the opportunity to interview.

fox news jennifer Black malibu juliet Juliet prostate cancer arlanda police department amazon fox malibu alexa orlando police department Cassie huntington mike toretta cassie
"arlanda" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

The Final Furlong Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"arlanda" Discussed on The Final Furlong Podcast

"It's safe to do, so we'll get. We'll all be able to go back, but I will take it right now. That I cannot go racing this year and I'm fine with. That I'm okay with that I know a lot of people aren't. But, maybe I'm just more realistic. Yes sure like I come. I come from a training yard and I'm not even like racing, I just have to deal with us, and it's just the way things are at the moment we have to. We have to take the precautions racing going so well at the moment. It's everyone is taking precautions as they should be. Which is Britain's on? Yeah, okay? Yes, it would be great to get the owners going racing. They're big part of our yard. The keep keep us going to keep business running for us, and we have to be very supportive of us like even if it's just a bother Obama Tuesday or the Kerr on the weekend every. There's nothing better that it goes of the winner ever for an owner chain jockey, so yeah, it's great to have them at the track boss. At the moment, things are different. We have to do the precautions the way it's place are to us. We have to the health screening. It's been working so far. Arlanda is probably in a great position because of the laser together all the. The time anyway, so we're not crossing over mixing So yeah, it would be great guessing onus, go racing to be honest. I think there are a big part of our game and They're deserve ristic. Put a lot of money and time and Joe. A lot of patience goes into right. Chertoff, training horses on yeah, no big rates get the horror stories, but Gaza said public. Shirt. When is open? It's open like I. Say I haven't been racing and I don't see myself going racing for the rest of the year. look. To just circumstances that it's in. We just have to take it from me over the weekend. When does when do I think he will be able to racing next? Dublin racing, festival. Probably A. Second Way I don't think it's going to be. I I would definitely take county and CNN on board. I think BAFTA. Where am basically non-existent bound stockton back again. But the reality is that. was attended. Alright, your stress..

Chertoff CNN Arlanda Obama Britain Gaza stockton Joe Dublin Kerr
In the shadow of mothers  Anne Enright

VINTAGE Podcast

10:41 min | 1 year ago

In the shadow of mothers Anne Enright

"Thank you so much for writing such an incredible book. I thought was really interesting. How the book was sent. Just you know it really does pass the test when it comes to two women talking to each other about things and so you also involved in the pen. International Women's Manifesto. Do you did you when you came to thinking about writing this book was. It was a thing where you're like. I want to tell women's stories in interesting ways or was it kind of just like I'm interested in these characters and I mean I've always written about women. It was actually my last book. The Green Road that to pretty central male characters is. It just never occurred me before. I think it was really good. Fun Rushing Man I. Oh Oh yeah. I can see why people might want to do this. But I more or less human beings amend their female. Because that's what I know bests I Yeah I've I've done a man to work on gender in publishing and reviewing and I keep obgyn BG on Alaskan. I'm quite an advocacy. Abbas my political life. It's not really my creative life. Yeah just swimming. Martin a book. That doesn't really figure just stuff that I need to put together. I find the figure of Del. She's an actress. Goes through from the forties rush up to the nineteen hundred s She's Big Irish figure. I actually thought was at least three things for me in terms of telling stories And how we tell stories and also in terms of Arlanda base with what that was I don't know why I put it from the point of view the daughter it seems to be the natural way to go is interested in glamour. And I think that glamour is kind of impart its idealization which children off their mothers very much but also the glamour contains little hint of loss. You know when something is glamorous. It's already nostalgic or it's already receding from you. That was a really good moment for a daughter to have a better mother so she has this big famous mother and of course. She's everything to to daughter as well. So there's those two things went together very well and I loved. It was told from the spectrum because it kind of the fact that she was completely unknowable. In some way and there was this privacy almost even in an intimate relationship. The daughter goes through to the first half of the book is almost like a memory and she tells you exactly where her mother was and what she did and all the rest. I like a lot of members. You're somehow there's a lot of color and detail an interest curiosity but some. I haven't got the key to the person or the key. In this case to want the person ends up doing because The mother the actress the star ends up shooting a a small town producer in the fish. I found it really interesting to the way. Describe the you played at Trinity Day. Do Waving into the book or research around. I wanted to raise it book for years. And I've been looking for good books for for for decades because I just loved the kind of hopefulness of the slight toll. Dryness of the high shambolic backstage is and how what the difference between backstage than going on under the lights is like and I did a digital native a small amount of acting when I was in my early twenties I'm at one stage. I had considered working out as a career but as unemployed as every other actor was and Oakland at the time which is pretty standard Unemployment rate of ninety five percents in the profession. But anyway I decided that it was a bit of a mugs game and I turned to rushing instead deafening fit higher percentage of my team. Maybe you're always employed advising earning anything but you and most people aren't but you're busy that makes sense so you're a professor of fiction. How does that affect the way you right now? Do you think it's changed because you'll teaching as well? Does she feed off students? Does it change the way you think about writing or is it kind of very separate fee? Yeah I teach creative writing a new C. D. I really enjoy it. I love the freshness of the page and the fact that it isn't finished yet the feeling that I am seeing seeing people's work shift with in a noble way when they bring us into an Ma and they start passing durant and they suddenly start seeing. What they're doing. There's all makes sense It's very steep learning curve for people. It's quite anxious anxiety provoking i. It's a big moment for them and I like being there Around US energy. I don't necessarily take anything to my own process as the Americans. You don't necessarily take take anything to to might to the desk from the classroom except Thou sense that this is what you're it's like. This is the air you breathe is high sentences are made where you put your common making all the difference. Hi can hinge a story or a book on on on high. Turn on a dime. I can build it slowly. I mean when you're in a book your inside it doesn't change on book eleven. You're inside you don't quite know what it is and I suppose there's a time when you start to look at. Yeah now I know now I know that is. That's glorious when that happens as we go to really good fun. Did you find the price of this book? I'm any different to the other. Books is kind of book. Very Different Orgy. Feel like you. You have a new well. Every book is the saying in us. I spend an enormous amount of time. Not Getting anywhere and slightly in despair rewriting and rewriting and rewriting. What feels like the wrong paragraph and that was on sometimes for our moms or is always goes on from him so I mean let's be frank and then I realized that have been growing the book that I've been solving other problems off the page. So there is a time for quite. There's a tipping point where you're actually. It's actually moving at takes about nuts about a year in for me and then another year in I get the gasses. I know where I know what the whole thing is going to be now. I'm a really foolish hopeful about. I'M A. I'm a great food at the desk because I don't know where I'm going. I start to book so it's up to mistake. Obviously somehow it works the must be some sense there but of an ending or where. It's going I'M I. I had the the episode that the the the mother choosing the producer in the foot and I must have had an more of motivation and history there as well but I just didn't know what was going along the way and have such an easy life if I could just make up my mind and say okay. This is a book in three parts and it takes place in three days and you know wakes up at five. Am and it ends at twelve midnight on Thursday. And here's what happens and then I just go type type type type but the problem. I think books that are too preplanned that there are. There are bits finished. There'd be dead on the page. You like something that's making itself up as it goes along. Yeah don't be seduced by parameters. Well no yeah I mean. People get all their ducks in a row. You've got a ROLODEX. There's no medicine today. Wouldn't ducks I like that. Tell me a little bit about how you think. Maybe people responding island to your writing as opposed to to anywhere else. Do you see a difference in. This book is so much you know a lot of set an island but it's also features. This character is to say that she was born in England and yes very much sees herself as Irish and being Irish is is almost a performance live aspects of her in some ways. Yes tell me about that. How did you feel about the perception of Irishness? Yeah well it was really interested in in this. Mongrel troy of the actors in the forties. There were actually came back from London. Dublin and the moines trying the countryside's To bringing Shakespeare to the small towns and and and then aren't the wonderful the way they show up at the stage when when Romeo kinks Julius is dead or whatever. I'm there's likely patronizing but they galvanized these small towns. People really remember the mirror very important they were real interesting and different to the texture normal Moore life which doses quite impoverished knitted during the wars. Anyway I love these guys It's been like Shakespeare while at the The they worked in India as well but the so they were kind of colonial remnants in a way but they weren't entirely English or Irish or anything. It was hard to identify. There was a guy called me home. Mclemore who has ended up finding Gate Piers Hilton Edwards and they were the only game in Ireland for for decades. They were a couple of never knew there. Were a couple in here so that was fine. So that's already really interesting. The meal mclemore. Who had apart from anything else Beautiful Beautiful Irish Gaelic. Irish was born in Winston and he made himself up. At what point did he change? I am he came to I. I'd have to look it up again. Became young to Ireland and decided he was going. He was called Mike Williams. I thank our Williams and he turned it into Macklemore and he spoke like that has an Irish theatre voice in which he did wonderful renditions and people didn't find him out. I guess we've got the Internet now. You will be able to so there. Was this gay couple and his sister married on your McMaster. Who's in my book? And they went around. I didn't I didn't. This is all history outside of the book and they went around the country so anything is possible. They might have been straight. You know that might be another kind of Mongol identity that they weren't they were. They were between borders between countries and between identities and they were actors. And that's what they were supposed to be.

Ireland Producer Mike Williams Shakespeare Arlanda United States Trinity Day Abbas Martin Durant London Professor Oakland Frank Dublin Hilton Edwards Mclemore Macklemore England
"arlanda" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Back in the nineteen eighty s or nineteen Ninety-seven gay ran away another time as well. It's now five forty one on land morning news. I mentioned to you. That would have the full five day forecast. Totally wasn't kidding here. It is brought to you this morning by southeast deal appliance warehouse. Hey, Tom, Joe beautiful start on this Wednesday already getting toward the halfway Mark of the week. We're watching a stubborn storm system back across Texas. It's going to be moving our way rain chance going way up on Friday afternoon and Friday evening. We'll have some more scattered storms could become our next weather action day where we could have some active weather. You may have to take action to make sure you're safe you're in the afternoon, some scattered storms back in our forecast. Then nice day eight today ninety for high. Tomorrow. Mid eighties fry with increasing rain storms in the afternoon. We'll be watching that and updating the timing is closer this weekend. The Puerto Rican day Frei downtown good the Apopka art foliage festival. Looks good temperatures mid to upper eighties for the weekend. They extended five day forecast. Four times an hour. From channel nine I'm chief meteorologist, Tom Terry. I am going to be in the Puerto Rican parade on Saturday, and I'm excited about that. So if you're planning on going to the prayed look for me, I'll be the tall skinny guy. Gosh, I hope I'm not walking. I hope someone brings me a chair to sit down on. It is now clear cool sixty one at Arlanda severe weather station. Safetouch Security triple team traffic. Hello, ed. Hello Joan checking out that drive on I four up to speed in both directions. Overnight construction has wrapped up at OBT that exit ramp is now open so construction on the turnpike. Southbound.

Tom Terry Frei chief meteorologist Arlanda Texas Joan five day
"arlanda" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They felt felt for me. Yeah. So genuine. Helena's poking me hard on the radio. You couldn't do that. Also, just a second ago, holding your shoe shoe for the first half of the Senate. He was talking about Brooke. But I'm not a madman. Like rolling out my ankle underneath the table. I've been wearing heels for hours. Marjiana's character could have easily been a punchline like the the stage. Mom, yeah. Yeah. Tell me about your decision. Not to go that way. I mean, obviously as creative people you want a stretch and everything, but how did you decide that she wasn't going to be that mom? I mean, if you like we just said yourselves we'd seen that before or felt a little too easy. Yeah. We were. We were worried boxes send you a corner. And we would just have to write jokes that we'd already seen your should be. So one one from the beginning that you couldn't she couldn't grow or change. And that was really important to us. Same thing with chase too. I think maybe the knee jerk. Idea would have been to make him like this like little thirteen year old who's famous he's probably like Rudy his older siblings. And like thinks he's too cool. But he's not he loves them and like looks up to them. And then when Kerry tells him that he addition for a commercial where he only to smell a fart chases like. Whoa, cool at so audition. You got a call back, and he's sincere. He's a sweet kid surprise. You know, you kind of see the beginning. And you think oh, it's Bieber Esq. But he's he's adorable. Yeah. Yeah. So we kind of tried to do that just so it gave us more just each of the characters had more legs like for street or the manager. He is obviously taking advantage of this kid. You know? Does some pretty rough things to him like he's like trying to die his tongue to make his tongue pinker for the girls. But then also will cry out him at the drop of a hat because he loves him so much, and he's his best friend. So we tried to make sure that every character had a bunch of different things going on. So all the supporting cast wasn't just coming into frame and playing there one character game one. Yeah. Yeah. Ken Marino is so funny. He's funny. And I forgot to turn my phone off. He has texted eleven times during this conversation. We just share. It's I gotta say. Landed in New York and wanted us to know. Bladed landed. Andy is texting. What's up? You there? New York City is a character in this. It really feels like it is not us. Not us. We always talk about that. But that seems so lofty to say, but why just like we like that idea? But it feels like I dunno shows like say that and it always feels like, okay. But it is it is like a huge part of our show. It's a huge reason we said it in New York instead of LA or anywhere else. We we were talking about why we said it New York, and we were like just because we wanted to see them walk down the street in the west village, which is so dumb. But literally true. Yeah. And then in the finale, we set certain scenes in Rockefeller Center at night, just because we wanted to shoot in Rockefeller Center, and on the Brooklyn Bridge. Yeah. It's so great to because if as an actor in New York, you go two sets all the time on shows if you're working in shooting here, and we didn't have one. So every day we were all over the city went all these different places and shot in Times Square in the middle of the night. And it was awesome. He has struggling in New York has its particular vibe because I've struggled in a few. And I've struggled in New York, and it just has it's own vibe. And you can feel that in this show. Yeah. Drew tarver. You've struggled all across America. I have. That's my reality show struggling across America. Somebody's gonna pick it up. Somebody will pick it up. My guess Arlanda York Andrew Tarar, they are co starring in the new comedy central show. It is called the other to the creators are here as well. Chris Kelly, and Sarah Schneider. Can I ask a real practical questions? So you guys have these great gig SNL. Did you leave SNL to do this? Yeah. You just like, hey, we're going to do this thing where we're venturing out on our own. What was that? Like, I mean, that's a to even iconic place like that. Well, we've been there for a while for six years, and it wasn't just a Lauren. We're leaving over the last year or two we had developed a show with he's an executive producer on the show. So, and that's kind of just how this show is trying to figure out what next as as they leave. But it is so much part of the world. There is you know, we had back then in our pilot. We had Heidi Gartner in our show. We had Julia tourism our show. Yeah. And so many of our like amazing makeup artists and designers, and they all came from SNL. We saw we stole them. We did. It was scary leaving because it is such this established amazing. It was some of the best years of our life. But we knew there are people that we could continue to work with and Lorne was still involved. And so I think we still feel like a part of the family or feel like it's an extension of. Of being. Yeah. What kind of what kind of transition was it for you, professionally because you know, I know what the machine is. Like, you you do it's intense. It's the first six days or crazy as opposed to this. You know has to have a story arc and it goes over a yard of time. But we were saying like the blessing and the curse was like how how you have more time. So it really allows you take, you know, like do a character arc into really over think the characters and make sure that everything ties together, and you know, but then also the curses that it allows you time to over think it. So that's the nice thing about SNL. Is you write something on Tuesday and its on air on Saturday. So sometimes it sucks, and you're like we needed more time on that. But then Monday comes around and get to work on another scotch. So you can't beat yourself up for too long. And then if you read something you love it goes on TV right away. And it's so fun to get instant gratification. So it has been tricky to work on something for so long before it comes out, but it's been nice when you watch the whole season. You're like, oh, we got to make hours and hours of this thing we love. Yeah. Because at SNL you kind of are motivated by the fact that in a couple of days something you've made gets to be seen live, and there's an energy that's like driving you forward. And with the show like this. We've been working under for a year and a half two years. It's a little bit of a slower burn. Yeah. But it's exciting. Silently coming out. Yeah. And how how long have you been attached to these guys more for a year and a half this thing, they're baby? Yeah. Around like a year, which I think was because I was shot the pilot a year and a half ago we've been working on it for two years. That's not the exact numbers. It get real. And I were cast I think last June June that we just had by just had. I mean still awhile ago that June. Yeah, it's an it's definitely an interesting thing to get cast in the biggest thing of your career as an actor. And then you are so excited. But but then I mean, you're still excited for every step shooting. It waiting does. He get picked up all of this. Then it almost feel like once it comes out. It's like, oh, yeah. Yeah. I did a long drawn out sort of excitement that is strange had the pilot was up online for two weeks over the holidays. And so people started to get to see it and everybody was really nice, and you know, we'd side awhile ago. So everybody's like, oh, we saw the pilots so good. And we're just I was just kind of like know. I know it's hilarious. Sorry for screaming into the mic radio. Okay. That's matt. You can apologize to matter. The name of the show is the other two it premieres and comedy central on January twenty four th it is very funny. I will tell you that Elena York, drew Tarver, Chris Kelly, Sarah Schneider. Thanks so much.

New York SNL America Drew tarver Chris Kelly New York City Rockefeller Center Sarah Schneider Marjiana Helena Senate Brooke Ken Marino Arlanda York Bieber Esq Rudy Kerry executive producer
"arlanda" Discussed on Eyes on Conservation Podcast

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on Eyes on Conservation Podcast

"Maybe you guys can walk us through. Exactly how like what are those connections? Cow exactly is climate change going to increase violence against women and marginalized communities like like, what exactly is taking place is it increased mental health issues increased lack of provision and resources like can. You guys walk us through that. And I think I wanna add. It's not just women. And you've you've mentioned it. I mean, we address women in the article because that's a lot of the research. Some there's not a lot of research on this. What's been done? It's been focused on women. He mentioned it's any marginalized community anyone experiencing violence. It happens to men happens to children in you know, I think the as a piece of foundational knowledge that makes his connection is that violence is rooted in powering control, whether that's domestic while sexual violence child abuse. So when control or power is taken away from someone who's committing that violence it's going to cause a task the late. So I think there's like the very real implications. Like Paul mentioned is when there's a wildfire or a natural disaster an shelter to close. There's an excellent excellent coverage of in writing when there was reading fires that was last year in their shelter. The it kinda followed. What was happening there monitoring evacuation orders where those? Survivors go, you know, we can find other locations for them. But they're having to flee their already in crisis because they're not living at home. And now they're having to flee very dangerous situation without resources and support. So there's a very real kind of where people go when a shelter close in. We highlighted the article that when hurricane sandy hit. There were twelve shelters that had to close during that time. And typically what happens in this situation is victims are essentially forced to go back to what they know where they feel safe which often means returning back to a violent situation. I'm so so there's that, you know, impact of that frequency increased frequency of wildfires in hurricanes at other climate related issues are creating an actual physical safety owed. Add also that as as communities are evacuated. Find themselves in makeshift camps or FEMA camps or at. School gymnasiums children are much more at risk. There's a lot less accountability and oversight. Oftentimes, we see. That's what community really comes together. And there's a lot of strength in that. But there is also inherent risk and vulnerability for children for folks who are trying to flee, but then force into this into the space. I think also larger level if we look at climate refugees and people who are fleeing their communities or their countries that are experiencing prolonged drought or access to resources at water clean air and worked, and what that might look like the the statistics for people who experience sexual assault coming across the border into the US for Mexico. Some statistics put it at a almost half of the women who come across experienced sexual violence, experienced sexual assault. So that's very real threat as well. And kind of. Unless concrete way, but if we look at I think, we can drop parallels to male entitlement to women's bodies and women's spaces as well as male entitlement to the earth to resources into extraction and in Arlanda work. We talk a lot about rape culture, which is a culture in which systems are are in place that allow for sexual assault to thrive or two for it to be okay. When that's in media, whether that's music TV, very real current political situation. And how do we can we connect that rape culture to how we men in particular are doing are fighting the planet, and in terms of resource extraction, and really the creating of a lot of the a lot of what leads to climate change, and you Christine mentioned that there's not a lot of research being done on. This..

assault rape Arlanda work FEMA Paul Christine US Mexico
"arlanda" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on KTRH

"The French McCall has. Has delayed for now the gas tax increase due to the yellow jacket protesters that are burning down Paris. So I guess I guess rioting works to keep increasing taxes. Who knows who knew you know, something I learned Ramon? You know, why the French to eat snails so much? They don't like fast food. You know, what I need room? I need somebody who can Email me and help me get tickets to London because the tickets are too much. I'm trying to fly out to London around Christmas and coming back in little more than a week. So if you have somebody out there has it all figured out some of you out there, real smart analyst type people in you've got the website. On how I can get a great reduction. I'd really like to get business class seats for economy class fare is that asking too much, but some of you out there probably have a good system. I'm flying from San Diego, by the way, I'll drive up to LAX if I have to but I'm flying from San Diego or you can just put in LAX because I think it'll be cheaper to London. And then flying back a little over a week later D Houston. So if there's somebody out there that has this website that is that you just event Jellicoe about how great it is. Please send me an Email, Michael Michael berry, show dot com. Michael Michael berry, show dot com. On the issue of our twelve days of Christmas. I can't remember if I told but on the the lady that needed a roof Arlanda Larry's show, Walter is helping there I got an update from Josh Benoi on that. So that continues along we don't have our choice for tomorrow. I had to pick our person for tomorrow. People keep sending me. Hey, Bob Jones, these help here's his phone number. I can't really put out the word for needs. Help. Help me help. You hear helped me help? You figure out the one thing that person needs. And I'll see if I can get it taken care of you. Tell me a woman has key Lloyd's owner ear she would like to have those key removed. She's a grocery store clerk at a small town grocery store. She's twenty years old. Can you imagine going on a date with these awful things on your ears? She she has no insurance. She can't get them to I can call my dermatologist and get that cut off. If you tell me somebody quote needs help or really needs help there's not a lot I can do. So that person's not gonna get any help identify a discreet specific thing that we can isolate and take care of may not be the biggest most important thing. But it would be something, right? Recreational pot becomes legalized in Michigan today..

Michael Michael berry London Bob Jones San Diego Ramon analyst Michigan Paris Lloyd Josh Benoi Arlanda Larry Houston Walter twenty years twelve days
"arlanda" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on Pod Save America

"And she did vote for Roberts Alito Sotomayor care. Gin Gorsuch. So she does have this record of voting for supreme court nominees, no matter which party no one, you know, no matter who they're nominated by what the president's party is. The exception, of course, is she didn't do much when fucking Mitch McConnell wouldn't give garland hearing, shouldn't do anything. I would love to be there when Susan Collins hears about this whole Merrick, garland thing because she seems to have either been asleep during it or have given forgotten about it because it was it is the context for all of this and she completely ignored it completely ignored it, which you know McConnell when he did the garland thing. Part of that was giving some of his members cover like Collins to not have to face what an awful thing he did because he's like, fuck it. I'll take the rap for this. I'm the majority leader. I'm the one who has all the power to not give Merrick Arlanda hearing, and you can say, whatever you want, that's what you do with power. And then also, and this is important. She didn't really say this in her speech. Much, but she said this on CNN that she believes that Dr Christine blazey Ford was attacked sexually assaulted. She doesn't believe it was Brett cabin. So she believes Susan Collins believes a theory that was almost universally condemned as crazy conspiracy when it was floated by Ed Waylon fucking Brett Kavanagh's friend who used to be at the center on ethics and public policy, whatever the fuck it was called. The conspiracy theory that when Dr Christine blazey Ford said that she was one hundred percent certain that it was Brett Cavanaugh who attacked her. She was just suffering from a case of mistaken identity, and it was actually someone who looked like Brett Cava. That's what Susan Collins believes to be true. She didn't say, I actually don't know who's telling the truth and who's lying. She didn't say that. No, she went with the conspiracy theory about the cavenaugh Doppler ganger. So yeah, I'm pretty sure she was already in the camp. This is an important point because you sort of have to call bullshit on what is. Winning here, which is put aside Trump and the in the the far right MAG aheads, but what mainstream Republicans to extended that's term it's still exists. Wanna do is have it both ways. They want to claim to be people who in the metoo era believe victims. But in in call, Christine, Ford, credible. But they want to be able to say that and then also vote as she was lying because it is one or the other. She if you say she is credible than you have to to to believe that she is correct when she says that she's a hundred percent. Certain that Brent Cavanaugh attacked her and you can't have it both ways, and people are getting Susan houses trying to get away with that. And it's just it's ridiculous. It's the, it's, you know, she might as well pulled out her Zillow maps. Now, I, I think two of the most politically difficult. No votes were from Lisa Murkowski and from North Dakota's Heidi Heitkamp who is the only twenty eighteen Senate democrat who's actually trailing in the polls right now. What did you think about why they made the decisions? They did these two women. And what did you think about their reasoning? I think they did what they thought was right. And that is without regard for the political consequences, Heidi Heitkamp took huge risk. She could have gone the Joe Manchin route and just voted, yes. When it wouldn't have affected the outcome and she didn't do that. And Lisa Murkowski stood up against a lot of pressure from Connell and trumpet. Everyone else did the right thing and we should applaud that. Yeah. Oh, absolutely. And you know, especially Heitkamp to Murkowski's up in in twenty twenty two. She is sorta used to pissing off her party a little bit, right?.

Dr Christine blazey Ford Susan Collins Heidi Heitkamp Mitch McConnell Lisa Murkowski Roberts Alito Sotomayor garland Brett cabin Gin Gorsuch Merrick Arlanda Brett Cava Brett Cavanaugh president Brett Kavanagh CNN cavenaugh Doppler Brent Cavanaugh Zillow Trump
"arlanda" Discussed on 20/20

20/20

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on 20/20

"Why didn't Linda sisters attend the memorial service that Nathan organized, the fuel it appropriate memorial service when we don't know what happened. Arlanda sister's afraid of Nathan right now. What window sisters are afraid. As we all should be. There is a killer out there. I wish very much that my whole family could have come together to pray for my mom. I wished desperately that my mom was rescued. I hope that she will be found. Now I. Now I'm going to drive off. What about your door? Finding take care. In the midst of all this family dysfunction and the ongoing criminal investigation the questions hang in the wintry New England air. If Nathan did plan to kill his mother, why would he have risked his life in that raft? Since he had no way of knowing he'd be rescued or was the multi-million dollar fortune. He's now set to inherit from his mother motive enough to risk it until these cases are solved and proven that he didn't have some involvement. People are going to believe he is the only game in town. He's the right guy, but in January twenty seventeen shocking headlines and insurance investigation blames Nathan directly. They insurance company filed papers in US district court claiming Nathan made incomplete, improper and faulty repairs to the boat. The company won't pay his claim because it finds what Nathan did was intentional specifically removing part of the boats structure and heading to see with four inadequately filled holes. Insurance company believes that the boats sank because of Nathan's actions, it's very troubling. Small points out that investigators did not make a finding on what happened to Linda so far. There's been no response from Nathan in court. We wanted to ask him not only about the investigation of the fishing boat, but also about that recent FBI search in his grandfather's case. So we've been trying to get a hold of Nathan. He hasn't answered my texts my voicemails. I'm gonna give him one last call. The number you have called is no longer in service. If you feel disconnected his error, please. Nathan has disconnected his phone sealed in his fortress of solitude, cutoff forever from the two people who loved him. Most Nathan Carmen may long be remembered. As we, I saw him a riddle, wrapped in a mystery inside a white crew suit. Is he a conning and remorseless killer capable of murdering, his closest family members just a lonely, tragic figure who liked the rest of us only wants to be understood tonight. Even after all our questions, the answers seem as remote and murky at the bottom of the ocean. Nathan never charged with murder is now facing a lawsuit from his aunts. They want to prevent Nathan from getting any share of his grandfather's estate. We will follow that trial expected in early two thousand nineteen, and we'll stay on the case. I'm Amy, Rohbock David urine, I we'll be back next week. In the meantime, all of us here in twenty twenty and ABC news the good night. Afraid. Are you hiring with? Indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard. Get started today at indeed dot com slash podcast that's indeed dot com. Slash podcast..

Nathan Carmen Linda Arlanda FBI New England ABC US murder Amy Rohbock David million dollar
"arlanda" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on All In The Mind

"So it's felt that there's a psychological thing psychological substrate, but that is come into play at this time. Even even though that's the case, Benjamin, Kyle, as he was at the time, couldn't identify anything psychological in his life that triggered it when he a parapet. But of course it was difficult for him to access those memories, but it's really felt that psychological things seemed to kick in some way. So people feel that they can no longer own. Perhaps the identity that they've already carried all their lives. You with all in the mind on our in. I'm Lynn mountain and I'm speaking with RH neurologist, gills Montague. She's drawn on the stories of her patients to explore the link between memory and identity who book is called lost and found. We tend to assume that our personality remains fairly fixed across their lifetime. But perhaps we made up of a series of different sills depending on what happens to us. Gills Montague is interested in how personality shapes and who we become when somehow opposed analogy changes. It can be due to brain disorder injury also and drugs. She recalls another of who patients Martin Martin was a patient of mine in Arlon. Again, I saw him with a condition that affected the front of his brain. So previously he'd been very polite where liked in his community in the west of Arlanda small village, very compassionate. And he was very organized. He had braces and cufflinks and he was on various committees, but over the course of a couple of years, he's completely changed man. So he would stagger down the street and he will be shouting. He'd be stipulating an attorney as he had type of dementia, not Alzheimer's, but one that affected the front of his brain that changed his personality and not called frontal temporal dementia f. TD which we often see in younger people, and thus the condition that he had an really, he was transformed Monceau unlike Alzheimer's, where you often see a semblance of sameness for Martin's family. That was none of that really. And that led me to think about why is it the personality change threatens our identity so much. An attorney out there was some research done at Yale University recently that what seems to matter to you and I, when we think about someone, they changed our moral traits. So if you can think of someone who's very honest, who has a lot of empathy, a lot of compassion in your life. And now you can imagine they wake up the next morning and they don't have any of those traits. You will probably think they're a different person if however they're non moral traits change. So if they were less creative or less curious, you wouldn't necessarily feel that they had changed intrinsically. An Martin story really told me because he lost those things that were so integral to who he was, the empathy and so on that he became a different person. And that's what people often report in this condition called frontal temporal dementia, a changed person at different identity. So in that case, would you assist the Martin actually was no longer his former self? Yeah, there were two questions that came to mind on Tara. Who was his niece? Asked me that very question. You know, Martin had always cared about his sister, her mom and. He no longer care does. As far as they were aware, her mom had cancer and Martin just didn't seem to register it. So in a sense, there was no dice. I mean, Martin have insight into these changes because of his condition, but certainly is family thought that he was a change man. But there was another question that was really difficult and Tara set to me is this the real Martin? Is this really the way he always was? And it was just a veneer that he had that he was this nice, compassionate man on towards the end, you know, took me a long time to try and figure that is, and I really believe that people shouldn't be defined by the destruction of their brain. So it feels unfair to me that we would say, this is finally the real Martin who's been exposed by this brain condition. And I would like to say that we should preserve Martin as we remember him best rather than judging him at his worst..

Martin Martin Gills Montague attorney Tara personality change Montague Kyle Arlon Benjamin Yale University Alzheimer Arlanda
"arlanda" Discussed on Ladies, We Need To Talk

Ladies, We Need To Talk

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on Ladies, We Need To Talk

"Love this woman. God's being the brains behind one of the country's most loved and respected advice columns. She's also Jay and a sexual health research. Welcome everybody. Tanya coons is a six gist who specializes in pleasure. She's a fierce fight of. Everyone's right to enjoy six. We welcome her and at the end of the keel Louis who is a writer, actor and Camilla ROY horror straight Arlanda woman with a swag of theater and TB projects on the going cleaning black comedy on TV and black is the new what at Sydney theatre, she came up with this idea of talking Jonah and brought it to life in the hilarious, TV comedy, KiKi and kitty, which means she could certainly imagine what would have to say about the orgasm gap. Let's kick it off with Melissa. What is the orgasm gap? The orgasm gap refers to that the difference in frequency reported by men and women when they have sex with each of them. That's what it mainly refers to and it's become a really popular expression because of the pay gap. So we've been talking a lot about the gender pay gap. And we're now starting to talk a lot about the orgasm. There's a lot of research backing up can you explain someone? So we have a huge national stadium study which involved over twenty thousand stricken, I don't men and women and we found from that study which was reporting about twenty fourteen that over ninety percent of heterosexual men had an orgasm. The last time they had sakes and only about sixty five percent of heterosexual women reported having an orgasm the last time the headset. So that's a huge huge gap. And it's been replicated in other stuff. Buddies as well. So an even larger study in the US over fifty thousand people under similar gap. In fact, it was a bit bigger than twenty-six percent. Who's about thirty percent difference? Ten one of the things that I love about. You is your on the front lines of talking to couples and stuff about topics like these this is not part of our imagination is no no I've seen studies about hook up six fifty five percent of men. So that they've had an orgasm and a measly four percent of women and hookups, which I'm totally dismayed at early so up six referred a teen dates one night is when I'd stand that sort of stuff hooking up the chances of famous having an orgasm increases the longer in relationship. Mckay. You're the youngest panel win. Would you say that this reflects your experience and your friends experiences? Yeah. I definitely do think that there is a huge difference in how often we all Gaza insects. I think for myself this idea of. When sex dot at to become like really good was when I kind of learned that I could have entitlement and autonomy over my body. And I think there's a really big correlation in this developing as a person and say of so often as a young woman, you don't feel like your body is your own so sex isn't necessarily always about an orgasm. It's about some type. I know for me, it was about some type of acceptance and reassurance that you're like, you you're attractive, and you won't hit because I didn't feel that as a woman in our society. So I definitely think now getting ODA and having good sakes. It is still this kind of thing of now I'm able to ask to have pleasure, which is always hard because you make it in someone with bed like sex is kind of awkward. You don't want to hurt anyone's feelings. And then it's also I think of men need to learn to this is I'm talking from very hetero perspective that you need to learn how to give women pleasure. I don't think that's something. We also focus on tonic of a question for you. You spend time talking to real people about this X lives is a real gap. I'm having these real life conversations between what men think is happening, and what's really going on. Word is read some research, but it was different speak into lots of men about thirty percent of men thing that all women will orgasm from intercourse, and this is not the case. In fact, any about twenty eight depends which research reading twenty to thirty percent of women. We'll that way. And I think it's a revolving depends on the genital configuration. And what you're doing things like that..

Tanya coons Jay US KiKi Jonah Melissa Arlanda Camilla ROY Mckay Sydney theatre writer Louis thirty percent six fifty five percent sixty five percent twenty-six percent ninety percent four percent
"arlanda" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"I it's a title it's a media brand i don't look at it i don't look glamour as just a magazine yes we do put eleven magazines a year which is a huge part of what we do but it's a digital brand on it's a social brand and it's an events brand around women of the year and so for me it was the challenge to go and be editor at a immediate title during a time that is so important for women i think when i started having the conversations with conde nast who was very much as me to just kicked off in the mainstream media in general seem very interested in what women had to say or were saying and i think you know i think publishing going through an interesting time that's right for me i think you know it's going through it's going through an interesting time and i think i love a challenge i took socialist cnn when it wasn't a huge thing it big job and i built it into global team that worked twenty four seven and won an edward r murrow award i wanted to take glamour which is brilliant legacy brand that's been around since one thousand nine hundred ninety nine take all of my experience from broacast and digital tv and and put that to good work agglomerate okay so you don't run away from the legacy enjoy it i've i've i've worked my whole career i've worked at lexi bronze so i started at a legacy brandon arlanda radio or t which is like the radio telephone sharon i worked at the bbc in london for years the overlay legacy brands cnn is the legacy brown tear in the us when we talk about broadcast media and then glamour is i mean it's been around.

editor conde nast cnn bbc us edward r murrow brandon arlanda london
"arlanda" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message come from microsoft teams a digital workspace where teams can create collaborate and communicate authentically bring together your chats meetings vials and apps all in one place visit office dot com slash teams to learn more for more than twenty years pbs has ensured that one of the hottest places in american television is your attic and it's not because that's where you keep your secret relatives or where you hold your private parties it's because that is where your old stuff is and if you wanna know what all that old stuff is worth you can take yourself right over to the people at antiques roadshow sometimes you'll find that you're sitting on buried treasure i did not expect that whoa how like how i end sometimes you won't i found out that grandma's broads flatware from thailand has a high lead content and it's not safe to use thank you it takes roadshow i'm stephen thompson and i'm linda holmes and we are talking about antiques roadshow today on pucklechurch happy hour we're joined as always by glenn weld and of the npr's desk glenn arlanda and with us in our fourth chair oh boy we could think of no better guest to talk about this then the head honcho of the maximum fun podcast network and the host of the npr interview show bullseye our pal jesse thorn jesse hey buddies so it's not every day that we do an episode on a tv show that has run in the united states since nineteen ninetyseven and in the uk longer than that but i felt like it was so appropriate to engage jesse in his love of antiques roadshow which i have gotten to enjoy third hand via twitter on occasion i'm literally vibrating with site.

thailand stephen thompson linda holmes glenn weld npr glenn arlanda united states uk jesse twitter microsoft twenty years
"arlanda" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Stop for lot of chatter it stops doc from being so succession or lack of succession can affect revenue credibility clientele a good succession plan she says the starts well before aco reaches retirement age it's something companies should evaluate every year you're always thinking about uh who were the next two or three generations of leaders nels olsen is with corn ferry an executive search firm berkshire hathaway is looking to to executives who've been with the company for a combined fifty years this is what seventy eight percent of companies do look for and groom internal candidates looking at internally is is always fast because those individuals noted company no the culture note strategy even when companies do bring people in from the outside they try to bring them in below the co 2 basically try them out and get them up to speed steve arlanda ceo of the committee for economic development if a little like merging onto a free way you've got to merge onto the highway with out creating an accident and accidents do happen ceos of run companies into the ground as well as take them to new heights in new york i'm sabri benesch or for marketplace luke three the here's a seemingly random economic statistic that a is going to make a whole lot of sense once you hear it but also be is a sore spot in the nafta negotiations that are going on more than seventy percent of the goods traded between the united states and mexico is shipped by trucks make sense right but who gets to drive those trucks is the issue natalie kituko f writes about it in the new york times natalie welcome to the program thanks for having me this is in a lot of ways that the tale of two truckers uh the stories one who brings it twenty four miles into the states and and the other who gets to take at the rest of the way one of the rules how did we get here.

aco berkshire hathaway ceo economic development sabri benesch united states new york times nels olsen executive steve arlanda new york nafta mexico seventy eight percent seventy percent fifty years
"arlanda" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Conceivably you're quite right see that there has been a backlash to the president's perceive insensitivity if one hundred thousand puerto ricans give up on the island moved to central florida and a lot of them have a grudge against president trump there all people in florida who think that could have a significant impact one of the things that president trump mentioned with the idea of removing puerto rico's debt can you tell us a little bit more about that back to the days of fdr in the 1930s 1940's puerto rico's being the closest that america has known to kind of european state planning and it's basically been kind of a paternalist stateplanned economy with special tax breaks to try and encourage specific industries to be based in puerto rico and only american ships can sail to and from the arlanda amusement credibly kind of on freemarket set up a gigantic public sector forty percent of the working population works for the state they have this crushing debt burden which if they were one of the fifty states on the mainland they would be able to declare a form of bankruptcy and try and restructure that debt because they are not state they have been unable to escape from that detonates become really political loss couple of years because you have wall street firms and and hedge funds which pulled up some of this debt you have all the people saying that put reco cannot recover until it allowed loud rice all solve its debts i'm is kind of america's own greece is an analogy the lot of economists drew trump.

president puerto ricans florida puerto rico america arlanda hedge funds forty percent
"arlanda" Discussed on The Bugle

The Bugle

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on The Bugle

"All of august twentyseven seen making this well the anniversary of the day in the year 410 in which the visit gulfs sacked roma took three easily finished finish i'm just proves rome was a been a great place for long weekend committed run of ice cream 1883 on this day the eruption of krakatoa enormous explosions destroyed the arlanda krakatoa calls years of climate change so what is the point in me recycling my tin cans if the homosexuals are going to keep causing volcanoes like that at at krakatoa so we're gonna stop reading a christian looney monthly magazine i caused a global dropping temperatures with several years krakatoa so we have a moral duty to the global warming away letting the volcanoes win eighty ninety six the anglosaxons if all wall took place on this very day be shortest war in global history at thirty eight minutes yes that was an away win four britain still waiting for signs of ought to pluck up the bulls for the second leg on british soil good luck with that you alphabet struggling loses might be a bit rich coming from me or another since 1928 was the signing on this day the kellogg preowned pact which outlawed all war in 1928 what's well worked extremely well as well as the famous egyptian no pointy mausoleums accord of two thousand seven hundred b c as loop erma jug pretty permit fans in as always a section all this podcast is going straight testify sister's this is 2017 we are the edinburgh fringe sentence he is since the first at a professor of the first edinburgh fringe nineteen forty seven was on that.

gulfs roma rome climate change monthly magazine professor global warming britain edinburgh thirty eight minutes
"arlanda" Discussed on View From the Gutters Comic Book Club

View From the Gutters Comic Book Club

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on View From the Gutters Comic Book Club

"A mogens fantastic and um eggs me want to get drunk for all kinds of different reasons than the movie we watched tonight does or movie tonight was the 1995 classic stallone classic judge dredd named rob schneider is larry handles roofing sylvester stallone is judge dredd rob schneider as some dared diane lane judge hershey judge arlanda zondagh as judge diane lane as judge bitch armand asante as the world's fucking like no bling dairy contests shared his eyes opened his eyes were so wide though i don't know how he didn't blink like and joan chen and also the greatest actor the world juergen proc now yes i'm just gonna say that uh accent side alex aguinaga i'm sorry yes and also the exorcist max onsite out yet cannot i'm just gonna do as a quick aside because i can do that but can bags on site i was like the most bad asked mother fuck are ever he has battled satan he has battled like every fucking kind of threat you can think gaspart was he rebel pop no but he would have kicked the crap out of robocop okay maybe not i dunno bobrovnikov and him would have teamed up and that's a movie i would bucking pay to go and say hey i actually see that yeah ride gone but joe he did kinda go out like a bitch against darth diary of a wimpy kid so that's true i'm sorry i didn't mean to bring the room damn held on why europe i mean to bring it even lower he was the dad in the russell crowe.

judge dredd rob schneider sylvester stallone arlanda zondagh diane lane armand asante gaspart joe darth diary russell crowe joan chen
"arlanda" Discussed on Monday Morning Podcast

Monday Morning Podcast

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"arlanda" Discussed on Monday Morning Podcast

"And i say hey very no that like that go all her name is linda perry noted that she leads native that jessica of it's not you know i don't order name was born on blondes lead thing arlanda perry recently married to sara gilbert from roseanne did you know that who played darlene the rather married the last time i saw linda perry not the last time i i see her but i saw her way of ordering will launch chickens she liked fox she's got to be my age probably which goro the little girl for we time out there gobert older than i am i saw the show the other day she like twelve that's because uber folks graham it was like watching the tv bonn at all of artist's.

arlanda perry roseanne darlene linda perry sara gilbert goro