11 Burst results for "Arima And Co"

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

06:38 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Fleek as example was really popular a while ago. Is that not cool anymore? Are the kids not saying on fleek? But at the same time, I think a brand a couple of years ago got called out for using it because it wasn't that kind of voice and it felt that they were trying to capitalize on young and black culture without actually representing any of that marketing. So having those active decisions when you're making a copy guidelines is something you can do internally and have it so anyone who's producing copy can be like, yeah, this is what we don't say. This is what we do say. There's going to be some hard words on there as well. There are certain words you just shouldn't put out in a marketing campaign that if I have to spell it out, there's a bigger problem here. One of the things I do is I look for bad campaigns. So I've seen some very fairy, like you wouldn't believe the levels. And even in the UK as well. You got to give me an example here. I know. Don't use any racist terms, but. Okay, so this was a few years ago. And to be fair, the person who published it wasn't a marketer, but it was on the company's website. So it was a gym in the UK. Someone published that their workouts are like 12 years of slavery, referring to the book. Oh, God. Yeah. There's this certain levels that you're just like, I didn't think I needed to add that to a list that I organization shouldn't do that. The one that got peloton in trouble was the husband or maybe it could have been a boyfriend buys the girlfriend who seems to be frustrated a peloton so she can get in shape and feel better and now she's keeping it trim and tight and she's so grateful to him for buying this gift. And I think the message was supposed to be about prioritizing your health and being supportive and maybe it was because it was a white man from an affluent background giving his beautiful white wife bike to go exercise. It kind of came off as like there was an old movie with Steve Martin, the father of the bride, where the fiance buys the wife of blender and she's like, what, am I supposed to be in the kitchen blending stuff? And she gets upset, and I won't defend peloton. Obviously that commercial isn't appropriate. I like it was a bad story as well. I'm sorry. I'm not married, but I would at least have a conversation before they spend a couple of grand on a bike. My wife wanted a peloton. It's funny. She's walking behind us and as we speak. My wife wanted a peloton for her birthday and as I bought her the bike before it was delivered, it was Christmas. And I bought her the bike and then the gift was a picture of a QR code with a link to that ad. And then it was a link to a spoof of that ad, it was like, you know, she breaks up with them. I think there was like an alcohol ad where she's at the bar like sucking down martinis because he was a creep and I was basically like for Christmas. I'm like, this is getting delivered to home, but let's make sure that you don't end up at a bar drinking because you're tired of me. This is what I think you said you wanted. But the story you have there is that you knew she wanted it. That could have been an amazing narrative of how many ways does people drop hints about their birthday gifts. And then eventually you give up and you buy the thing for them. And we've seen that. I also cheaped out and I bought what we call a peloton, it's an Echelon, and we have a TV, so we use the peloton app, but it's a different bike anyway. So one of the things I want to say about existed boxing as well. It is this more authentic aspect. It is looking at stories that are a little bit more realistic than it is just, oh, a wife and a husband or a happy partnership, they're going to just buy each other gifts and not have a conversation about it. Come on. Yeah. I felt like it was ironic that a year later I was buying my wife a peloton or an exercise bike. And I was like, I'm going to get in trouble for this somehow. I'm now a stereotype. Let's try to avoid this. Anyway, Joanne, I had such a wonderful time talking about this. And honestly, these are normally conversations that can be very difficult to have. I appreciate you coming on our show. Obviously representing a diverse background helping us be a little bit more diverse in our speakers set. But more importantly, helping marketers understand how to be more inclusive in their marketing strategies. It's something I truly believe is important. Thanks for coming on and being my guest. Thank you for having me and one quick tip I want to leave for everyone that they can all implement. Fire away. On all social platforms, you can add alt text to your photos and gifts. And that's a good way to engage with disabled community and have them access your content. You can start doing that today for free. Good tip. All right. Well, thank you. Something actionable to leave us with, and that wraps up this episode of the mar tech podcast. Thanks for listening to my conversation with Joanne Boyce, the founder of arima and co. If you'd like to get in touch with Joanne, you can find a link to her LinkedIn profile in our show notes. You can contact her on Twitter, her handle is Joanne Boyce. That's be a YC, or you could visit her company's website, which is arima company dot com. ARI MA company dot com. And a special thanks to HubSpot for sponsoring this podcast, whether you're business started last year or if you're filing for an IPO tomorrow, the HubSpot CRM is ready to scale with your business, no matter what comes next, with smart content optimization that helps you invest your marketing dollars where it counts an SEO tools that put your business ahead above the rest, HubSpot will help your business grow better. To learn more about how your business can grow better, go to HubSpot dot com. And also a special thanks to insightly for sponsoring this podcast in sightly as unified CRM elevates the customer experience by aligning sales, marketing and service into one platform to help your business sell smarter grow faster and build longer, lasting relationships, for a personalized demo, visit in tightly dot com slash martek that's insightly INS IGH tl Y dot com slash martek. Just one more link in our show notes I'd like to tell you about if you didn't have a chance to take notes while you were listening to this podcast, head over to martek pod dot com where we have summaries of all of our episodes and contact information for our guests. You can also subscribe to our weekly newsletter and you can even send us your topics suggestions or your marketing questions, which we'll answer live on our show. Of course you can always reach out on social media, our handle is mar tech pod MAR to ECH POD, on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, or you can contact me directly my handle is Ben Jay shapp JP. And if you haven't subscribed yet and you want a daily stream of marketing and technology knowledge in your podcast feed, we're gonna publish an episode every day this year, so hit the subscribe button in your podcast app, and we'll be back on your feet tomorrow morning. All right, that's it for today, but until next time, my advice is to just focus on keeping your customers happy..

Fleek fleek Joanne Boyce UK Steve Martin Joanne arima and co HubSpot ARI MA boxing LinkedIn Twitter Ben Jay shapp JP Instagram Facebook
"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

07:16 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Campaign me time. Damn. And that's what it is. The implementation of inclusive marketing is not necessarily to limit or to kind of hold anyone. It's to expand creativity. It's taken what we've been laying on. Even myself, because it's easy when you have to put together creative in a day, it's easy to jump to a stereotype. It's easy to look at an old campaign and then let's update it a little bit, change the dial a phone to a mobile phone. But if we push the creative a little bit more, push the narrative and start to think okay, how can we make this touch as many people as possible but keep the story true? Then you get so much more beauty. There's so many campaigns out there that really tug a string at your heart. And then you notice the people in it. Then you notice that, oh, it was the nation guy I was leaving that. I didn't notice. I was too busy crying. I'm not safe for every campaign to make you cry. But I'd rather make you have an emotion before you notice who the person is. Okay. Walk me through more of the playbook. You mentioned that you're going through an audit. I kind of went on a departure and talking about some of the times that I've got in trouble and had to defend myself of like, nah, we produced two pieces of creative. We are marketing to men and women equally. We just separated out the creative. That was a stupid decision by me. Talk to me about more of the playbook and how do you make sure that you're maximizing your marketing ROI by using marketing inclusion? The other aspect is actually on that visual representation point. So you take a campaign, you have different people in lead, different photography. If you're on a smaller budget, it's just thinking about where you can source different stock photos that platforms that generate stock photos specifically of marginalized backgrounds, disabled people of color that you can access. But if you can tell a story, same story, but using different individuals is to lead, you can extend the reach of that one campaign without having to reshoot it every single time. And that, to me, is a good way to save on some money, 'cause you have to think of a new story or a new creative every single time. But it's also a way to kind of show how something affects different people. So that visual representation aspect and thinking also when you come to use influencers. So I mentioned earlier when we were talking about your equation and algorithm to bring people onto the show. When user influences a lot of time, people will go to a campaign and use the biggest influence or the biggest thought leader would not necessarily sometimes they have really shit engagement. They could have a million followers, but not one person would buy their product, I think. Time for a one minute break to hear from our sponsor, HubSpot. Technology trends become bona FIDE infrastructure shifts in the blink of an eye. If anybody asked me 5 years ago if QR codes would make a comeback and digital pictures of monkeys would sell for millions of dollars, I probably would have laughed. But consumer interests move quicker than even the most agile unicorn in the valley. Whether you started your business last year, or if you're filing for an IPO tomorrow, the HubSpot CRM is ready to scale with your business, no matter what comes next. With smart content optimization that helps you invest your marketing dollars where it counts and SEO tools that put your business ahead above the rest, HubSpot helps your business grow better. Learn more about how your business can grow better at HubSpot dot com. It's the Kim Kardashian effect where we talk about macro influencers versus micro influencers. You can work with Kim Kardashian and get this huge reach, but low engagement might have business results depending on what your product or service is, or you could work with 10,000 micro influencers that have a thousand followers each, but they're all actually family and friends and the engagement is much better. And that's exactly the formula for people from marginalized backgrounds because they're not held in the Kim Kardashian levels. The people that they engage with their community is so much richer. So if you were to work with ten influencers from marginalized backgrounds and underrepresented background, you might get a higher ROI than you would work in Kim Kardashian because those people are trusting because they're like, oh, you're not going to sell us out, they have a belief. You mentioned yesterday something that I think is important too, and it's more future looking, right? We're talking about while your existing marketing campaigns are you going to drive higher ROI through inclusive marketing. A lot of the younger generation is starting to think about the values of organizations where they put their money. How do you think about messaging what your organization's values are that you believe in diversity and inclusion? Where does that kind of stack up with? Here's our products. Here's our services. Here's why you should buy something as opposed to this is who we are, help me balance a company's mission and marketing their values as opposed to products and services. That's the interesting one because their mission should lead their marketing and it should be at the core of it. So this is why I also say if your values and you don't give a shit about it and you want to be a dinosaur and you don't care about the future and you're just like we're going to do what we're going to do don't bother. Honestly you're saving us all the hassle. But if your values are about let's say you have the best windows in the world and good windows could save lives. Whose lives are you saving? How can you tell that narrative? How are the different people that are living behind the windows you provide living their lives? How can you then connect that? You're still talking about Windows, which sorry if anyone sells windows, I think is a boring subject matter. But the story behind the window is what you're sharing. And that's how you connect with the younger generation. The younger generation gen X coming up, they know way more about inclusion than any generation before them because they've lived it. They're used to going on TikTok and engaging with people from different backgrounds, different ethnicities, non binary individuals. They're used to seeing that on the Internet and having access to directly talk to those people. Whereas a generations beforehand maybe not, maybe you lived in a small town and you haven't seen anyone different to you in 50 years. So future proofing. Your future proofing your marketing by thinking about diversity and inclusion and having inclusive marketing strategies, and we kind of walk through a little bit of the playbook. This is not a one time, hey, let's do an inclusivity audit, fix some things and move forward and forget about it. It's an ongoing process. Talk to me about the resources necessary to make sure that you're including inclusive marketing into your ongoing strategies. Do you have to hire an agency to audit you? Is this something that you can do internally? What are the best in class companies doing to make sure that this stays a primary focus for them? A mixture of things. So you can have training where you make it everyone's responsibility. What tends to happen a lot of time with clients is that someone different will join the team and then it's that person's responsibility to look after everything for whatever difference is. So if this is the first woman, she has to look after all the marketing to do at the moment now. Everyone needs to take ownership. So that's training, and that's awareness. And that's kind of where a lot of people are in their business. Then you have looking at the agencies you work with. So making sure you have a request for them. If you're going to provide us with influencers or content, we need it to be diverse and having that be a standard. And that's a process that you can implement in your brief in any kind of documents you have to make it easier to make it a thing that everyone thinks about when they're doing it. And internally, a lot of companies we've helped them build inclusive copyrights. So words that you want to avoid, words that your market or your target audience might use, like on.

Kim Kardashian HubSpot
"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

08:16 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Help you excel in all that you do. Thanks, Emily. If you're interested in hearing more from Emily Thompson on the being boss podcaster or any of the other great hosts in the HubSpot podcast network, go to HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. Okay, on with today's interview, joining us is Joanne Boyce, who is the founder of arima and co, which is establishing inclusive marketing as an industry standard worldwide. Marketing is the power to change society and arima and co believe that providing marketers with education resources and tools can change the way that they work to make a positive impact. Yesterday, Joanne and I talked about inclusive marketing and today we're going to continue the conversation talking about creating inclusive marketing strategies. But before we get started, I wanted to say thank you to insightly for sponsoring this podcast. Most businesses struggle to manage customer data and relationships across their teams. And site leaves unified CRM elevates the customer experience by aligning sales, marketing, and service into one platform, and this helps businesses like yourself smarter, grow faster, and build longer lasting relationships. Visit in sightly dot com slash martech for a personalized demo that's insightly IN si ght dot com slash martek. All right, here's the second part of my conversation with joy Ann Boyce, the founder of arima and co. Joanne, welcome back to the martek podcast. Thanks for having me back. Benjamin, so glad to be here. Excited to have you back on the show. You know, we actually had a longer than normal episode yesterday because we were having such a good conversation about what inclusive marketing is and it gets into the idea that you need to focus on a wide variety and different types of people and not just segment your marketing by, I don't know what stereotypical boundaries might be. So opening up to diversity in terms of ethnicity in terms of gender in terms of disabilities in your marketing effort to something that can not only help you increase your Tam, totally addressable market, but it also is the way of the future where younger generations are starting to prioritize the business relations that they have based on values. And if you don't have diversity and inclusion as one of your core values, you're a dinosaur. Now the problem is a lot of businesses don't know how to do this. So give me the playbook here. All right, I gotta start being more inclusive in my marketing strategies. Am I just creating ads with actors that are different skin colors that can't just be it, right? It's gotta be more than that. So much more. I was hoping it would be that simple, but I know it's not. It's not, but again, going back to what I said in our previous episode, it is marketing because the first thing I would say with your inclusive marketing strategy is to start with an audit, know where you are. Know what your representation is, know where you stand, know how people perceive your brand online, because if you don't know, you're not going to be able to gauge what the efforts have gotten you. You're not going to be able to gauge if you've expanded your audience, if there's been any shift or narrative. So start with an audit. And in that audit, start looking at your audience mark and personas and the segmentation of those. Have you ever considered disability race or gender when you're thinking of has that been a discussion within the team? Look at your website, how accessible is it for people who are using screen readers or other accessibility devices when it comes to the accessibility of the website? I do want a lot of my clients on this one. That is a project in the sense of you're going to improve it as the tech improves. Screen readers in the back in the days and screen readers now are very different websites back in the day and websites now are no longer hello world. They are very different. So put that part of your strategy throughout the year and check on that and make sure you review it and kind of understand how you can make improvements as you're building and improve the website, improving your content. But I say the best thing to do is start with an audit. All right, so you got to go through an audit and understanding what? Is it just who your targets are? Is it obviously you mentioned the disability, how accessible your website is probably something people think about last and it's not something that people think about it in marketing it's something seems like a technology solution can all people actually access my content. So I understand accessibility that seems like a technical solution, talk to me about how you figure out diversity and inclusion in your marketing. How do you think about ethnicities and gender? So one of the things we like to do is just tell you what your perception is online. The best way you can do it is probably ask someone who doesn't know anything about your business organization, what vibe is it giving? Would they work here? And depending on the people you ask, you get different answers. A client of ours was very proud of the gender split of their team and they used their team and all their marketing content. And when we did a audit of their website their socials, we found that even though their team was 50 50 gender split, which you would assume their content would be the content was actually 90% male. And this was a surprise to them because in their minds they were pushing every member of the team equally, but they weren't tracking it so they didn't know. So you hear it a lot in diversity and inclusion not to do a tick box, but when you come to marketing, we produce things that live on the Internet for a time period, you have to go and count it and count the perception of it, not what you know of the individual. So how is this being perceived and how would someone interpret this story with someone interpret the person sat at the desk as a disabled person? You may know that they are, but is it interpretable in that content? And you just go through and look at your website, your socials. And if you can find anyone speaking about your brand in a bad way. Unfortunately, that's also helpful because it's kind of honest ish opinion of how your digital presence is. Because sometimes this market is, we can blur the lines of how we see things. I got in trouble once and it was related to marketing to actually this was specific genders. I was working at a laundry and dry cleaning delivery startup. And I wanted to test a gender specific creative. And so we had a picture of a guy probably stereotypical is probably a white guy drinking a beer at home or going to a game being at a sports bar. And you can reclaim laundry day. Instead of sitting at home doing your laundry, you could be out doing the things that you want to do. And there was a companion piece of creative that was, do you want more guy time, the other one was, do you want more girl time? And the girl time was two girls sitting at a Starbucks or a coffee shop. Having a cup of coffee. And the people that saw the ad targeting women started getting upset saying that this is sexist. So the reason why I'm telling this story is I'm not sure how you create specific pieces of creative that target non diverse audiences. If you are targeting black, white, you know, every color you could possibly think of with specific pieces of creative, people will view that as being stereotypical, right? But sometimes putting that creative together might actually produce a better result. How do you think about targeting in your creative and your marketing efforts and how much should you be thinking about imagery that includes diversity or trying to put the same type of imagery in front of people that look like those images? There's a couple of layers there. So that specific example, I would have been what is the emotion you're trying to create and emotion is you want to create where people have control at that time. Taking the story back to then is looking at what the data says, when do people feel like they have no control at a time. If there's a gender split in that story narrative, maybe follow that and explore it. However, it could have worked the same way. You could have swapped out the person drinking a beer for a guy or a girl or someone non binary. Pretty universal. It was more and I don't remember if it was actually drinking a beer at a sports bar, but that's what I think of guy time. Get together with your buddies, go watch the game. And that's why I think it's really important to when it comes to marketing and I will preface this when it comes to boxing, bring the bias to the table. Because that was your interpretation of guy time. And if it was a room where you can say actually what's everyone's interpretation of me time, then that will impact the creative. It'll impact the story that's being told. Me time damn, where were you ten years ago when I was creating these ad, that would have been such a better campaign instead of guy time and girl time, a little bit more me time. Everything is shifted and that's another aspect of it. We could have done such a better job with.

arima and co Emily Thompson Joanne Boyce joy Ann Boyce Joanne arima Emily Benjamin Starbucks boxing
"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

02:13 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"If you can't wait until our next episode and you'd like to learn more about Joanne, you can find a link to her LinkedIn profile in our show notes. You can contact her on Twitter, her handle is joy Ann Boyce. That's CE, or you could visit her company's website, which is arima company dot com that's AR IMA company dot com. And a special thanks to HubSpot for sponsoring this podcast, whether you're business started last year or if you're filing for an IPO tomorrow, the HubSpot CRM is ready to scale with your business, no matter what comes next, with smart content optimization that helps you invest your marketing dollars where it counts an SEO tools that put your business ahead above the rest, HubSpot will help your business grow better. To learn more about how your business can grow better, go to HubSpot dot com. And also a special thanks to file stage for sponsoring this podcast. If you're looking to streamline your creative approval workflows, they are offering a free trial of their platform to mar tech podcast listeners. So go to file stage dot IO slash martech to streamline your review and approval process. Just one more link in.

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

01:35 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Talk to me about the business benefit from inclusive marketing. At the end of the day, when you start opening up your target towards a diverse crowd, what can you expect from a benefit for your business? A wider market of people who are interested in your product. It's not just spray and pray. It's thinking about who's interested and can we tap in. And if that interested market does stop in, you can switch a whole bunch of people back on. In terms of Gen Z and millennials and the younger generations coming on board, they're buying intent right now is about 70% on the values of a company. So you could increase that buying intent when younger generation. I don't always like to play the age aspect of it because a lot of people like we want to target baby boomers or whoever whatever generation. But even if you're targeting a specific generation or specific market, making that marketing inclusive opens you up to a segment that's already interested. It not only opens up your potential Tam. You're totally accessible market. It also is the way of the future. That this is something that younger generations are increasingly prioritized. So if you want a larger market now, or if you want to be successful with your marketing efforts in the future, diversity, inclusion, inclusive marketing is something that is table stakes. It is something that you have to do. And that wraps up this episode of the mar tech podcast. Thanks for listening to my conversation with Joanne Boyce, the founder of arima and co for joining us in part two of this interview which we'll publish tomorrow. Joanne and I are going to continue our conversation talking about inclusive marketing strategies..

Joanne Boyce arima and co Joanne
"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Was maybe a one and needed to go to 5. And then psychology just became known as this thing that helps people who are very seriously ill. And we forgot about that aspect. So everyone in that aspect was like, oh, you're fine. Even though you're operating at a one and not a ten, you'll find you're not at minus ten. Algorithms have been operating in this minus area because they've only been benefiting certain people white men. Therefore, they have been able to build a large followings and build up this audience. So when the people who have been not benefiting from algorithms and systems come along, they're starting at a disadvantage. But it's not always transparent. However, don't quit me on where it came from, but there is some research out there that says individuals from marginalized backgrounds. When they do have a following, even if it's smaller, they're following tends to be higher engaged because there's less of those people to look to. That's an interesting thought that the algorithms that have been working for the last ten, 15 years in these social networks, bias towards people that they think are going to be able to help the social platforms, which are people that basically had an unfair advantage because of their demographics. Here's the other hard part that was figuring out our algorithm is let's say the score is a one out of a hundred score where a hundred is like we got to get this person on the podcast they're a real influencer and the average person is 50. I was sitting here saying how do I evaluate if we're going to give a boost towards people from diverse backgrounds or we want to be supportive of women in the martech industry? How do I quantify what type of boost they should get to be inclusive in our marketing efforts? Is it a 10% boost? Is it a 100% boost?.

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

02:17 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"I've spent a lot of time thinking about this in part because some of the content that we produce is about diversity and inclusion. I believe that my audience cares about it. I personally care about it. And I think it's important, and we were trying to think of ways to be inclusive in our guest selection process. And I had mixed emotions. So we have an algorithm that we've built that helps us evaluate the potential reach of people that fill out our speaker application. So we look at things like your LinkedIn profile, your Twitter profile, your domain handle, how many email followers you have..

LinkedIn Twitter
"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

02:00 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"If I'm selling a marketing technology is it true that my brand has to think about diversity and inclusion first and foremost as opposed to hey we're a technology vendor and we want to build the best technology for the people that focus and that should be front and center. Talk to me about where the line is and when are basically people just being full of shit because that's what they feel like they should be saying. Obviously you should focus on diversity and you should focus on inclusion and you should think about a wide market and I don't want to make it seem like I don't believe in those things but I feel like sometimes brands are putting that before the sort of core message that they're trying to market to. Brands should be authentic and that's what people are asking for. I would personally prefer if a brand said nothing that it put across a fake message. I have advised clients in the past not to put out things because it wasn't authentic because I knew that the relationship between the marketing and the sales team needs to be close to relationship between leadership and the direction of the companies needs to be on point. If you're going to receive backlash like H and M did in 2018, or you can receive backlash like other companies have. You need to have something to stand on. If you don't give a shit, I'd rather you be authentically not given a shit. But if you do, and even in a marked tax situation, even if you're developing softwares that are going to be users of your software and inclusive marketing incorporates all aspects, gender, race, ethnicity, accessibility, and representation of disabled community. So yes, it may be white men on top, but they may be queer. They may be disabled. They may be other things that you're doing to marginalize people who are buying your products, that you haven't even considered. And that's what the Roosevelt is. Time for a one minute break to hear from our sponsor, HubSpot. Technology trends become bonafide.

Brands Roosevelt HubSpot
"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

05:17 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"So in that aspect, you can relate to it. So it hasn't gone too far. So it's looking at who the audience is and then how you can add more to it. So I would disagree on the aspect of diversity marketing and inclusive marketing. Diversity marketing tends to be what Coca-Cola used to do back in the day, where they had a specific campaign for the black community specific and painted Latino community and so on and so on. For me, inclusive marketing is looking at that campaign and looking how it can be touch more people who are interested. So it would be one campaign, but maybe you would change the main character and have other side characters and still more inclusion in that one campaign itself. So we're talking about an example with one piece of creative, the Gillette campaign with a trans man being taught how to shave. I guess the question is, all right, if Gillette has been targeting white men with 6 packs and sports cars for 20 years and then they see that their brand of razors starts to market toward someone that they don't necessarily identify with. Doesn't that have a potentially negative repercussion for the existing base that they've been marketing to. Doesn't the white guy with a sports car sit there and say, I don't identify with the trans boy learning to shave. I now have a different brand impression, is there potential repercussions and downsides from marketing to an inclusive brand using Gillette still as an example, is there some brand risk from changing how you're doing your marketing to focusing more on this sort of inclusive type of message? So the brand risk is on both sides in the aspect of Jeanette. They still kept to the story. It wasn't a campaign that, yes, we solely support trans men. It wasn't pushing away their audience. As I mentioned, I even familiarized it with yourself. Did your father teach you to shave? That was the narrative of the campaign. So if that general customer doesn't relate to it, they're quicker to not relate to my dad doing teach me to shave than they are too quick to identify that is a trans man because they haven't been exposed to that. I think there's also a difference between campaigns that are focused about a narrative or charity which kind of put these things at a forefront, which is the things you see in Pride Month, where that is the forefront versus and everyday campaign, where it just happens to be part of the storyline. So an audience being turned away or being turned off by an everyday storyline, it would either be that the brand's values don't align and maybe that's their standpoint or the individual doesn't connect with a story, which is marked. If they don't connect with a story, you weren't going to get them no matter who was at the forefront. So I feel like this makes a lot of sense for consumer brands having an inclusive message showing all of the people that can be consumers of your product..

Gillette Coca Cola Jeanette
"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

03:58 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"Joanne, welcome to the mar tech podcast. Hi, French man. Thanks for having me. I'm so excited to have you here. I'm so excited to have you on the show. And I'm excited to talk about an incredibly important topic and honestly one that can at times be a little bit challenging to talk about. It's one of our very important diversity and inclusion episodes, and today we're going to talk a little bit about inclusive marketing. This is kind of your strike zone. This is where you focus. Tell me about what inclusive marketing is in your eyes. The quick and short answer would be its marketing, but fixed in a couple of hours. Essentially, it's understanding that whatever audience you're targeting, that audience is diverse and representing them in your copy in your imagery and really making sure that they can access the content you're creating. I always get weird these episodes. I said this offline, I'm a white guy talking about diversity and inclusion. So I feel like nobody wants to hear this from me. I'm glad you're here. White American male, privileged as could be, and you are in the UK. What? I'll let you describe your ethnicity and background just so everyone has the context. Tell me about who you are. The full intersectionality, which I'll describe what that is later. I am a black woman based in the UK and also dyslexic, and I'm bi. So I'm part of a lot of communities. So my experience of marketing content and being a marketer, the two sometimes don't always mesh. So that's where I came into the world. And I was like, hold on. As a marketer, I'm not marketing for individuals like myself. Something's broken here. All right, you're helping me, because I feel like this one vertical that I'm covering straight white American male. And often the finger gets pointed at us as part of the problem because there is, and not to say that all white American males have done something wrong, but we have privileges that other people aren't necessarily given based on their sex color creed, what have you. So you're helping me figure out how this works for the rest of the world. You said that inclusive marketing is basically marketing, but you're marketing to diverse communities. All of your target segments cover diverse backgrounds. And to me, I'll play devil's advocate a little. That sounds counterintuitive..

Joanne UK
"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

MarTech Podcast

02:45 min | 3 months ago

"arima co" Discussed on MarTech Podcast

"The martech podcast is a proud member of the HubSpot podcast network to find great business podcasts like this one, visit HubSpot dot com slash podcast network. From advertising to software as.